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Figure 1: Percentage of U.S Adults Who Own a Cell Phone Versus a Smartphone 100 90 80

Cellphone

70 60

Smartphone

50

Factors and Considerations for On-Street Pay-by-Cell Phone Exclusivity

40 30 20 10 0

and others with small footprints and two- to three-story buildings such as Cheyenne, Pierre, and Helena. The results of the survey revealed that 7 of the 50 cities do not charge for on-street parking. Of the 43 cities that do charge for on-street parking, 33 offer on-street parking payment via cellular phone app. One city does not yet but is in the process of introducing the service. With this additional city, 79 percent of the capital cities that charge for on-street parking, offer payment by cellular phone.

2004

2006

2008

2010

2012

2014

2016

2018

SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER; SURVEYS CONDUCTED 2002-2019

Table 1: Percentage of U.S. Adults Who Own the Following Devices

Category

Any cellphone

Cellphone, but not Smartphone smartphone

Total

96%

81%

15%

Men

98%

84%

14%

Women

95%

79%

16%

Ages 18–29

99%

96%

4%

Ages 30–49

99%

92%

6%

Ages 50–64

95%

79%

17%

Ages 65+

91%

53%

39%

White

96%

82%

14%

Black

98%

80%

17%

Hispanic

96%

79%

17%

Less than high school graduate

92%

66%

25%

High school graduate

96%

72%

24%

Some college

96%

85%

11%

College graduate

98%

91%

7%

Less than $30,000

95%

71%

23%

$30,000–$49,000

96%

78%

18%

$50,000–$74,000

98%

90%

8%

100%

95%

5%

Urban

97%

83%

13%

Suburban

96%

83%

13%

Rural

95%

71%

24%

$75,000

SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER; SURVEY CONDUCTED JANUARY 8TH THROUGH FEBRUARY 7, 2019

The vast majority of Americans—96 percent—now own a cell phone of some kind. The share of Americans that own smartphones, a form of a cell phone, is now 81 percent, up from just 35 percent in Pew Research Center’s first 2011 survey of smartphone ownership. Along with mobile phones, U.S. citizens own a range of other information devices. For example, nearly three-quarters of U.S. adults now own desktop or laptop computers, while roughly half now own tablet computers and roughly half own e-reader devices.3 Mobile payments continue to trend in the U.S. smartphone market, as the penetration of smartphone payment services is projected to reach more than 30 percent of U.S. smartphone users.4 Smartphone ownership is immaterially lower for lower income groups and the 65+ age group. While the U.S. numbers continue to grow across age groups, persons of the 65+ age group are most likely not to have access to a smartphone.

Arguments for Pay-by-Cell Exclusively ■  Cost savings to city—no parking meters needed; no cash collec-

tions, no coin jams or malfunctioning meters, no meter maintenance or repairs, and no ongoing SaaS (Software as a Service) subscription services. ■  Staff may be repurposed for other essential city service needs. ■  More efficient cash controls with the removal of manual cash handling. ■  Enhanced public safety of motorist initiating their transaction in a secured and sheltered environment of their personal vehicle. ■  Reduced liability in the form of less coins collected and temporarily housed in on-street meters. ■  Motorist ease of adding time to their parking session while away from their parked vehicle. ■  Inability to piggyback on prepaid time when using single-space meters. ■  Eliminates motorist frustration with the requirement to carry coins to pay for parking. ■  Allows for the reservation of parking sessions in many paid parking environments. PARKING-MOBILITY.ORG / MAY 2021 / PARKING & MOBILITY 33

Profile for International Parking & Mobility Institute

Parking & Mobility, May 2021  

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