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Young Professionals in Parking

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The Road to Paid Parking

THE INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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Bicycles, Bicycles, Bicycles How two parking organizations deal with abandoned bikes.

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A Complex Master Plan

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Choosing the Right Repair

OCTOBER 2015


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WAYFINDING OCTOBER 2015 | Volume 31 | Number 10

20 The Road to

Paid Parking A new transportation hub helps usher in a different system in Vallejo, Calif.

By Michelle Wendler, AIA, and Matt Davis

A

N INCREASING NUMBER OF CITIES are looking to make the transition to paid parking. For communities able to successfully navigate the challenges involved, the outcome can prove a catalyst for continued development or help pay for the costs associated with the development of parking.

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parking.org/tpp

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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24 eorgia Regents University Augusta (GRU) is a newly-formed consolidation of two long standing universities: the Medical College of Georgia and Augusta State University. The schools are only a few miles STUDY apart in Augusta and were two of eight the Georgia Board of Regents elected to consolidate to share resources, combine curriculums, and provide better learning environments by joining together. During the consolidation of the Medical College of Georgia and Augusta State University, it was clear to senior administration and other stakeholders that a comprehensive evaluation of both parking and transit was needed to help ensure better connectivity and improved use of the infrastructure that served the two institutions. Connectivity between campuses, proper allocation and sharing of parking resources, adequate parking, improved mobility, identifying technology enhancements, and the implementation of new parking management initiatives were all primary elements of the parking and transit master plan.

Georgia Regents University implements a complex parking and transit master plan.

CASE

Georgia Regents University implements a complex parking and transit master plan.

Connectivity between campuses, proper allocation and sharing of parking resources, improved mobility, technology enhancements, and new parking management initiatives played roles in the parking and transportation master plans that helped in the consolidation of two Georgia universities.

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

parking.org/tpp

THE BEST FIXES ARKING STRUCTURES ARE AN INTEGRAL ELEMENT in our daily lives that create an interchange between our homes, our destinations, and our built environment. These

structures are often incorporated into buildings, integrated into the surrounding landscape, or serve as stand-alone architectural features. With so many of these structures aging—in some cases, decades beyond their expected useful lives—repair and rehabilitation projects offer an opportunity to revive both function and form. PHOTO 1: PARKING GARAGE, CONDOMINIUM BUILDING, BROOKLINE, MASS

Reinforcing steel corrosion due to chloride contamination.

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL P PARKING ARKING INSTITUTE

The Best Fixes

By John M. Porter, PE, and Nathan D. Boutin, PE

Although they bear the brunt of the harshest conditions in our environment, parking structures are sometimes under-maintained and over-used. They are exposed to freeze-thaw cycles, corrosive salts and chemicals, fatigue from cyclic-loading, and exposure to moisture that all can lead to deterioration of the structure and building components. The most common cause of concrete deterioration is corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel, which is often the result of chloride contamination in cold climates and coastal areas. Chlorides in de-icing salts and seawater break down the typically excellent protection that concrete provides against reinforcing steel corrosion. Corrosion byproducts (rust) have a larger volume than the original, stable reinforcing steel. This expansion causes bursting tensile stresses within the concrete that leads to delamination and spalling of the concrete (Photo 1). Similarly, steel-framed parking structures will corrode when paints, galvanizing, and other protective coatings are damaged or fail and the structural steel is exposed to moisture. When parking structures are not maintained and condition assessments are not performed on a regular basis, future repair costs can grow exponentially. This often leads to large, expensive projects that, in some cases, come as a surprise to building owners, parking space owners, and building tenants. The following three rehabilitation case studies demonstrate a range of small to large projects that integrated aesthetic upgrades, end-user improvements, and functional enhancements while managing parking and facility users throughout construction.

How to choose the right repair approach by using proper condition assessments.

PHOTO 2: BROOKLINE CONDOMINIUM PLAZA

Failing pool enclosure fence and deteriorated waterproofing.

PARKING GARAGE, CONDOMINIUM BUILDING, BROOKLINE, MASS.

2

It’s a fact on a lot of college campuses and their surrounding communities: Many bikes end up left behind by students. If nothing is done, the accrual of abandoned bikes over the course of a couple of years results in a lack of available legitimate bicycle parking spots. It’s funny how things always seem to get back to being a parking problem. The Borough of State College generally auctions off more than 100 bicycles per year. Last year, Penn State gathered 317 abandoned bikes during roundup time and another 60 during the course of the year. One year, we did not do the annual roundup and had more than 600 abandoned bikes to deal with the following year. At the rate of 300-plus abandoned bicycles per year, a point is rapidly reached where there is insufficient space for legitimate use. The problem faced by staff is differentiating bicycles that are abandoned from those that are still used. You can’t judge a bike by its appearance. Junky old bikes are frequently leaning up against the new very expensive bikes and it is the junky one that still has an owner and is currently registered.

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

Identifying the Abandoned Fortunately, we have a model for dealing with this issue that works well. The university and all surrounding municipalities have a rule/ordinance that requires bikes to be registered. The Penn State Parking Office purchases the bicycle permits and coordinates the registration process. Bicycle shops in the area cooperate and assist by making sure that bikes sold have a current registration upon sale. Registration is coordinated by the Penn State Parking Office and data is housed on campus. Permits are free to anyone who applies. Bicycles are registered for a two-year period with one series expiring every May 31. Those permits must then be replaced by another two-year permit. Penn State can confiscate any bicycle parked on campus that is not currently registered or that is parked at an unapproved location, such as sign posts, fences, trees, etc. One particular pet peeve of mine is when a bike is parked on a handrail with the cranks and handlebars sticking through to the pedestrian way. This poses a problem not only to the general public but more severely to the visually impaired.

Bikes are tagged to determine which are abandoned.

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

38 By Craig Cotton and Stacy Stockard

T

parking.org/tpp

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

HE CYCLE ALWAYS REPEATED. Every August, fresh-faced students showed up to the Texas Tech University campus to begin their collegiate

journey, shiny new bicycles in tow. And at the end of every May, hundreds of bicycles littered the campus. Every bike rack had a dozen bicycles still locked up and either left behind by their student owners or forgotten and immobile due to a lack of repairs. Texas Tech Transportation and Parking Services (TPS) employees spent weeks cutting the locks of bicycles, collecting them, and sending them to summer surplus auctions. They often picked up more than 500 bicycles. Locals bought the bikes for pennies on the dollar while TPS saw no remuneration for the man hours spent. Every August, it started over with freshmen purchasing brand-new bicycles. After awhile, TPS knew we had to get the abandoned bikes back in the hands of the students who needed them and break the cycle.

By the Book Caption goes here for big photo and may don’t need a caption for the round photo? Caption goes here for big photo and may don’t need a caption for the round photo?

A Win-Win on Two Wheels INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

A university operating policy placed TPS in charge of determining which bicycles were abandoned by their owners and then collecting the abandoned bicycles. Once finals end, students take their bicycles from campus. A TPS crew tags all bikes found on campus immediately following May commencement. Tagging involves attaching a tag to a bicycle’s handlebars stating that the owner has 30 days to remove the tag to show the bike is not abandoned. A string is tied to the spokes of a wheel so when the owner rides the bicycle, the string breaks. This provides a backup method of ensuring a bicycle in use is not collected.

Bicycles, Bicycles, Bicycles

A large campus and town band together to successfully collect and auction off abandoned bikes.

A Win-Win on Two Wheels

A new program connects abandoned bikes with students who can use them.

Caption for the photo on the right goes in this space. Caption for the photo on the right goes in this space. parking.org/tpp

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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This two-level, partially-below-grade concrete parking structure built in 1964 is located below a seven-story condominium building and accommodates about 30 vehicles. This small garage is critical to the condominium owners as other parking options in this congested area are limited. A plaza above the garage is used as a common space for owners to utilize the swimming pool that is recessed into the elevated plaza level structure. Exposure to de-icing salts and moisture eventually led to chloride contamination of the concrete and widespread deterioration. In the spring of 2013, a contractor was hired directly by the condominium association to repair the most severely deteriorated area of the elevated concrete parking deck. Due to the severity of deterioration, the entire slab was demolished within the repair zone, which came as a surprise to the condominium owners and the contractor. At that point, the contractor and the board of trustees stopped the project and quickly retained a structural engineer to prepare construction documents for the slab replacement. The team worked together to develop a fast-track repair approach to reconstruct the parking deck, which was completed in approximately one month. The next spring, the board recognized that a complete condition assessment of the parking garage and plaza was needed to determine repair costs, prioritize repairs, and establish the budget. The board hired

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BICYCLES BICYCLES BICYCLES

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28 P

com recently ranked the Centre Region (State College area) as the ninth most

sidered but sufficient modern bike racks play a big role.

A new program connects abandoned bikes with students who can use them.

New transit routes link the two campuses of the consolidated university.

How to choose the right repair approach by using proper condition assessments.

HERE ARE THOUSANDS OF BICYCLES ON THE PENN STATE UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS

and thousands more in the adjacent Borough of State College. In fact, walksite.

bicycle-friendly location in the country, with a score of 77 out of 100. Many factors are con-

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Big Picture

G

24

A new transportation hub helps usher in a different system in Vallejo, Calif.

By Doug Holmes, CAPP

T

A large campus and town band together to successfully collect and auction off abandoned bikes.

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

By Mike Martindill and Mitch Skyer

The Road to Paid Parking

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

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D

ESPITE BEING ONE OF THE LARGEST

E CAS UDY ST

Houston unveils permanent art parking meters to a happy community.

Gumball Machine art meter sculpture combines organic and industrial objects to create unexpected artifacts.

and fastest-growing cities in the nation, there’s one thing the City of Houston can’t get enough of: free parking. In Houston’s Warehouse District, streets fill rapidly with the vehicles of employees and university students, leaving area residents and business owners searching for spots. The situation became so overwhelming that in 2013, the community reached out to the city and requested parking meters (believe it or not). The Warehouse District, located on the northeast side of downtown Houston, is an eclectic mix of residential lofts, artist studios, industrial companies, and fine dining. The city’s parking management division wanted a solution that not only solved the parking problem but also embraced the culture of the neighborhood. Thus, the Art Parking Meter program was born, and on Oct. 22, 2013, Mayor Annise Parker unveiled what we believe to be the nation’s first permanent art parking meters, right there in the Warehouse District. “The Warehouse District has a one-of-a-kind atmosphere, and we wanted one-of-a-kind meters to reflect that feeling,” says Maria Irshad, assistant director of parking management. “Our goal was to reduce serious street overcrowding with a solution that adds a fun and unique twist to traditional parking meters. The art parking meters are an example of how residents from across the city are working together to make Houston shine. Thanks to the amazing talent of four local artists, the meters will leave a memorable impression on visitors and Houstonians alike.”

Artsy PARKING 42

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

By Melonie Curry

parking.org/tpp

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

43

Artsy Parking

Houston unveils permanent art parking meters to a happy community.


Editor’s Note

DEPARTMENTS

4 Entrance 6 IPI Board Member Profile 8 Consultants Corner 1 0 The Green Standard 1 2 The Business of Parking 1 4 Financial Matters 1 6 Parking Spotlight 18 IPI’s Ask the Experts 4 6 IPI in Action 48 State & Regional Spotlight 5 0 Community Digest 58 New IPI Members 6 0 Parking Consultants 62 Advertisers Index 62 Parking Break 64 Calendar of Events

MORE THAN PARKING

I

probably shouldn’t admit this, but we largely trained our dog in a municipal parking garage. Super cute when we adopted her at 12 weeks old, she was a 50-pound leash-pulling, adrenaline-fueled fireball four months later. (We were her third family in four weeks, which probably should have told us something.) The trainer we begged for help gave us specific exercises to practice with a 20-foot leash, twice a day for a half hour at a time. Easy enough, except it started to rain—monsoon, really—and kept going for several weeks. Finding a covered area large enough to give the bullheaded pup that much leash while walking was a challenge, and a county parking garage offered the perfect solution. It was dry, it was lit, and at 5 a.m., it was empty. And so it was that several years before joining the staff of IPI, I learned about the value of parking beyond just parking. This month, we’ll explore several unique parking solutions that affected communities beyond just where they leave their cars. From the introduction of a paid parking system that transformed a neighborhood to the way two universities used parking to help with their consolidation, the solutions are unique and creative and offer ideas that can be put to work almost anywhere. We also take a look at how two parking departments—one university and one municipal—found unique and successful solutions to the problem of abandoned bikes. I imagine many of you know this challenge well, as students and other bike riders ditch broken, rusty, or unwanted bicycles on racks rather than working to fix them or find them new homes. Dealing with so much two-wheeled clutter is an enormous challenge, but these two organizations did it successfully, even finding ways to provide the bikes to others who needed them. IPI members say it all the time: Parking is about much more than cars. This issue proves it, and I hope you’ll share it with others in your department and beyond. I’m happy to say that six years after our foray into the county garage with a crazy black lab, she’s one of the easiest leash-walkers I’ve ever had—thank you, parking! As always, my email is below, and I love hearing from you. Please reach out anytime. Until next month…

fernandez@parking.org

parking.org/tpp

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

3


ENTRANCE Publisher Shawn Conrad, CAE conrad@parking.org Editor Kim Fernandez fernandez@parking.org Contributing Editor Bill Smith, APR bsmith@smith-phillips.com Technical Editor Rachel Yoka, LEED AP BD+C, CNU-A yoka@parking.org Advertising Sales Bonnie Watts, CEM watts@parking.org Subscriptions Tina Altman taltman@parking.org. Graphic Design BonoTom Studio info@bonotom.com Proofreader Melanie Padgett Powers For advertising information, contact Bonnie Watts at watts@parking.org or 571.699.3011. For subscription changes, contact Tina Altman, taltman@parking.org. The Parking Professional (ISSN 0896-2324 & USPS 001436) is published monthly by the International Parking Institute. 1330 Braddock Place, Suite 350 Alexandria, VA 22314 Phone: 571.699.3011 Fax: 703.566.2267 Email: ipi@parking.org Website: parking.org Postmaster note: Send address label changes promptly to: The Parking Professional 1330 Braddock Place, Suite 350 Alexandria, VA 22314 Interactive electronic version of The Parking Professional for members and subscribers only at parking.org/tpp. Periodical postage paid at Alexandria, Va., and additional mailing offices. Copyright © International Parking Institute, 2015. Statements of fact and opinion expressed in articles contained in The Parking Professional are the sole responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent an official expression of policy or opinion on the part of officers or the members of IPI. Manuscripts, correspondence, articles, product releases, and all contributed materials are welcomed by The Parking Professional; however, publication is subject to editing, if deemed necessary to conform to standards of publication. The subscription rate is included in IPI annual dues. Subscription rate for non-members of IPI is $120 per year (U.S. currency) in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. All other countries, $150. Back issues, $10. The Parking Professional is printed on 10 percent recycled paper and on paper from trees grown specifically for that purpose.

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FEELING BLESSED By Kim Jackson, CAPP

I

cannot believe the amazing opportunity I have been given to chair the IPI Board of Directors for the next two years. If you had told me when I first joined the organization in 1988 that my path would lead to this achievement, I would never have believed Advancing the parking profession it. When I reflect on my career in this industry and within IPI, I must say I have been blessed in so many ways. Now, I will be able to give back on a much larger scale. Like most of us, I did not say as a child, “When I grow up, I want to be a parking professional!” It was not even a flickering thought. However, I was given an opportunity to enter this career field by an extraordinary woman who mentored me, giving me all the tools I needed to succeed. In addition, she introduced me to IPI (IMPC back then) and made sure I was not only a member but met as many people as she could introduce me to during my first conference to widen my professional network. During my journey I was afforded many opportunities, but the opportunity to become a training facilitator stands out. As I began to meet hundreds of different people, I learned I could now share my knowledge and experiences with various levels of staff from other organizations and make an impact. Participants looked at their jobs in a different way; some were excited by the career path they could take. I was giving back and widening their professional networks. I cannot explain how awesome it is to make an impact on someone else’s life and career. I consider myself very fortunate and blessed to continue to have occasions where I can make a difference. It can be as simple as educating a parker on why we must enforce, explaining to a stranger why parking is so very important, or reminding our employees why we do what we do. We have a new opportunity to give back and share globally. Wow! I could have never imagined I would lead this effort 27 years ago. I can only hope as we continue that I am as successful as those who have chaired before me.

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

KIM JACKSON, CAPP, is director of transportation and parking services and university staff services development at Princeton University and chair of the IPI Board of Directors. She can be reached at kimj@ princeton.edu.


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SMARTER PARKING for SMART CITIES. TM

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IPI BOARD MEMBER PROFILE

DAVID G. ONORATO, CAPP Member, IPI Board of Directors Executive Director, Pittsburgh Parking Authority

I

am proud to say that I was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pa. Two of the most important values I carry with me today are hard work and the importance of family, both of which were instilled by my parents at a young age. They provided me and my siblings—one brother and three sisters— the path that led us to be the first generation to graduate from college and attend postgraduate studies. They prioritized family, whether it was a simple home-cooked dinner or our annual family vacation, which is still ongoing 26 years later. Outside of family, I love participating in a variety of sports, including baseball, basketball, and football. I grew up as an avid fan of Pittsburgh sports. I was able to brag during my college years as Pittsburgh became known as the City of Champions. It was incredible having the chance to witness the victories of the ’79 Super Bowl, World Series, and the ’76 University of Pittsburgh National Championship. My passion for sports continues today. Recently, I have taken up golf, which may take more time to master than I anticipated; some of my IPI colleagues know exactly what I mean. I have been fortunate enough to pass these meaningful life values on to my own family. I have been happily married to my wife, Cathy, for 31 years. We have been blessed with three successful children: David, Lauren, and Matt. Being able to pass on the family values to my own family is the most rewarding accomplishment I have achieved. I am thankful to have their support through this life journey. I know there is nothing I cannot accomplish with their support and hard work. My hard work ethic also served me well in my professional career as I progressed up the corporate ladder to my current position as executive director, ultimately leading the Pittsburgh Parking Authority to be recognized as the Parking Organization of the Year by IPI. I am looking forward to bringing my parking experience and ideas to the IPI Board as a recently elected Board member.

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015


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CONSULTANTS CORNER

A FIVE-YEAR APPROACH TO PROTECTING YOUR PARKING INVESTMENT By John Dorsett, AICP

Y

ou have a lot invested in your parking assets. Parking can be capital intensive and represents a significant investment for owners. In light of this, it’s remarkable how often parking owners take a set-it-and-forget-it approach to their parking assets.

Getting Started

JOHN DORSETT, AICP, is a certified planner and principal with Walker Parking Consultants. He can be reached at john.dorsett@ walkerparking.com.

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The first step is evaluating the current performance of parking areas. There are two areas of primary concern to be evaluated: customer service and operations. In evaluating customer service, owners and their operators need to determine whether parking facilities are pleasant and easy to use. Can parkers easily find spaces close to their ultimate destinations? Can drivers enter and exit the facility quickly and conveniently? Are stairways and floors clean and well-illuminated? Is equipment working properly? On the operational side, owners should begin by auditing their equipment and systems to ensure that facilities are operating at optimum efficiency and that equipment is operating well. Are equipment and software up to date? Are you charging the right rates? Is technology being used to control costs? If your facility accepts credit cards for parking payments, are you compliant with Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI-DSS)? The answers will determine what remedies are required. If stairwells and floors aren’t sufficiently clean and illuminated, the fix may be as simple as washing parking areas and installing LED lighting. If congestion is found at entrances and exits, the solution may be to automate payment and access control. If parkers find it difficult and time-consuming to find parking, the answer could be a parking guidance system. There’s a variety of guidance systems to choose from, from simple LED signs outside entrances indicating

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

where spaces are available to complex systems featuring illuminated, single-space sensors. Modern mobile technologies are also available. Simple fixes can be found for administrative shortcomings as well. If management software isn’t up to date or doesn’t do enough, the easy solution is to purchase a management software package that meets the facility’s needs. If equipment isn’t operating to full capacity, it should be repaired or replaced. When it comes to pricing, it often makes sense to hire a consultant to perform an operations analysis. The consultant can evaluate utilization (how close to capacity the facility is on average) and make recommendations. Owners may feel great about the fact that their parking facilities are full every day, but this may actually be a warning sign that they aren’t charging enough. When this is the case, owners are leaving money on the table. Likewise, if a facility tends to operate well under capacity every day, it may be an indication that rates are too high or that the facilities aren’t convenient, clean, or efficient enough. These are all questions the parking consultant can answer.

Preparing for the Future The third element of the five-year plan is to prepare for the future. One essential item that’s often ignored by owners is preventive maintenance. The five-year plan should include a maintenance schedule. It is equally important to set aside money for capital improvements. In spite of owners’ best efforts at maintenance, equipment can break down and structural elements can become compromised. Owners can’t afford to be caught cash-strapped when vital repairs become necessary. By implementing a five-year strategic parking plan owners can be sure that they are getting the most out of their parking assets. And when the five-year plan is completed, it’s time to start again!

ISTOCK

How can owners ensure their parking is operating at its peak? The secret can be found in the implementation of a five-year strategic plan through which parking resources are evaluated, areas needing structural and operational improvement are identified, and plans are made to complete those improvements.


MHTM™ MicroDrive.

The parking barrier.

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THE GREEN STANDARD

ON THE ROAD; IN THE LOT By Irma Henderson, CAPP

B

y now, there are very few people who have not heard the terms “global warming” and “climate change.” While there are some who feel the increasing temperatures are a result of Earth’s natural cycles, others point to the increase of mankind’s use of fossil fuels.

Buy Smart

IRMA HENDERSON, CAPP, is interim director of transportation, parking, and fleet services at the University of California, Riverside, and co-chair of IPI’s Sustainability Committee. She can be reached at irma. henderson@ucr.edu.

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When shopping for a new or used vehicle, choose the cleanest, most fuel-efficient vehicle that meets your needs. Some of the most fuel-efficient, cost-effective vehicles are also some of the smallest vehicles on the market. These smaller vehicles can have a great effect on our parking supply if operators can adequately evaluate their customers’ needs and adjust accordingly. Case in point: Smart cars, Mini Coopers, and Fiats are so small that they redefine the definition of a compact vehicle and the amount of area needed to park those vehicles.

Drive Smart To improve fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, drive more efficiently by observing the speed limits, going easy on the brakes and gas pedal, and avoiding excessive idling. Three words: automatic space counters. Consumers’ desires to drive smarter and reduce idling/ circling time now fall directly in line with operators’ needs to provide greater customer service and quick and easy access to available, open parking.

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

Tune Your Ride and Check Your Tires Get regular maintenance, tune-ups, oil changes, and new filters, and keep your tires properly inflated. If you have looked at the Green Parking Council’s Green Garage Certification Standard, you know that adding a tire inflation station is a small value-added service most operators can install for a fairly minimal investment.

Give Your Car a Break Use public transportation, carpool, walk, or bike whenever possible to avoid using your car. Leaving your car at home just two days a week can reduce your greenhouse gas emissions by an average of two tons per year. While this may be counterproductive to a private operator’s daily revenue goals, for some entities, such as universities and hospitals, it can have a large, positive effect on demand and reduce the need to build costly infrastructure.

Use Renewable or Alternative Fuels There is a wide variety of vehicles and fuel types available today that can lower your greenhouse gas emissions, from E85 and biodiesel to electric, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fuel-celled vehicles. There are more than 10,000 alternative fueling stations in the U.S. today, and several federal, state, and local agencies offer grants and programs to build and increase the infrastructure to support these technologies. The challenge for the parking industry is to not only respond to the potential fueling needs of our customers but also balance our need to manage our assets, space allocation, and turnover ratios. Whether or not you believe in climate change, one thing is certain: Business is always evolving as customer needs change. The question now lies in your hands: Are you going to struggle to cope with a changing environment or are you going to anticipate them and successfully prepare? 

ISTOCK

Regardless of the reasons why, Earth’s climate is getting warmer, and the signs are everywhere. Rain patterns are changing, the sea level is rising, and snow and ice are melting. As global temperatures continue to rise, we’ll see more changes in our climate and our environment—extreme drought in California, snow in Atlanta, and flooding in Texas. One of the entities invested in battling climate change, advocating for clean energy, and educating the public is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. One of the publications produced by the agency is “What Can You Do—On The Road,” which addresses every parking operator’s key customers: the driver and his/her vehicle. It outlines six simple steps that our customers can take to reduce their carbon footprint, which can have real effects on how the parking industry operates.


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THE BUSINESS OF PARKING MARKETING LEGAL

THE LOST ART OF NETWORKING By Bill Smith, APR

BILL SMITH, APR, is principal of SmithPhillips Strategic Communications and contributing editor of The Parking Professional. He can be reached at bsmith@smith-phillips. com or 603.491.4280.

12

etworking has always been a hallmark of successful businesses. But at many organizations today, it’s a lost art.

I spoke with Whitney Taylor, president of Whitney Inc., a professional services firm based in Los Angeles that provides business development strategy, marketing/communications, PR/outreach, and government relations services. She is well-known throughout the parking industry as a networker extraordinaire and can often be found at parking, business, and government networking groups and events. According to Taylor, “Organizations tend to overlook the need to maintain and grow their networks on an ongoing and consistent basis. Many companies think they can begin building a relationship when a need arises. Wrong! Network before there is a need! It’s much harder to connect with someone as a customer or partner when you are still trying to get to know him. Effective networking allows you to get to know people before you work together.” Unfortunately, many organizations don’t place a premium on networking, and it can become an afterthought, getting lost in the shuffle of day-to-day operations. Ironically, the advent of social media as a marketing and business development tool may be contributing to the trend of diminishing face-to-face marketing. It can be tempting for parking professionals to focus solely on electronic networking. Why not? You never have to leave your desk to connect with other professionals, prospective customers, or partners. Don’t do it. Abandoning face-to-face networking is a mistake.

Building Relationships “Building relationships is often undervalued,” says Taylor. “This is a relationship, not an acquaintance. You need to treat it like a real relationship, getting to know people personally and learning what’s important to them. Really getting to know people puts you in a position of being able to provide real value to the relationship.

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

“A relationship isn’t just a handshake and a drink,” continues Taylor. “It’s showing, rather than just telling, people that you can deliver and that they can trust you.” So, how do you build your network? According to Taylor, it depends on what type of organization you represent and what type of outreach is needed. For example, if your company is struggling with new business success or looking to expand into a new vertical, your networking efforts should be geared toward reaching the decision-makers in the verticals into which you hope to expand. Learn their needs and wants. You need to know which decision-makers will be important to your organization in the months and years ahead and solidify those relationships rather than trying to build them from scratch when you are seeking their business. There are plenty of opportunities to network within the parking industry as well as in vertical industries your organization may serve. Local affiliated branches of national industry organizations often offer annual conferences and trade shows, business meetings, and committees in which to participate. Likewise, local business groups typically have regularly scheduled meetings and networking happy hours

Saying Hello According to Taylor, although it may seem intimidating to walk into a room of strangers and introduce yourself to people, it’s really not that difficult. “Remember,” Taylor says, “everyone feels just as awkward as you do. They might even appreciate having you break the ice.” But it’s important to remember that networking doesn’t end when you leave the event. In fact, that’s just the beginning. You need to stay in touch with the people you connect with and cultivate relationships with them. Like any relationship, it needs to be nurtured. Taylor offers this parting wisdom: “Follow up, follow up, follow up! We get business cards everywhere, all the time. If you aren’t following up and getting to really know people, you are just wasting your time.”

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FINANCIAL MATTERS

COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID: WHEN TO SUBMIT By Mark Vergenes

G

etting to college or university feels like an uphill battle, from the studying and working and activities all the way to the most painful part for parents (or adult students): paying for that needed education. There’s plenty to think about when it comes to financing a college education and one of the biggest aspects is the basic form for aid. your FAFSA.) The FAFSA captures two data points: the financial picture of both the parent(s) and the student for the previous year.

The CSS Profile

Filling It Out MARK A. VERGENES is president of MIRUS Financial Partners and chair of the Lancaster (Pa.) Parking Authority. He can be reached at mark@ mirusfinancialpartners. com.

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The FAFSA relies on tax information from the previous year so it’s helpful to have your tax return already completed. However, if you don’t, you can still file the FAFSA using estimated numbers and then go back later and update your FAFSA with final tax numbers after you’ve completed your tax return. (The government offers an online tool—the IRS Data Retrieval Tool—that allows you to import your tax information directly into

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

MIRUS Financial partners nor Cetera Advisor Networks, LLC. give tax or legal advice. Opinions expressed are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representations as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance information is historical and indicative of future results. Articles prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. Copyright 2015.

ISTOCK

When should you submit college financial aid forms and requests? It depends on the form you’re filling out and whether your child is a new or returning college student. College deadlines for the federal government’s financial aid form, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), might be anywhere from Feb. 1 to April 1 for both new and returning students. But it’s in your best interest to submit the FAFSA as soon after Jan. 1 as possible (it can’t be submitted before Jan. 1) because some government aid programs operate on a first-come, first-served basis.

The main financial aid form that most colleges use to distribute their own aid, the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE®, is due anywhere from Feb. 1 to March 1 for new students applying to college regular decision (or Nov. 1 to Dec. 1 for new students applying early decision or early action) and by April 15 for returning students. The CSS/ Financial Aid PROFILE captures six data points that make up the financial picture of both the parent(s) and student for the previous year, along with an estimated financial picture of parent(s) and student for the current year and for the following year. Even if you don’t think your child will qualify for need-based federal financial aid, you should consider submitting the FAFSA if: ●●  You want your child to be eligible for an unsubsidized Stafford Loan (a non-need-based federal student loan available to any student). ●●  You want your child to be considered for college needbased aid. Colleges generally require both the FAFSA and the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE before they will consider your child for college need-based aid. Both the FAFSA and the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE can be submitted online, and you must file them for each year that you want your child to be considered for aid.


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PARKING SPOTLIGHT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS IN PARKING

MAKE YOUR MARK By Rachel Yoka, CAPP, LEED AP BD+C

I

PI’s members represent a broad swath of industries, including but not limited to universities, municipalities, health care organizations, transportation agencies, and airports, to name a few. One of our association’s greatest strengths is the breadth of markets we represent and the collaboration that results from the interaction across these segments. We also represent and bring together all the services and suppliers needed to support parking organizations— consultants and engineers, software and hardware solutions providers, and more. We focus our education and networking programs on every aspect of the profession, from frontline staff to management. As our organization continues to grow and our profession evolves, IPI offers and will continue to develop programming to suit all our members based on market, services, and experience. Much has been discussed about the next generation of parking professionals. Many of these individuals will choose parking as their career of

“This industry is already being changed for the better by passionate, bright young professionals who embrace technology, sustainability, and creativity. It’s exciting to think about what lies ahead with an IPI group RACHEL YOKA, CAPP, LEED AP BD+C, is IPI’s vice president of program development. She can be reached at yoka@ parking.org.

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like YPIP to connect these young professionals.” —Isaiah Mouw, CAPP Republic Parking System

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

choice—an exciting development for our industry and yet another recognition of the critical role of parking. At the 2015 IPI Conference & Expo in Las Vegas, IPI launched the Young Professionals in Parking (YPIP) to engage and retain the best and the brightest who come into the parking industry. Designed to welcome and serve young professionals younger than 40 into the parking community, the program aims to provide a greater platform for professional development, networking, and training for young professionals across the many sectors and services in the industry. Spearheaded by Megan Leinart of Propark America and Isaiah Mouw, CAPP, of Republic Parking System, YPIP will connect and engage young parking professionals, providing the tools and resources necessary to guide them throughout their careers within the parking industry. The business of parking requires a specific and tailored skill set. In tandem with the CAPP and Accredited Parking Organization (APO) programs, the YPIP program will create opportunities to develop the skills that will expand knowledge of parking-related issues, promote advancement in the industry, and build relationships that provide career-long benefits.

YPIP Hot Spot Events In 2015 and 2016, IPI and YPIP will go on the road, bringing a new series of YPIP events to some of the newest and most groundbreaking parking and mixeduse developments throughout the U.S. Held quarterly, these programs will highlight parking and mixed-use development projects, allowing attendees to expand their knowledge of a variety of parking designs and technologies. Geared to the 40-and-under set but open to all, these “Hot Spot” events will give attendees the opportunity to learn from project stakeholders, as well as network with other young parking professionals. Our first event will kick off in Denver, Colo., this month with a tour of the new Denver Union Station development, highlighting the project’s unique details, including the combination of parking, transportation,


and a variety of mixed-use elements. To register for the Oct. 22 event and find out more, visit parking.org/ypip.

a colleague for the award. January’s due date will be here before you know it.

Stay Connected Recognizing Emerging Leaders Recognizing that young professionals cross all services and sectors, the YPIP program will integrate with IPI’s many programs and activities, including our Professional Recognition Program. For the first time this year, we will offer the Emerging Leader of the Year Award, created to recognize one up-and-coming young parking professional who has exhibited outstanding leadership and accomplishments in his or her career. Get started on your own submission or nominate

As part of this initiative, we have created an easy way to stay in touch, share your stories,

and seek advice from our community. Join the YPIP Facebook group for news, events, and more: facebook.com/groups/Young ProfessionalsinParking. And don’t forget to tag yourself in the photos from the launch party in Las Vegas!

“The Denver Hot Spot event will be the perfect kickoff to this fantastic series of YPIP programs. These will be the hottest parking industry events this year and we’ll get off to a great start touring one of Denver’s most innovative developments and networking with fellow parking professionals.” —Megan Leinart Propark America

parking.org/tpp

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IPI’S ASK THE EXPERTS

Dennis Burns, CAPP Regional Vice President

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. The below-grade structure developed as a foundational element of the City Creek Center in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. This exceptional example of parking structure design incorporates almost every best practice I am aware of. The investment in elements that are often value-engineered out is particularly impressive; painting the interior white, increased floor-to-floor heights, impressive graphics and signage, and many technology elements that help patrons navigate are just a few of this garage’s many impressive features.

Marlene Cramer, CAPP Assistant Director, University Police Business Services

Cal Poly State University My favorite parking structure is the Santa Monica Civic Center Parking Structure in California. I love to see it at night when it is all lit up. It is such a beautiful work of art.

Isaiah Mouw, CAPP Vice President

Republic Parking System A parking garage at the Boston Children’s Hospital holds a special place in my heart. Our family was there during a stressful time in our child’s life, but I remember the garage had a wayfinding system in which cute animals represented the different levels of the garage. Our boys looked forward to finding our car in the garage using the wayfinding hints, and the staff was very friendly.

David Hill, CAPP

Chief Executive Officer

Nicole Chinea, CAPP Senior Associate WALTER P MOORE One York Condos, New York, N.Y. I recently visited this automated garage for the first time. While these structures are a debatable topic in parking, there are many facilities around the world that have been operating for years. I was amazed at the minimal footprint that these garages utilize and the convenience they provide to residents.

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Clayton Hill Associates, LTD. The Dubai Mall parking garage in Dubai is a huge facility and memorable for its difficult functional design, long lineups, and the impossibility of finding your way from deck to deck when the garage is busy. It presents a very complex management task for heroic parking professionals.

The opinions, beliefs, and thoughts expressed by the contributors do not necessarily reflect the opinions and viewpoints of the International Parking Institute or official policies of IPI.

If you have a favorite or most memorable parking structure, where is it and what makes it extraordinary?


For all of your parking Design and Maintenance/Restoration needs, think

.

Whether you are considering the design of a new facility or maintenance of an existing structure, Kimley-Horn offers a multi-disciplinary team of professionals ready to bring creative design solutions that are tailored to your speciďŹ c needs. To learn more, contact parking@kimley-horn.com.

www.kimley-horn.com/parking


By Michelle Wendler, AIA, and Matt Davis

A

N INCREASING NUMBER OF CITIES are looking to make the transition to paid parking. For communities able to successfully navigate the challenges involved, the outcome can prove a catalyst for continued development or help pay for the costs associated with the development of parking.

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The Road to

Paid Parking A new transportation hub helps usher in a different system in Vallejo, Calif.

parking.org/tpp

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Vallejo Waterfront Studies and Parking Structure, Vallejo, California Status • Phase I Studies completed 2006 • Phase II Parking Structure Phase A completed 2012 • Phase III Parking Operations and Revenue Control Studies completed 2013 • Phase IV Parking Structure Phase B Future Phase

Awards 2013 Project of the Year Award Solano Transportation Authority & Special Congressional Recognition

The City of Vallejo, Calif., went through a process to implement paid parking for a portion of its parking supply related to the Ferry Terminal, which is one of eight stops of the popular San Francisco Bay Ferry. This process required educating stakeholders, developing a pricing strategy, and determining which technology to use to collect and enforce collection of fees. The implementation process took some time but has now been fully incorporated. The city’s journey through this process can assist other organizations as they navigate a similar road.

The District The Vallejo Waterfront includes three districts—the Northern, Southern, and Central Waterfront—totaling

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125 acres. Located between downtown Vallejo and the Vallejo Ferry Terminal, the Central Waterfront is characterized as having a pedestrian-friendly, urban emphasis that is well-connected to the downtown. The existing waterfront area was being used as parking for the ferry terminal, and it was determined that this was not the highest and best use of this land. The city, working with the master developer, created a master plan for the area. The first phase in the development of the master plan called for consolidating the ferry parking into a parking structure to free up the rest of the land for development and to build a bus terminal as part of a multi-modal approach to the area. The complex together is known as the Vallejo Station Intermodal Facility.

Parking The 750-space Vallejo Station Phase A Parking Garage opened on Oct. 15, 2012, as part of the Downtown Specific Plan and Waterfront Planned Development Master Plan. The plan called for the ability to meet the parking needs of the SolTrans Bus Terminal and the ferry terminal while creating an improved pedestrian environment. The structure is a three-level, partially below-grade garage that is designed to expand in a second phase to provide 600 additional stalls. The York Street Paseo runs across the top deck and connects the bus terminal to the ferry, which minimizes pedestrian vehicle conflicts. Phase B of the garage will


be designed to accommodate future retail and/or commercial space as well as a potential hotel and conference center in a vertical subdivision to be created on the top deck of the garage.

Financing The construction cost of the structure was paid for with grant funding. However, the grants did not provide funding for ongoing operations or maintenance costs for the structure. This led the city to evaluate paid waterfront parking as part of a comprehensive parking management plan, completed by the city and its consultants with the goals of: ●●  Increasing parking convenience for ferry and bus riders to increase transit ridership and decrease regional traffic congestion. ●●  Generating revenue to pay for the maintenance and security of parking facilities that benefit ferry and bus riders. ●●  Ensuring adequate parking for current and future ferry commuters without negatively affecting downtown shoppers, visitors, or residents of nearby neighborhoods.

The Plan The comprehensive parking management plan included: Developing a list of parking guiding principles. These principles defined parking management in the City of Vallejo and provided a framework for other improvement recommendations. ●●  Recommending a parking pricing strategy. The recommended fee/rate structure took into account regular and occasional users and estimated operational, maintenance, and administrative costs and commuter incentives. ●●  Recommending a cost-effective methodology and technology for a parking access and revenue collection system. This involved finding a system that took into account the best ways to efficiently handle peaks generated by ferry patrons without affecting traffic flow into the parking structure. ●●  Recommending an enforcement strategy. ●●  Defining staffing needs, enforcement requirements, and associated costs for a paid parking program. ●●  Recommending measures to mitigate the effects of a paid parking program on the surrounding commercial and residential properties. The parking management plan involved many community meetings, stakeholder meetings, and a detailed evaluation of the costs and implementation strategy. The process took almost a year to complete. ●●  

Changes Take Place The City of Vallejo began charging for parking at the Vallejo Station Parking Garage and adjacent ferry parking lots on Aug. 1, 2013. The city planned for the waterfront garage and lots to be priced to cover the cost parking.org/tpp

Parking System Guiding Principles The City of Vallejo developed a list of parking system guiding principles during its paid parking transformation along the waterfront:   1. Safe and secure at all times for all users.   2. Simple-to-use system so motorists can park as quickly as possible.   3. S  et lowest parking price possible to cover costs.   4. Minimize impacts of parking prices on ferry riders via discount over daily price.   5. Ensure good value for priced parking.   6. M  anage downtown and waterfront parking as a single system.   7. Increase shared parking to better utilize existing parking resources.   8. M  inimize commuter parking spillover into downtown adjacent neighborhoods.   9. Minimize impacts of commuters parking in short-term spaces for downtown shoppers/ visitors. 10. P  rovide signage and enforcement so all motorists can understand the rules, and are treated equally.

of operations and maintenance of the new garage. After an analysis of operating costs and several community meetings in October 2012, the Vallejo City Council approved fees at $20 per calendar month (5 a.m.–9 p.m.), or $5 per day (up to 24 hours). Monthly parkers can extend their parking overnight for $4 per day. These fees apply to the new parking garage and the adjacent surface parking lots, which are marked as paid parking areas. These prices were set at the lowest possible rates to cover ongoing operation and maintenance of the new parking garage and the adjacent parking lots. Customers pay at one of the 19 conveniently located kiosks or on their smartphones or devices, or they may purchase monthly permits online. Permits are tied to the license plate number of the vehicle parking in the lot; no dashboard display or assigned stall is required. The city utilizes license plate recognition technology for enforcement. For the plan to be effective, the city needed to increase the amount of signage and enforcement for the adjacent downtown on street parking. These areas are not paid but have a two-hour time limit. The construction of the garage, including lighting, surveillance, and increased security, has improved the safety of the waterfront area, and while charging for parking was controversial, it allowed the city to pay for the operations and maintenance cost of the parking facility, setting the stage for future development.

MICHELLE WENDLER, AIA, is principal at Watry Design, Inc. She can be reached at mwendler@ watrydesign.com.

MATT DAVIS is associate principal at Watry Design, Inc., and a Certified Green Garage Assessor. He can be reached at mdavis@watrydesign. com.

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G

eorgia Regents University Augusta (GRU) is a 足newly-formed consolidation of two long standing universities: the Medical College of Georgia and Augusta State University. The schools are only a few miles STUDY apart in Augusta and were two of eight the Georgia Board of Regents elected to consolidate to share resources, combine curriculums, and provide better learning environments by joining together. During the consolidation of the Medical College of Georgia and Augusta State University, it was clear to senior administration and other stakeholders that a comprehensive evaluation of both parking and transit was needed to help ensure better connectivity and improved use of the infrastructure that served the two institutions. Connectivity between campuses, proper allocation and sharing of parking resources, adequate parking, improved mobility, identifying technology enhancements, and the implementation of new parking management initiatives were all primary elements of the parking and transit master plan.

CASE

By Mike Martindill and Mitch Skyer

Georgia Regents University implements a complex parking and transit master plan. New transit routes link the two campuses of the consolidated university.

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Connectivity between campuses, proper allocation and sharing of parking resources, improved mobility, technology enhancements, and new parking management initiatives played roles in the parking and transportation master plans that helped in the consolidation of two Georgia universities.

parking.org/tpp

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GRU engaged a qualified team of parking and transportation planners and specialists to assist in developing a comprehensive plan that would focus on transit planning, improving connectivity between the campuses, and enhancing the efficiency of the transit program. The team also studied current parking conditions, estimated future parking needs (including the sizing and siting of any new parking improvements), and addressed wayfinding, signage, and the condition of the existing parking assets and other parking-related needs/issues.

Working Together Initially, the team worked in a collaborative manner to study existing conditions and spent a significant amount of time at both campuses to better understand in-place systems during peak times of activity and how effectively transit and parking supported the respective needs of each institution. The team rode the buses, walked the campuses, met with stakeholders, conducted workshops to solicit input from various users, and performed a large amount of due diligence to develop models that represented current conditions. Team members used these models and other information to estimate future needs for both transit and parking, considering anticipated growth of the new institution during the next 10 years. In addition, through a comprehensive due diligence effort, the team developed a series of parking management initiatives aimed at improving parking conditions, allocating parking properly among the various use groups, and improving and simplifying parking enforcement. Though parking and transit were managed as well as could be expected given the limited resources in place, it was clear that several new initiatives could take parking and transit to a higher level. From the outset, the team wanted to take advantage of its collective experience to recommend common best practices used throughout the country that have proven effective in improving parking and transit management while enhancing the experience of the users.

Challenges and Opportunities Throughout the study, the team met with a strategic planning firm to better understand the university’s vision for improving the quality of life for students, staff, and visitors who will live, visit, and learn at the newly formed consolidated university. The Medical College of Georgia campus is quite dense and situated among the city’s large Veterans Affairs medical center and another not-for-

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profit hospital. Existing parking and traffic was very congested, with campus parking consisting of five parking garages, several parking lots, and some on-street parking. Typically, the college’s parking was extremely well-utilized, especially for visitors and patients of the hospitals and medical office buildings making up the medical college campus. In addition, several academic buildings are located on campus, which further contributes to its parking woes. To provide adequate parking, several remote lots were needed that were not well-served by the college’s transit system, let alone linked to nearby Augusta State.  At Augusta State, parking consists of surface parking at two campus locations. Though not nearly as dense as the Medical College of Georgia, finding a space on campus on busy days was a challenge. Neither campus had in place an effective parking enforcement program for ensuring the proper use of parking between the various user groups. The original vision was to add more buildings at the less-dense Augusta State campus to improve the quality of life and create a different kind of campus environment than existed. However, as the goals and objectives advanced, the new (and current) vision is to expand the campus formerly known as the Medical College of Georgia.

The Solution The team assembled several new ideas for improving transit and parking conditions, paving the way for both the transit and parking systems to accommodate the long-term growth of the new consolidated campuses. The most important recommendation included the mission-critical proposal to hire a new champion for the consolidated university’s parking and transit system. This person would be responsible for implementing many of the new initiatives the team recommended. The new director-level hire would report to the vice president of auxiliary services and needed to have a strong background in managing parking systems for both universities and medical centers. Once this person was on board, he or she would procure the parking and transit technology, parking equipment, software, and hardware necessary for managing the parking and transit between the two campuses. In essence, this person would start with a blank slate and create a new, sustainable parking and transit system to support GRU and its anticipated growth


and significance to the state of Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a great opportunity. After a presentation of the findings and recommendations, the study effort was expanded to collaborate with another master planning effort. This plan would take the consolidation in a different direction, placing more emphasis on vertical construction and expansion at the existing Medical College of Georgia campus. The expansion of the medical college campus was arguably more representative of the greater vision for consolidating the two schools and the creation of a superior public medical school. The transportation and parking plan was then revised to support the new vision. GRU has already implemented several of the initiatives outlined in this plan, including the development of a more efficient usage of the transit system, accessibility of remote parking lots, linking the two campuses with new transit routes, and improving headway times of the transit system. The transit recommendations focused on campus connectivity between the Health Sciences (downtown) and Summerville/Forest Hills/University Village (uptown) locations. GRU recognized from the outset that the service had to be both functional and appealing. Any option that required passengers to plan their days in multiple-hour segments would never be used by a large number of people. The service had to be timely and responsive and had to provide a terrific alternative to driving on congested roads and hunting for elusive parking spots. For the Health Sciences (downtown) campus, employee and patient movement were the primary considerations. The workforce locations were evaluated in conjunction with the currently available and projected parking locations. Recommendations to influence parking decisions, such as assigned permitting, installing gate controlled access, and clearly separating patient, employee, and student parking in an enforceable manner, were made. These recommendations were of primary importance to the transit system as they allowed the planning to be based on predictable and enforceable behavior. GRU was extremely concerned with the possibility of implementing a transportation system that would be underutilized, or worse, completely ignored. By planning transit around parking, the convenience and value of the bus system increased significantly. Employee movement was considered both when arriving and departing the workplace, student class periods and demand for services were evaluated, and when patients were affected, their convenience level was made a priority. Choice was a key factor in offering parking.org/tpp

both parking options and transit connectivity. When people were provided with choice regarding costs, time, and location, they felt more in-control and could base their behavior and decisions on personal preferences rather than simply being assigned a solution. Passengers consistently demand their transit system be convenient and offer frequent service. This can often exceed budget limitations and result in unsustainable costs. To meet these seemingly opposing requirements, GPS vehicle tracking software was implemented on all vehicles. This solution provided real-time passenger information regarding bus locations. Passengers can download apps directly to their Apple or Android phones and track the bus and stop information and select individual and multiple routes. Additionally, display options of single routes and the full transit system can be published to the GRU parking and transit website and shown on kiosk displays at key passenger gathering points. Operationally, technology plays a crucial role. The GRU transit manager and supervisors can track speed, location, idling time, hours of operation, route and schedule performance, and vehicle history at the touch of a button. GRU also elected to implement passenger-counting technology to track peak usage, gather data to evaluate route costs per passenger, and have information available to determine whether stops should be removed or given additional service. The data gathered on every bus during all routes will enable GRU to make operational decisions quickly, save money, improve service levels, and enhance operations on a continual basis. In an environment in which there are many competing interests and those interests are often independently justified, having solid data encourages understanding and cooperation when difficult decisions regarding resource allocation have to be made.

Looking Ahead GRU is in the midst of hiring a parking director to take on the many opportunities that still exist for improved parking enforcement, such as using license plate recognition and digital permitting, eliminating an abundance of reserved parking, changing the pricing structure, improving existing parking assets, and establishing reserves for extending the useful life of the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking assets. It was clear throughout this project that new parking technology was key to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the new parking management initiatives. For GRU, this means the addition of new software and hardware, but the value of this update is absolutely worth the investment long term. Everyone involved in the process is confident that once these recommendations are implemented, parking and transit behavior will change and a new and improved experience will be created for all who work, live, learn, teach, and visit the newly formed Georgia Regents University at Augusta.

MIKE MARTINDILL is vice president of Timothy Haahs & Associates, Inc. (TimHaahs). He can be reached at mmartindill@ timhaahs.com.

MITCH SKYER is president of Passio Technologies, Inc. He can be reached at mitch@passiotech. com.

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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THE BEST How to choose the right repair approach by using proper condition assessments.

P

ARKING STRUCTURES ARE AN INTEGRAL ELEMENT in our daily lives that create an interchange between our homes, our destinations, and our built environment. These

structures are often incorporated into buildings, integrated into the surrounding landscape, or serve as stand-alone architectural features. With so many of these structures aging—in some cases, decades beyond their expected useful lives—repair and rehabilitation projects offer an opportunity to revive both function and form. PHOTO 1: PARKING GARAGE, CONDOMINIUM BUILDING, BROOKLINE, MASS.

Reinforcing steel corrosion due to chloride contamination.

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FIXES

By John M. Porter, PE, and Nathan D. Boutin, PE

Although they bear the brunt of the harshest conditions in our environment, parking structures are sometimes under-maintained and over-used. They are exposed to freeze-thaw cycles, corrosive salts and chemicals, fatigue from cyclic-loading, and exposure to moisture that all can lead to deterioration of the structure and building components. The most common cause of concrete deterioration is corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel, which is often the result of chloride contamination in cold climates and coastal areas. Chlorides in de-icing salts and seawater break down the typically excellent protection that concrete provides against reinforcing steel corrosion. Corrosion byproducts (rust) have a larger volume than the original, stable reinforcing steel. This expansion causes bursting tensile stresses within the concrete that leads to delamination and spalling of the concrete (Photo 1). Similarly, steel-framed parking structures will corrode when paints, galvanizing, and other protective coatings are damaged or fail and the structural steel is exposed to moisture. When parking structures are not maintained and condition assessments are not performed on a regular basis, future repair costs can grow exponentially. This often leads to large, expensive projects that, in some cases, come as a surprise to building owners, parking space owners, and building tenants. The following three rehabilitation case studies demonstrate a range of small to large projects that integrated aesthetic upgrades, end-user improvements, and functional enhancements while managing parking and facility users throughout construction.

PHOTO 2: BROOKLINE CONDOMINIUM PLAZA

Failing pool enclosure fence and deteriorated waterproofing.

PARKING GARAGE, CONDOMINIUM BUILDING, BROOKLINE, MASS. This two-level, partially-below-grade concrete parking structure built in 1964 is located below a seven-story condominium building and accommodates about 30 vehicles. This small garage is critical to the condominium owners as other parking options in this congested area are limited. A plaza above the garage is used as a common space for owners to utilize the swimming pool that is recessed into the elevated plaza level structure. Exposure to de-icing salts and moisture eventually led to chloride contamination of the concrete and widespread deterioration. In the spring of 2013, a contractor was hired directly by the condominium association to repair the most severely deteriorated area of the elevated concrete parking deck. Due to the severity of deterioration, the entire slab was demolished within the repair zone, which came as a surprise to the condominium owners and the contractor. At that point, the contractor and the board of trustees stopped the project and quickly retained a structural engineer to prepare construction documents for the slab replacement. The team worked together to develop a fast-track repair approach to reconstruct the parking deck, which was completed in approximately one month. The next spring, the board recognized that a complete condition assessment of the parking garage and plaza was needed to determine repair costs, prioritize repairs, and establish the budget. The board hired parking.org/tpp

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PHOTO 3: BROOKLINE CONDOMINIUM PARKING DECK

PHOTO 4: BROOKLINE CONDOMINIUM PLAZA

Plaza rehabilitation.

Full-depth repairs.

an engineer to perform the assessment, which revealed widespread and severe deterioration of the parking deck, failed plaza waterproofing, collapsing pool fencing (Photo 2), failed security doors, and deteriorated fire protection systems. Three rehabilitation alternatives were developed as part of the condition assessment that provided the board with the anticipated costs, advantages, and disadvantages of each alternative. The alternatives were designed to provide the owner with a range of initial construction costs and associated future maintenance and repair costs. The board determined that repairing all current deterioration throughout the garage and plaza, as well as installation of pedestrian and vehicular-traffic-bearing membranes on the parking deck and plaza; new pool security fencing; and upgrades to entrance ramps, handrails, doors, security systems, and fire protection was the preferred rehabilitation approach. This was the most expensive of the three options presented and carried a heavy price tag (nearly $500,000) for a small condominium building.

Construction required frequent communication and planning with the board due to the small nature of the site and building occupants who were located immediately adjacent to construction activities. The building tenants wanted the project to revitalize the garage and create a gathering space on the plaza that was missing for years. After review of bids for the project, the board allocated enough funds to also perform a pool restoration project along with the garage and plaza rehabilitation. The project began in the summer of 2014 (Photo 3) and displaced all garage tenants, who were transitioned to street parking permits. This was a major inconvenience for the condominium owners, who were accustomed to readily accessible parking within the garage, and made it critical to maintain the construction schedule and reopen the garage to parking. Construction required frequent communication and planning with the board due to the small nature of the site and building occupants who were located immediately adjacent to construction activities. The project team worked together to track repair quantities and the schedule, and also performed frequent cost analyses and

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projections to stay on budget. Many of the repairs in the contract were performed on a unit-price basis, where cost is driven by the quantity of repairs based on the level of deterioration (as opposed to a lump-sum contract). This made budget updates and quantity projections critical to the overall project budget. Construction was completed on budget in the spring of 2015 (Photo 4). At the conclusion of the project, the board initiated discussions with the engineer to implement routine maintenance and inspections to stay ahead of future repair costs.

RESERVOIR PLACE GARAGE, WALTHAM, MASS. The two-level parking garage at Reservoir Place has 700 parking spaces below a three-story, 140,000-square-foot office building and is critical to daily facility operations. The below-grade garage, constructed in the mid-1980s, is a Filigree structure consisting of a cast-in-place concrete topping on prestressed concrete planks. The owner observed extensive cracking and spalling concrete throughout the garage, and in 2012, retained an engineer to perform a structural condition assessment and develop a rehabilitation program to extend the useful life of the structure. The condition assessment included visual observations of the structural components, inspection of the existing reinforcement at exploratory openings made in the topside of the elevated deck, and examination of concrete cores extracted from the underside of the elevated deck. Based on the condition assessment, the engineer prepared rehabilitation alternatives and construction cost estimates for the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consideration and provided a cost/benefit analysis of each alternative. The owner elected to undertake a $1.9 million rehabilitation project to repair damaged structural elements and protect the elevated parking deck with the application of a ­vehicular-traffic-bearing waterproofing system. The engineer customized the waterproofing system to accommodate areas of widespread cracking and other areas of heavy use, such as turning areas and entrance/exit lanes. The repairs were designed in 2013, and construction began that fall. Building operations, tenant access, and parking needed to be maintained throughout the project so the engineer worked with the owner to develop detailed construction phasing plans to limit the loss of parking and provide egress and access throughout the garage. Nearly all concrete repairs required extensive temporary


shoring to safely support the structure during demolition activities (Photos 5 and 6). The project involved seven phases that were subdivided further by the contractor based on the amount of shoring materials that could be installed in any given phase. To minimize the disruption to building occupants during the work because of sound vibrations, project documents required hydrodemolition to remove unsound concrete. When the contractor needed to use pneumatic demolition equipment for certain structural elements, the work was performed in off hours (nights and weekends). Monitoring during pneumatic demolition was also critical due to a laser eye surgery center that houses sensitive equipment directly above the construction zone. The engineer installed seismographs to monitor background ambient vibrations, trial demolition, and production demolition to verify that vibration levels did not exceed the laser-eye equipment threshold. With the installation of more than 140,000 square feet of vehicular-traffic-bearing waterproofing (Photo 7), odors needed to be considered to reduce disturbance to garage users and tenants in the office space above. The engineer specified a low-odor system to reduce the impact on the building occupants. The project team also coordinated mechanical system functions with the building engineer to verify that elevator shafts and stair towers were put under positive air pressure during waterproofing installation and all doors and penetrations were sealed. Exhaust systems in the garage and temporary exhaust fans were also used to mitigate odors.

PHOTO 5: RESERVOIR PLACE

Concrete repair in progress with new supplemental reinforcing steel.

PHOTO 6: RESERVOIR PLACE

Reinforcing steel corrosion, broken prestressing strands, concrete deterioration, and temporary shoring.

The engineer also provided maintenance, repair, and monitoring budget estimates for the next 15 years to assist the owner with future budgeting. In addition to structural repairs and waterproofing, the owner pursued a lighting upgrade and painting of all walls and columns throughout the garage. These projects achieved reduced energy consumption and improved visibility and safety, benefitting both the owner and the garage occupants. With all three projects occurring simultaneously, the owner had a significant coordination effort to manage. The multiple phases in the rehabilitation project provided frequent opportunities for the engineer to produce quantity and total cost projections, typically at the end of a phase or sub-phase. The projections proved to be useful to the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cash flow while managing all three projects. Construction was completed in the fall of 2014, and the owner implemented a garage maintenance program. The program was developed by the owner and engineer to include general maintenance items, structural repairs, and waterproofing repairs based on anticipated material life-cycles. The engineer also provided maintenance, repair, and monitoring budget estimates for the next 15 years to assist the owner with future budgeting. parking.org/tpp

PHOTO 7: RESERVOIR PLACE

Vehicular-trafficbearing waterproofing.

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PHOTO 8: HAWTHORNE PLACE

Complete reconstruction of a portion of the waffle slab parking structure.

HAWTHORNE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. Hawthorne Place was constructed in 1965 and consists of two 17-story condominium buildings with a two-level, below-grade parking garage with a footprint of approximately 110,000 square feet and 660 parking spaces. The roof of the garage, known as the plaza, is at-grade and is comprised of parking areas, drive lanes, walkways, and landscaped plaza areas. The elevated parking decks and plaza are cast-in-place concrete waffle slabs. The plaza

By prioritizing short- and long-term repairs, the owner can budget for future projects and plan repair work that can often impact parking and revenue. level was originally treated with built-up waterproofing that was at the end of its useful life. There was chronic leakage throughout the garage and widespread concrete deterioration. The most severe leakage occurred along the expansion joints where the original waterproofing and waterstops had failed.

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After years of increasing leakage, installation of temporary gutters, damage to vehicles, and widespread concrete deterioration, the owner hired a structural engineer to perform a condition assessment of the elevated decks and plaza level. The condition assessment included: Visual observations of the structural components.

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Acoustical sounding to document the extent of delaminated concrete.

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Non-destructive testing: —Half-cell potential testing to document corrosion activity. —Ground penetrating radar to determine the concrete cover over reinforcement.

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Concrete testing: —Petrographic (microscopic) analysis of concrete cores. —Compression strength testing. —Chloride content testing.

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Exploratory openings in the overburden on the plaza level to inspect the condition of the waterproofing, document the depth of overburden, and inspect the condition of the concrete deck.

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PHOTO 9: HAWTHORNE PLACE

View of the plaza level and elevated parking deck (in background).

PHOTO 10: HAWTHORNE PLACE

Landscaping and hardscape on the plaza level.

Condition assessment of the electrical and mechanical systems throughout the garage. The condition assessment revealed concrete deterioration over approximately 30 percent of the decks and widespread failure of the plaza level waterproofing membrane. The concrete deterioration was the result of chloride contamination from de-icing salts and exposure to moisture. After the design team performed the condition assessment, it prepared multiple rehabilitation alternatives to extend the useful life of the structure. The options included varying types of waterproofing membranes, cathodic protection, and application of corrosion inhibitors with varying construction costs and future maintenance costs. The owner ultimately determined that widespread concrete rehabilitation (Photo 8), new waterproofing, new vehicular-traffic-bearing waterproofing systems, and new landscaping was the preferred rehabilitation approach. Construction documents were developed, the project was competitively bid and awarded, and construction commenced. The $8 million project was phased over three years to accommodate operations on the plaza,

●●  

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maintain parking, and maintain egress and access to and from the condominium buildings. The final project provided the owner with a rehabilitated garage and plaza with the showcase of the project being the landscaping and hardscape features (Photos 9 and 10). These features included mature landscaping, new planters, lighting upgrades, roadways, and accessible walkways throughout the site for building occupants and garage users. Deterioration and distress in parking structures often goes unnoticed or unaddressed until widespread repairs are required. Performing routine inspections and implementing a maintenance program will help extend the useful life of the structure and building components and will reduce future maintenance costs. By prioritizing short- and long-term repairs, the owner can budget for future projects and plan repair work that can often impact parking and revenue. When large repair projects are needed, understanding the rehabilitation options along with the advantages, disadvantages, and associated costs of various options will help the owner determine the repair strategy that fits his budget and the future of the parking facility.

JOHN M. PORTER, PE, is an associate principal with Simpson Gumpertz & Heger. He can be reached at jmporter@sgh.com or 781.907.9390.

NATHAN D. BOUTIN, PE, is senior staff I-structures at Simpson Gumpertz & Heger. He can be reached at ndboutin@sgh.com or 781.907.9389.

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BICYCLES BICYCLES BICYCLES A large campus and town band together to successfully collect and auction off abandoned bikes.

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By Doug Holmes, CAPP

T

HERE ARE THOUSANDS OF BICYCLES ON THE PENN STATE UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS

and thousands more in the adjacent Borough of State College. In fact, walksite. com recently ranked the Centre Region (State College area) as the ninth most

bicycle-friendly location in the country, with a score of 77 out of 100. Many factors are considered but sufficient modern bike racks play a big role. It’s a fact on a lot of college campuses and their surrounding communities: Many bikes end up left behind by students. If nothing is done, the accrual of abandoned bikes over the course of a couple of years results in a lack of available legitimate bicycle parking spots. It’s funny how things always seem to get back to being a parking problem. The Borough of State College generally auctions off more than 100 bicycles per year. Last year, Penn State gathered 317 abandoned bikes during roundup time and another 60 during the course of the year. One year, we did not do the annual roundup and had more than 600 abandoned bikes to deal with the following year. At the rate of 300-plus abandoned bicycles per year, a point is rapidly reached where there is insufficient space for legitimate use. The problem faced by staff is differentiating bicycles that are abandoned from those that are still used. You can’t judge a bike by its appearance. Junky old bikes are frequently leaning up against the new very expensive bikes and it is the junky one that still has an owner and is currently registered.

Bikes are tagged to determine which are abandoned.

Identifying the Abandoned Fortunately, we have a model for dealing with this issue that works well. The university and all surrounding municipalities have a rule/ordinance that requires bikes to be registered. The Penn State Parking Office purchases the bicycle permits and coordinates the registration process. Bicycle shops in the area cooperate and assist by making sure that bikes sold have a current registration upon sale. Registration is coordinated by the Penn State Parking Office and data is housed on campus. Permits are free to anyone who applies. Bicycles are registered for a two-year period with one series expiring every May 31. Those permits must then be replaced by another two-year permit. Penn State can confiscate any bicycle parked on campus that is not currently registered or that is parked at an unapproved location, such as sign posts, fences, trees, etc. One particular pet peeve of mine is when a bike is parked on a handrail with the cranks and handlebars sticking through to the pedestrian way. This poses a problem not only to the general public but more severely to the visually impaired.


Parking personnel collect abandoned bikes, which are auctioned off in the spring.

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The borough will cut the locks and confiscate bikes parked in similar locations but does not have the ability to confiscate a bike parked on private property or someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence. Bicycle owners can be ticketed if their bike is removed from anything that is not intended to serve as a bike rack. In addition to bikes collected during the year for various violations, the Spring Bicycle Roundup is held on campus after the permit expiration date. Parking enforcement staff tags all bikes on campus that do not have current permits. The tag notifies the owner (See photo on p. 34) the bicycle will be deemed abandoned. If the owner renews the registration or removes the bike between tagging and roundup it will not be confiscated. Locks and chains are cut at the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expense during roundup.


Any tagged bikes that remain are considered abandoned and removed. Attempts are made to identify owners through various methods, such as looking for information from old expired permits or the serial number on the bike. Occasionally a bike that was previously reported as stolen is located. In those instances, the information and bike are turned over to university police. Bikes that are returned to their owners are required to be registered.

Auctions Bicycles are held for a minimum of 90 days to satisfy the Pennsylvania Escheats Laws and then sold at auction if unclaimed. Penn State and the Borough of State College auction off the unclaimed bikes. The borough holds its auction via a third party (Public Surplus), bundling three bikes of varying quality and selling them as a lot. Each lot generally fetches between $40 and $50, grossing about $1,500 per year. Funds are deposited in the boroughâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general funds account. Penn State takes a different path: Live auctions are held at Lion Surplus (the division of auxiliary and business services that disposes of university property) every spring. According to Lion Surplus staff, the spring auction generally grosses between $7,000 and $10,000. This money is used to improve the bicycle friendliness of the area through the purchase of more and better bike racks, paths, etc. There has also been some discussion of getting a bicycle advocacy group to take parts of the less attractive or functional bikes and create a usable bike, but that is still in the discussion phase. The university sales effort is coordinated with the parking office, which has staff on hand to register each bicycle before it leaves the premises. There are also skid loads of hulks that are sold as scrap.

There is talk of holding two auctions per year, one in fall and one in spring, and some of the better bikes are now being culled from the cache and put on the Lion Surplus sales floor for sale at any time. Apparently, bicycles sold in this fashion garner a higher price than those sold at auction. However, if too many of the better bikes are put on the sales room floor, it can decrease the number of people who show up for the auctions. Recently, the borough began a program in which some of the unclaimed bikes are used in a bike share program for staff. Borough offices are mainly concentrated in the center of town, but ordinance or zoning inspections take municipal staff to all corners of the borough. Other department staff also need to get quickly from the borough building to other borough facilities. Having a bike handy is a convenient way to travel through the municipality and informally supports employee wellness programs. Although roundup efforts are concentrated in the spring, staff collects bicycles all year round. A pick-up truck or van is rented in the spring for the mass collection. When bicycles are collected during the rest of the year parking staff attach a bike rack to their vehicles to transport bikes to the impound area. Officers can put the rack on or off the car in a very short time. All in all, it takes a lot of effort to create a complete bicycle program. There are many aspects to a good, friendly bicycle environment that go beyond the creation of bike racks. Dedicated bike lanes, maintenance stations, air stations, lockers, etc. all contribute to the overall bicycle friendliness of the entire community. Certainly, removing the bikes routinely dumped on campus and the surrounding community is another key part of bicycling efforts.

DOUG HOLMES, CAPP, is interim parking manager at the Borough of State College, Pa. He can be reached at dholmes@ statecollegepa.us.

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A Win-Win on Two Wheels A new program connects abandoned bikes with students who can use them.

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By Craig Cotton and Stacy Stockard

T

H E CYCLE ALWAYS RE P E AT ED. Every August, fresh-faced students showed up to the Texas Tech University campus to begin their collegiate

journeys, shiny new bicycles in tow. And at the end of every May, hundreds of bicycles littered the campus. Every bike rack had a dozen bicycles still locked up and either left behind by their student owners or forgotten and immobile due to a lack of repairs. Texas Tech Transportation and Parking Services (TPS) employees spent weeks cutting the locks of bicycles, collecting them, and sending them to summer surplus auctions. They often picked up more than 500 bicycles. Locals bought the bikes for pennies on the dollar while TPS saw no remuneration for the man hours spent. Every August, it started over with freshmen purchasing brand-new bicycles. After awhile, TPS knew we had to get the abandoned bikes back in the hands of the students who needed them and break the cycle.

By the Book Caption goes here for big photo and may don’t need a caption for the round photo? Caption goes here for big photo and may don’t need a caption for the round photo?

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A university operating policy placed TPS in charge of determining which bicycles were abandoned by their owners and then collecting the abandoned bicycles. Once finals end, students take their bicycles from campus. A TPS crew tags all bikes found on campus immediately following May commencement. Tagging involves attaching a tag to a bicycle’s handlebars stating that the owner has 30 days to remove the tag to show the bike is not abandoned. A string is tied to the spokes of a wheel so when the owner rides the bicycle, the string breaks. This provides a backup method of ensuring a bicycle in use is not collected.

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Thirty days after tagging, TPS begins collecting bicycles whose Tips for having tags have not been removed or whose strings are still tied to bicycle sales spokes. The bicycles are trailered back to the TPS tow yard, Check with legal counsel and risk management where they are assigned a space on a bicycle rack and logged offices to minimize risk and determine legalities into the NuPark Campus parking management software regarding abandoned property rules. as a bicycle tow. TPS gives owners of registered bicycles Identify and target the population who wants bicycles. For at least another 30 days to contact the office. Together, Texas Tech, it was incoming students new to campus who wanted to tagging and collecting take three weeks for the crew of try bicycling. TPS aimed to get them a bike at a low cost to see if they five to six TPS employees. liked it before they invested money in a new bicycle that may end up being For a long time, the collected bikes made their way abandoned by the end of the school year. to the university’s surplus, where unneeded and abandoned items, such as office furniture, were auctioned off a few times per year. Not many bicycles made their way

Identify the best way to sell to your target audience. For TPS, online sales meant only Texas Tech students and employees could purchase, and that’s who the department wanted to reach. It also meant TPS used only credit cards, so no cash control issues came into play. Advertise your sale. Look where your target audience gets its news. For Texas Tech, the biggest partner in advertising was the Office of Parent and Family Relations. It passed word of the sale to the parents of incoming students. These parents keep their ear to the ground for anything that could help acclimate their students to college life.

Setting Up the Sale

back to students who needed them, and TPS saw very little return financially or a positive impact on the transportation system from the auction. The trend repeated every year until 2014.

A Growing Trend Texas Tech’s student population continues to grow—currently, the campus hosts 35,000 students with a target of 40,000 by 2020. TPS estimates that 5,000 to 6,000 students and employees bike on campus during the fall and spring semesters. Students use bicycles to commute from their homes and residence halls and even from their vehicles in commuter lots, bypassing the busing system. That said, many students haven’t biked in years. They want to try cycling again but have reservations. Some are hesitant to spend the funds on a new means of transportation on top of the cost of attending a university. If they don’t enjoy cycling or aren’t sure how to make a simple repair to their bicycle, they stop using their bikes and see a loss on their investment. The latter leads to a number of abandoned bicycles. And if the student enjoys cycling, many times they upgrade from an entry-level bicycle to a better built, more durable bicycle. Clearly, it made sense to try and match up homeless bikes with interested students.

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After the summer 2014 abandoned bicycle collections, the department held back 130 bicycles in its tow yard. Texas Tech’s Office of Risk Management asked that the bicycles sell in as-is condition to limit any liability from repairs made by TPS, so those in poor shape or needing major repairs were passed to surplus instead of sales. Those that needed simple fixes, such as derailed chains or flat tires, went up for sale. Programmers set up bicycle sales in NuPark, which offered an online payment option and pulled from not only the bicycle tow listing but also campus parking accounts. This also limited the sales to the target audience: Texas Tech students and employees. TPS prominently placed waivers throughout the sale pages—including each bicycle’s purchase page—disclaiming any warranties. Each bicycle listing featured a photo of the bicycle taken at collection, the make, and the wheel size. The department priced the bicycles at an egalitarian $40 across the board, and each came with a new U-lock, one of the most theft-proof types of bicycle locks on the market. The sales were not intended to serve as a money-making venture, so the $40 covered the cost of the U-lock and a small portion of labor costs. Throughout the summer, those staffing the information and purchasing tables at new-student orientations shared details about the upcoming sale with incoming students and their families through conversations and informational postcards. Roughly two weeks before the sale date, TPS began marketing the sale through Twitter, TechAnnounce (the daily campus-wide email messaging system), and the Texas Tech Parent and Family Relations eNewsletter—all free resources. Word spread quickly throughout campus.


Owners of newly-purchased bikes fill out registration stickers at time of sale.

Sale Logistics Programmers set the NuPark Campus bicycle sales page to become visible at midnight on Monday, Aug. 18, 2014— the first business day following residence hall move-in. Students and employees had three ways to purchase bicycles: online through their parking accounts, in-person at the TPS office, or at a bike sale outpost. The outpost consisted of about a dozen bicycles in the sale stationed in the plaza between the student union building and library—the area of campus with the greatest amount of foot traffic. It also provided a chance for department visibility and interaction. When a bicycle sold, the purchaser had 10 days to pick up the bicycle from TPS. Buyers presented a form of identification (driver’s license or Texas Tech identification card) to a frontline staff member in the permit office, and the staff member registered the bicycle to the purchaser and took payment if the bicycle was not purchased online with a credit card. A TPS staff member then escorted the purchaser to the tow yard, pulled the appropriate bicycle with the rack assignment provided in NuPark Campus, and gave the bicycle and the U-lock to the purchaser. If the purchaser failed to pick up the bicycle within 10 days of purchase, the purchaser forfeited the $40 payment and any rights to the bicycle. The bicycle then returned to the sale.

Success TPS knew the bicycle sale would go over well with Red Raiders. Employees in all areas of the department heard of students and employees in search of affordable bicycles, and a number had unsuccessful attempts at purchasing one at the surplus auctions. But TPS didn’t know just how popular the sale would be. By the time employees reported at 8 a.m. that Monday, more than half the allotment of 130 bicycles sold. By the parking.org/tpp

end of the workday, only about 20 remained. By the end of the night, the entire lot was gone. All 130 bicycles sold within 24 hours of being put online. Students who needed bicycles got them at a reduced rate. With the U-lock, TPS gave purchasers the ability to prevent bicycle thefts on campus. Because bicycle registration occurred when the bicycles were picked up, registration numbers grew, and crews could identify more bicycle owners throughout the year and during 2015 abandoned collections. When a purchaser picked up a bicycle, TPS employees shared information at Bike Tech, the on-campus bicycle shop housed in the Student Recreation Center’s Outdoor Pursuits Center. Bike Tech provides a shop where Texas Tech students and employees use bicycle repair tools free of charge or, for a minimal amount and the cost of parts, have bicycle mechanics fix problem areas. Most importantly, the new system introduced more students and employees to cycling. The sales got bicycles back into the hands of those who needed or wanted them at a low cost. Employees who never biked to work purchased bicycles to try the commute. In one case, an employee who had no success buying a bicycle through the surplus auctions after multiple tries bought a bicycle so she and her husband could finally bike together. Many bicycles went to incoming students just starting college life, and others went to returning students who wanted to give bicycling a shot for the first time. Because the 2014 sale sold out so quickly, the department doubled the amount of bicycles offered for sale in 2015 and split them into two sales: Monday, Aug. 17, the first workday after students moved into residence halls, and Monday, Aug. 24, the first day of class. The first sale sold out in six hours and the second in 12 hours. A total of 342 bicycles sold in 2015. Even with increased offerings, the demand continues to rise.

CRAIG COTTON is unit supervisor of Texas Tech University Parking Services. He can be reached at craig.cotton@ttu.edu.

STACY STOCKARD is senior editor of Texas Tech University Parking Services. She can be reached at stacy.moncibaiz@ ttu.edu.

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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CAUSDEY ST

Houston unveils permanent art parking meters to a happy community.

D

ESPITE BEING ONE OF THE LARGEST

and fastest-growing cities in the nation, there’s one thing the City of Houston can’t get enough of: free parking. In Houston’s Warehouse District, streets fill rapidly with the vehicles of employees and university students, leaving area residents and business owners searching for spots. The situation became so overwhelming that in 2013, the community reached out to the city and requested parking meters (believe it or not). The Warehouse District, located on the northeast side of downtown Houston, is an eclectic mix of residential lofts, artist studios, industrial companies, and fine dining. The city’s parking management division wanted a solution that not only solved the parking problem but also embraced the culture of the neighborhood. Thus, the Art Parking Meter program was born, and on Oct. 22, 2013, Mayor Annise Parker unveiled what we believe to be the nation’s first permanent art parking meters, right there in the Warehouse District. “The Warehouse District has a one-of-a-kind atmosphere, and we wanted one-of-a-kind meters to reflect that feeling,” says Maria Irshad, assistant director of parking management. “Our goal was to reduce serious street overcrowding with a solution that adds a fun and unique twist to traditional parking meters. The art parking meters are an example of how residents from across the city are working together to make Houston shine. Thanks to the amazing talent of four local artists, the meters will leave a memorable impression on visitors and Houstonians alike.”

Artsy 42

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Gumball Machine art meter sculpture combines organic and industrial objects to create unexpected artifacts.

y PARKING By Melonie Curry

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Artist Troy Stanley was commissioned for the art meter project on Houston’s Washington Avenue and designed his pieces to draw attention to the meters.

Kicking Off The first step in launching the program was figuring out how to make parking meters beautiful. That meant finding the right people for the job. Artists for the project were strategically chosen through a selection process by a panel of representatives from the city and the Houston Arts Alliance, a nonprofit agency established by the city to enhance the quality of life and tourism by advancing the arts in the Houston region. The Houston Arts Alliance invests and nurtures Houston’s thriving creative community by providing more than 225 grants to nonprofit arts organizations and individual artists each year, commissioning the work of artists for public spaces, managing the city’s art collection, and showcasing Houston’s rich folk-life traditions. Applicants were asked to propose a creative idea for a parking sculpture that was durable, functional, and could withstand time, weather, and high-volume traffic. 

The Art The four artists chosen to art-up the city’s parking meters represent the diversity and talent Houston’s art commu-

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nity has to offer. Ketria Scott, designer of the Gumball Machine art meter sculpture, described her work as a combination of “organic and industrial objects to create unexpected artifacts, suggesting a story or an artifact of unexplainable occurrence or transformation. My hope is that the piece holds the viewer’s attention for a moment and gives him or her pause to wonder and create his or her own story of how it came to be and what it means. Basically, it’s a starting point for the viewer’s story.” “The auto industry that changed America continues to play a major role in Houston’s energy economics today,” says sculptor Devon Christopher Moore, whose fabricated sculpture combines the head and base of a parking meter with an assemblage of vintage auto parts. Artist David Medina’s Found Art meter sculpture captured many different discarded items found in the district. Medina, a faculty member at the prestigious Glassell School of Art, works in a variety of media. He decided to cast the items in bronze and attach them to a traditional meter. Anthony Thompson Shumate contributed three very unique pieces to the project, The Wind Blown Meters,


Wind-Blown Meters appear to be suspended in mid-air, defying gravity.

which appear to be suspended in mid-air and to defy gravity on a daily basis.

Spreading the Joy Before the meters were installed, unmanaged curb space resulted in a parking free-for-all, with increased traffic from drivers circling the area, frustrated residents unable to park by their homes, and hindered economic development. By collaborating with the community, the program reduced parking stress and encouraged curbside turnover. The artistic component enhanced the area’s curb appeal and added to the unique atmosphere, which makes the Warehouse District a destination for visitors and resident Houstonians. The warm welcome received for the first Art Meter Project created the opportunity for a second project along Houston’s Washington Avenue Corridor. Established in 2012 as Houston’s first Parking Benefit District (a defined geographic area in which a portion of meter revenue is returned to the district to finance improvements that enhance the quality of life and promote walking, biking, and public transportation use), the Washington Avenue Corridor was a growing nightlife destination in desperate need of a parking management strategy. Houston’s Parking Management Division faced a different challenge on Washington Avenue: convincing people to pay at the meter. Meters were new to the area, and people did not know where or how to use them. At the start, curbside parkers didn’t feed the meters and racked up serious citations. It was clear that customers were not aware that the meters were in effect until 2 a.m. The second art meter project was designed to draw attention to and better illuminate the meters for the parking public. Troy Stanley, a sculpture and mixed media artist and a resident of the Washington Corridor, was commissioned for the new art meter project. As a resident, Stanley had a special insight into the culture of the neighborhood and created pieces to reflect the area’s parking.org/tpp

Sculptor Devon Christopher Moore fabricated a piece using a head and base of a parking meter with vintage auto parts. spirit. The series, Urban-Over-Growth, utilizes lighting to decoratively enhance meters that are primarily used at night. A light fixture inside the sculptures, aided by mirror vinyl wrap, illuminates a cut-steel floral design that is projected onto the surfaces surrounding the meters. Each Urban-Over-Growth meter is unique and represents Houston’s typical three-season weather: Urban-Over-Growth-Spring, Urban-Over-GrowthSummer, and Urban-Over-Growth-Fall.

Feedback and Results “Houston’s Parking Management has been a great partner,” says Jonathon Glus, president and CEO of the Houston Arts Alliance, which seeks opportunities to engage local artists and fabricators in creative place-making across the city. “The six 2013 meters were the first parking meter project in the nation to employ sculptural elements to design; the 2014 meters are the first to accommodate an electric design. The Art Parking Meters exemplify two important elements in public art: permanence and distinction.” Houston’s Art Parking Meter program provides a solution that adds a fun and creative twist to traditional parking meters. The meters reflect the uniqueness of each district, maintain full functionality, and help the city more effectively manage curbside parking. The City of Houston looks forward to future opportunities to collaborate with artists and the community to highlight the cultural nuances of Houston through better parking management.

MELONIE CURRY, MBA, is a staff analyst for the City of Houston Parking Management Division. She can be reached at melonie. curry@houstontx.gov.

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

45


IPI IN ACTION PROGRAM

IPI’S NEW SAFETY INITIATIVE: SUICIDE IN PARKING GARAGES By Helen Sullivan, APR, Fellow PRSA

A

t a gathering of parking professionals discussing sensitive industry issues, IPI Executive Director Shawn Conrad, CAE, asked attendees for a show of hands. “How many of you have had to deal with a suicide or a suicide attempt at one or more of your parking facilities?” he asked. When three-quarters of the audience raised their hands, it provided more than enough confirmation that this difficult issue demands industry-wide attention. Under the oversight of IPI’s Parking Safety Matters program and with the involvement of IPI’s Safety and Security Committee, a new initiative will focus on member education and prevention. It will be spearheaded by Larry Cohen, CAPP, whose article “Saving Lives” appeared in the August 2015 issue of The Parking Professional. You may recall that, as executive director of the Lancaster, Pa., Parking Authority, Cohen was compelled to address the issue at his facilities following five suicides from the roof deck of the city’s Prince Street garage during a two-year period. Tragically, just a few days after his article appeared, another man fell or jumped to his death from a hospital garage in the city. There is no question that having one of your facilities be the venue for ending someone’s own life is not the kind of attention members would ever want. Before we embark on an action plan to prevent this problem, it helps to gain insight into the mindset of a person contemplating suicide and realize what makes parking garages particularly vulnerable.

Why Do Suicidal People Choose Parking Facilities?

HELEN SULLIVAN, APR, Fellow PRSA, is IPI’s communications counsel. She can be reached at sullivan@ parking.org.

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According to recent statistics, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death for Americans; in fact, every 12.8 minutes, someone dies by suicide. Thousands of these happen by jumping, and more than one-third typically occur at a parking garage, highway, or train station. Although we have no specific figures on suicide in parking facilities, our industry’s open-air, multiple-story structures can be highly visible and, as in the case of Lancaster’s Prince Street Garage, even iconic, making them a beacon for troubled people contemplating suicide. Here are some of the reasons: ●●  High likelihood of death. In “Suicide and the Parking Garage” in the September 2010 issue of The Parking Professional, Isaiah Mouw, CAPP, and Andy Troth, CAPP, noted that people who jump from a significant

INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

height are fairly assured they will die. Convenience. Garages have open sides for ventilation, usually allowing customers to enter without security checks, and they may have fewer people walking around. ●●  Underlying mental illness. Hospital and college campus parking facilities are a common target for suicide by jumping. According to the National Violent Death Reporting System, nearly 60 percent of these victims had a current mental health problem, and 53 percent were previously treated for such a condition. Furthermore, suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students. The American Psychological Association has found that more than half of U.S. college students have considered suicide at some point (compared to 15.3 percent of other demographic populations).

●●  

A Partner in Prevention Fortunately, suicide can often be prevented through education. Among the goals of our new initiative will be helping members tackle the issue both reactively and proactively. These measures range from advance preparation and staff training to instituting a variety of deterrents and prevention measures, such as signage, fencing, and landscaping. As Cohen, Mouw, and Troth pointed out in their articles, the costs should be weighed against their effectiveness, and we will be presenting information on each so you can make informed decisions. We also will give members the tools to effectively deal with the press in the unfortunate event that an incident does occur to avoid the media sensationalism that can foster a contagion of suicides. In the meantime, I hope you will share information, resources, statistics, or lessons learned from dealing with suicide or attempted suicide. Your experiences and collective knowledge will be invaluable for IPI as we embark on this important campaign. Write to me at the email address to the left.


STATE & REGIONAL SPOTLIGHT CALIFORNIA PUBLIC PARKING ASSOCIATION

CPPA PREPARES FOR THE FUTURE By Marlene Cramer, CAPP

T

he California Public Parking Association (CPPA) has served public parking agencies throughout California for the past 32 years. The organization, like many other state/regional associations, was built on friendship and a desire for agencies to network and improve the industry.

The mission of CPPA continues to be to promote excellence in the parking industry, foster networking and information exchange, and provide a forum to discuss parking advancements and create and sponsor professional training. CPPA is a proud to be an official allied state and regional association with IPI. Working with IPI gives CPPA many opportunities to advance the profession and extend the mission of the industry that Parking Matters®. It is our intent as an organization to continue our partnership with IPI to help us advance the parking profession in California.

California Legislation The following are California bills that were recently signed into law that affect parking programs throughout the state:

AB 1151 (Payment Plans for Parking Penalties): Modifies section 40204 of the vehicle code to allow a city to offer a citation payment plan at any stage in the process, not just after the hearing officer makes a determination that there is a violation (as set forth in CVC 40215(c)(7)). This is a permissive statute, and cities are not required to offer a payment plan to customers. The CPPA supported this bill. ●●  AB 1015 (Car Share Vehicles): Will authorize a local authority to, by ordinance or resolution, designate certain streets or portions of streets for the nonexclusive parking privilege of motor vehicles participating in a car share vehicle program or ridesharing program. ●●  AB 198 (Vehicles: Tow Truck Assistance): Will authorize a driver of a tow truck who is either operating under an agreement with the law enforcement agency responsible for investigating traffic collisions on the roadway or summoned by the owner or operator of a vehicle involved in a collision or that is otherwise disabled on the roadway to utilize the center median or right shoulder of a roadway in the event of an emergency occurring on a roadway that requires the rapid removal of impediments to traffic or rendering of assistance to a disabled vehicle obstructing a roadway if specific conditions are met. Will other states follow California’s lead? ●●  

2015 Conference The 32nd Annual CPPA conference will be held at the Oakland Marriott City Center, Nov. 4–6, 2015. The conference program features new information, multiple training opportunities, and face-to-face time to meet with vendors and colleagues to share ideas and find solutions to daily issues. This year’s conference theme, “To Park or Not to Park: Striking a Balance,” reflects the dynamics our attendees face. The conference will include sessions relating to these challenges and others, such as frontline training, as well as a wide range of networking opportunities and motivational sessions.

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015


Cities, universities, health care facilities, and transportation agencies face a more complex landscape than ever before. While striving to provide outstanding customer service through services such as parking, they not only face more budgetary challenges but also increasing pressure to implement sustainable best practices and operational efficiencies. We will kick off the conference this year by empowering attendees to take on today’s parking challenges with keynote speaker Stuart K. Robinson’s “Pave Your Way to Success with New Rules of Thinking.” You won’t want to miss the opportunity to see this inspiring and entertaining motivational speaker. Our tradeshow is one of the largest state/regional shows in the country. We will have more than 60 vendor representatives exhibiting at our conference. We hope you can join us.

2016. This hotel property is conveniently within walking distance of Disneyland. For more information on CPPA, visit cppaparking. org. 

Save the Date Our 2016 conference will be held in beautiful Southern California at the Hyatt Regency Garden Grove, Nov. 2–4,

2015 CPPA Board of Directors and Chairs Ron Profeta, City of Riverside Charles Kindred II, UC San Diego ●●  PAST PRESIDENT: Wayne Dalton, City of Monterey ●●  TREASURER: Mario Inga, CPFM ●●  SECRETARY: Mike King, City of Sacramento ●●  DIRECTOR AT LARGE, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA: Carmen Gachupin, CSU, Los Angeles ●●  DIRECTOR AT LARGE, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA: Tony Lucas, Sacramento State University ●●  VENDOR REPRESENTATIVE: Kirk Strassman, Xerox Corporation ●●  CONSULTANT REPRESENTATIVE: Julie Dixon, Dixon Resources Unlimited

Bill Hurrell, CDM Smith

●●  PRESIDENT:

●●  ADVISORY COMMITTEE CHAIR:

●●  VICE PRESIDENT:

●●  LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE CHAIR:

parking.org/tpp

Julie Rosenberg, San

Francisco MTA Debra Picou, San Diego Community College District

●●  MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE CHAIR:

●●  PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CHAIR:

Marlene Cramer, CAPP,

Cal Poly University, SLO ●●  NEWSLETTER EDITOR: ●●  TECHNOLOGY CHAIR:

Matt Farrell, Retired Mary Houghton, T2 Systems

Michelle Wendler, Watry Design and Marlene Cramer, CAPP, Cal Poly University, SLO

●●  CONFERENCE COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS:

MARLENE CRAMER, CAPP, is assistant director, university police business services, for Cal Poly State University. She can be reached at mcramer@calpoly.edu.

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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COMMUNITY DIGEST

Liliana Rambo, CAPP, Named President of Winpark and an Influential Woman of Houston Liliana Rambo, CAPP, immediate past chair of the International Parking Institute, was named president of Winpark Management, LLC. “We are thrilled to welcome Liliana Rambo to the Winpark family,” says Propark CEO John Schmid. Propark is the parent company of Winpark. “Liliana’s vast experience in the parking industry will enhance every aspect of our first-class operations.” Earlier in the month, Rambo was named one of Houston’s Top 30 Influential Women by d-mars.com Business Journal, which listed tenacity, discipline, and diligence as a few criteria for the award. Honorees are

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

determined to have broken barriers in their fields and left an indelible mark on Houston. Rambo and her fellow honorees were recognized at a gala celebration in late August. Before joining Winpark, Rambo was parking director for the Houston Airport System, where she held responsibility for more than 35,000 parking spaces and achieving annual revenue of more than $100 million. Previously, she was parking management director for the City of Houston, and before that, she led parking operations in the City of Hollywood, Fla., and off-street parking operations for the Miami Parking Authority.


SECURITY INTERCOMS

Variety of Products. Unlimited Solutions.

For over 60 years, Aiphone has solidified its position as one of the most esteemed providers of communication and intercom systems around the world. In addition to being known for their innovative and quality products, Aiphone provides some of the best customer support in the industry. With representatives across North America, online QuikSpec assistance, and Technical Sales Support, Aiphone can answer any question from “What is the best system for my application?” to “Did I wire my system correctly?”

Aiphone Solutions include: • Emergency Towers to provide security for exterior spaces • Built-in HID® stations for use with card reader systems • Remote mobility for centralizing security services • Visitor identification to protect entrances • Internal communication to quickly reach other locations

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Too close for comfort?

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In the close confines of parking structures where space is at a premium and structural columns limit lines of site, collisions are a reality. Park Sentry® cushions the impact of collision damage; wrapping columns in a highly visible, energy absorbing material that withstands repeated impact and buffering vehicles and columns from costly dings, dents and scratches. Made of high-tech material, modular design; customizable to fit any size column or wall.

For additional information contact

Sentry Protection Products 1.216.228.3200 info@sentrypro.com www.sentrypro.com www.parksentry.com

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

Dorothy Harris Promoted to Senior Vice President Denver International Airport recently announced the promotion of Dorothy Harris to senior vice president of parking and transportation. In her new role, Harris will be responsible for parking, lost and found, ground transportation, and transportation services for both the public and employees. Harris began her parking and transportation career at Stapleton more than 25 years ago. She is a past chair of IPI and has been a member of IPI’s Board of Directors and Board of Advisors. She was honored with IPI’s Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2015 IPI Conference & Expo in Las Vegas. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Virginia State University.

INRIX ANNOUNCES ACQUISITION OF PARKME

INRIX®, Inc., announced it has completed the acquisition of ParkMe, a Santa Monica, Calif., company that helps consumers find parking and make reservations and mobile payments. In expanding the company’s data aggregation and industry expertise, the acquisition helps INRIX more rapidly deliver a comprehensive set of parking services, including finding, comparing, reserving, and paying for parking from a smartphone or vehicle. With these expanded capabilities, the acquisition expands the breadth and depth of the parking services it offers to Audi, BMW, and Lexus, among others. “For 10 years, INRIX has been focused on analyzing and facilitating the movement of vehicles around the world, and that includes avoiding congestion during a trip and at the driver’s destination. Over time, we’ve expanded our service to include real-time fuel price information, EV charging, even parking,” said Bryan Mistele, president and CEO of INRIX. “Today, ParkMe and INRIX become one company. Fueled by a talented staff and an unrivaled set of breakthrough technologies, together we provide customers with the best source of driving intelligence in all its forms—traffic, fuel, EV, inter-modal navigation, and parking worldwide. “Our mission has always been to make parking easier, faster, and less expensive for consumers,” said Sam Friedman, co-founder and CEO of ParkMe. “By joining INRIX, we can achieve that vision faster than we could have on our own.” ParkMe Co-Founder and COO Alex Israel added, “We are excited that becoming part of INRIX gives us the opportunity to work with some of the world’s leading automotive companies as we provide our services to millions of users around the world.”


COMMUNITY DIGEST

LUXE ANNOUNCES FIRST DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS The on-demand valet parking service app Luxe recently announced that Stephen Rocco Rodi has joined the firm from Edelman as its first director of communications. Rodi will oversee the management and execution of all communications functions, including PR, brand, social media, and email marketing. He will report to Ro Choy, Luxe’s chief business officer, and be based in Luxe’s San Francisco headquarters. Prior to joining Luxe, Rodi was an executive vice president at Edelman, where he held various roles, including global client

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lead for the Walt Disney Company, deputy global client relationship manager for eBay, Inc., and global client lead for Belkin International, where he was responsible for strategic counsel and overseeing cross-­functional communications programming. During his tenure at Edelman, Rodi also held the position of head of the Bay Area consumer technology practice and chief of staff for Edelman’s U.S. Western Region, where he led operations, business development, and integration of Edelman’s offerings for clients.

Humber River Hospital Selects Park Assist Humber River Hospital,Toronto, Canada, selected Park Assist to install its M4 Parking Guidance System to enable parkers to find parking spaces effortlessly and without stress. The M4 uses a camera-based sensor system to guide drivers to open parking spaces, as well as help them find their cars upon leaving the hospital. In partnership with Precise ParkLink, the Park Assist M4 system will bring unique benefits to the hospital. Patients and visitors will be able to find open parking spaces faster and will be able to easily locate their vehicle when leaving using Park Assist’s Park Finder feature. Park Finder uses a mobile app to direct patients/visitors/staff to their vehicles by license plate recognition (LPR). In addition, Park Assist’s Park Alerts software feature uses LPR technology built into the M4 sensor to enable the hospital to set automated parking rules and alerts. Park Alerts allows the hospital to track vehicles both entering and leaving to enhance overall security, as well as enforcement of garage policies. “Our technology will give Humber River Hospital and its visitors a comforting, stress-free parking experience with faster parking, enhanced customer experience through guidance and Find Your Car, and added operational efficiency,” says Gary Neff, CEO of Park Assist. “We are delighted to make the process of finding a parking space easy, especially for those hospital patients and visitors who typically have weightier, more consuming issues on their minds.”


MAKE MAKE YOUR YOUR MARK. MARK.

YPIP Hot Spot Event Kick Off

The coolest group in parking. Find out more. facebook.com/groups/YoungProfessionalsinParking/


TAKE THE PATH TO EXCELLENCE GET CERTIFIED.

NEW CAPP Certification Program

CANDIDATE HANDBOOK Presented by the CAPP Certification Board of the International Parking Institute

[

ORGANIZATIONS

][

FACILITIES

][

1330 Braddock Place, Suite 350, Alexandria, VA 22314 571.699.3011 Phone | 703.566.2267 Fax capp@parking.org | www.parking.org/capp

PROFESSIONALS

]

Now Parking Organizations Can Become Accredited Too. IPI is launching a new program to enable parking organizations that meet rigorous standards to become Accredited Parking Organizations (APO). Accredited Parking Organizations demonstrate excellence in parking management and operations, customer service, professional development, safety, and security. Download the Accreditation Guidelines to review criteria and learn how to apply at parking.org/APO.


APT PROVIDES PARKING SYSTEM AT LARGE SHOPPING CENTER

APT Skidata will deliver a fully integrated parking solution to the £260 million Bradford Broadway shopping center development—the U.K.’s largest retail center—to be opened in 2015. Currently in its final construction phase, the shopping center, situated in the heart of Bradford’s retail district, is part of a wider urban regeneration project in Bradford, “Connecting the City,” and is due to open in early November. Won through a competitive tender, APT Skidata will install systems throughout the shopping center, contributing toward an estimated 78 percent increase in Bradford’s total annual retail spending. Major retailers, including Next, Marks and Spencer, and Debenhams, will open stores at Bradford Broadway, forming a part of more than 70 retail stores and leisure facilities at the 570,000-square-foot site. With two entry and three exit lanes to control parking for up to 1,300 cars, APT Skidata is installing its latest and proven Barrier.Gate access control system working in conjunction with Power.Gate, its multi-tasking parking control column that features bright, touchscreen graphics display technology to provide hassle-free access. In addition, APT Skidata will install a variable message sign guidance system on each level or zone of the car park, providing customers with an exact figure of available spaces within each specific area. It is also parking.org/tpp

installing 14 Easy.Cash payment machines that allow for all coin, cash, and card payments to give customers every payment option. As well as the parking technology, the company is also providing high-security

blockers to the service yard. The blockers can be bolted to, part-recessed in, or fully recessed in the road surface, protecting the shopping center from any vehicle-based attack and providing essential security for customers, employees, and assets.

GAS DETECTION

Gas Detection Ventilation and Control

Building owners and facility managers want to provide safe and effective parking garages while minimizing the energy costs associated with HVAC. Macurco Gas Detection helps engineers, integrators and installers to provide suitable gas detection and control systems for enclosed parking garages.

Detection products for Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2), Natural Gas, Propane and other Toxic & Combustible Gases

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Manufactured by Aerionics, Inc. Phone: 1-877-367-7891 Email: info@aerionicsinc.com Website: www.macurco.com OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

57


NEW AND RENEWING IPI MEMBERS

ACADEMIC University of Kentucky Parking & Transportation Services Lance Broeking California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Marlene Cramer, CAPP University of South Florida Raymond Mensah Grant MacEwan University James MacDonald University of Texas, Arlington Perry Eggleston, CAPP Austin State University Marc Cossich Missouri State University Earl Wall Indiana University Amanda Turnipseed

University of Colorado, Boulder Tom McGann

AIRPORT Houston Airport System, City of Houston Liliana Rambo, CAPP Greater Toronto Airports Authority Carlo Cordi

COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS InterPark Incorporated J. Marshall Peck Pare De Occidente Alberto Corvera Valet Park of America Ted Chagnon SafePark Estacionamentos Andre Piccoli Colonial Parking, Inc. Parking Service Group Leavelle A. Carter EasyPark Vancouver Nigel Bullers

CONSULTANT Dakota S.A. Marcelo Violante Engaging Solutions William Brown Jelas Puri Sdn Bhd Abd Rahman Mansor

CORPORATE The Terrapark Group Donald Palef Travelers Company Anne Hayes Sundance Square Management L.P. Barry Lohr One Parking Kirsten Dolan Importanne Group Dennis Zovko

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015


PUBLIC City of Edmonton Bohdan Maslo City of Coral Gables Kevin Kinney City & County of Denver Parking Management Camille Lomenzo City of Las Vegas Brandy Stanley Los Angeles County Metro Transportation Authority Frank Ching Massachusetts Convention Center Authority Jong Wai Tommee City of Tampa Department of Public Works Tina Scardina

City Of Tucson, Park Tucson Donovan Durband

Impark Allan Copping

Borough of West Chester Pam Grossman

GoParkit Technologies Limited Gearoid Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Riain

City of Wilmington Betty Gurganus

Q-saq, Inc. Stefan Tea

SUPPLIER

Richard N. Best Associates, Inc. Jeffrey Best

Banner Engineering Kurt Radmacher

Toledo Ticket Company Roy Carter

CarPark Joseph Gharib

Weldon, Williams & Lick, Inc. Tom Knight

Cardinal Tracking, Inc. Troy Swift

United Public Safety Joan Young

CivicSmart, Inc. Josh Callies EMX Industries Inc. Robert Hausch

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| 855.526.6847

OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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PARKING CONSULTANTS

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OCTOBER 2015 | INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE

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ADVERTISERS INDEX

Aims (EDC Corporation). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 aimsparking.com | 800.886.6316

Macurco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 macurco.com | 877.367.7891

Aiphone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 aiphone.com | 800.692.0200

Parkeon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 parkeon.com | 856.234.8000

Ameristar Booth & Building Structures. . . . . . . . . . . 59 ameristarbooths.com | 855.526.6847

Parking Soft. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 parkingsoft.com | 877.884.7275

Carl Walker, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 carlwalker.com | 800.FYI.PARK

POM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 pom.com | 479.968.2880

CHANCE Management Advisors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 chancemanagement.com | 215.564.6464

Rich & Associates, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 richassoc.com | 248.353.5080

DESMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 desman.com | 877.337.6260

Rydin Decal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 rydin.com | 800.448.1991

Duncan Solutions, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C2 duncansolutions.com | 888.99.DUNCAN

Sentry Protection Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 sentrypro.com | 888.265.8660

FAAC International, Inc. (Formerly Magnetic Automation Corp.). . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 faacusa.com | 321.252.4840

Southland Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 southlandprinting.com | 800.241.8662

Global Parking Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 globalparkingsolutions.com | 215.399.1475 Hรถrmann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 hormann-flexon.com | 800.365.3667 Horoad Electronic Technology Development Co., Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 horoad.com | 0086 755 83209520 IntegraPark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C3 Integrapark.com | 888.852.9993 IPS Group Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ipsgroupinc.com | 858.404.0607 Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 kimley-horn.com/parking | 919.677.2090

PARKING BREAK

JIM BASS is landside operations manager at the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport, Little Rock, Ark. He can be reached at jbass@fly-lit.com or 501.537.7354.

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

Tannery Creek Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 autochalk.com | 905.738.1406 TIBA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 www.tibaparking.com | 720.477.6073 Timothy Haahs & Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 timhaahs.com | 484.342.0200 Toledo Ticket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C4 toledoticket.com | 800.533.6620 Walker Parking Consultants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 walkerparking.com | 800.860.1579 WALTER P MOORE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 walterpmoore.com | 800.364.7300


Here’s Your Parking Webinar Planner (IPI Members: Register for six or more and save)

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Parking Construction: New Technology, Innovation, Practices and Delivery Presenter: Patrick Wells, DESMAN Associates

November 18 Innovation in Municipal Operations-Government at Its Best Presenter: Roamy Valera, CAPP; Art Noriega, Miami Parking Authority; David G. Onorato, MBA, CAPP, Pittsburgh Parking Authority; and Sean Mackin, Denver Public Works

December 9 Sustainability in Parking Presenters: Brian Shaw, CAPP, Stanford University; J.C. Porter, CAPP Arizona State University; and Jeff Petry, EPark Eugene, Ore.

IP PI Membe rs: $35 per w ebinar NEW: Only $30 per w ebinar when you register f or six or more! Non-mem bers $50 per w ebinar w Listen live or viiieew s at archived webinar e. your convenienc resented Live webinars p 2-3 p.m. on Wednesdays, one Eastern T ime Z Each webinar = 1

CAPP Point*

nts minimum requireme dential application *toward CAPP cre

Register now at parking.org/webinars

Webinars: Online, On Demand, On Your Schedule Access archived webinars anytime at parking.org., including: i Best Practices and Challenges in Public/Private Partnerships for Parking and Smart Growth Development i Big Data: What You Need to Know i Developing a Strategic Plan for Your Parking Operation i EVs and DOE’s Workplace Charging Challenge i Get Certified – What You Need to Know to about the Green Garage Standard i How to Implement Organizational Change & Manage Performance Improvement i Payment Systems: Countdown to EMV Chip Technology Rollout i Strategies to Recover Outstanding Debt i TDM Case Study: Seattle Children’s Hospital Airport Parking: Repair and Maintenance While Structures are in Use


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Highlighted are IPI and IPI Allied State and Regional Association Events

October 7–8

November 4–6

IPI International Parking Conference Santiago, Chile parking.org

California Public Parking Association Annual Conference & Trade Show Oakland, Calif. cppaparking.org

October 8 Dutch Parking Congress Amsterdam, Netherlands vexpan.nl

October 13 Mid-Atlantic Parking Association Fall Golf Outing Windsor Mill, Md. midatlanticparkingassociation.org

October 14 Mid Atlantic Parking Association Fall Annual Conference Baltimore, Md. midatlanticparkingassociation.org

October 14–16

Expo Parking Sao Paulo, Brazil expo-parking.com

November 18 IPI Webinar Innovation in Municipal Operations— Government at Its Best parking.org/webinars

December 2–5 Florida Parking Association Annual Conference & Trade Show Amelia Island, Fla. flparking.org

New York State Parking Association Annual Conference & Exposition Buffalo, N.Y. nyspa.net

December 7–9

October 21

December 9

IPI Webinar Parking Construction: New Technology, Innovation, Practices, and Delivery parking.org/webinars

IPI Webinar Sustainability in Parking parking.org/webinars

October 22 Young Professionals in Parking Hot Spot Event Denver, Colo. parking.org/ypip

October 22–26 Canadian Parking Association Annual Conference & Trade Show Ottawa, Canada canadianparking.ca

October 27 Mid-South Transportation and Parking Association One Day: Green Garage Workshop and Facility Tours Bowling Green, Ky. mstpa.org

November 2–4 Parking Association of the Virginias Annual Fall Workshop & Tradeshow Virginia Beach, Va. pavonline.org

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INTERNATIONAL PARKING INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 2015

Gulf Traffic Dubai, U.A.E. gulftraffic.com

2016 January 20 Young Professionals in Parking Hot Spot Event Miami, Fla. parking.org/ypip

March 13–16 Mid-South Parking and Transportation Association Spring Conference Louisville, Ky. mspta.org

March 30–31 New England Parking Council Spring Conference Boston, Mass. newenglandparkingcouncil.org

April 11–14 Texas Parking & Transportation Association Conference and Tradeshow Texas A&M University texasparking.org


Take command of your parking empire – anytime, anywhere – with Rome. With the new cloud-based Rome application, you can review real-time data from multiple revenue control systems – anywhere you have an internet connection. Rome automatically feeds revenue data from the garage to your general ledger and provides 24x7 access to unmatched analysis and reporting capabilities. In other words, Rome makes your old way of working ancient history.

www.IntegraPark.com


YOUR TICKET TO IMPROVED SECURITY. Toledo Ticket’s hangtags and credentials, provide both you and your patrons with an enhanced sense of security. Not only are our solutions efficient, but we also offer built-in accountability to keep your business secure, too.

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OCTOBER 2015  The Parking Professional  ● THE ROAD TO PAID PARKING ● PARKING AIDS UNIVERSITY CONSOLIDATION ● THE RIGHT REPAIR APPROACH ● ABANDONED BICYCLES ● ART PARKING METERS ● YOUNG PROFESSIONALS IN PARKING

The Parking Professional October 2015  
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