Issuu on Google+

PREP BASKETBALL | 22 On Dec. 10, Southwood won for the second time in a row while denying Northfield their second win of the season. Scoring in three of the four quarters was closely matched, but one lopsided stanza secured victory for the Lady Knights as they bested the Lady Norse 36-23. Check out the game summary in this week’s Sports Shorts.

Blue Ribbon Business - page 3 The Wabash County Chamber of Commerce recognized AgVenture/McKillip Seeds’ 75th anniversary by selecting them as December’s Business of the Month.

THE PAPER

of Wabash County Inc.

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010 Commissioners discuss ordinances and jail staff

by Danielle Smith Steve Downs, county attorney, presented drafts of ordinances addressing the accumulation of junk trash and debris and the regulation of weeds and vegetation to the Wabash County Commissioners at their Dec. 13 meeting. The ordinances require the commission to send notice to landowners identifying the steps they must take to correct the violation and possible penalties they may incur if the steps are not taken. Downs suggested that they incorporate a deadline into the ordinance to give the landowner a specific time to complete the cleanup. The deadline was set at 30 days, but left to the discretion of the enforcement officer, Mike Howard, or the planning commission. The planning commission will review the ordinances then they will be sent back to the commissioners for a final approval. Wabash County Sheriff ’s Department requested to reassign Cory Thomas, parttime jail officer, to fill the fulltime position that an individual resigned from last week. The motion was approved. The commissioners signed a letter to help finalize the Community Corrections grant application, to be sent to the Department of Corrections. Final approval of the grant is expected to take until February, at which time the commissioners will sign the grant.

In Memorium

Proudly Serving Wabash County Since 1977

AACTION grants for drug and alcohol programs total more than $20,000 by Danielle Smith Trisha Hanes, chairperson of Wabash County AACTION (Against Alcohol, Controlled substances and Tobacco In Our Neighborhoods), presented a summary of the 2011 grant allocation to the Wabash County Commissioners on Dec. 13. Wabash County AACTION is the local coordinating council for the Governor’s Commission for a Drug-Free Indiana. One of the functions of the organization is to allocate to local programs funds generated from a $200 drug interdiction fee imposed on those arrested for a drug or alcohol offense. “We’ve been lucky to have a low operating budget so we were able to allocate all of the money that has come in,” Hanes said. The total money available this year was $21,002.14, approximately $3,000 less than last year. Hanes explained this lesser amount by saying that the criminal field is still being affected by the struggling economy. The funds are divided between programs in three different categories: prevention and education, treatment and intervention, and justice. Prevention and Education programs The Access requested $3,200 for Access Reality, which employs the use of a daily afterschool program, teen church, weekend activities and home visits to educate youth on the reality of substance abuse. This program was approved for $1,825. Manchester College’s new Peer Education Program requested $1,250. This program brain-

storms and promotes weekly non-alcoholic events. They provide educational programs and messages to aid in binge drinking prevention. The program was approved for $750. Manchester College also requested $3,500 to bring a speaker through Campus Speak to the college for convocation. This speaker will provide information to students as they make decisions about alcohol while attending college. The community is invited to this event. The college was awarded $1,855 for the speaker. Manchester Jr./Sr. High School and Northfield Jr./Sr. High School each requested $1,500 for their After Prom party, which provides a safe environment for students to participate in fun activities while supervised rather than drinking. Each school was awarded $750. Southwood Jr./Sr. High School’s PEP (Peers Educating Peers) program requested $500. This program enlists students that have abstained from premarital sex and the use of drugs and alcohol to give presentations to other students. This program was approved for $1,000 of funding. Treatment and Intervention programs The Bowen Center of Wabash County requested $4,000 to fund substance abuse programs for low-income individuals. In 2010, a total of 20 clients were financially assisted by the AACTION grant. This program was awarded $2,000. Hands of Hope, a division of Family Service Society, Inc. requested and received $3,000 for Victim’s Advocacy Program, which provides

Wabash family celebrates Christmas season with grand display Watkins home features 50,000 lights set to 20 different songs.

James Bone, 81 Joseph Carpenter, 67 James Gottschalk, 74 Opal Harrell, 88 Dan McNear, 58 Gene Metzger, 79 Mary Rose, 86 Doris Scott, 85 Janet Turner, 74 Joanne Yates, 90

Index Classifieds............38-39 Community News..23-26,31 D & E ..................20-21 Sports Shorts ............22 Weekly Reports ....12-13 Vol. 33, No. 36

PO Box 603, Wabash, IN 46992 (260) 563-8326

support to victims of domestic violence. Manchester College requested $1,875 to help fund an on-line drug or alcohol course and treatment intervention that is required of all students found responsible for a drug or alcohol offense. The program was awarded $775. Wabash County Drug Court requested and received $3,000 to help defray the costs from chemical testing of participants. These costs can total upward of $500 for an offender, but are necessary to validate the person’s sobriety. Justice programs The North Manchester Police Department requested $800 to allow them to send two officers to the 2011 Indiana Drug Enforcement Association conference, which provides education and networking opportunities. A third officer will be sent using departmental funds. They were awarded $831.54. North Manchester Police Department also requested and received $1,419 for the purchase of a personal video system for each officer. This system will allow them to record traffic stops, searches, statements and interviews. The Wabash County Sheriff ’s Department requested and received $3,000 to fund various enforcement activities including increased patrols, quarterly drug searches at schools and efforts to discourage the sale of tobacco to youth. These grants totaled $20,955.54, and the remaining $46.60 will carry over to next year’s fund.

THE WATKINS FAMILY HOME, 458 Vermont St., features 50,000 lights on 160 computerized channels, all set to 20 different songs giving visitors a different show every day. The lights are on Sunday – Thursday, 5:30 – 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 5:30 – 11 p.m., and all night on Christmas Eve. (photo provided)

by Brent Swan What started as a simple holiday tradition of putting up a few Christmas lights each year has turned into something much more at the home of Nick and Bev Watkins, 458 Vermont St., Wabash. “We had 7500 lights last year,” Nick said. “I thought I had a pretty good display until I went online and searched for other displays and saw what some of those guys were doing.” It was then Nick realized he had to take his efforts to a whole different level. To achieve the look he wanted, Nick admitted that he started planning about for this year’s display almost a full year ago. The display, which he revealed to the public on Nov. 25, put roughly 50,000 Christmas lights into various forms of motion on 160 computerized channels. “The channels mean that 160 different elements can be controlled and either turned on or off at any point in a song,” Nick explained. “Although we don’t have 160 different windows or trees in our yard, almost every fixture has strands of different colors. So if we want to turn it all red or green, we can.” New features to this year’s display include 24 mini-trees, each containing 600 lights; four arches, each reaching five feet tall and 15 feet long and containing 800 lights; and the impressive 22 foot tall mega-tree. “The mega tree contains 9,600 lights, 25 strobe lights, and right at 200 LEDs in the star,” Nick explained. “We figured the mini trees took 48-50 man hours alone to construct.” The project was not without its own technical issues, however, as the massive amount of lights draw an equally impressive amount of power. (continued on page 5) “If every bulb is on, we’re pulling 223.65


2

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Issue resolved

Staff Knowledge

E-mail

Website

Phone

Data

Texting

100

Voice

0

Value

As Seen In The January 2011 Issue

Quote from article: Nice Listing:

“While the FCC is proposing that cell carriers alert consumers who are about to exceed their plans’ monthly minutes allotment, which could lead to significant overage charges, this company (U.S. Cellular) is already practicing due diligence and giving its customers a heads up.”

WIRELESS HIGHSPEED INTERNET

December 17-24, 2010* *See Store for Details

Extended Holiday Hours Open Sunday 12-5

We sell both DirecTV and Dish Network... Thinking about switching? Give us a call! (888)759-3006 600 N Cass St. Wabash, IN


3 AgVenture / McKillip Seeds Co. celebrates 75 years as a family business www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

BLUE RIBBON BUSINESS: AgVenture / McKillip Seeds Co. was recently honored as the Wabash County Chamber of Commerce’s December Blue Ribbon Business of the Month. The recognition coincides with the business celebrating 75 years of family operation. Pictured are (from left): Mike McKillip and Troy McKillip. (photo provided) The Chamber membership committee extends a Happy 75th Anniversary to

AgVenture / McKillip Seeds, the December Blue Ribbon Business of the Month.

In 1934, Alvin McKillip grew a 10acre seed plot for Indiana Farm

Bureau. That set the stage for the next year, when the first McKillip Seeds corn hybrids were sold. Today, they produce and market thousands of seed units including corn, soybean and wheat seeds, to farmers across northern Indiana, northwest Ohio and into southern Michigan. Alvin’s sons, Jim, Bob, Jack and Ken, joined the business by the 1960’s continuing to grow and develop the family-centered company. Today, the third and fourth generations are very much involved in daily operations. Nine family members are working partners in the business, plus additional members in the office and sales team. In 2006, McKillip Seeds joined AgVenture, Inc., the nation’s largest network of independently owned and operated Regional Seed Companies (RSCs), greater providing access to seed technologies and additional genetics that growers need to raise high yields in today’s production environments.

Mike McKillip emphasizes the importance of the rich 75-year family history by saying, “At AgVenture McKillip Seeds, we’ll continue to work hard and evolve for our family and for our customers.” Each year in late August or early September, the company holds a customer appreciation day. The public is invited to tour the facility, enjoy refreshments and participate in an education class on the growing of seed. Experts provide guidance for maximum returns for their customers. A g V e n t u r e McKillip Seeds has been a Wabash County Chamber of Commerce member since 1978 and was the 2002 Business of the Year. Contact the

McKillip family at 565 N 500 W, Wabash, by telephone at 260-5633833, by fax at 260-5634141 or at their website www.mckillipseeds.com. M e m b e r s h i p Committee members and Blue Ribbon Business Chairs, Stephanie Ogan and Michael Thompson, both of Ponderosa, honor a Chamber

member each month by randomly drawing a member’s name and completing a brief interview and picture to highlight one Chamber member business. We encourage you to take time to become more familiar with Chamber members and patronize our local businesses, keeping jobs and dollars in Wabash County.

SPECIALS OF THE WEEK FOR AUGUST 20TH-25TH Reg. $12.89

Lobster $ 89 Tails 7 oz. ............ ea. Pork $ 59 Riblets .................. lb.

9 1

Fresh Boneless Reg. $3.89/lb

Chicken $ Tenders ..............

269 lb.

IT’S TIME TO ORDER YOUR CHRISTMAS HAMS, PRIME RIB, FRESH OYSTERS AND STEAK GIFT BOXES STEAK GIFT BOXES " ' % $58.00 ' % $48.00 & " " ' % $54.00 $ " ' % $38.00 ' % $33.00 !! " PORK GIFT BOXES ! "

#" !!

! !

$13.99 $10.99 % $11.99

'

%

'

%

'

Purdue Master Gardener Program seeking members The Purdue Extension Office is still accepting applications for its Master Gardener Intern Class, which begins Jan. 4, 2011. Training will be held on Tuesday nights, 6 - 9 p.m., in Charley Creek Gardens’ Education and Resource Building, 551 N. Miami St., Wabash. Participants will be exposed to a wide range of subjects: herbaceous ornamentals, woody ornamentals, composting, home lawn care, soil and plant science, pesticide safety, home gardening, landscape management and fruit production. If you’d like an application to join our league of volunteers or have questions about the program, contact Curt Campbell, Wabash County Courthouse, 1 W. Hill St., at 260-563-0661 ext. 245 or cecampbe@purdue.edu. The application deadline has been extended to Dec. 17.

The Best Seat in the House Just Got Better!

SAVE UP TO

40% OFF

La-Z-Boy

“Rocker Recliner” YOUR CHOICE!

srp*

ONLY

$299

12 Months Interest Free on Qualifying Purchase

La-Z-Boy “Chaise” Rocker Recliners

La-Z-Boy

“Microfiber” Rocker Recliner

YOUR CHOICE!

89

$ $

ONLY

ONLY

$399

$419

La-Z-Boy Leather

Finesse Rocker Recliners From From

139

$ $

99

$ $

starting at

$599!

ONLY La-Z-Boy

Reclining Sofa

$699

279

$ $

ONLY

99

$

$1699 *Applies to La-Z-Boy Hot Buys. While supplies last.

Check out our 20%-50% Off Storewide Sale 3564 Commerce Drive, Warsaw • 269-2001 Mon. - Fri. 9:00-7:00; Sat. 9:00-4:00

HOURS: M&F 9:00-7:00 T-W-TH 9:00-5:30 SATURDAY 9:00-5:00

La-Z-Boy Full

Reclining Sectional

Price includes 2 reclining love seats and 1 corner wedge. Chaise lounge and additional armless seats available at similar savings.

1100 NORTH CASS ST. • STATE ROAD 15 • WABASH, INDIANA

260-563-1046 or Toll Free 866-563-1046

FREE DELIVERY To Wabash and Surrounding Areas


4

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Startup energy component maker to establish Marion facility Vela Gear Systems

LLC, a startup man-

ufacturer

of

mechanical power transmission components used in several markets including wind energy, announced recently that it will establish its first manufacturing operations here, creating up to 163 new jobs by 2013. The company, which manufactures components for planetary gears and gearboxes, will make a multi-million dollar investment to construct a 250,000 square-foot manufacturing facility adjacent to Ivy Tech Community College in Marion. “The potential new jobs and investment associated with this

project will continue Indiana’s forward momentum as a leader in the cleantech market,” said Mitch Roob, of Secretary Commerce and chief executive officer of the Indiana E c o n o m i c D eve l o p m e n t Corporation. Construction on the new facility is scheduled to begin by mid-2011. New equipment phase-in and hiring will take place in late 2011 with operations set to begin by mid-2012. “Indiana is an ideal location due to high-skilled the workforce, and a central location close to

ELDEN YOHE - COMMERCIAL BROKER/REALTOR President, Yohe Realty, Inc. 63 E. Hill Street Wabash, Indiana 46992

Phone: 260-563-8366 Toll Free: 1-800-466-9643

a variety of North American customers,” said Noel Davis, founder and chief executive officer of Vela Gear Systems LLC. Vela Gear Systems LLC was founded by veterans of the gear making industry from across the Midwest. The facility will be among the only U.S. manufacturers of large scale gears for wind turbine assemblies. The Indiana E c o n o m i c D eve l o p m e n t Corporation offered Vela Gear Systems LLC up to $1.6 million in performancebased tax credits, based on the company’s job creation plans. The city of Marion will consider the establishment of a tax increment financing district at the development site. “We are proud to

welcome Vela Gear to Marion. Along with Governor Daniels’ statewide efforts, we have been working hard to make Marion an attractive place to start and grow business,” said Mayor Wayne Seybold. “Vela Gear represents the outcomes of these efforts and the future of advanced manufacturing for Marion and Indiana.” Vela Gear Systems’ announced expansion comes just one week after electrical systems manufacturer, Northwind E l e c t r o n i c s announcement that it will invest $954,000 to purchase, improve and equip the former General Motors Plant 16 manufacturing facility in nearby Anderson, creating up to 100 new jobs by 2013.

- LISTING, SELLING AND LEASING COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES Some of the sales and leases have been: LIVING ESSENTIALS (formerly MarkHon) 200 Bond Street

LINCOLN SUPPLY TO ATLAS BLDG SERVICES (lease) 1545 S. Wabash Street

(land only) 204 Stitt Street and Cass Street (3 properties)

O’REILLY AUTO PARTS

THE GARDENS RESTAURANT

(formerly Companion Animal Hospital) 820 N. Cass Street

(lease) 360 Manchester Avenue

REMC BUILDING (R&B Properties, Ft. Wayne) 350 Wedcor Avenue

WAL-MART SUPER CENTER (land only) 1601 Cass Street

WABASH PIZZA

WABASH SHOPPING PLAZA (leases only) 1305 N. Wabash Street

LAKEVIEW MOBILE HOME PARK Old 24 West (Higgley Curve)

BULLDOG BATTERY

Corner Stitt, Wabash Street and Manchester Avenue

(land only) 88 E Wedcor Street (Wabash to Huntington Street)

SHOE CITY

WABASH INTERIORS (CARPETING)

DAWES & PUGH (former Atlas Bldg Services) 1723 S. Wabash Street

VILLAGE PANTRY

(now Antique Mall) 18 West Market Street

1812 S. Wabash Street

WALGREEN PHARMACY

THE WORKS (ICE CREAM)

(land only) 481 North Wabash Street (2 properties)

(lease) 396 Manchester Avenue

- - - - AND MORE - - - -

- TRUST YOUR COMMERCIAL PROPERTY TO AN EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONAL Yohe Realty has expanded into Commercial Sales & Leases and discontinued Residential Properties; therefore EXCESS FURNITURE is now offered for sale: Desks, tables, files, credenzas, conference table with up to 12 nice captain chairs, 1 computer, computer table, music center, cubicle dividers, many chairs (both occasional and secretarial) and lots of miscellaneous items. Everything is about 60% off new prices. SALE: Monday thru Friday 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon at 63 East Hill Street Call: Office 563-8366 Residence 563-1976 - Appointments Welcome

- EXCESS OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Six rooms - may include some office furniture if needed. Will remodel to tenants needs. ELDEN YOHE will still maintain his Commercial Real Estate Sales & Leasing in the other three rooms. Call Office 563-8366, toll free 1-800-466-9643 or residence 563-1976. Open: Monday thru Friday 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 - Appointments Available

Quit Now Indiana contest winners announced

After smoking for more than 40 years, Steve Williams decided to quit for good when the Quit Now Indiana contest was announced. Williams received support from his wife and family throughout his attempt to quit smoking. Coupled with the vision of driving a new smoke-free car and the money he could possibly win from the contest, he kept motivated to quit smoking once and for all. He was the first place winner, receiving $2,500. After working with cancer patients at the Elkhart Clinic for the past seven years, Craig Watson realized that he did not want to become a patient because of his tobacco addiction. So, he made the decision to quit cold turkey. Watson used the Quit Now Indiana Facebook fan page for motivation. Reading how other smokers were quitting gave him the encouragement he needed to stay smoke-free. Watson received $1,500 as the second place winner. Nicole Wall began smoking at the age of 18 due to peer pressure. Now a 25-year-old, married, mother of two young children, Wall decided to quit smoking when she learned she was pregnant with her third child. The Quit Now Indiana contest was an additional incentive for her to stick to it and become smoke-free for her children. She received $1,000 as the third place winner. Visit www.QuitNowIndiana.com to learn more about the winners.


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

5

State rule affects those who work with agricultural fertilizer

THE LEARN MORE CENTER received a check for $1,000 from 105.9 The Bash as the winners of the Holiday Night to Remember. They are the recipients of a matching grant, so the actual benefit to the Center is $2,000. Pictured are (front row): from left, Cindy Conliff, student; Zoraida Treska, student; Drema Drudge, instructor; Karen Bechtold, board member; Julie Denniston, 105.9 The Bash; back row, Jack Hubbard, student; Jeannie Allen, instructor; Nancy Stapleton, student; Allen Miracle, board member; and Wade Weaver, 105.9 The Bash. (photo by Danielle Smith)

Wabash family celebrates Christmas ...continued from front page

amps,” Nick said. “We had to have a separate 200-amp service installed for the display and we still wound up pulling 40 amps off of the house.” As the time for the official reveal wound to a close, a family friend approached the Watkins with a modest suggestion. “A friend of ours came to us and said we should start a donation to some kind of charity,” Bev said. “We had thought about doing something of that nature in the past and the first thing that came to my mind was Riley, because I went to Riley as a child,” Nick said. Nick and Bev decided to set a goal of reaching $1,000 for the hospital, but acknowledge there is no fixed amount they are hoping to raise. “Right now we’re at about 67 percent of our goal,” Bev explained. “Whatever we raise, we’ll give 100 percent to the hospital. If the donations stop today we’ll be as happy as if we were to exceed our goal.” Although the Watkins are raising money for Riley, the family hopes people realize that it is not the only reason they installed the display. “We want people to come out and enjoy the lights, if we come out to your car it is to give you a candy cane or to talk, not to get your money,” Nick said. “We have two big boxes of those candy canes in the back of

the house we give out to people who come by.” Nick and Bev went on to say their children, Joey, 6, and Ethan, 4, have taken the attention the home gets in stride. “They love to help us hand out the candy canes,” Bev said. “They have a lot of fun with it all.” The Watkins have launched a website to track the progress of donations and post videos of the display, www.lightsforriley.co m. Nick has also created a YouTube chan-

n e l , www.youtube.com/lig htsforriley and can also be found on Facebook. If driving by the home, the family urges you to enter City Park and exit on Vermont St. to keep the traffic flowing the same direction. “There is room around the neighborhood for people to park and walk up, or they can drive by,” Bev explained. “We hope people come by and visit, we put this all together for people to enjoy.”

Those hired to apply, handle or transport fertilizer for agricultural purposes within Indiana must become certified through the Office of the Indiana State Chemist and Seed Commissioner by Jan. 1, 2012. The new rule also requires certification for anyone applying manure from confined feeding operations. Certification exams are conducted at the Purdue University-based OISC, with exams available at remote testing sites starting in January. A state law passed by the Indiana General Assembly in 2009 created the rule that mandated the certification, known as Category 14, said Leo Reed, the OISC’s manager of certification and licensing. “This rule is designed to give fertilizer and manure applicators the opportunity to demonstrate their compe-

tence in handling and applying these materials, in a manner to protect the waters of the state and the environment in general,” Reed said. The rule covers “fertilizer material,” defined as both commercial fertilizer and manure from confined feeding operations. CFOs are livestock facilities that house at least 300 cattle or 600 swine or sheep or 30,000 fowl, such as chickens, turkeys or other poultry. There are about 1,500 CFOs in Indiana. Because they house more animals than CFOs, concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs, also fall under Category 14. “The key is fertilizer material ‘for hire or manure,’” Reed said. “Those applying any fertilizer materials for hire and those people applying manure from a CFO — even to their own property — must receive Category 14 certification if they use in excess of

10 cubic yards, or 4,000 gallons, of manure per year. “So if you’re applying manure from those facilities you need certification. If you’re transporting manure from those facilities, you need certification. If you’re distributing manure from your facility or individuals are coming to pick it up from you, you need certification or at least a fertilizer dealer permit.” The Category 14 exam consists of about 70 questions. The exam is free, although remote testing sites operated by a contracted vendor of H&R Block charge a fee. Passing the exam qualifies

participants to be licensed. A five-year private applicator license is $20, while a fertilizer business license is $45 and good for one year. A one-year fertilizer distributor license is $45 and requires no certification exam. No extra license fees will be charged to those holding pesticide licenses. For additional information about Category 14, exam testing sites and pre-test training sessions, visit the OISC website at http://www.isco.purdue.edu/ and click on the “Fertilizer Certification Applicator Rule” link, or call OISC tollfree at 1-800-893-6637.

Men’s Day Thursday, Dec. 16th 9:00 - 7:00 Men Will Save

20%

on All Purchases. (Regular Priced)

Free Gift Wrapping!

! "! "

!

! ! # "

" & !$ % $# " & $$ # % $'

1585

r ia

" ## #

Price “Roll Back”

Reserve Series

Preferred Series Reg.

Starting at

Starting at Queen Set Reg $1060 !

..........$810

Full Set ............

..........$1035

King Set ..........

..........$1529

......$1015

Full Set .......

......$1225

Queen Set Reg $1280 King Set .....

Reg.

Twin Set ..........

Twin Set .....

......$1825

Memory Foam Reg.

Starting at Twin Set .....

.......$775

Full Set .......

.......$930

Queen Set Reg $1086 King Set ....

HOURS: M&F 9:00-7:00 T-W-TH 9:00-5:30 SATURDAY 9:00-5:00

1100 NORTH CASS ST. • STATE ROAD 15 • WABASH

1740

260-563-1046 or Toll Free 866-563-1046

w Sign up no in for lessons January!

.....$1552

FREE DELIVERY To Wabash and Surrounding Areas

%$

## $" $

#


6

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Indiana’s Conservation Districts receive more than $570,000 in Clean Water Indiana Grants The Indiana State Department of Agriculture-Division of Soil Conservation (ISDA-DSC) and the State Soil Conservation Board (SSCB) have selected the 2011 recipients of the Clean Water

Indiana Grants. A total of $573,408 was awarded to all 88 Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs) that submitted a grant application to carry out conservation initiatives. “Our districts play a

critical role in improving Indiana’s water quality by communicating about progressive conservation initiatives and delivering opportunities locally throughout the state,” said Lt. Governor Becky

Call today to schedule your beautiful smile FREE consultation. New Patient Special

$ Braces, Invisalign or Invisalign Teen

300 Off

Free Consultation Call Toll Free at

877-399-3200 7207 Engle Road Fort Wayne 260-436-2255

1301 State Road 13 W. North Manchester 1379

Skillman, who serves as Indiana’s secretary of agriculture. SWCDs received up to $5,000 for projects and initiatives in the following grant categories: Adult OutreachEducation, Cost-Share Demonstrations and Capacity Building. An additional $2,000 was available for partnering with other districts and professional training. “A good example of Clean Water partnership projects occurred with DeKalb and Steuben SWCDs that utilized a previous grant (Clean Water) to collaborate and partner with a local agribusiness to host an Agronomy Field Day,” said ISDA-DSC Director Jerod Chew. “This event attracted at least 150 farmers and featured field plots on no-till, strip-till and a discussion of other conservation measures. These districts and many others will host similar field days throughout Indiana again in 2011.” Other Clean Water Indiana Grant projects include: - Continuation of a watershed technician on staff who will implement a watershed proj-

ect cost-share program to help reduce sediment and nutrient runoff. Restoration of stream banks and ag land that has been subject to excessive erosion due to extreme weather events. - Addressing the importance of wetlands

as a natural filter in protecting the quality of our rivers, lakes, and streams. - Providing cover crop planting incentives to ag landowners to help protect the soil surface from rain impact, increase water infiltration therefore decreasing run off,

and encourage the development of healthier soils as a result of the additional plant organic matter. For more information on Clean Water Indiana Grants and a complete list of grantees, visit www.in.gov/isda/2356.h tm.

WABASH COUNTY YMCA collected canned goods for Winchester Senior Center Food Pantry. New members were able to bring in five cans of food to receive $25 off their joiner fee during the month of November. The first delivery of cans to the food pantry was Nov. 20 with over 200 cans donated. Pictured are: Beverly Ferry (left), CEO of Wabash County Council on Aging, and Julie Echard (right), executive director of Wabash County YMCA. Last month the food pantry served over 2,000 people. The next joiner fee special is Jan. 1, 2011. If you join the Wabash County YMCA on Jan. 1, 2011, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., the joiner fee will be $20.11. Call 260-563-YMCA (9622) for details. Wabash County YMCA is a United Fund Agency. (photo provided)


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

7

Area Junior Achievement programs retain highest status fundamentals important to improving the quality of their lives,” says Lena Yarian, president of JA of Northern Indiana. “To further increase our service to students at a time when charitable donations across the nation have reached historic lows, we practice the same economic and business skills JA programs teach stu-

dents. We reduce indirect expenses and focus on providing the outcomes-based programs educators request for their students at all grade levels.” Junior Achievement of Northern Indiana, dedicated to educating and inspiring young people to succeed in a global economy, serves a 25-county region. With the support of

more than 5,000 positive adult role models who volunteer their time, Junior Achievement provides students in kindergarten through 12thgrade with experiences in economic education, workforce readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy, and motivates them to achieve their personal, educational, and

career goals. Junior Achievement of Indiana’s Northern learning sequence and its JA BizTown and JA Finance Park programs will reach nearly 98,000 students across northern Indiana this year. For more information contact Susan Floor at 260- 982-7551 ext. 2309.

MANCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL students participating in Junior Achievement Titan are Scott Baker (left), Aric Howard (seated), Dillon Gable, David Francis (kneeling). Junior Achievement programs reached more than 96,000 students during the 2009-10 school year. Junior Achievement of Northern Indiana is number one across the nation in providing services to students. (photo provided) Across 25 counties in northern Indiana, are 224,299 there kindergarten through 12th-grade students. Junior Achievement (JA) programs reached more than 96,000 of them during the 200910 school year, including 1,100 students in Manchester. North With a 43 percent overall reach, Junior Achievement of Northern Indiana remains number one across the nation in service to students, significantly above the national 9 percent average for other JA service areas. “We are extremely proud of our ongoing

ability to provide economic education, workforce readiness and financial literacy programs to so many students in North Manchester. It’s all possible because of the commitment of educators, volunteers and funders who recognize the importance of preparing youth for workplace success and a self-sufficient future,” says Susan Floor, president of JA serving North Manchester. “We are pleased to also announce that locally we have reached 100 percent penetration and a milestone in our community! Our annu-

Firefighters and law enforcement officers join forces to increase blood donations

Firefighters, police officers and first responders are often close to the need for blood, responding to emergency situations throughout the year. This year the Wabash Police Department and Wabash Fire Department are joining forces with the American Red Cross for the annual Wabash Battle for Blood. The Battle will take place Dec. 17, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at First United Methodist Church, located at 110 N. Cass St., Wabash. Come to donate and receive a t-shirt and be entered into a weekly region-wide drawing for a $250 Visa gift card. The Battle for Blood is a friendly competition between firefighters, police officers and first responders to see who can bring in the most blood donations and votes. The winning department will receive a certificate and bragging rights for the year. “Donating blood is a great way for everyone in the community to show support for local heroes,” said Sharyn Whitman, CEO for the Indiana-Ohio Blood Services Region of the American Red Cross. The goal of this year’s Battle is to collect 70 pints of blood. More than 500 pints of blood are needed every day in our area alone to help patients fight cancer, battle serious disease, survive accidents or trauma. “We hope everyone will come out and donate blood and vote for their favorite first responder during this friendly rivalry,” said Whitman. For more information or to schedule a blood donation appointment, call 1-800-RED-CROSS or go to www.redcrossblood.org.

al campaign is currently taking place and we would like to thank all of our contributors for their continued support of JA!” “In today’s challenged economy, too many young people are not able to make the connection between work and reward. Junior Achievement offers skills development programs that enable students to understand the value of the free enterprise system and learn the work-builds-reward

15 REASONS FOR E15

15 REASONS FOR E15

Ethanol. It’s clean, renewable, grown right here in America – and it’s already proven effective and practical in gas tanks across the country. More than 70 percent of American gas stations now sell E10 – a blend of 10 percent ethanol and 90 percent gas – the maximum amount allowed by a regulatory cap. But the cars we have now can run on higher blends.

Chad Maynard

Raising this cap by just 5 percent will make room for the next generation of cleanerr, better ethanol, while creating jobs and lowering pollution. It’s time for E15.

1. STRONGER ECONOMY Ethanol uses American labor, American resources and American ingenuity. By raising the regulatory cap, the jobs and tax revenue created will help put our country back on track. Technology, innovation and progress here in America will inspire workers, students and communities, while lowered

CONGRATULATIONS!

POET North Manchester Employee of the Month

unemployment rates would begin to put people’s faith in our economy, spurring investment, spending and loans.

CHAD MAYNARD Congratulations to nominee:

A little more ethanol will do a lot for America, including the creation of 10,000 to 20,000 new jobs for every billion gallons produced.

ROB BRUBAKER AND SHELLY LEIFER


8

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 8, 2010

>L»SS7H`@V\;V*SLHU@V\Y/V\ZL6M.VSK:PS]LY7SH[PU\T1L^LSY` *VPUZ > L»SS7H`@V\;V*SLHU@V\Y/V\ZL6M.VSK:PS]LY7SH[PU\T1L^LSY` *VPUZ

>(5;, >( ,+ + 3HZ[ ,]LU )\`PUN [<U[ :WYPU PS N  

79,*06<:.,4: 4,;(3:

)<@05 5.,=, 5 =,5; ;O\‹-YP‹:H[‹:\U

+LJLTILY‹‹‹ /6<9:!+HPS` :H[!HTWT  :\U!WTWT

>(9:(>

>()(:/

-69;>(@5,

9HTHKH7SHaH/V[LS  ,*LU[LY:[

/VUL`^LSS*LU[LY >4HYRL[:[YLL[

/HTW[VU0UU *OHSSLUNLY7HYR^H`

+V^U[V^U>HIHZOUK-SVVY

<:'*LU[LY:[YLL[

0 ,_P[)3PTH9VHK‹)`*YHJRLY)HYYLS

*HSS-VY+PYLJ[PVUZ6US`7SLHZL

*HSS-VY+PYLJ[PVUZ6US`7SLHZL

*HSS-VY+PYLJ[PVUZ6US`7SLHZL

 



:+<86":+<12:"

  

*2/ /' '&2,16

KHYDOXHRIJROGDQGVLOYHU 7 NHHSVFOLPELQJHYHU\GD\ 3HRSOHHYHU\ZKHUHDUHPDNLQJELJ

3XW\RXU*ROG&RLQVWRZRUNIRU \RX<RXPD\QHYHUDJDLQEH DEOHWRJHWWKLVPXFKPRQH\IRU WKRVHROG*ROG&RLQV&KHFN LQWUXQNVLQ\RXUDWWLF/RRN GHHSLQWR\RXUEDVHPHQW

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ÁHGIURPRQHSHUVRQWRDQ QRWKHU1RFRPHRQVVD\LQJZH KDYHEX\HUVVWDQGLQJE\WRSXUFKDVH\RXULWHPV7KLVLVMXVWDVWUDLJKWIRUZDUUG PHHWLQJZLWKQRKLJKSUHVVXUH<R RXPDNHWKHÀQDOGHFLVLRQV$QG\RXZRQ·W KDYHDORQJZDLWVR\RXFDQJHWRQZLWK\RXUGD\ 3UHFLRXV*HPV 0HWDOVKDVEHHQDPHPEHURIWKH%HWWHU%XVLQHVV %XUHDXVLQFH:HKDYHKDGDQ$UDWLQJZLWKWKH%HWWHU %XVLQHVV%XUHDXVLQFH$QGZHDUHDQ$FFUHGLWHG0HPEHURI WKH%HWWHU%XVLQHVV%XUHDX 3UHFLRXV*HPV 0HWDOVKDVEHHQEXLOWRQKRQHVW\DQGLQWHJULW\ 2XUJRDOLVWR(;$0,1( (9$/8$7(SURGXFWVVXEPLWWHGE\RXU FOLHQWHOH%\JLYLQJ\RXDIXOOXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIWKHYDOXHRI\RXU JROGVLOYHUSODWLQXPLWHPVDVZHOODVFRLQV\RXFDQPRUHHDVLO\ PDNHDGHFLVLRQDERXWVHOOLQJWKHP

'R1RW&OHDQ ' R1RW&OHDQ <RXU&RLQV <RXU&RLQV

',$021'6 <RXUGLDP PRQGVGRQ·WKDYH WREHLQSHUIHFWRUÁDZOHVV FRQGLLWLRQ:HSD\SUHPLXP SULFLQJIRUVWRQHVRYHU FDUDWV/HWXVJLYH\RXDQ HYDOXDWLRQ

6HUUYL YLLQ QJ &OL OOLH LHQ QWV WV $FFURVVV7K $ 7K KHH &RX XQWU\ QWUU\\ 6LLQFFHH 6   

6LQFH 6LQFH     6WDQ:DOWHU,QFGED3*0

3

-(:(/5<

2OG‡%URNHQ‡8QXVHG *ROGMHZHOU\PDUUNHG.‡.‡.‡.LVYDOXDEOHD  WRGD\·VSULFHV :KLWH <HOORZ*ROG5LQJ0RXQWLLQJVV‡&KDLQV‡(DUUL  ‡:HGGLQJ%DQGV‡&XII II/LQNV‡&KDUP%UDFHOHWV‡&ODVV 5LQJVV‡$QWLTXH%URRFKHV‡1HFNODFHV DQGPRUH

UHFLRXV*HPV 0HWDOVZDQWVWREH\RXUFRQWDFWIRUDOOJROG VLOYHU LWHPVWK KDWDUHQRORQJHURIXVHWR\RX:HSXEOLVKHDV\WRFRQWDFWSKRQH QXPEHUVVRZHDUUHDOZD\VPRUHWKDQZLOOLQJWRGLVFXVV\RXULWHPVZLWK\RX 2XUKHDGTXDUWHUVDQGUHWDLORXWOHWDUHORFDWHGLQEHDXWLIXO KLVWRULFGRZQWRZQ :DEDVK,QGLDQD,I\RXHYHUSDVVWKURXJKVWRSE\WRVHHXV :HFRQVLVWHQWO\SD\WK KHKLJKHVWSULFHV7KLVLVSRVVLEOHGXHWRRXUUHÀQHU\ GLUHFWDVVRFLDWLRQ%HFDXVHRIRXU\HDUDIÀOLDWLRQZLWKRXUUHÀQHU\ZH REWDLQKLJKHUSULFHVZKLFKLQWXUQDUHSDVVHGRQWR\RX

+RZGR\RXZDQWWREHSDLG"&KHFN"&DVK" <28FKRRVH

=PZP[V\YUL^YL[HPSZ[VYL

3UHFLRXV*HPV 0HWDOVLVLQFRUSRUDWHGLQWKH6WDWHRI,QGLDQDDQGWKH6WDWHRI &DOOLIRUQLD:HIROORZDOOOLFHQVLQJJXLGHOLQHVDQGXVHRQO\VFDOHVDSSURYHGE\ WKH86'HSDUWPHQWRI:HLJKWV 0HDVXUHV :HZDQWWREH\RXUSUHPLHUVRXUFHIRUJROGVLOYHU SODWLQXPLWHPVDVZHOODV FRLQVWKDWDUHQRORQJHUXVHIXORULPSRUWDQWWR\RX 7DDNHDPLQXWHWRPHHW0U6WDQ:DOWHUE\YLVLWLQJRXUZHEVLWHDW

56 6>6 67,5 7,5

ZZZSUHFLRXVJHPVDQGPHWDOVFRP

79 9,*06<: ,*06<:. .,4: ,4  4,;( ;(3: 3 , ,HZ HZZ[* *HUHS HUH : :[YLL[ [YLL  >HIHZO > HIHZO

2U J YHK PDFD G UHF  

7RO 7 7R ROO) )UHH UHH   +HZ EHJ DG RKHDUIURP\RXDQGDQ QVZHUDQGTXHV RQV\RXPD\KDYH 3 FHVÁXF XD HGD \GXH RPD NH FRQG RQV

+V^U V^U>HIHZO‹*VYULY*HUH   >HIHZO: YLL Z /^`

4VU[OY\;O\Y ‹-Y ‹:H[  * VZLK:\UKH`

' 6&/$ 0(5 3 HDVHEHDGY VHG KD ZHDUHQR D ¿ D HG QDQ\ZD\Z KDQ\R KHU URDGVKRZSURPR RQV :HDUH KHSUHP HUQD RQD SUHF RXV VPH D VEX\HU VSHF D ] QJ QJR G V YHUDQGFR QV


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 8, 2010

.63+‹:03=,9 .63+‹:03=,9 





5V3VUN3PULZ  5V3VUN3PULZ  

*605:‹73(;05<4 * 605:‹73(;05<4

(;&,7(0(17%8,/' '6 6 3UHFFLR LR RXV XV* *HHPV 0 0HHWD WDOV OOV· V·

%X\LQJ % X\LQJ( (YHQW YHQW LQ

:DEDVK : :D DEDVK‡:D :DUV : DUVDDZ Z‡) )R RUW:D :DD\Q \QH 

:KDW,WHPV:LOO3XW&DVK,Q<RXU3RFNHW" $V\RXORRNDURXQG\RXUKRPHIRULWHPVWREULQJZLWK\RXWR3UHFLRXV*HPV 0HWDOVFRQVLGHUWKH IROORZLQJ 'R\RXKDYHROGEURNHQ&+$,16WKDW\RXQRORQJHUZHDU"+RZDERXWROG5,1*6" :KDWDERXW%5$&(/(76"0D\EH\RXKDYHROG%522&+(6WKDWQRORQJHUÀW\RXUIDVKLRQVW\OH"2QH ODG\UHFHQWO\UHFHLYHGRYHUIRUVRPHROGQHFNODFHVDFXIIEUDFHOHWDQGULQJV 0HQ\RXPD\KDYHROG&8))/,1.6PDGHRIVWHUOLQJRU.RU.JROG"7,(&/$636" 0DQ\RIWKHVHLWHPVPD\QRWEHPDUNHGVREULQJWKHPWR\RXU3UHFLRXV*HPV 0HWDOVUHSUHVHQWDWLYH ZKRFDQWHVWLWHPVEHIRUH\RXPDNH\RXUÀQDOGHFLVLRQ 7KHQGRQ·WIRUJHWDERXW)/$7:$5( (7($6(76&20327(6&$1'<',6+(60(;,&$1 6,/9(5DVZHOODV67(5/,1*-(:(/5<DQGPDQ\RWKHUTXDOLW\LWHPVPDGHRIVWHUOLQJVLOYHU :HKDYHPDQ\FXVWRPHUVZKREULQJLQVWHHUOLQJÁDWZDUHDQGWHDVHUYLFHVWKDWKDYHEHHQKDQGHGGRZQRUDFTXLUHGRYHUWKHFRXUVHRI\HDUV,IWKHVHLWHPVDUHQRORQJHU RIXVHWR\RXWKH\FDQSXWPRQH\LQ\RXUSRFNHW )DPLOLHVLQKHULWROGFRLQVWKH\NQRZQRWKLQJDERXWRUQRORQJHUZDQW%ULQJWKHPWR3UHFLRXV*HPV 0HWDOVIRUDQKRQHVWHYDOXDWLRQRIWKHLUYDOXH$OWKRXJKWKH\ PD\QRWKDYHQXPLVPDWLFFROOHFWRUYDOXHWKHVLOYHURUJROGYDOXHPD\SXWDVPLOHRQ\RXUIDFH

%8<,1*$//7<3(6 2)86&2,16 %8<,1**2/'6,/9(5  3/$7,180%8//,21 1XPLVPDWLF&RLQV:DQWHG

6,/9(5&2,16

>(3205

86‡)RUHLJQ‡&DQDGLDQ

%ULQJLQ\RXUVLOYHUFRLQVIRUFDVK<R RXZLOO UHFHLYHHLWKHUVLOYHUFRQWHQWYDOXHRUFROOHFWRUYDOXH ZKLFKHYHULVKLJKHU/HWXVPDNH\RXDQRIIHU :HDUHDOVRLQWHUHVWHGLQEX\LQJ ³&RPSOHWH&ROOHFWLLRQV³&ROOHFWRU&RLQV ³3URRI6HWV³8QFLUFXODWHG&RLQV

5V3VUN3PULZ 5V(WWVPU[TLU[Z @V\^PSSTLL[^P[O[OL7.4 YLWYLZLU[H[P]LPUHX\PL[VULVUVUL ZL[[PUNUVO\NLJYV^KZ 6YPM`V\WYLMLYJHSSMVYHU HWWVPU[TLU[

;VSS-YLL

            >LHSZVTHRL]PZP[Z[V[OVZL ^OVHYLOVTLIV\UK

>LOVSKHSS[YHUZHJ[PVUZPUZ[YPJ[JVUÄKLUJL

'(17$/*2/'32&.(7:$7&+(6 <R RXPD\KDYHWXFNHGDZD\VRPHGHQWDOJROGDORQJWLPHDJR WKLQNLQJLWZRXOGEHYDOXDE EOHVRPHGD\6RPHGD\LV72'$< :HSD\FDVKIRU'(17$/*2/' *ROG&DSV*ROG%ULG GJ JHHV*ROG&URZQV

7YPJLZÅ\J[\H[LKHPS`K\L[VTHYRL[JVUKP[PVUZ

:HDOVREX\32&.(7:$7&+(6ZRUNLLQJRU QRQZRUNLQJWLPHSLHFHV 2PHJD D/RQJLLQHV*UXHQ(OJLQ6RXWK%HQG +DPLOWRQ,OOLQRLV:DOWKDPDQGRWKHUV

>()(:/

/VUL`^LSS*LU[LY >4HYRL[:[YLL[

+V^U[V^U>HIHZOUK-SVVY



*HSS-VY+PYLJ[PVUZ6US`7SLHZL

>(9:(>

9HTHKH7SHaH/V[LS  ,*LU[LY:[

<:'*LU[LY:[YLL[

 

*HSS-VY+PYLJ[PVUZ6US`7SLHZL

-69;>(@5,

/HTW[VU0UU *OHSSLUNLY7HYR^H`

0 ,_P[)3PTH9VHK‹)`*YHJRLY)HYYLS

  

*HSS-VY+PYLJ[PVUZ6US`7SLHZL

6WDQ:DOWHU,QFGED3*0

'LPHV +DOYHV 4XDUWHUV   %HIRUH

:(0$.( +286(&$//6 :HVFKHGXOHDSSRLQWPHQWVWRPHH  ZLWKWKRVHZKRDUHKRPHERXQG-X  JLYHXVDFDOO

7ROO)UHH

;;O\Y‹-YP‹ O\Y‹-YP‹: :H[‹:\U H[‹:\U

+LJLT +LJLT TILY I Y IL ‹ ‹‹ ;;O\-YP:H[! O\-YP:H[!HHT TWT WT :\U! : \U!WT WTWT WT



 63+,9*6<765

:HNQRZKRZIDU6RFLDO6HFXULW\JRHVWKHVHGD\VIRU6HQLRU &LWL]HQV3OHDVHFRQVLGHUWKLVDOLWWOHVRPHWKLQJH[WUDIURP XVWR\RXWRVKRZRXUDSSUHFLDWLRQIRU\RXUHIIRUWV

7KLV&RXSRQ,V*RRG)RU$35(0,802Q$Q\ 6DOH0DGH7R35(&,286*(06 0(7$/6,1& %ULQJ,W:LWK<RX:KHQ<RX9LVLW8V,Q<RXU$UHD :LUPVY*P[PaLUZ6US` 5(9B3*0BBVSUHDG5SURFHVVBWKHSD S SHUB



5HFHLYH 7RZDUG* *$6 $6

:LWK$6DOH2I2U0RUH 2QH&RXSRQ3HU+RXVHKROGDQG7UDQVDFWLRQ 5(9B3*0BBVSUHDG/SURFHVVBWKHSDSHUB

9


10

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Economist says Indiana should enjoy slow but steady growth in 2011

% & '$ $ ! '# ' $ " # !

'#

" $

Wabash County YMCA

## # %"# '# $ !

%$

## $" $

#

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON GIVE SOMETHING

1666

A Ball State University economist is forecasting that Indiana’s economy will grow at a painfully slow but steady rate in 2011 with unemployment falling throughout the year to a low of about 8.7 percent, more than a full percentage point lower than it was in October 2010. Hicks, Michael director of Ball State’s Center for Business Research, believes the state will continue to be a national leader in job creation as the U.S. rebounds from the deep recession of 2007-2009. “As bad as it has been, Indiana has done remarkably well over the recession. Given the large manufacturing share of our economy, we probably should have had an unemployment rate in near 16 percent.” He made his comments during the 15th annual Indiana Economic Luncheon on Oct. 8 at the

Horizon Convention Center. Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman was the keynote speaker at the event. “This forecast says the state will be very slow to rebound from the recession, but all signs point to Indiana continuing to outperform the nation as a whole,” he said. “Indianapolis will again be the state’s economic engine as the capital city continues to attract new businesses and existing firms begin adding to payrolls. However, other parts of the state will see some economic growth but not as fast as we all would hope.” During the luncheon, Hicks reviewed the economic forecast of the Indiana Econometric Model, which combines a U.S. economic model produced by Yale University with Ball State’s model. The forecast analyzes the potential employment, labor force and income

growth in the state’s nine largest private sectors. Personal income should rise by 4.81 percent by year’s end, with the construction (7.23 percent), manufacturing (7.07 percent) and transportation (6.99 percent) sectors leading growth. These sectors were hard hit during the recession and, like the economy as a whole, will not recoup their losses by the end of 2011, Hicks said. Other sector and their expected growth rates: - Utilities, 1.2 percent - Health care, 3.02 percent - Retail, 3.19 percent - Finance and insurance, 3.96 percent - Wholesale, 5.34 percent - Information technology, 5.27 percent Hicks said inflation will be tame, but the large money supply suggests inflation will accompany any strong growth in the economy.

“There is some good news,” he said. “We economists and our models did a poor job of predicting this recession, and the nature of the mathematics underlying the models suggests they are more likely to underestimate the rate of the recovery, than overestimate it.” Hicks said that much of the spending on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, commonly known as the “stimulus,” has yet to be translated into lower unemployment. If more jobs are created, they will come in mid-2011 and 2012, and so cast some uncertainty on these estimates. “I believe that 2011 will be much better than the past two years, but uncertainty surrounding federal policy and continued discomfort with government debt in the U.S. and abroad will cast a shadow on this recovery,” he said.

RELIABLE

GREAT VALUE $30 IN-STORE REBATE

Bar lengths may vary by region.

NEW! MS 250 CHAIN SAW

BG 55 HANDHELD BLOWER

MS 170 CHAIN SAW

SE 61 STIHL WET/DRY VACUUM

$

$

$

$

Proven handheld blower at an affordable price

Designed for occasional wood-cutting tasks around the home

Powerful wet/dry vacuum for everyday use

29995

Reg $329.95

16" bar

Available on MS 250 and MS 250 C-BE through 12/25/10 at participating dealers while supplies last.

14995

17995

15995

STIHL HAS YOU COVERED WITH PROTECTIVE APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES. Available at participating dealers while supplies last. © 2010 STIHL BES10-1222-91220-19

Wabash Portable Equipment £nÎäÊ-œÕ̅Ê7>L>ÅÊ-ÌÀiiÌÊUÊ7>L>Å 260-563-1173 www.WabashPortable.com

STIHLdealers.com


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

11

Expert: Returns on crop storage lower than normal

Farmers trying to decide whether to sell the crop they harvested this fall or continue to store it have a big question to answer: Will storing the crop lead to greater profits later? Although that is a matter of speculation, the returns on crop storage are lower than normal this year, according to Corinne Alexander, associate professor of agricultural economics at Purdue University. “Buyers are saying, through price signals, that they are willing to pay a lot more right now because they need the grain,” Alexander said. “The

market isn’t paying a lot to store, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea. There’s no easy rule of thumb.” Alexander recommends that farmers who choose to store their crop avoid putting it into commercial storage, which is less profitable than storing it on the farm. The increase in crop prices primarily is the result of lower yields for different crops around the world. This means that supply is tight in relation to demand. That likely will raise commodity prices. Also playing into the current high prices is a drought in

Russia and lowerthan-expected yield in U.S. crops. There still is uncertainty about the actual size of the corn crop as well as what the demand for corn will be. Corn production nationwide is expected to drop by four percent from last year on yields averaging 154.3 bushels per acre, compared with 164.7 bushels per acre in 2009, according to a November report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In Indiana, corn production is forecast 918.4 million at bushels, down two percent from last year. In August, the USDA

had projected that Indiana corn production this year would top 1 billion bushels for the first time. Alexander said projections showed less than 1 billion bushels for the 2010-11 ending stocks, which is a tight number. Demand for corn acres is expected to be high in 2011. International circumstances also are playing into high crop prices. When Russia banned exports on wheat this year, countries that normally would import from Russia had to buy elsewhere. The result was increased demand for wheat

Teen MOPS hold Signs shows support for ethanol Christmas meeting production Dear editor, The reason for this letter is to respond to all the negative information given by highly regarded media pundits, Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck, concerning biofuels. Lets compare cost to taxpayers. The oil industry receives between $133.2 billion and $280.8 billion annually with tax deductions, credits and other benefits included. Even when leaving out the $100-200 billion military costs to keep the oil shipping lanes open, the $16 billion ethanol support is small. The “Ethanol Fact Book” states that the U.S. ethanol production supports nearly 500,000 jobs in all sections of the economy and added $65.6 billion to the gross domestic product in 2008 and produces 36 billion gallons of ethanol yearly. The 30-year-old growing industry added $24.6 billion to household income, 1.18 million jobs and $222.6 billion in federal tax revenue. The internal combustion engine will not run on wind or solar. The hybrid electric still requires fuel to support the battery added drive train engine. The 56 pounds of corn uses 31.5 pounds of starch to either produce beverage or sweetener or 2.8 gallons of ethanol. That same bushel of yellow corn provides 1.5 pounds of corn oil, 17.5 pounds of high-protein feed for livestock or poultry and 2.6 pounds of corn meal. Doesn’t it make more economic sense to invest tax dollars in support of farm production rather than pay farmers to not grow crops? Charles W. Signs North Manchester

Teen MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) met at 5 p.m. on Dec. 6 at the First United Methodist Church. The meal was provided by Peggy Riggs and the Teen MOPS leaders. The moms played Christmas games and made live greenery door swags for the craft. Susan Shannon spoke about the origins of such Christmas traditions as the candy cane and gift giving. She talked about the significance of the gifts brought to the baby Jesus by the wise men, as told in the book of Matthew. The moms were presented with framed silhouettes of their children. The next meeting will be held on Jan. 3, 2011. Any persons interested in joining Teen MOPS may register at the LIFE Center or by calling 563-7275.

New Year’s Eve carry-in supper to be held

exports from the U.S. and other countries. “We’re going into a year where we’re expecting substantially higher prices for all commodities that are field-crop commodities, simply because there is going to be an acreage battle,” Alexander said.

1225

Eileen & Friends Country Crafts & Home Decor (All Handmade in the USA)

Gertie Goose Clothing Largest Selection of Goose Clothing in 4 Counties!

1702

• • • • • • •

•Antiques • Quilts • Longaberger Baskets • Wood Items • Lots More! 58 E. Main St. Peru 765-472-1050 Mon.-Fri. 10-5 Sat. 10-3

Concrete Work Water Lines Basements Septic Systems Ponds Crawl Spaces Site Preparation (Commercial & Residential)

We have large quantities of Top Soil, Fill Dirt, Sand and Gravel for Sale!

Chris A. Tyson P.O. Box 246 Wabash, IN Phone 260-563-1243 • Fax 765-981-4877 Home 765-981-2455

On New Year’s Eve the public is invited to a carry-in supper at Laketon American Legion. Supper will be at 7:30 p.m., and will be followed by an evening of euchre, or attendees may bring a favorite card game or movie. Breakfast will be served at 12:15 a.m. For more information call Thelma, 260-982-2896, or Mary, 260-774-3530.

s e t a R t a e Gr for...

696

H H  R R   

Ann Annette ette Ay Ayres Ayres Branch Branch M Manager anager





Time to Insulate Thermafiber is offering scrap material to the public this Saturday from 8:00am – 3:00pm Insulation board - $1.00 per piece Loose Fill - $1.50 per bag Warehouse office at east end of the plant 3711 Mill Street, Wabash, Indiana Cash (exact change) or Check only please Subject to availability 225

106 W West est Street Street NM Manchester anchester t 260.982.6200 t

BippusBank.com BippusBank.com t

Huntington Huntington Roanoke Roanoke N Manchester Manchester 1614

M Member ember FDIC FDIC Equ Equal q al H Housing ousing gL Lender ender


12

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Funeral Homes Wabash LaFontaine

Wishing Your Family a

Blessed Christmas and Happy New Year

1672

Wabash Police Department Citations Dec. 9 Ryan Kiefaber, 23, 374 Elm St., Wabash, warrant – revocation of probation / conspiracy to deal narcotic drug Dec. 8 Ashley Brown, 27, Peru, speeding Olivia Zapp, 18, Indianapolis, minor consumption Dec. 5 Aaron Monroe, 22,

Wabash, resisting law enforcement, warrant – revocation of probation / possession of narcotic drug Carissa Copeland, 25, 960 Stitt, St., Wabash, driving while suspended – prior Victoria Hubbard, 23, Rochester, no operator’s license when required Dec. 4 Brenda Buckley, 37, 7042 S 50 E, Wabash, theft Heather Craig, 33, 706 Manchester Ave.,

Wabash, driving while suspended – infraction, unrestrained child Dec. 3 Danny Price, 51, 68 E 200 N, Wabash, driving while suspended – infraction Allan Hileman, 19, 1402 Adams St., Apt. 4, Wabash, muffler violation Accidents Dec. 9 At 5:42 p.m., vehicles driven by Cody May, 17, Urbana, and Virgal Hall, 89, 615 Berkley Dr.,

Joseph Carpenter, 67 Former member of West Virginia National Guard Nov. 10, 1943 – Dec. 9, 2010 Joseph L. Carpenter, 67, Wabash, died Dec. 9, 5:19 a.m., at St. Vincent Hospital, Indianapolis. He was born Nov. 10, 1943, in Stirrat, W.V., to Elbert and Elizabeth (Griggs) Carpenter. He married Hazel (McCord) Learned, in North Manchester, on Dec. 19, 1987. Mr. Carpenter retired from Bay State Abrasives, in North Manchester, after 30 years. He served six years in the West Virginia National Guard. He enjoyed fishing, watching football on the television and watching his grandkids. He is survived by his wife, Hazel Carpenter, Wabash; three children, William (Carol) Carpenter, Peru; Michael Carpenter, North Manchester; and Rachel Runyon, Logan, W.V.; four stepchildren, Harold (Nicole) McCord, Peru; Leslie (Tonya) Learned, Cromwell; Johnny (Hollie) Learned, Wabash; and Wendy Kelly, Silver Lake; two sisters, Verna Mae West, Logan, W.V., and Nelda Hubbler, Warsaw; two brothers, Charlie Carpenter, Logan, W.V., and Donald Carpenter, North Manchester; 30 grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a brother, Eddie Carpenter. Funeral services were held Dec. 13, at Grandstaff-Hentgen Funeral Service, Wabash, with pastor Lorren Bradley officiating. Burial was in Memorial Lawns Cemetery, Wabash. Preferred memorials are to the Joseph L. Carpenter family c/o GrandstaffHentgen Funeral Service, 1241 Manchester Ave., Wabash, IN 46962. The memorial guest book for Mr. Carpenter may be signed online at www.grandstaff-hentgen.com.

James Bone, 81 U.S. Army veteran Jan. 18, 1929 – Dec. 9, 2010 James Donald Bone, 81, Wabash, died Dec. 9, 4:53 p.m., at his home. He was born Jan. 18, 1929, in Wabash, to Thomas and Sarah Marie (Bidwell) Bone. He married Meriam Ilene Tyson, in Wabash, on Oct. 5, 1963; she died Dec. 6, 2010.

Mr. Bone was a graduate of Wabash High School. He retired from Dana Corporation in Marion. He and his wife owned and operated Olde Canal House Cafe in Lagro. He enjoyed woodworking, fishing, camping, and especially loved spending time with his family. He was a U.S. Army veteran. He is survived by 10 children, Mary Anna Coe, Wabash; Laura (Mike) Bradley and Miriam Linkenhoker, both of North Manchester; Cathy Carr, Burnsville, Minn.; Tom (Kellye) Bone, Edmonds, Wash.; Scot (Crisann) Bone, Wabash; Gary Bone, LaFontaine; Dennis (Sharon) Bone, Roann; Lois (Calvin) Holley and Troy (Kristie) Bone, both of Lagro; 22 grandchildren; 26 great-grandchildren; four brothers, Harold Bone, Denver; Charles (Jan) Bone, Leesburg; Walter Bone, Sacramento, Calif.; and Bruce Bone, Mahomet, Ill.; and a sister, Florence Van Buskirk, Elwood. Along with his wife, he was preceded in death by two brothers, Tom Bone Jr. and Verlin Bone; and five sisters, Bernice Easterday, Eldora Middleton, Nancy Shell, Barbara Jean Bone, and Patty Bone. Funeral services were held Dec. 14, at Grandstaff-Hentgen Funeral Service, Wabash, with Chaplain Don Miller officiating. Burial was in Marion National Cemetery. Preferred memorials are to Wabash County Cancer Society. The memorial guest book for Mr. Bone may be signed online at www.grandstaff-hentgen.com.

Wabash, collided on Glenn Avenue near Sivey Street. At 11:52 a.m., vehicles driven by Coda Fouts, 24, Peru, and Dustin Niccum, 36, 445 Delaware, Wabash, collided at the intersection of Cass and Stitt streets. Dec. 6 At 5:08 p.m., vehicles driven by Justin Poe, 29, 257 Manchester Ave., Wabash, and Michael Weibel, 59, 436 W. Canal St., Wabash, collided on Comstock Street near Factory Street. Dec. 4 At 11:30 p.m., vehicles driven by Chad Gilley, 33, 721 Congress St., Wabash, and Deborah Craig, 49, 342 W. Maple St., Wabash, collided at the intersection of Allen and Elm streets. Wabash County Sheriff ’s Department

Citations Dec. 7 Edwin J. Aguila, 35, Marion, speeding Accidents Dec. 10 At 5:35 a.m., a vehicle driven by Kirk E. Robinson, 52, 256 E. Hill St., Wabash, left the roadway on SR 13 N near CR 300 N. Dec. 9 At 6:35 p.m., a vehicle driven by Frank E. Gasbarra, 64, Rochester, struck a deer on SR 114. At 6:17 p.m., a vehicle driven by Brian A. Warren, 49, 11880 S 100 W, LaFontaine, struck a deer on CR 1200 S near CR 200 W. At 10:30 a.m., a vehicle driven by Joshua T. Hanback, 17, North Manchester, left the roadway on CR 200 E near CR 1425 N. Dec. 8 At 10:15 p.m., a vehicle driven by Zachary H.

James Gottschalk, 74 U.S. Army veteran Feb. 26, 1936 – Dec. 6, 2010 James E. “Popsie” Gottschalk, 74, rural Lagro, died Dec. 6, 11:30 a.m., at Autumn Ridge Rehabilitation Center, Wabash. He was born Feb. 26, 1936, in Wabash County, to Lyman and Ruth (Conrad) Gottschalk. He first married Lorretta Folk; she died Sept. 23, 1973. He then married Sandra Sue Schlemmer on Nov. 1, 1975; she died Aug. 26, 1997. Mr. Gottschalk was a 1954 graduate of Lagro High School, and a U.S. Army veteran. He was a retired construction worker, and owned and operated Gottschalk Construction for 12 years. He also drove a school bus for the Metropolitan School District for 17 years. He was a former member of the Lagro United Methodist Church and was a member of the Lagro American Legion Post 248. He loved driving his tractor, working with his grandkids on their 4-H projects, and spending time on the farm. He also enjoyed playing Santa Claus. He is survived by five children, Ed Gottschalk, Michael Tucker, and Tammy (Scott) Siders, all of Lagro; and Brian (Stephanie) Gottschalk and Lori (Troy) Vigar, both of Wabash; 10 grandchildren, Ashley Siders, Allison Siders, Lacy Gottschalk, Austin Gottschalk, Noell Gottschalk, and Preston Tucker, all of Lagro; and Isaac Gottschalk, Elise Gottschalk, Shane Vigar, and Jared Vigar, all of Wabash; and a brother, Robert Gottschalk, Huntington. Funeral services were held Dec. 10, at GrandstaffHentgen Funeral Service, Wabash, with Rev. Rick Borgman officiating. Burial was in Lagro Cemetery. Preferred memorials are to Lagro American Legion Post 248 or Lutheran Cancer Center of Fort Wayne. The memorial guest book for Mr. Gottschalk may be signed online at www.grandstaffhentgen.com.

Bailey, 21, 703 N. Wayne St., North Manchester, struck a deer on SR 114 near CR 500 E. Dec. 6 At 3:23 p.m., a vehicle driven by John E. Lamont, 50, Indianapolis, struck a deer on SR 15 near CR 900 S. At 2:15 p.m., a vehicle driven by Kelley Pearce, 31, Peru, struck a deer on SR 15 near CR 1300 N. Dec. 5 At 6:36 p.m., a vehicle driven by Christina A. Sellers, 28, 3806 E 500 S, Wabash, struck a deer on Old SR 15 near CR 350 E. Dec. 4 At 4:55 p.m., a vehicle driven by Linda Neese, 58, Alexandria, struck a parked car at 1100 Main St., Lagro. At 3:44 p.m., a vehicle driven by Kent Claussen, 41, 1960 W 1200 S, LaFontaine, left the roadway on CR 950 S near CR 100 W. At 8:40 a.m., vehicles driven by Carlos J. Carrillo, 30, Fort Wayne, and Chielsey A. Cloar, 18, Peru, collided on Old 24 near CR 475 W. At 3:50 a.m., a vehicle driven by Sondra L. Hanson, 23, Bluffton, left the roadway on SR 218 near CR 600 E.

Dec. 3 At 10:08 p.m., a vehicle driven by Kimberly M. Myers, 31, Fort Wayne, struck a deer on SR 114 near CR 300 E. At 4:40 a.m., a vehicle driven by Trevor J. Mello, 22, 171 1/2 W. Main St., Wabash, left the roadway on CR 300 E near CR 250 S. Dec. 2 At 5:46 p.m., a vehicle driven by Stephanie D. Hensley, 37, 313 N. Wabash Ave., LaFontaine, left the roadway on SR 13 N near CR 1000 N. North Manchester Police Department

Citations Dec. 12 Kaylee Hawley, 19, Winchester, minor consumption, public intoxication Dec. 8 Kameron Troxell, 19, Fort Wayne, speeding Accidents Dec. 7 At 3:11 p.m., vehicles driven by Theodore Dill, 68, Wabash, and Mary Hutton, 74, Wabash, collided at the intersection of Beckley and Thorn streets. At 11:06 a.m., vehicles driven by Barbara Shah, 66, North Manchester, (continued on page 13)

Gene Metzger, 79 Member of the National Guard March 12, 1931 – Dec. 9, 2010

Gene C. Metzger, 79, North Manchester, died Dec. 9, 11:30 a.m., at Kosciusko Community Hospital, Warsaw. He was born March 12, 1931, in Wabash County, to Dorsey E. “Sport” and Georgia (Christman) Metzger. He married Helen J. Pyle on March 20, 1954; she survives. Mr. Metzger graduated from Chester High School in 1949. He was a lineman with Public Service, REMC and retired from General Telephone. He served in the National Guard and was a member of Deming Lodge #88 F & AM and Ivy Chapter #69 Order of Eastern Star. He was an active member of Congregational Christian Church, North Manchester. He was also an avid fisherman. Along with his wife, he is survived by a son, Dan L. (Regina) Metzger; a daughter-in-law, Barbara Metzger; and three grandchildren, Adam (Angie) Metzger, Andrew Metzger, and Megan Metzger, all of North Manchester. He was preceded in death by a son, Douglas G. Metzger, who died in 1996; and a brother, Bill Metzger. Funeral services were held Dec. 13, at Congregational Christian Church, North Manchester, with Pastor J.P. Freeman officiating. Burial was in Oaklawn Cemetery, North Manchester. Preferred memorials are to Congregational Christian Church, 310 N. Walnut St., North Manchester, IN 46962. Condolences for the family of Mr. Metzger may be sent online to www.mckeemortuary.com.


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Continued from page 12 and Michele Graham, 44, Key West, Fla., collided at the intersection of 4th and Mill streets. Marriage Applications Daniel Smith, 23, 93 N. Comstock St., Apt. 2, Wabash, and Amanda Mercer, 24, same address Timothy Miracle Jr., 25, 4530 E 500 S, Wabash, and Shelbi Wiles, 19, same address Douglas Hall Jr., 28, 340 S. Washington St., Roann, and Crystal Huston, 35, same address Brent Boardman, 23, 210 S. Maple St., North Manchester, and Emily 22, same Bauman, address Land Transfers Dorothy Thomas to Julian Marcus Pugh, Warranty Deed, Oak Park Addition, North Manchester, Lot: 26 Florine L. Marshall to Gina A. Castle, Warranty Deed, Original Plat, Laketon, Multiple Lots / Blocks Juan Ramirez and Debora S. Ramirez NKA Debora S. Wagner to Juan Ramirez,

Quitclaim Deed, 16-29-7 Old Fort Banking Company to Living Tree Investments Inc., Corporate Deed, Original Plat, North Manchester, Lot: Pt. 143 John Edward Shankle, Michael Dewayne Shankle, David Lee Shankle, Vicki Lynn Shankle Music, Lecretia Ann Shankle Swan, Kristina Joy Stout Shankle to Brent A. Swan and Danielle J. Smith K&M Rental Inc. to Galt Group LLC, Corporate Deed, Warvels Park Addition, Chester Township, Riverside, Multiple Lots / Blocks Joan J. Poe to Dennis L. Houser and Joan J. Poe Life Estate, Warranty Deed, Haldermans Edmund Addition, North Manchester, Lot: Pt. 13 Thomas L. Ogan Trust and Beverly J. Ogan Trust to Thomas L. Ogan and Beverly J. Ogan, Quitclaim Deed, 21-28-6 Richard D. Eppley Trust and Elda Mae Eppley Trust to Richard D. Eppley and Elda Mae Eppley, Trust Deed, 1926-8

Mary Rose, 86 Member of St. Bernard Catholic Church June 4, 1924 – Dec. 10, 2010 Mary Anna Rose, 86, Wabash, died Dec. 10, 9:50 p.m., at Wabash County Hospital. She was born June 4, 1924, in Wabash, to Harley O. and Amelia J. (Krebs) Phillips. She married Walter Robert “Rosie” Rose, in Wabash, on Nov. 27, 1943. Mrs. Rose attended Wabash High School. She was a lifetime member of the St. Bernard Catholic Church and a member of the Wabash Women of the Moose. She loved working on the computer and doing needlework. She is survived by her husband, Walter “Rosie” Rose, Wabash; three children, Walter (Kandice) Rose Jr., Wabash; Barbara Burnside, Hudson, Fla.; and Leo (Nanette) Rose Sr., Chesterton; 10 grandchildren, Eric (Lori) Rose, Franklin; Patrick (Misty) Rose, Urbana; Jason (Erica) Rose and Stephany (Jeff) Hipskind, both of Wabash; Andrew Whitesel, New Port Richey, Fla.; Jenifer (Daniel) Bean, Hudson, Fla.; Jamie (Kenny) Greene, Land O’ Lakes, Fla.; Zachariah Rose, Michigan City, Ind.; Veronica (Mike Hopta) Rose, Bolton, Mass.; and Leo Rose Jr., Chesterton; 26 great-grandchildren; and her sister, Ruth Ann Phillips, Kokomo. She was preceded in death by three brothers, Lawrence, Howard, and Charles Phillips; a grandson, Matthew Jay Whitesel; and a great-grandson. Funeral services will be held Dec. 15, 10 a.m., at St. Bernard Catholic Church, 188 W. Sinclair St., Wabash, with Father Sextus Don officiating. Friends may call Dec. 14, 3-7 p.m., at Grandstaff-Hentgen Funeral Service, 1241 Manchester Ave., Wabash, with a rosary service at 3 p.m. Burial will be in the Garden of St. Bernard at Memorial Lawns Cemetery, Wabash. Preferred memorials are to St. Bernard Catholic School Scholarship Fund. The memorial guest book for Mrs. Rose may be signed online at www.grandstaff-hentgen.com.

Richard D. Eppley to William F. Eppley, Curtis E. Eppley and Richard D. Eppley Life Estate, Warranty Deed, 19-26-8 Elda Mae Eppley to William F. Eppley, Curtis E. Eppley and Elda Mae Eppley Life Estate, Warranty Deed, 19-26-8 Darl L. Driscoll Estate, Representative Deanna M. Rogers and Representative Teresa L.

Eiler to Beth E. Bell, Personal Representative Deed, 9-27-6 James R. Dyson Trust and Ruth A. Dyson Trust to Reid D. Dyson, Angela K. Dyson, Roger D. Dyson and Deborah A. Dyson, Quitclaim Deed, 26-27-5 Amgad W. Riad to Jamia R. Alexander, Quitclaim Deed, Sunset Acres Addition,

Doris Scott, 85 Former Wabash resident Oct. 1, 1925 – Dec. 7, 2010 Doris L. Scott, 85, North Webster, died Dec. 7, 10:15 p.m., at Lutheran Hospital, Fort Wayne. She was born Oct. 1, 1925, in Wabash, to Oren Lee and Hazel Anna (Long) Wilcox. Ms. Scott graduated in 1943 from Chippewa High School in Wabash. In 1968, she moved from Wabash to Fort Wayne, where she resided for 36 years until moving to North Webster permanently in 2006 after being a summer resident for 30 years. She retired on Oct. 1, 2008, as a trucking broker for Sharkey Transportation, Inc., in Fort Wayne, after 25 years. Ms. Scott was the first pharmaceutical representative in Fort Wayne at Pennwalt Corporation. She was also a dance instructor with Arthur Murray Dance Studio in Richmond and Fort Wayne. She attended Christ’s Church at Georgetown and Christ’s Hope Church, both in Fort Wayne; Milford Christian Church; and Red Zone Christian Church, Syracuse. She is survived by three daughters, Sherry (Ray) Davenport, South Whitley; Cathy Anspach, Fort Wayne; Darcy (Dan) Barr, Larwill; a son, Craig (Sally) Thompson, Hudson; eight grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents; a son, Kelly Scott, who died in 1977; and a brother, Robert L. Wilcox. Funeral services were held Dec. 11, at Owen Family Funeral Home, North Webster. Preferred memorials may be sent to ARC, 107 N. Pennsylvania St., Suite 800, Indianapolis, IN 46204. Condolences for the family of Ms. Scott may be sent online to www.owenfamilyfuneralhome.com.

Opal Harrell, 88 Former Wabash resident Aug. 7, 1922 – Dec. 9, 2010 Opal G. Harrell, 88, Huntington, died Dec. 9, 11:07 a.m., at the Markle Health and Rehabilitation Center. She was born Aug. 7, 1922, in Wabash, to Emmett and Cora (Russell) Ziner. She married P. Thomas Harrell, in Roann, on Feb. 17, 1940; he survives. Mrs. Harrell worked in housekeeping at Huntington Memorial Hospital for 12 years, retiring in 1990. She was a past member of the Women of the Moose Chapter 255 of Huntington and was also a past member of the Antique Tractor Club of Huntington. She enjoyed flower gardening and spending time with her family, especially her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Along with her husband, she is survived by four sons, Jack D. Harrell, Roanoke; Daniel D. (Linda) Harrell, Warren; and D. Gregory (Donna) Harrell and Gary L. Harrell, both of Huntington; two daughters, Diana L. (Terry) Hoffman, Macy; Debra J. (Dennis) Bruch, Huntington; 11 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by three (triplet) sons, Carl, Ralph and Richard Harrell; two brothers, Claude and Roscoe Ziner; and a granddaughter, Carrie Jo Harrell. Funeral services were held Dec. 13, at the Myers Funeral Home, Huntington, with Brooks L. Fetters officiating. Interment was in Hopewell Cemetery, Lagro. Preferred memorials are to Markle Health and Rehabilitation Center c/o Myers Funeral Home, 2901 Guilford St., Huntington, IN 46750. The memorial guest book for Mrs. Harrell may be signed online at www.myersfuneralhomes.com.

North Manchester, Multiple Lots / Blocks Jamia R. Alexander to Jeanett L. Alexander and Jay A. Alexander, Warranty Deed, Sunset Acres Addition, North Manchester, Multiple

Lots / Blocks Rex E. Nordman and Phyllis Nordamn to Vicki Sue Hall Life Estate, Rex E. Nordman and Phyllis Nordman, Quitclaim Deed, Ewing & Hanna

13

Addition, Wabash, Lot: Pt. 13 First Source Bank AKA 1st Source Bank to Heritage Estates MHP LLC, Warranty Deed, 29-30-7

Dan McNear, 58 U.S. Army veteran July 24, 1952 – Dec. 6, 2010

Dan Randy Lee McNear, 58, Lagro, died Dec. 6, 8:30 p.m., at Wabash County Hospital. He was born July 24, 1952, in Manchester, Tenn., to the late Leonard Valard McNear and Mildred A. (Hamby) McNear Teerling. Mr. McNear was a self-employed mechanic. He served his country in the U.S. Army. He is survived by the love of his life, Dorothy Owen; a son, Fred Michael (Lorri) Delong, Tuscumbia, Ala.; three daughters, Jessica (Matthew) Campbell, Beth Goodman, and Bobbie Owen, all of Lagro; two brothers, Wayne (Maxine) McNear, Adams, Tenn., and Mike McNear, Florence, Ala.; two sisters, Joann (Fred) Delong and Wilma Jean Frontini, both of Adams, Tenn.; and 15 grandchildren. Along with his parents, he was preceded in death by two sisters, Brenda LaMar and Mary Elizabeth McNear. Funeral services were held Dec. 10, at McDonald Funeral Home, Wabash, with Pastor Charlie Osborn officiating. Burial was at a later date. Condolences for the family of Mr. McNear may be sent online at www.mcdonaldfunerals.com.

Joanne Yates, 90 Member of Asbury Country Church Sept. 10, 1920 – Dec. 7, 2010

Joanne Yates, 90, Peru, formerly of rural Roann, died Dec. 7, 12:20 p.m., at Wabash Skilled Care Center. She was born Sept. 10, 1920, in Bluffton, to Russell G. and Nellie (Grossnickle) Deal. She married Brice F. Yates, in Warren, on Aug. 19, 1944; he died May 25, 2010.

Mrs. Yates was a 1938 graduate of Warren High School. She was a homemaker and a bookkeeper for Yates Electric. She was a member of the Asbury Country Church for more than 50 years. She faithfully attended Northfield High School sporting events. She also enjoyed Purdue basketball, and loved watching and supporting the Pacers and the Colts. She lived in rural Huntington County before moving to rural Roann. She is survived by two sons, Jim (Rayne) Yates, Mexico, Ind., and Mike (Janine) Yates, Litchfield Park, Ariz.; four grandchildren, Laura Yates, Marion; Jim Yates, Muncie; and Tyler Yates and Whitney Yates, both of Litchfield Park, Ariz.; a great-granddaughter, Cheyenne Yates, Muncie; three nephews, Ronnie Deal, Anderson; and David Lohrig and Bill Lohrig, both of Roanoke. Alon with her husband, she was preceded in death by two sisters. Funeral services were held Dec. 11, at Grandstaff-Hentgen Funeral Service, Wabash. Burial was in Memorial Lawns Cemetery, Wabash. Preferred memorials are to Asbury Country Church. The memorial guest book for Mrs. Yates may be signed online at www.grandstaff-hentgen.com.

Janet Turner, 74 LaFontaine resident July 29, 1936 – Dec. 5, 2010

Janet L. Turner, 74, LaFontaine, died Dec. 5, 12:00 p.m., in her home. She was born July 29, 1936, in Marion, to the late Francis and Marguerite (Kaylor) Townsend. She first married Merlin E. Fager Jr. on March 31, 1956; he died in February of 1981. She then married William R. Turner on February 13, 1983; he died Nov. 30, 2008. Mrs. Turner was employed as a clerk at the LaFontaine Drug Store for 20 years before retiring to enjoy life with family and friends. She was a 50-year member of Indiana Extension Homemakers Association and a longtime participant of the Euchre Club. She enjoyed attending Grace Community Church, Cowboy Church, and the Women’s Bible Study, and treasured her time with family and friends as well. She was an avid reader, liked to cook, do crafts and after retirement, she loved to travel. Her family would like to extend a special “thank you” to New Hope Hospice. She is survived by a daughter, Marianne Sutton, Marion; four granddaughters, Janelle Straws and Melissa Straws, both of LaFontaine; Stephanie Helsel; and Megan Fager, Indianapolis; three great-grandchildren, Klayton and Abbigail Helsel, and Skylar Fager; and lots of extended family and friends. Along with her husband, she was preceded in death by a son, James E. Fager; a sister, Mary K. Clouse; and a brother, William Townsend. Funeral services were held Dec. 10, at Needham-Storey-Wampner Funeral Service, North Chapel, Marion, with Dr. Tom Mansbarger officiating. Burial was in LaFontaine IOOF Cemetery. Preferred memorials are to Grace Community Church or New Hope Hospice. Condolences for the family of Mrs. Turner may be sent online at www.nswcares.com.


14

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Drought leaves beef producers in need of forage supplements

Winchester Senior Center reading with Head Start cancelled

The reading session with the Head Start class at Dallas L. Winchester Senior Center is cancelled for Dec. 15 at 10:15 a.m. If you are still interested in reading to the children please mark Jan. 19, 2011, on your calendar. The Head Start class will return at 10:15 a.m. that day to take part in another reading session. To find out more information about a variety of opportunities at the Winchester Senior Center, log onto the website at www.livingwellinwabashcounty.org or contact Megan McKillip at 563-4475. Winchester Senior Center is operated by Wabash County Council on Aging, Inc., a Wabash County United Fund agency.

Tan Every Tuesday for

$2.00

Now thru 1/1/11

See Us For The Perfect Stocking Stuffers All New 2011 Lotions Arriving Daily!

Buy any gift card $20.00 & Up and receive one free tanning session and 30% off all lotions Put Some Sunshine In Your Friends’ Holiday Season!

GIFT CERTIFICATES

Perfect For That Hard To Buy For Person Available In All Sizes Voted #1 Tanning Salon In The Area!

MYSTIC TAN TAN IN 60 SECONDS! & + !#(' !#(' &+

&+ * !#(' ($ % & ) !" "

+

&

+

MAXX TAN 1300

&& ' +

& +

Heavy spring rains and late summer drought were the perfect storm for the forage issues that now plague Indiana’s beef producers. Forages are in short supply in some parts of the state and of low quality in others, leaving beef producers to deal with the high prices of alternative feeds to meet the energy and protein needs of their said Ron herds, Lemenager, Purdue Extension beef specialist. “We’re getting a number of calls from producers who are asking questions about a short forage supply, either because they had to start feeding hay earlier than normal, or because they didn’t get a second or third cutting in during the growing season,” Lemenager said. “Some producers have a carryover of hay from the previous year, but that hay is more weathered and lower quality.”

Many of the producers who started to feed hay early had to do so because the drought wreaked havoc on the pastures where cows were grazing. Many pastures were overleaving grazed, plants weak and, ultimately this can lead to delayed early spring growth. To help pastures recover, producers may need to keep cattle off pastures a little longer than normal this next spring, creating more need for forages and alternative feeds. Another problem Lemenager mentioned is the high price of corn. Many alternative feeds are closely tied to the price of corn, and at $5 a bushel producers are looking for other ways to supplement low quality hay. “In terms of alternative feeds, I think we’re talking about distillers grains, corn gluten feed and soybean hulls,” Lemenager said.

“Then, there are some commercially available supplements like tubs, blocks and cubes that producers might want to think about. The bottom line is that they need to compare these different products on a costper-unit energy or protein basis, depending on what the forage analysis tells them.” Commercial feeds often offer more complete nutrition, but they come at a price. Analyzing forages to find out what they’re lacking allows producers to choose supplements based on cost per unit of energy or protein – not just the cost per ton. Regardless of the nutritional decisions producers make, there will be costs – now or in the long run. “A lot of times a drought will have a three-year economic impact,” Lemenager said. “Some producers need to provide supplemental feeds, so there’s a cost associated with this calen-

dar year. If cows aren’t managed correctly and they go into the calving or breeding season in 2011 in a thinner body condition, they’re going to have longer postpartum intervals and pregnancy lower rates. If pregnancy rates are down in 2011, it’s going to translate into a smaller calf crop in 2012. “Producers need to decide when they want to spend the extra money to overcome some of these problems and what kind of economic impact they want to have on losses later down the road.” To help beef producers answer these questions, Lemenager and Purdue Extension forage specialist Keith Johnson will present a webinar at 7 p.m. on Dec. 16. The program will be broadcast to host sites at local Purdue Extension offices. Those interested in attending should contact their county Extension office.

Richvalley United Methodist Women met recently Richvalley United Methodist Women met recently at the church for their annual Christmas carry-in. The room was decorated with colorful tablecloths, a lighted Christmas tree, candles and numerous nativity sets. Cindi Price gave the meal blessing. Hostesses Price and Ruth Dyson provided casseroles, rolls and a drink. Members provided salads and

desserts. Pam Smith gave the lesson on Christmas. We are in the Advent Season now, waiting with anticipation and preparing for the Christ child. The Christmas story was read according to Luke. It took all types of people for this story such as wise men, Mary, Joseph, shepherds, angels, Herod and Baby Jesus. A tea light was lit for each one. Smith also read ‘The Animals – Christmas Eve’. Price led members in singing Silent Night. Roll call was answered by 10 mem-

bers with Christmas m e m o r i e s . Responses were serious and some with humor. Treasurer Joan Day reported the thank offering was higher this year. Christmas giving this year went to Operation Elf, Wabash; Indiana United Methodist Children’s Home, Lebanon; LI.F.E. Center, Wabash; Hamilton Grove Foundation, New Carlile; Bashor Home, Goshen; and Shalom Place, Wabash. The next meeting will be Jan. 8, 2011, at 9 a.m. Jane Long and Ruth Dyson will be

hostesses, Deanna Unger will give the lesson and roll call response will be “A thought on New Year’s resolutions.” Patty Sausaman and Sylvia Sriver were in charge of sending cards to community people. Cindi Price led the discussion on Joshua, who followed in the footsteps of Moses. Members are to read Judges for the January meeting. Arline Kizer gave closing devotions about thanking the Lord for being with us in all kinds of weather, wherever we gather.


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

15

Duke Energy Indiana, consumer groups agree to renegotiate Edwardsport cost settlement agreement Duke Energy Indiana, the Indiana Utility Consumer Counselor, the Duke Energy Indiana Industrial Group and Nucor Steel jointly notified the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission that they are withdrawing their Sept. 17 settlement on cost increases associated with Duke Energy’s Edwardsport coal gasification power plant near Vincennes. The parties agreed to enter into new settlement negotiations. “This action is the best path forward for the Edwardsport project at this time,” said James E. Rogers, Duke Energy chairman, president and chief executive officer. “While we are disappointed the original settlement is being withdrawn, we understand the parties’ desire to negotiate a new settlement that is separate and apart from recent events. “The support and cooperation of the settling parties is important to us, so we have agreed to re-examine and renegotiate the terms of the cost settlement. The merits of the Edwardsport plant are strong and construction continues to move forward. The total project

is about 80 percent complete and we are on track to finish the plant by the fall of 2012.” “The OUCC continues to support the Edwardsport project for the reasons our agency has stated on numerous occasions,” said Indiana Utility Consumer Counselor David Stippler. “However, due to recent revelations about communications between Duke Energy and the former IURC chairman, our office has called into question the integrity of the process that led to the settlement agreement. For these reasons, it is

appropriate to reopen the negotiation process and take a fresh look at the issues addressed in this case.” The settlement was to be considered by the IURC Dec. 13 and 14. The groups have proposed a new schedule for commission consideration of the revised cost with hearings that – if approved – may begin as early as mid-March. Those dates are dependent upon commission scheduling and approval. In April, the company announced that the project’s scale and complexity would add approxi-

mately $530 million to the previously approved $2.35 billion estimate. That brought the total estimated cost of the plant to $2.88 billion. The approximately 618-megawatt plant will use state-of-the-art technology to gasify coal, strip out pollutants, and then burn that cleaner gas to produce electricity. The plant’s efficiency reduces its carbon emissions per megawatthour by nearly half. As the first major new power plant built in Indiana in more than 20 years, the facility is a key step in modernizing the state’s aging electric

system. More information on the plant is avail-

able at http://news.duke-ener-

gy.com/2010/10/14/edwa rdsport/.

Merry Christmas ...from the Timbercrest family to your family. Making good things happen together. " !!!

DEADLINE FEBRUARY 1, 2011

2011-2012 SCHOOL YEAR

SCHOLARSHIP MANAGEMENT SERVICES ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY 1, 2011

1/10/11

LIBRARY 6:30 PM

1/11/11

SOUTHWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 7:00 PM

1/12/11

HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY 7:00 PM


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Charley Creek Alzheimer’s Gardens announces caregiver support Yule Time Stroll group to be held

Dec. 16

GREAT GIFT IDEAS! Sweaters, Slacks, Suits & Dresses, Gift Certificates

The Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Support Group offers emotional support, practical assistance in coping with the issues they face and the latest information about research. Meetings are confidential and free of charge. The topic of “How to Manage the Holidays” will be discussed at this month’s meeting. The group meets at 6 p.m. on Dec. 16 at the Dallas Winchester Senior Center. For more information on the event, contact Kim Polk at 260-563-4475. The Dallas L. Winchester Senior Center is operated by the Wabash County Council on Aging, Inc., a Wabash County United Fund Agency.

‘11 HHR LS Stk#110164

2011 CRUZE LS

MSRP..........................$20,665 Prefer.......................... $20,151 EVA ..............................-$1,000 Rebate ........................-$2,500 Credit Union Discount .-$1,000

Holiday Apparel Has Arrived

Stk#110264

MSRP..........................$18,375 Prefer...........................$17,913 EVA ................................ -$250

$17,663

$15,651

+tax

• SPORTSWEAR • CASUALWEAR • ACCESSORIES • PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS ATTIRE • UNIQUE FORMALWEAR • JEWELRY • MOTHER-OF-THE-BRIDE OR GROOM DRESSES FEATURING FRIENDLY, PERSONAL SERVICE & EXCELLENT ALTERATIONS

The

Francis Shoppe

2010 MALIBU 1LS Stk#110191

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MSRP..........................$23,140 Prefer..........................$22,392 EVA ..............................-$1,000 Rebate ........................ -$1,500

2011 CAMARO 2LT COUPE Stk#110201

MSRP..........................$30,350 Prefer..........................$29,479 EVA ................................ -$250

$29,229

$19,892

+tax

+tax

+tax

OR $252/mo Ally Smartlease

OR $229/mo Ally Smartlease

OR $241/mo Ally Smartlease

2011 TRAVERSE FWD LS

2011 EQUINOX FWD 1LT

‘11 SILVERADO 1500 4WD EXT CAB LS

Stk#110235

MSRP..........................$30,964 Prefer..........................$29,878 EVA ............................. -$1,500 Rebate ........................-$2,000

Stk#110247

$26,378

MSRP..........................$26,295 Prefer..........................$25,339 EVA ................................ -$250 Rebate ........................ -$1,500

$23,589

+tax

+tax

MSRP..........................$33,190 Prefer..........................$31,377 EVA .............................. -$1500 Rebate ........................-$2,500 Down Payment Asst... -$2,005 Cred. Union Disc. ........-$1,000

$24,372

2011 IMPALA LT SEDAN Stk#110250

MSRP..........................$26,900 Prefer..........................$26,276 EVA .............................-$2,500 Dealer Cash................-$4,000 Cred Disc.............-$1,000 AARPUnion or Cred. Union Disc$1,000

$18,776

+tax

1ST PMT WAIVED! ON LEASE

OR $351/mo Ally Smartlease

*Must Fianance Thru Ally Bank w/ Approved Credit

+tax

OR $297/mo Ally Smartlease

WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM

Still The Best coverage in America with 5 Years/100,000 Miles Powertrain Warranty Pricing for GM Employees, GM Retirees and GM eligible family members only. Price does not include sales tax and documentary fee. Down Pmt Assist available on some models and must finance with Ally Bank at Standard rate with approved Credit. Ally Smartlease does not include use tax per month. 1st PM security deposit and sales tax due at lease signing. Security deposit waived on certain models. 12,000 miles per yea on Impala prove AARP membership prior to 9-01-2010. Credit Union discount is for select members with a direct mail piece with an authorization number. Take Delivery before 12/01/2010. 0% APR not available with most offers.

Barry Bunker

Skip Lebo

Lucas Bunker

Kyle Ulrick

Tom Enochs

Mike Overman

Doc Thornburgh

Stan Enochs

Scott Enochs

Gary Thompson

Bob White

State Road 15 North 1307

Wabash Ave. Marion, Indiana 765-664-1275 www.barrybunker.com

OM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM

WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WWW.BARRYBUNKER.COM • WW

The Charley Creek Gardens, located at 551 N. Miami St., will again hold a Yule Time Stroll, Dec. 15-26. Guests are encouraged to begin the stroll anywhere on the path, wander through the lighted garden trails, and warm up in the Education Building for a cup of hot chocolate. Hours for the stroll are 6 to 8 p.m., Monday Thursday, and 6 to 9 p.m., Friday and Sunday. Check out the “Calendar of Events” on the website at www.charleycreekgardens.org for additional information. The Yule Time Stroll allows you to revisit childhood memories or create a few of your own, make Charley Creek Gardens Yule Time Stroll part of your holiday tradition. Parking is available at 518 N. Wabash St. If there are icy conditions or questionable weather, please call 260-563-1020 to see if the stroll will be open.

17


18

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Purdue health and veterinary scientists tell their story to third-graders

~ QUALITY FABRICS ~ Specializing in cottons for quilting 1604 S. Wabash St. • Wabash 260-563-3505 www.colorsgonewild.com

A new book aimed at third-graders features Purdue University scientists and fun activities to build student interest in health and veterinary sciences. we ask “When young children what it means to be a veterinarian, they often think of a white woman caring for dogs. That perspective makes some children feel as if they

don’t have a place in this career,” said Sandy Amass, professor and associate dean in the School of Veterinary Medicine. “Leaders in the field of veterinary medicine, as well as others in related areas of science, technology, math and engineerare working ing, toward inspiring all students from underrepresented minorities to those with dis-

-*)% *, " ), * ) ' (-+ & * *(& & )& ('!* ++& ' -*,('1+ # (-," +"#'!,(' ,* , *#('

) ' ,( '0(' /"( " + * -*)% *, #!", * * +"& ',+ /#%% % +

(', , (* **0

advantaged economic backgrounds, to consider careers in science. “This book, which is part of a larger program called Fat Dogs and Coughing Horses, offers a diverse and personal view of eight scientists who are committed to improving human and animal life.” “How I Became a Scientist: An Activity Book for 3rd Graders” was published this fall and is being distributed to the program’s partner schools in Clinton County, and the cities of Indianapolis; Atlanta, Ga.; and New York City, N.Y. A school in Ghana, Africa, also is participating. Anyone can access a free online copy of the book at www.purdue.edu/svm engaged/sepa/activitybook3. The program’s title, Fat Dogs and Coughing Horses, represents the health issues of obesity and asthma – which is known as heaves in horses – that students can easily understand. The program

)*(.#

**0 " / %$ * 1719

Today’s tough economy gives experienced farmers an opportunity to teach younger farmers planning and decision-making skills they might not learn in good times, a Purdue University agricultural economist says. Those looking to pass their operation on to nextgeneration farmers can show them how to plan

% "! # ! % #

strategically and make decisions under poor market conditions, said business planning specialist Angela Gloy. “This type of real-world, real-time education cannot be simulated in the classroom, nor is it necessarily intuitive,” she said. “Good managers will recognize and act upon opportunities to teach the next generation about which cost-saving measures you’re imple-

! !%

% "

%

% #

$

" !% % "!

and Thad Blossom, a program manager in veterinary clinical sciences. Carol Bain, a technical research assistant in comparative pathobiology, illustrated the book, and Blossom designed it. The Fat Dogs and Coughing Horses project, which is in the second year of its five-year grant, is supported by a Science E d u c a t i o n Partnership Award from the National Center for Research Resources, which is a component of the National Institutes of Health. The School of Veterinary Medicine is working with the Discovery Learning Research Center at Discovery Park, College of Education, College of Health and Human Sciences, Science Bound program and public schools in Indiana. The project also includes an interactive traveling exhibit produced by Purdue A g r i c u l t u r a l Communication in partnership with the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Younger farmers can learn from bad economy

#.

%

targets third-, sixthand ninth-graders, and this book is part of the curriculum created for third-graders. Both the book and curriculum meet Indiana education standards. The featured scientists, who study what helps keep humans or animals healthy, also can visit classrooms to talk more about their careers and meet students. “It’s like having storybook characters come to life, and this reinforces the message that people of backdifferent grounds can be scientists,” Amass said. “Their stories also show young people the different areas of study: from how people age to heaves in horses and to food microbiology.” “How I Became a Scientist” was written by Kauline Davis, director of diversity initiatives with an appointment in the of Department C o m p a r a t i v e Pathobiology; Jessica Schneider, program coordinator in veterinary clinical sciences;

%

!

! $ 1587

menting, the trade-offs involved in one choice over another, and the short- and long-run implications behind each decision. In short, you’re teaching how to manage under conditions of not just price volatility but also extremely low price levels.” One of the financial benefits of a recession is that it can be a time of low interest rates, which helps young people buy into a portion of the farm business if they are prepared. To make a successful transition in management, each farm should have a plan outlining leadership roles, marketing strategies, the direction of the business and other related concerns, Gloy said. Bringing in another generation affects the operation in so many ways that strong planning is a low-cost means of reducing some risks. “There can be very negative consequences for the farm business in the absence of a plan,” she said. “Farm families could jeopardize land and other assets.” There also are personal considerations, such as whether potential partners could work well with each other, said Robert Taylor, professor emeritus of agricultural economics. They also should consider whether the farm would (continued on page 19)


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

19

Finalists named for statewide Young Farmer awards Finalists have been selected for the two statewide awards given to young farmers by Indiana Farm Bureau. The overall winners of the Young Farmer Achievement Award and Young Farmer Excellence in Agriculture Award were announced Dec. 10 at IFB’s annual convention, which was held in Indianapolis. Indiana’s winners will then represent Indiana in the American Farm Bureau Farmer & Young Rancher contests, the winners of which will be announced during the AFBF convention in Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 9-12. The Young Farmer Achievement Award recognizes young farmers whose farm management techniques and commitment to their communities set a positive example for those involved in production agriculture. Among the finalists for the award were Orville and Jessica

Haney, Kosciusko County. Orville and Jessica live and work on the farm that has been in the same family for six generations. The operation currently includes about 120 cows on just under 570 acres near Akron, on which they raise corn, hay, wheat and oats in addition to pasture. Orville manages the farm in partnership with his father and brother, with all major decisions shared between the three of them. Jessica supplements the farm income by working as a nurse, and they have two children: Keith, 4, and Claire, 2. The Young Farmer Excellence in Agriculture Award recognizes young farmers who are involved in agriculture in ways other than as farm owners. Mike and Raylee Honeycutt, Marion County, were finalists for this award.

Mike and Raylee have backgrounds in agriculture, but they now live in Marion County. They nonetheless manage to stay involved in agriculture – Raylee is the marketing manager for CountryMark Co-op, a farmer-owned fuel cooperative, and Mike heads Leadership & the Educational Program Delivery Team at the National FFA Organization, which is headquartered in Indianapolis. They also stay involved in agriculture through Farm Bureau. Mike is the new Marion County Farm Bureau president and Raylee is county woman leader, and they serve as co-chairs of their county’s political action committee. The state Young Farmer Achievement Award winners receive a $6,000 cash prize from Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance; a $500 cash prize from Dodge; 250 hours maximum free

use of one M-Series tractor (and loader, if appropriate) courtesy of Kubota Tractor Corporation; and the David L. Leising Memorial Award, which includes a $200 savings bond. The winners of the state Young Farmer Excellence in Agriculture Award winner receive a John Deere Gator courtesy of Farm Credit Services; $3,000 cash prize from Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance; and a $500 cash prize from Dodge. In both contests, the winners receive an expenses-paid trip to the national convention in Atlanta, Ga., and the runners up receive a $1,000 cash prize from Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance.

1663

CONVERSION: THE ULTIMATE IN LOAN FLEXIBILITY.

Younger farmers can learn from bad economy continue from page 18 Bringing in another generation affects the operation in so many ways that strong planning is a low-cost means of reducing some risks. “There can be very negative consequences for the farm business in the absence of a plan,” she said. “Farm families could jeopardize land and other assets.” There also are personal considerations, such as whether potential partners could work well with each other, said Robert Taylor, professor emeritus of agricultural economics. They also should consider whether the farm would generate enough income for each to make a living. “If we make a decision, it’s got to be good for both of us,” Taylor said. “It doesn’t work if the decision is good for

me and bad for you. Set the business up so that the decisions that are good for one guy are good for the other guy also.” Each person should work hard to improve the business relationship, Taylor said. “Make very sure I’m doing the best I can to be a good young or old partner,” he said. “Each person needs to recognize there is potential for difficulty. I need to work hard and not be difficult.” He said communication is important in a partnership, including understanding each other’s goals. The partnership can run into problems if each person heads in different directions. More than 95 percent of new farmers begin on their family farm. But if

there are no children to take over the business, a farmer might look for a young person outside the family who wants to get into farming, Taylor said. “The young guy gets the chance to farm, the old guy continues to farm and do what he can and be a part of the ongoing, vibrant business,” Taylor added. “He’s not chasing the cows when they’re out, but he’s helping with government programs because he can do that. So he gets the chance to continue farming for many years.” Taylor said young farmers should provide both labor and management, which includes identifying problems and suggesting solutions for how the farm could improve.

LET YOUR LOAN WORK FOR YOU. Loans from Farm Credit Services of Mid-America can give you lifetime benefits, whatever the interest rate environment brings. One of the most valuable features of our loan program is conversion — the ability to change your product when interest rates or other circumstances offer increased savings or greater security. Unlike many other lenders, we don’t require a lengthy and expensive refinancing process. Farm Credit lets you move quickly to a lower-rate product, or a product that offers longer fixed-rate benefits. It’s quick, simple and involves a fee that is typically only a fraction of what refinancing costs can be.

REAL ESTATE

MACHINERY

as low as

as low as

15 year fixed

LINE OF CREDIT as low as

5.85 3.85 3.95 %

APR

Two locations to serve you:

5 year

%

APR

% APR

Existing customer? Call us today for a simple and quick interest rate conversion!

North Manchester

1606 St. Rd. 114 W North Manchester, Indiana 46962-0179 phone: 260.982.2128 • toll free: 800.851.1286

Warsaw

2506 East Center Street Warsaw, Indiana 46580 phone: 574.267.6283 • toll free: 800.851.1286 Bernie Drew

www.e-farmcredit.com

www.wetzel1.com

GREG FRECK, E-mail: gfreck@e-farmcredit.com BRETT CAREY, E-mail: bcarey1@e-farmcredit.com

2102 W. Second St. • Marion, IN 46952 Greg Freck

Brett Carey

Real Estate Loans x Operating Loans x Equipment Loans x Leases x Crop Insurance x Life Insurance


20

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Potter’s House Ministry to host free Christmas meal

Fabric artistry of Julia Sermersheim fills Gallery G at Manchester College

To coincide with the Christmas holiday, Potter’s House Minstries will host a free meal open to the public Dec. 19, 2-4 p.m., at the church, 774 Pike St., Wabash. The meal will include chili, great northern beans, pinto beans, bread, and drinks.

52 W. Canal, Wabash • 563-4400

Christmas Party

JBT DJ & Karaoke Saturday 18th • 9:30pm LIVE BAND NEW YEARS EVE CALL TO MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW! 1731

Julia Sermersheim transforms cloth, simply and expansively, into fiber and fabric art for a winter exhibition in Gallery G at Manchester College. The free show in the upper College Union on the North Manchester campus continues through March 27, 2011. Julia Sermersheim: Impress/Impression is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and noon to 3 p.m. when classes are in session. Her works for this show range from landscapes to abstract works, from the humble to quite contemporary. Price sheets are available in Gallery G. Sermersheim discovered her art passion in the early 1980s, crafting quilts with her mother.

She would strategically arrange her leftover blocks of cloth on the wall, eventually creating a fiber wall piece. Today, the seasoned artist captures influence from nature, magarchitecture azines, and the fine arts. “My newest pieces incorporate some of the fabric I have recently hand-dyed,” says the Jasper native. “These hand-dyed fabrics and other fabrics become a base for the newest process I have been experimenting with – silkscreen.” Sites of her recent exhibitions include Kentucky Wesleyan University, the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft and Swope Art Museum in Terre Haute. She is a recipient of the Phyllis

Dye Turner Award of Distinction. Sermersheim holds her bachelor’s and two master’s degrees in education, using her fabric artistry to help teach hearingimpaired students. For more about Julia Sermersheim, visit www.justjulia.com. For

more about Gallery G and Link Gallery art exhibits at Manchester College and private of showings Sermersheim’s exhibit, please contact Ejenobo Oke, assistant professor of art, at eroke@manchester.edu or 260-982-5334.

First New Year’s Eve at the Charley Creek Inn

The Charley Creek Inn, located at 111 W. Market St., Wabash, invites you to a special New Year’s Eve Celebration on Dec. 31. Acclaimed Jazz Artist Spider Saloff will perform with pianist Tommy Muellner, featuring music from the 1920s. Spider has been described by Rex Reed as “A gifted and polished song stylist. A most enjoyable musical outing.” The New York Post shared, “Saloff will win you over completely” and the Chicago Tribune stated, “Slyly sophisticated, easily accessible, Saloff stands as a kind of ideal.” You can learn more about Spider at www.spiderjazz.com. The celebration begins at 7 p.m. There is limited seating for this event so it is recommended to call early. Tickets may be purchased by visiting the Front Desk at the Charley Creek Inn or by calling 260-563-0111. In addition to the special performance by Saloff, the evening includes pre- and post-dinner appetizers, a gourmet dinner prepared by the Executive Chef and his team, and a champagne toast. Rooms are still available at the Charley Creek Inn for this night. Spider will also perform in the Green Hat Lounge from 6:30 to 7 p.m. for early arrivers. Please plan to join in the New Year’s Eve Celebration at the Charley Creek Inn.

Christmas Dinner 2010 11 am - 2:30 pm Adults - $14.95 – 12 and Under Menu $6.95

SERVED Choice Of Roast Turkey, Mashed Potatoes and Green Beans Spiral Sliced Ham, Baked Potato, Butter Corn Lemon Herb Tilapia, Rice Pilaf, Sugar Snap Peas CHILDREN’S MENU Chicken Tenders with Macaroni & Cheese Hamburger with French Fries Unlimited Salad and Dessert Bar Beverages Are Included

Call Now For Reservations!

(574) 269-2323 2519 E. Center St.


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

HUNTINGTON 7 HUNTINGTON

Christmas festival tradition undergoes revival in Macy

What began as one of a child’s favorite Christmas memories will once again become a reality on Dec. 19. About 15 years ago the Town of Macy’s two churches teamed together to have a Christmas festival. There were three purposes for this festival: to honor Jesus and His birth, to tell some town history and to have some old-fashioned Christmas fun. When North Miami senior Connor Conley was required to do a service project, she decided to reinstate that Christmas festival. The project requires 30 hours of service. Conley pre-

(260) 359-8463 Hauenst ein R d. W est of W al-Mart Hauenstein Rd. West Wal-Mart

sented her idea to the Macy Good Start Committee and the Macy Christian Church. Both groups enthusiastically embraced Conley and her project. After several months of preparation, Conley’s favorite memory now has the potential to be passed along as a favorite memory for many more. The festival will be Dec. 19, 5 p.m., beginning with Santa coming into town, driven by elves in Jerry and Phyllis Calloway’s horse-drawn wagon. Teams of horses, mules (provided by Zartman Weakly) and wagons will allow all

participants to ride through the festival reliving history, viewing the live nativity scene and listening to caroling. Satisfy your appetite with the free soup dinner provided at the Christian Church Fellowship Hall. Stop by the sweet shop to purchase your favorite Christmas sweets: pies, cakes, cinnamon rolls and other favorites will be sale in the on Fellowship Hall with proceeds to benefit a needy family. Santa will be busy in his workshop at the Town Hall. He will be greeting young and old alike, supervising

Hiking can earn cash for parks with new iPhone app

Hiking and running or even walking around home or the office can now automatically benefit Indiana DNR State Parks and Reservoirs when Hoosiers use a new application on their iPhone. Those enjoying the outdoors and exercising pay nothing; they just run or walk while toting their iPhone. The funds that come to Indiana’s state parks and reservoirs from this effort go into the Discovering the Outdoors Fund, which, as it grows, will help defray the cost of field trips for children to Indiana’s state parks and reservoirs. This fund, managed by the Indiana Natural Resources Foundation, was established in memory of long-time DNR employee and interpretive services supporter Tom Huck. The money that goes to support Indiana’s state parks and reservoirs comes from ad revenue from the application. The more steps the user takes, the more Indiana’s state parks and reservoirs get. Much like a pedometer, the app records the user’s steps. Once finished, the user submits his or her steps and

21

the children’s activities of decorating cookies and snow globe-making, and sitting for free 4x6 photos with your child. Hot chocolate and coffee will be provided by the local Masonic Lodge. Boxes for donated non-perishable items will be located at the Macy Elevator where you will load up for your Christmas ride. Jars for any freewill

will be offerings placed at various locations with all proceeds going to benefit a couple of local families in need. Come to Macy from 5 to 8 p.m. for some old fashioned Christmas fun and make all of Conley’s hard work become a favorite Christmas memory of your own.

ALWAYS THE BEST NEW .GQ FILMSTI.com www.GQTI.com www

$4.50 $ $4 4.50

BARGAIN TWLIGHT

SHOWTIMES 12/15 - 12/16

Y 4:00-6:00 PM D A I LLY No passes

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:00, 1:30, 4:05, 6:45, 9:20 FRI/SAT LS 11:50 3D TANGLED (PG) $2.50 PREMIUM PER 3D TICKET 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 FRI/SAT LS 11:35 LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS (R) 11:10, 1:50, 4:20, 6:55, 9:45 BURLESQUE (PG-13) 6:40, 9:40 FASTER (R) 2:30, 4:50, 7:15 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1 (PG-13) 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:25 MOVIE GIFT CARDS C ARDS UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) available a v ailable at a t the box box office offic e 12:20, 2:40, 4:55, 7:10, 9:30 FREE F ION N REE $1 CONCESS CONCESSION FRI/SAT LS 11:45 COUPON COUPO N With e very $10 every MEGAMIND (PG) 12:00, 2:10, 4:30 Movi e Gift Card Movie DUE DATE (R) 12:10, 9:35 purchas e. purchase. limite ti FFor or a limited i ited time FRI/SAT LS 11:55

1747

#

& # &' " %#(" " #(& (% ## & ) *& # (&' " " % " & #&& ' + # %! %& " ( " (% )" %! #% %# ( " '# % #% (&'#! %&

Tangled PG

Showtimes: Friday 7:00 pm Saturday & Sunday 2:00 pm & 7:00 pm

! '%

"

',

%(

( %$( #" " #! & #" ## ' ) '' % 1703

enters the Indiana state parks and reservoirs’ code of 1089. First the user must do the most recent download at http://itunes.apple.c om/us/app/g reenbootpedometer/id38 2417952?mt=8. Then the user must find cell phone coverage before walking or running. Once the ads show up, the user is connected. The user then presses the “Lock” button, submits the 1089 code listed above, presses “done” then walks or runs as much as possible. Green Boot ( w w w. g r e e n b o o t media.com), the sponsoring media company, supports green initiatives and charities through interactive media

exposure. The company allocates 15 percent of its annual proceeds to protecting parks, wetlands and more.

WEST PARK SKATE CENTER

Full Bar Service

New Year’s Eve

HUNTINGTON

Friday & Saturday 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. & 8 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. $3.00 Admission 6 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. $5.00 Admission Skate rental extra

Saturday & Sunday 12 noon - 2:30 p.m. & 2 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. $3.00 Admission 12 noon - 4:30 p.m. $5.00 Admission Skate rental included

Per Person

LEARN TO SKATE LESSONS Earn a FREE Pair of Roller Skates Sat. 10:30-12 noon $3.50

Jct. 24W & SR9

Reserved Seating Only

260-356-3777

Also Available! Dine downstairs on a 1st come, 1st served basis. 5:00-9:30

!"

!

#

" $ !

! ! !

Includes Large Smorgasbord, Peel & Eat Shrimp & Salad Bar Plus Deluxe Dessert Table, Coffee, Tea or Soft Drinks

December 31 6-9:00 p.m. at All Occasions 163 S. Miami St., Wabash Tickets for dinner must be purchased by Tuesday, December 28 (No tickets will be sold at the door) Call in with credit card & we’ll mail your tickets!

at All Occasions 260-563-7770 & 260-563-7779 163 Miami St., Wabash

" 1695

1411


22

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Second quarter separates Lady Knights from Lady Norse MC basketball programs each pick up conference win

SOUTHWOOD’S ABBY HARNESS (25) puts up a shot over the outstretched arms of several Northfield defenders during their game on Dec. 10. Harness scored eight points to help the Lady Knights defeat the Lady Norse 36-23 on the road. (photo by Shaun Tilghman)

by Shaun Tilghman The Southwood Lady Knights looked to pick up their second straight win On Dec. 10 as they traveled to Northfield, where the Lady Norse were trying to record their second win of the season. The cross-town rivals played three quarters of evenly matched basketball, but the Lady Knights put together a big second quarter effort that would prove the difference in their 3623 win. Sarah White got things started for Southwood by hitting two free throws early in the game. Northfield answered when Alyssa Richter got a steal and made a

nice pass ahead to Katie Stephan for the score. Sydney Reed then made good on two free throws before White connected on a trey. Neither team was able to score for over four minutes, but Stephan made a bucket at the 1:03 mark to give the Lady Norse a 6-5 lead after one. White opened the second quarter with a basket to give her team the lead. Northfield’s Morgan Peas then made a free throw to tie things up, but from there it was all Southwood. The Lady Knights outscored the Lady Norse 14-2 in the stanza getting five from White, three from Kaley Harness, and

two each from Jessica Pegg, Abby Harness, and Ana Marie Farlow – making it 198 at the break. After a second quarter in which Northfield was at the charity stripe six times and Southwood eight, neither team attempted a free throw in the third. Four Lady Knights recorded baskets to give their team eight points, while Sydney Elztroth hit a two- and a three-pointer and Reed scored two to give the Lady Norse seven. With one quarter to play, Southwood still held a 12-point lead, 27-15. Elztroth scored first for Northfield to narrow the gap to 10, then a basket by Abby

Harness and a threepoint play from White made the score 32-17. Southwood extended their lead to 17 with 2:06 left to play, but Stephan and Michelle Hendricks gave Northfield the last two baskets of the contest, making the final 36-23. White led all scorers with 17 points, while Abby Harness added eight for the Lady Knights. Elztroth scored seven points, to go with eight steals and seven rebounds, leading the Lady Norse. S o u t h w o o d improved to 3-4 on the year with the win. The loss dropped Northfield to 1-6 this season.

Manchester College (MC) hosted a basketball doubleheader on Dec. 11, as the women’s and men’s programs each faced their respective counterparts from Mount St. Joseph in H e a r t l a n d Collegiate Athletic Conference (HCAC) action. Women’s game The women’s basketball team got the day off to a positive start with a 65-61 win in the early game. Manchester held a 34-22 lead at the half, shooting 11-of23 from the floor and 4-of-7 from the perimeter. They extended their lead to as many as 18 in the second half, 5032 with just under 10 minutes remaining, but Mount St. Joseph battled back to within one point with 1:14 left in the game. The Spartans were able to hang on, however, resulting in the 65-61 victory. Senior Kelsey DeMott led MC with 16 points, nine rebounds, two steals and two assists. Junior Alex Starkey was 4-of-7 from the floor and had 11 points, five assists and two steals. Erynn Meiklejohn, a first year, added 10 points on 4-of-6 shooting, to go with eight rebounds and three blocked shots. Manchester improves to 3-5 on the year, 3-1 in the HCAC. Men’s game The men’s squad secured the sweep for Manchester by recording a victory in the late game, 8174.

MC took a 40-18 lead into the half, holding Mount St. Joseph to just 18 percent field goal shooting in the first half. The Spartans went up by as many as 32 in the second half, including a 6533 lead with 10 minutes remaining before MSJ closed out the half with a big run to make it an 81-74 final. Senior Tyler Delauder scored 17 points on 5-of-10 shooting from the floor and was 4-of-6 from the perimeter;

he also had four steals and three assists. Senior Mitch Schaefer hit 4-of-7 shots from the three-point arc on his way to 16 points and six rebounds. Senior Tyler Henn added 12 points and 15 rebounds, while junior Jason Spindler contributed 10 points on 5-of-6 shooting with eight rebounds and five blocked shots. Manchester improves to 4-3 on the year, 2-1 in the HCAC.

AREA LINEUP (Dec. 15 - 21) MANCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL Friday, Dec. 17 6:15 p.m. Girls V Bball vs. Southwood 8 p.m. Boys V Bball vs. Southwood Saturday, Dec. 18 9 a.m. Wrestling at Wawasee NORTHFIELD HIGH SCHOOL Friday, Dec. 17 6:15 p.m. Boys JV/V Bball vs. Wabash Saturday, Dec. 18 9 a.m. V Wrestling at Twin Lakes Invite 9 a.m. JV Wrestling at North Miami Invite 6:15 p.m. Girls JV/V Bball at Wabash Tuesday, Dec. 21 4 p.m. Boys V Bball at CSB Classic (Caston) SOUTHWOOD HIGH SCHOOL Thursday, Dec. 16 6:30 p.m. Wrestling vs. Huntington North Friday, Dec. 17 6:15 p.m. Girls V Bball at Manchester 8 p.m. Boys V Bball at Manchester Saturday, Dec. 18 9 a.m. V Wrestling at Raider Invite 9 a.m. JV Wrestling at North Miami Invite WABASH HIGH SCHOOL Thursday, Dec. 16 6 p.m. Boys C Bball vs. Oak Hill Friday, Dec. 17 6:15 p.m. Boys JV/V Bball at Northfield Saturday, Dec. 18 6:15 p.m. Girls JV/V Bball vs. Northfield Monday, Dec. 20 7:30 p.m. Boys C Bball vs. Rochester MANCHESTER COLLEGE Saturday, Dec. 18 10 a.m. Women’s Bball vs. Malone at Cruizin’ Classic (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) 4 p.m. Men’s Bball vs. St. Thomas at Cruizin’ Classic (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) Sunday, Dec. 19 8 a.m. Women’s Bball vs. Bridgewater at Cruizin’ Classic (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.) 10 a.m. Men’s Bball vs. Lawrence at Cruizin’ Classic (Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.)

Proud Sponsor of Wabash County Athletics

1667


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

North manchester

Jenae Renz

jenaerenz@verizon.net

THE CHRISTMAS SEASON is almost upon us and as we think of giving gifts, don’t forget the most

important gift you can give – the gift of life. The American Red cross will be holding a blood drive at the North Manchester Church of the Brethren on Dec. 23 from noon until 6 p.m. The church is located at 1306 Beckley St. in North Manchester. Please take a little

time out of your busy schedule to help those in need. Remember, the need for these blood supplies never takes time off for the holidays. Please bring your donor card or some other form of positive identification with you. Without one of these, we cannot accept your donation.

LaFontaine & Somerset Lynnanne Fager 765-981-2276- • leavesofthefall@embarqmail.com

JUST A THOUGHT: “You must give some time to your fellow men. Even if it’s a little thing, do something for others – something for which you get no pay but the privilege of doing it.” ~ Albert Schweitzer, 1875 - 1965 L A F O N TA I N E CHRISTMAS LIGHTING CONTEST: The LaFontaine Business Association’s Christmas Lighting Contest will be held on the evening of Dec. 17. If you want to make sure a house is seen, call 981-2605 and leave a message. Remember to have your lights turned on by 6 p.m. on the 17th! SAVE THOSE BOX TOPS FOR EDUCATION! LaFontaine

Elementary is collecting Labels for Education and Box Tops for Education. There are collection baskets at the front entry to the school. Each year we earn close to $400 from the Box Tops and various amounts of points from the Labels for Education. The Labels for Education points can be used to provide the school with gym items and also art supplies. From now until the school break for Christmas we can get double points for all our Labels for education items. Please remember to save your Box Tops and Labels for Education all year long and drop them off at the school. If you have a collection at home, please turn them in to the school so we can deposit the labels and get double the points. Thank you!

HAVE NEWS you’d like to share? If so, you may contact me by em a i l , leavesofthefall@embar qmail.com (leaves of the fall AT embarqmail DOT com (no spaces or caps); or you may mail your information to me at PO Box 3, LaFontaine, IN 46940. Please include your phone number. News items need to reach me by Wednesday evening for publication in the following week’s edition. I prefer photos be sent via email, however, if you’d like to mail an actual photo and want it returned, please include an SASE. FYI: If the week you would like to see your news in The Paper begins with a holiday, please have your items to me by Tuesday (instead of Wednesday) the week before.

Mark K. Kissell

I n ve s t m e n t A d v i s o r Re p r e s e n t a t i ve

“ Yo u r L o c a l A d v i s o r P r ov i d i n g P r o f e s s i o n a l G u i d a n c e ” ➢ Re t i r e m e n t P l a n n i n g ➢ 4 0 1 ( k ) R o l l o v e r s / I R A Tr a n s f e r s ➢I nve s t m e n t s / F i xe d I n d e xe d A n nu i t i e s ➢Medicare Health & Dr ug Plan Options ➢ L i f e I n s u r a n c e & L o n g Te r m C a r e N e e d s ➢Financial Advisor y Ser vices

C a l l To d a y ! 260•982•1090 or 1•888•342•8918 United Financial Group P u t t i n g B a l a n c e I n Yo u r F u t u r e N o r t h M a n c h e s t e r, I N A d v i s o r y s e r v i c e s o f f e r e d t h r o u g h A m e r i c a n C a p i t a l M a n a g e m e n t , I n c. A Re g i s t e r e d I n ve s t m e n t A d v i s o r. U n i t e d F i n a n c i a l G r o u p a n d A m e r i c a n C a p i t a l M a n a g e m e n t , I n c . , a r e n o t a f f i l i a t e d .

Sixteen-year-olds are now eligible to donate if they have a consent form from the Red Cross, which has been signed by their parent. Childcare will again be provided for

your convenience. Pleas plan to attend and help those in need this holiday season. There will be drawings throughout the day for some nice gifts as well as all donors

will be entered into a weekly region wide drawing for a $250 Visa Gift card. THE PTO SCRIP ORDER DATES: Jan. 3, 18, and 31, 2011; Feb. 14 and 28, 2011; March

23

14 and 28, 2011; April 11 and 25, 2011; May 9 and 23, 2011. Orders due by 10 a.m. at any school office. Order pick up is from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Friday (continued on page 24)


24

www.thepaperofwabash.com

The Fall Season is a for

Reason Change!

Come see what we have to offer at...

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

RENT BASED ON ALL SOURCES OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE 62+ OR DISABLED OF LEGAL AGE

519 Bryan Ave., Wabash or call 260-563-8587 or TDD 1-800-743-3333 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer

December 15, 2010

North Manchester News continued from page 23 at the office where order is placed. (Submitted by Amy Lewis.) YOGA CLASSES are available on Tuesday nights at the Manchester Church of the Brethren from 6 to 7 p.m. Come when you can. Call for more info 260-774-9336. GARBER-SIMMONS SENIOR CENTER (a United Fund Agency) will be closed for the Christmas holidays during the week of Dec. 20-24. We will be open Dec. 27-30, with a New Year’s Party on

Dec. 30 at 10 a.m. Light refreshments will be served and everyone is invited to join us to celebrate. We will be closed on Dec. 31 and reopen on Jan. 3, 2011, with Stretch Band exercise at 8:30 a.m. and “Foot at 10 Care” a.m. (Submitted by NeVonna Allen.) AREA FIVE NUTRITION PROGRAM provides a nutritious lunch Monday through Friday, at Scout Hall, for people age 60 and older, and is based on a voluntary donation.

Christmas Gift Ideas from John Deere

Gift Certificates Available!

RUGGED TOYS ARE BUILT FOR TOUGH FUN! Sturdy, die-cast scale models of the real thing, these toys really hold up in the rough and tumble world of today’s kids!

15%

JOHN JOHN OFF Selected DEERE DEERE Apparel APPAREL A P PA R E L

in stock, or special order from our catalog!

FS 45 TRIMMER • Easy-to-use, wellbalanced trimmer for homeowner use

•Includes many of the excellent design features of our professional models

$

MS 170 CHAIN SAW

• Designed for occasional wood-cutting tasks around the home

17995

•Includes many of the excellent design features of our professional models

• Great for quickly cleaning driveways, sidewalks and hard-to-reach places

$

• Primer bulb and throttle lock ensure fast starts

The North Manchester Public Library will host a Holiday Movie Marathon on Dec. 23. All ages are invited to take a break from the holiday rush to watch a film, snack on popcorn and drink mashmallowy hot chocolate. “Holiday Inn”, starring Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire, will begin at 1 p.m., followed by “The Santa Clause” with Tim Allen at 4 p.m., and “A Christmas Story” with Peter Billingsley at 6 p.m. The films will be shown on the big screen in the Blocher Community Room. Teen Wednesdays are held weekly in the library basement. Teens, ages 12-18, are invited to come play the Wii and board games and enjoy snacks provided by the Friends of the Library. The library will be closed Dec. 24-25 for Christmas. Please call the library, at 260-982-4773, with questions about programs and services.

14995

• Crown Royal • Jack Daniels 750 ML

19

99

1.75 Liters

13

99

• Jagermeister • Bailey’s Irish Cream 750 ML

5068 100 N.13 983 E. N. -St. Rd. BLUFFTON WABASH 1-800-876-9351 oror 1-888-876-9353 (260)565-3659 (260)563-1149

4777 W. 500 N. HUNTINGTON 1-888-876-9352 or (260)356-7958

e-mail: troxel@troxelequipment.com

13

99

983 N. E. St.- Rd. 5068 100 13 N. BWABASH LUFFTON 1-888-876-9353 1-800-876-9351or or (260)563-1149 (260)565-3659

website: www.troxelequipment.com

• Bud • Bud Light • Karkov Vodka • Lite • Coors 1.75 Liters 18 - 12 oz. Cans/Bottles • Canadian 99 Mist

12

24 - 12 oz. Cans

1599

• Canadian Mist • Seagram’s 7 Crown

-Sales -Parts -Service

and coupons from local merchants. Let me help you celebrate this new change in life! Call your Jennifer Martin at 260-982-1762 or email towncaller@hotmail.c om. DON’T FORGET that you can contact me with any birthdays or anniversary that you would like to put in The Paper. MY ADDRESS / DEADLINE: News items mailed to me at 807 N. Walnut St., North Manchester, IN 46962, or e-mailed to me at jenaerenz@frontier.co m. Please mark all email as news for The Paper.

14995

BG 55 HANDHELD BLOWER

$

Laketon area, and be home bound. All meals are individually prepared by Timbercrest to fit each person’s own dietary needs. ARE YOU NEW TO TOWN? Did you just have a baby? Did you recently become engaged? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, Town Callers would like to come visit you! Town Callers is a Community Greeting Service that welcomes new residents, new babies and engaged couples with a complimentary gift pack. The gift pack is filled with information about the area

North Manchester Public Library to host Holiday Movie Marathon

JOHN DEERE JOHN D EERE Wide selection of

Join us for fun and friendship, or you may do carry out. Reservations need to be made a day in advance at 982-9940 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. You may talk to Kim Buzbee. MEALS ON WHEELS can bring a hot lunch and cold dinner to area residents. They are in the office from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., Monday - Friday, to arrange for you or someone you know who needs help with their meals. The office number is 9826010, or leave a message if calling at other times. Clients need to live around North Manchester /

• Natural • Icehouse • Keystone 30 - 12 oz. Cans

13

99

• Icehouse • Keystone 6 - 16 oz. Cans

399 • Coors Light • Miller Lite

750 ML

799 • Svedka • Early Times 1.75 Liters

1499 • Jim Beam • Captain Morgan 1.75 Liters

1999

12 - 16 oz. Cans

949

• Smirnoff Vodka • Natural • Canadian • Keystone Club • Milwaukee Best website: www.troxelequipment.com 1.75 Liters 750 ML

• Captain Morgan • Cuervo Tequila

11

99

24 - 12 oz. Cans

1099 PRICES GOOD EVERY DAY

1599


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

THE LAGRO T O W N S H I P TOURISM BOARD has so many people to thank for such a wonderful day on Dec. 4. Our second annual Christmas in A Canal Town was wonderful. We measure our success by the positive feedback we receive, and once again, so many people have responded so positively to our event that we know Christmas in A Canal Town, Act III will be on the books for next year. We are not sure where to begin with the thanks, so we will start at the Lagro Community Church. Thank you to the members of the church who help each year, most especially this year to Joyce Speelman and Pastor Joel Murray, who coordinated the activities for their church. Thank you to the vendors who prefer to be at Lagro Community Church, and to Suzan Hamilton, Glynna Harmon, and Tami Harmon for the beautiful music they played all afternoon. Christmas in a Canal Town began with the help of Community Church and we can’t imagine trying to do CIACT without you. Next on the Thank You list is Joe and Lou Studio, who have coordinated activities at the Log Cabin for the past two years, and to all the singers and vendors who like to be at the Log Cabin. The many musical acts, face painting, kettle corn, outdoor vendors and warming campfire is enjoyed by so many people. Lagro United Methodist Church has been another friend for the past two years. Last year, they hosted the Kids Klub Choir. This year, they welcomed vendors into the Fellowship Hall, as well as hosting a luncheon/early dinner for people. Without Monica Sparling and all the women of Lagro UMC, we would be lost. They are there to help out, always encouraging and ready to try new endeavors, year after year. Adding to the fun at the Lagro UMC was a wonderful

Lagro

Amanda Lyons

260-563-8091 • lagronewscolumn@gmail.com performance by God’s Country. Thanks to all of you! St. Patrick’s Church is a historic place, and for the past two years history has been made with the wonderful events at this venue. Last year, the church hosted the Madrigal Singers. This year it was Steve Henderson, former Northfield High School Choir Director, directing a choir of nearly 40 people in a glorious concert of religious and secular music. Nearly 200 people crowded into St. Patrick’s to hear the concert. We thank each member of the choir for your commitment to practices since Oct. 31, and we only hope that the suggestion that you make it bigger and better for 2011 was heard by one and all. And thanks, especially, to Peggy Coppler who coordinated the effort and the Friends of St. Patrick’s for readying the church. It is beautiful and a rare jewel for any community. Bethel Church manned the beautiful nativity outside St.

Patrick’s Church. How solemn and beautiful it was to pay homage to the Holy Family after such a magnificent concert. Thanks to cast members of the nativity. The end of the day brought a lighted horse and carriage parade. This was the first year for the event. Those who were able to see the parade enjoyed it immensely. Next year, we hope for a larger turnout and an earlier parade so that everyone can enjoy the horses/carriages, little donkey, ponies, fire truck, and anyone who wants to be in a Christmas Parade. We could go on and on. How much fun is it to watch the community that is so familiar become a wonderland for so many people? The Lagro Township Tourism Board has one goal, to increase the knowledge of all the wonderful activities available in Lagro Township to those that have yet to experience it. Already we have ideas for a bigger and better next year. We hope that on Dec. 3,

2011, you will come out and enjoy everything that Lagro Township has to offer. Our final thank you goes to our local newspaper, the Wabash Plain Dealer and Amanda Lyons column of Lagro News in The Paper. They have encouraged us and saluted us with their coverage of our events the past two years. Without your coverage, it would be so much harder to make Wabash County aware of our efforts. Thank you so much. L A G R O C O M M U N I T Y CHURCH services on Dec. 19 will begin at 10 a.m. with Pastor Joel Murray’s sermon on his series on “Angels”. The Sunday school department will present special music led by Barb Marshall and Loretta Dillon. Tom and Bill Burnsworth will be the greeters and ushers. Betty Murray will be the acolyte. The elders will give the Advent reading. Bonnie Meredith will announce the hymns, and Suzan Hamilton will be the musician. Fellowship and refreshments will follow the service. Christmas Eve candlelight service will be at 7 p.m. on Dec. 24, provided the weather cooperates. Our thanks

to all who contributed to our food pantry this month. We are certainly blessed with your generosity. LAGRO UNITED M E T H O D I S T CHURCH will observe the fourth Sunday in Advent during the 9 a.m. worship service on Dec. 19. The Burcroff family will be the greeters. Scripture reading will be from Micah 5:1-5a. Rev. Rick Borgman will give the message, “Have you chosen God?” The Women’s Guild will meet for their annual Christmas Dinner on Dec. 21 at 6:30 p.m. Clara Swan will be hostess. Members are asked to bring a covered dish to share, a bingo prize, and gift exchange. DEADLINE FOR NEWS is each Wednesday by noon. You can e-mail news and pictures to lagronewscolumn@gmail.com; mail news to me at 5153 W 100 S, Wabash, IN 46992; or contact me by phone at 260-563-8091, 9 a.m. - 8 p.m.

25

260-839-2355

Weekdays 3pm - 5pm Weekends 8am - 5pm

Salted 50 lb. Bag Peanuts in of Potatoes the Shell 25 lb Box

Fresh Oysters Candy

on December 20th

Fruit Baskets

Will Custom Make 1679

PERFORMANCE AND V A ALUE VALUE visit www.simplicitymfg.com www.simplicitymfg.com

WELL CHILD CLINIC

ALL NEW

Friday, December 17th

39900

10:30 a.m. - Noon " " " " " " " "

!

$ $

$

Compact Single-Stage

260-569-2290 " 800-346-2110 & "

$ "

SS822E Briggs & Stratton® 800 Snow Series™ 4-cycle OHV Engine* Efficient 22" Clearing Path

$

propelled Auger pr opelled drive system

# % $& " " "$ $ " $ !% #

Electric Start

DEFERRED INTEREST

to Jan 1st, 2012 with Minimum Monthly Payment Due

**All power levels stated ft-lbs. gross torque per SAE J1940 by Briggs & Stratton. Notes: 1. Finance charges will be assessed at the Maximum APR rate from date of purchase if balance is not paid within promotional period 2. Promotional fee will be a one time fee that will appear on the customer’s first billing statement and added to their existing balance. 3. Consumer repayment terms are original purchase amount times Monthly Repayment Factor. Finance charges are based on the average daily balance for billing period at Maximum APR.

Wabash Portable Equipment “Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters Since 1949”

WCHOSPITAL.COM

1508

1830 South Wabash St., Wabash, IN 46992 260-563-1173 or 1-800-201-1173 a i r www.wabashportable.com a i r


26

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Sew Pieceful Quilt Guild to attend quilt show The Sew Pieceful Quilt Guild is sponsoring a bus trip to the International Quilt Show in Cincinnati, Ohio. The bus leaves Wabash on April 9, 2011. For more information contact Carolyn Kellam at 260-466-6603.

Roann and northern Miami County Joy Harber 765-833-5231 â&#x20AC;˘ roannhappenings@yahoo.com

JUST ONE â&#x20AC;&#x153;SMARTâ&#x20AC;? REASON TO CALL NOW: Standard Pricing. Know the price before we start. No surprises, just honesty â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the way it should be. Bob Zahm

ÂŽ

Heating & Cooling Systems Since 1904

356-0186 or 1-877-218-8526 www.huntingtonheating.com

METRO NORTH NEWS: Polar Pride winners for the month of November were Elizabeth Sisco, Keaton Stout, Nick Cole, and Trinity Shockome. The last student day before winter break will be Dec. 17. School resumes on Jan. 3. A reminder to parents that students will continue to have outside recess as much as possible. Please stress to the children to dress warm with hats, gloves, and coats. (From the Metro North newsletter.) ALL REMAINING ITEMS from the Holiday Giveaway, which was hosted by the four Roann churches, are now available at The

Barn, located on Chippewa Street in downtown Roann. Items are for needy in the families Roann area. R O A N N LIBRARY NEWS: Through Dec. 30, the library will have a drop box for canned goods to benefit the Roann Food Pantry. The Library will close on Dec. 24, 25, and 31, and Jan. 1, for the holidays. THE ROANN C O V E R E D BRIDGE LIONS CLUB met Dec. 2 in the town hall. President Keith Ford opened the meeting by leading the members to the pledge of allegiance to the American flag. The minutes to the November meeting and the treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report was given by Don Everest, they were approved as read. Janet Shoue reported that due to the Roann Food Pantry moving to the Town Hall the Christmas hams

have not been purchased. She will buy the hams when she is notified by the volunteers of the food pantry. Janet also suggested that the Lions Club check on information to provide the eyescreening testing program at the Roann Church of the Brethren for Preschool children. Donna Harman reported that the plans for Christmas in Roann for Dec. 11 have been made. The day will begin with Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrival by fire truck at 10 a.m. at the community building. He will be there until noon. Each child will receive a treat. Other events happening that day, including open house at the Thomas J. Lewis home (now owned by The Nelson family), and the library open house 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Russell Krom reported that the tractor pull dates for the 2011 year have been sched-

uled. Those dates are: July 2, Aug. 6, Sept. 8 and 10. The tractor pull club has been officially named the Eel River Old Iron Club. Those attending the meeting were: Keith Ford, Russell Krom, Don and Carolyn Everest, Dan Shoemaker, Janet Shoue and Roger and Donna Harman. The next meeting will be Jan. 6 at 7 p.m. (From the minutes of the Roann Lions.) PLEASE STOP BY the Deedsville Post Office to purchase your holiday stamps or send a package in the flat rate boxes. Please contact the Post Office at 574-3823034 with any questions. Hours are 6:45 a.m. to 10:15 a.m., Monday - Saturday. Stop in through Dec. 20 to enter our annual contest. You could win a book of Forever Holiday Evergreen stamps. Drawing will be held on Dec. 20 and goodies will be available too. Thank you for your patronage throughout the year. (Submitted by Julia R e n s b e r g e r, Postmaster.) HAPPY BIRTHDAY this week to Austin Owens, Bruce

Shaw, Steve Foust, Nelda Witmer, Carlee LeFebvre, Billy McCarty, Valerie Doud, Kelly Schuler, Tara Lynn, Jennifer McColley, Jane Whitney, Linda West, Stacy Baer, Phil Hendrick, Ciara Williams, Clifton Cordes, Mark Vigar, Sarah Bussard, and Tim Kersey. (From the Roann C o m m u n i t y Calendar.) H A P P Y A N N I V E R S A RY this week to Mr. and Mrs. Billy McCarty, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Flitcraft, Mr. and Mrs. Brady Brower, Mr. and Mrs. Brad Vigar, and Mr. and Mrs. Eric Scholes. (From the Roann C o m m u n i t y Calendar.) ROANN NEWS ITEMS may be sent to my e-mail address at roannhappenings@yahoo.com, or you may call me at the phone number listed. The deadline for news to appear in the next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue of The Paper is Tuesday at noon. It would be best to submit timely news items two weeks in advance.

Delta Kappa Gamma members met Nov. 13

Got the Fever? Get the cure.

0% 6600

APR A PR FFOR OR MON MONTHS THS

FINANCING OR

$1,500 $1,OFF 500 *

*

7UHDWWKDWQHZWUDFWRUIHHYHUGXULQJWKH*UHHQ)HYHU 6DOHV(YHQW*HW\RXUFKRLFHRI  PRQWKĆ&#x;QDQFLQJ OR $1,500 off* the 6030 and 6030 Premium Series 7UDFWRUV$YDLODEOHLQĹ&#x;HQJLQHKRUVHSRZHU FRQĆ&#x;JXUDWLRQVDQGZLWKDQHDUOLPLWOHVVFRPELQDWLRQ RIWUDQVPLVVLRQLQWHULRUK\GUDXOLFDQGGULYHRSWLRQV the 6030 Series Tractors are perfeect foor row-crop or OLYHVWRFNUHODWHGFKRUHV

The Alpha Zeta Chapter members of Delta Kappa Gamma met Nov. 13 in Columbia City at the Grace Lutheran Church with President Donna Ott presiding. The chapter celebrated its founding sisters and honored 50-year Member Mary Lou Fries. Corresponding

Secretary Janet Vesaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work with the newsletter was recognized by receiving a 5Star status from Alpha Epsilon State for its excellent coverage. The program, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrating 100 Years of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roles in Boy Scouts of Americaâ&#x20AC;?, was delivered by Member Sue

Corbin, a long time and nationally active Boy Scout leader. Mrs. Corbin emphasized the importance women have played in the organization once they were allowed to hold key positions. Alpha Zeta Chapter r e p r e s e n t s Huntington, Wabash, and Whitley counties of the Delta Kappa

Gamma International Society, a society of key women educators from the United States, North America, and Europe. Those attending from Wabash County were Victoria Eastman, Nancy Kolb, Brenda Landis and Judith Ward.

&RPHLQWRGD\DQGDVNDERXWDOOWKHJUHDWGHDOVDYDLODEOH GXULQJWKH*UHHQ)HYHU6DOHV(YHQW www.JohnDeere.com/Ag

XXXMPPTFNPPTFNPUPSTQPSUTDPN



&/t1JFSDFUPO 5 Miles North of Pierceton on St. Rd. 13 2IIHU HQGV -DQXDU\   2IIHHU DSSOLHV RQO\ WR QHZ  7UDFWRUV 9DOLG LQ WKH 8QLWHG 6WDWHV RQO\  Ć&#x;[HG UDWH Ć&#x;QDQFLQJRURII6HULHV7UDFWRUV9DOLGDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJGHDOHUVRQO\Ć&#x;QDQFHRIIHHUVXEMHFWWRDSSURYHGFUHGLW RQ-RKQ'HHUH&UHGLW,QVWDOOPHQW3ODQ6RPHUHVWULFWLRQVDSSO\VHH\RXUGHDOHUIRUGHWDLOVDQGRWKHUĆ&#x;QDQFLQJRSWLRQV AB1YBU2FL47258A-TRO3X71130TP-00337685

**)56+22(211):%1(815)+-67)5)(81-76385',%6)(&)7:))1

%1( 

16)/)'7

02()/6 5)):-1',216)/)'702()/6(2)6127-1'/8()-167%//%7-21  ))<285()%/)5*25()7%-/6 16)/)'7 02()/6  ))<285()%/)5*25()7%-/6  %7)6%6/2:%6 *250217,6 **)5621/<%9%-/%&/)%73%57-'-3%7-1+2/%5-6>()%/)56 33529%/%1(%1<5%7)6%1(7)5063529-()(%5)&%6)(21'5)(-7:257,-1)66 7,)5B1%1'-1+2**)56%5)%9%-/%&/) 33/-)6727,)385',%6)2*%//1):!#%1( >02()/60%()217,)2/%5-6167%//0)1752+5%0*520

@ 

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

1599


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Sheriff Striker encourages safe driving Dear editor, With onset of winter upon us, the Wabash County Sheriff ’s Department encourages its drivers to be aware that winter driving can be treacherous. As a result, all drivers need to be prepared for dangerous road conditions. Snow is inevitable this winter. And, like it or not, it’s going to happen sooner rather than later. The following tips for winter driving, which can be treacherous. Avoid driving while fatigued. Getting the proper amount of rest before taking on winter weather driving reduces driving risks. Never warm up a vehicle in an enclosed area, such as a garage. Make certain tires are properly inflated and don’t mix radial tires with other tire types. Keep gas tank at least half full to avoid gas line freeze-up. If possible, avoid using parking brake in cold, rainy and snowy weather. Don’t use cruise control when driving on a slippery surface (wet, ice). Always look and steer where you want to go. Use your seat belt every time you get into your vehicle. Before leaving home, check traffic and weather reports on TV, radio or websites. Be aware of statewide travel alerts and road conditions. Clear snow and ice from car surfaces before driving. Snow on the hood can blow toward the windshield and limit visibility. Keep safety equipment, spare parts and food and water in the car. Keep your cell phone fully charged. Drive with headlights on. If you need to pull over, stay with your vehicle, where you’ll be safer. Call for help on your cell phone, or hang a colorful cloth from your window or antenna. Using common sense is encouraged when driving in blizzard-like conditions. Drive safely to avoid our officers from having to respond to your particular situation. Sheriff Leroy Striker

Do you have a story worth sharing? The Paper is always looking for story ideas from our readers. Do you know someone who has a unique hobby or an interesting story that should be shared with the entire county? If so, call Brent Swan, Shaun Tilghman, or Danielle Smith at 260-563-8326, or email news@thepaperofwabash.com.

Wabash Fire Department releases November report

Wabash Fire Department recently released their monthly report for November 2010. They reported 166 EMS runs, 42 fire runs, 27 blood pressures and 31 LDT’s calls.

27

Conners thank Animal Shelter community for supporter shares story support of Help Portrait Dear editor, Help Portrait was a huge success on Dec. 4. We helped 23 families, 77 individuals. These ladies, couples and families were so very thankful and appreciative for their Help Portraits. We would like to start off by thanking The Paper for the nice articles that ran for two weeks. Many of the people attending saw this and came. We would like to thank C/S Printing for being so gracious to donate 250 4x6 dual side Help Portrait Cards. Jo Wagner, Curves, let us use their facility for the day. Jennie Terrell, Peebles Realty, and Jane Cole gave monetary donations that we used to purchase 23 WalMart gift cards that were included with the individual CDs so they could purchase their choice of prints from their sessions. We would like to thank our wonderful volunteers who all worked so hard and donated their time and energy: Stacy Beatty and Angie Hough, registration; Pam Smith, Super Cuts in Indianapolis; Justin Kelly, Painted Lady, and Jeff Leslie, Center Court Barbershop, for haircuts and styling; Aimee Emrick, Get Nailed, for doing make-up; and our wonderful photographers, Winter Lawson, Four Seasons Photography, Chris Whonstetler, Whonstetler Photography, Amy Brown, Amy Brown Photography, Lyn Dahl, Lyn Dahl Photo Graphics, Tricia Barton, Passion Photography by Trish, and Scott and Brandy Conner, Creative Captures Photography. Caprial and Jordan Conner provided entertainment for the children and Tom and Sarah Cochran and Emily Haarer shared their excitement and enthusiasm video recording the testimonials. Last, but not least, thank you to everyone that attended our first annual Help Portrait. If would not have been a success without you. We are already so excited and looking forward to next year. Brandy and Scott Conner

have one thing to say to the old owners. They made a huge mistake by treating her so badly. She turned out to be a fantastic little dog and her new owners would never give her up for anything. The common misperception is that if a beagle does not hunt well then it’s not worth keeping and taking care of. Well the people that think that are so wrong. In my book they are the same as any other house dog. I have two of them now and they do not

Purchase a Brick Paver •A Great Way To Support Your Local YMCA

hunt nor do I want them to. If they want to sleep all day they can and if they want to play all day they can do that too. If anyone is looking to get an animal, be sure that you are able to take care of it. Please adopt from a shelter, do not buy from a breeder. Shelter dogs make wonderful pets too. Sherry and the Wabash Shelter can use all the help you give them. can Please help them; any donation is greatly appreciated.

COUPON

the WALDO $25 Toward Any Membership Good December 16-23 5162 W 900 N, Roann Hours M-F, 9-4 260-982-2679 1742

e h t y l i m a F r u o Y Give s! a m t s i r h C r o f y t i r Gift of Secu

•Honda Engine •13-Gross HP •Cast Iron Sleeve •Low Oil Shutdown •7 Gallon Fuel Tank •Low Tone Muffler •5 Outlets: 4-120 V-20A 1-120-240-30A Locking

A Gift That Will Be Remembered-

Wabash County YMCA

Dear editor, I would like to say thank you to the staff at the Wabash County Animal Shelter, especially Animal Control Warden Sherry Cox. Sherry went above and beyond her call of duty for me when my husband and I a little adopted female beagle about nine months ago from the shelter. I am from Northern Wisconsin. Sherry had sent me an email with a picture of the beagle we now call Brandy. When we saw Brandy’s picture we both fell in love with her. We adopted her without even meeting her first. Sherry drove five hours to meet us halfway so we could pick Brandy up. Brandy had been badly mistreated and left to fend for herself on the street by her previous socalled owners. Well I

Great Gifts for the Whole Family!

•The Name Will Be There Forever •A Great Gift For The Hard To Shop For

•Briggs & Stratton Intek Engine •10 Gross HP •5 Gallon Fuel Tank •Low Tone Muffler •5 Outlets: 4-120V-20A 1-120/240-30A Locking

ur o Y or t p p Su •Great AdvertisementHave Your Business Name Seen By Everyone That Enters The YMCA

Y

A C M

260-563-YMCA (9622)

Wabash Portable Equipment “Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters Since 1949”

1830 South Wabash St., Wabash, IN 46992 260-563-1173 or 1-800-201-1173 a i r www.wabashportable.com a i r

500 South Cass Street, Wabash 1741

1734


28

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Support These Area Businesses By Buying Holiday Gifts Close To Home The Have Come Out...

Visit the Wab ash Cou n ty Hi s t o r i cal M us e um Gift S tore

Since 1931 Open This Saturday Till 5:00 OFF Save 40% - 50% Open Sunday, Dec. 19th On Large 1 to 5pm Selection Of Merchandise Almost Everything Else is

50%

• Wedding Sets • Ladies’ & Men’s Rings Pendants • Earrings Bracelets • Watches

40F% F

20%

O

OFF

Excludes Consignment Items

A Perfect Christmas Gift for the Person that has Everything!

260-563-6458

a

i

“Where Service is a Tradition”

r 1185

Keratin Straightening Treatment

T h is fa s c in at i n g l o o k in t o l o c al h is t o r y w ill m ak e t h e P ER F EC T C h r is t m as g i ft . Pl us M o re Uni que Wa bas h Cou nt y Gi ft s fo r E ve ry o ne on Yo ur L is t !

* * OPEN CH RIS TMAS DAY* *

Open Saturdays from 9-3

1193

3 6 E. M ar k et S t r e et , D o w n t o wn Wab a s h 2 6 0 - 5 6 3 - 9 0 7 0 • w a b a sh m u s e u m . o rg

1184

1183

Call 563-0700 for information and price!

2p m- 4pm B r i n g t h e f am i l y to v i si t M o v i n g P i ct u re s , o u r e x h i b i t o n t h e E a gl e s t h e a t r e .

Shop ‘Til C ping Da hrist ys mas!

Brazilian Blowout

PRE-O rd er Bil l Wi mb er ly ’s n e w bo o k : Ha n na ’s To wn

SALE ENDS DECEMBER 31ST

61 W. Canal St., Downtown Wabash Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sat. 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Diamond Necklaces, Engagement Rings & Earrings

10

797 Wabash Street 260-563-0700

O p e n Tu e s d a y - Sa t u r d a y 1 0am -4p m

Call 260-568-0109 To Purchase Your $50 Gift Certificate for Carpet Cleaning

29

1210

Speciaasle! Purch

**&"5. / /& &#/. *! )+-"

*'"" *!(". -&$%/+* 4 "- - !("3

25

%OFF

+* -& /0-! 3 %-&./) . +0-. +1 " ,"* 0*! 3.

Any Toy

Expires 12/24/10 With Coupon Only

With Handy 12-In-1 Multitool

122 Hale Drive, Wabash Mon.- Fri. 10-6; Sat. 9-4

Circular Saw Blade Shop Clock with 12-in-1 Multitool An ideal gift for your favorite handyman or handywoman.

Choose the perfect... Wine • Cheese Specialty Olive Oils • Jams • Beers • Martini Mixers • Whiskey • Hand Painted Glassware & Much More...

R 130 107 B4 AA battery included. While supplies last.

-+ !2 3

260-563-5609 1194

111 West Market Street, Wabash, IN

For all the people on your Christmas list. Call For More Details 260-563-0111 Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 1-9pm • Fri. & Sat. 1-10pm

"-0

www.charleycreekinn.com

ira 1181

Down on the Farm Do Yo Last M ur Shoppinute ing a t the Gift Certificates Far m! Available! 711 N. Broadway

PIZZA KING 46 W. Canal St

Need Gift Ideas?

• Wabash • 260-563-7417

G if t C e rt if ic a te sA fo r C h ri s tm avsa! il a b le

GET A FREE ORDE OF G ARLIC BREA R WITH CHEESE D w it h th e p u rc

u rch R e g u la r P ri c e d 1a6s e o f a ” P iz z a Expires 12/20/10 With Coupon On ly

"

" " " " "

" "

"

Punch Pass Gift Certificates YMCA Attire Brick Pavers Annual Memberships !

Sun. 12-4

# %$ & !!

+ # ($% $!! & $& ! $ #' & % ) !&+ &' *%

"

Wabash Portable Equipment “Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters Since 1949”

1830 South Wabash St., Wabash, IN 46992 260-563-1173 or 1-800-201-1173 www.wabashportable.com

HOLIDAY HOURS: MON - FRI 9-8 PM • SAT: 9-5 PM CLOSING AT 5 PM ON DEC. 24TH. CLOSED SUNDAY & DEC. 25TH

air

120 NORTH WALNUT STREET, NORTH MANCHESTER, IN (260) 982-8180 OR (888) 982-8180

%"

# '

"#

Peru

765-472-4172

$ $'

Wabash County

(Across from Taco Bell) Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5

1192

1678

air

$",' 1157

1195

$ #'


30

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

Letters to the editor policy

The editorial staff of The Paper invites readers to submit letters to the editor on timely issues. To ensure fairness to everyone, we have established the following guidelines: Mailed and faxed letters must be signed. All submissions, including by e-mail, must include an address and daytime telephone number for verification. The editor reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and readability. Also, per the editor’s judgment, personal attacks, inflammatory statements and legally objectionable material will not be printed. The editor must also limit readers to submitting a maximum of two letters per month, regardless of whether previous letters have been published, due to space allotments in each weekly issue. Please limit all letters to 500 words or less.

" Envelopes Business Cards Letterheads Full Color Brochures

$

!

#

Let Us Print For You!

The Paper Printing Fast Turnaround • Low Prices

New surgeon general’s report shows immediate need for strong tobacco control programs A new U.S. Surgeon General’s Report was released Dec. 9 that provides a stark reminder of how lethal and addictive smoking is for everyone. This report underscores the importance of actions to prevent kids from starting to smoke, helping smokers quit and protecting everyone’s right to breathe clean air. “Exposure to tobacco smoke causes immediate damage to your body. The next cigarette you smoke can be the cigarette that is the trigger for a deadly heart or asthma attack, or damage your DNA which can lead to cancer,” says Dan Gray, Wabash County Tobacco Free Coalition coordinator. Efforts are always being made to educate the youth of Wabash County about the dangers of tobacco and provide cessation classes for all that are ready to quit their tobacco use. Educating is the beginning of prevention. There are County Town Hall meetings being scheduled in February to educate Wabash County Hoosiers the dangers of secondhand smoke and what can be done to protect the health of all Hoosiers in Wabash County. In the new report there is biological evidence that suggests each cigarette is doing immediate damage and the sooner the smoker quits, the better. The message is clear, it is important to act now to reduce adult smoking in Indiana. The report also finds that today’s cigarettes are designed to deliver nicotine more efficiently to the brain, addicting kids more quickly and making it harder for smokers to quit. Today’s tobacco products are designed for addiction. “This report stresses the need for a strong tobacco prevention and cessation program like we have had for the last 10 years in Indiana. Reducing tobac-

co use is one of the most effective ways to protect our state’s health and prevent deadly and costly diseases such as cancer and heart attacks by preventing kids from starting and helping adults quit,” added Dan Gray. The Surgeon General’s report details the serious health effects of even brief exposure to tobacco smoke. It concludes that: Tobacco smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals, including hundreds that are toxic and at least 70 that cause cancer. Every exposure to the cancer-causing chemicals in tobacco smoke can damage DNA in a way that leads to cancer. Exposure to secondhand smoke has an immediate adverse impact on the cardiovascular system, damaging blood vessels, making blood more likely to clot and increasing risks for heart attack and stroke. Smoking makes it harder for women to get pregnant and can cause miscarriage, premature birth and low birth weight. It also harms male fertility. According to Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, “There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke. Every

inhalation of tobacco smoke exposes our children, our families, and our loved ones to dangerous chemicals that can damage their bodies and result in life-threatening diseases such as cancer and heart disease.” It is imperative for Indiana to continue its progress; in 2009, smoking rates declined to an historic low rate of 23.1 percent representing a highly significant downward trend in adult smoking between 2001-2009 (down from 27.4 percent in 2001 to 23.1 percent in 2009). Indiana now has 208,000 fewer smokers than just 10 years ago, but nevertheless Indiana still ranks below nearly every other state in the country (Indiana ranks 45 in smoking rate). There are still more than one million smokers in Indiana and the costs continue to mount up. Each year there are 9,700 deaths in Indiana due to tobacco use. There are over 194,000 Hoosiers living with serious tobacco-related illness. The tobacco use burden to the Indiana economy is $7.7 billion in annual costs. Indiana spends a total of $487 million each year on Medicaid payments

caused by tobacco use. The report and related materials can be found at www.surgeongeneral.gov. For any information, to schedule someone to speak about the dangers of tobacco and secondhand smoke, or cessation classes, call Dan at 5637727. Cessation classes are offered at the YMCA once a quarter, there is also a 1800-QUIT-NOW call that can be made for free counseling and NRT. We all need to work together to protect the health of everyone in Wabash County by being aware of the dangers of secondhand smoke in public areas and doing something to prevent it. Just as the Surgeon General alliterated, “There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke. Every inhalation of tobacco smoke exposes our children, our families and our loved ones to dangerous chemicals that can damage their bodies and result in lifethreatening diseases such as cancer and heart disease.” Wabash County Tobacco Free Coalition is a Youth Service Bureau program. Youth Service Bureau of Wabash County is a United Fund agency.

1586

$$ *

""$

Let’s Get the Party Started!

FOR ORDERS PLACED DECEMBER 13, 2010 THROUGH JANUARY 28, 2011 AND FOR DELIVERY AFTER JANUARY 3, 2011

A

(*

''

!# $)& '

$(%

$%

$!

Call Us For Details!

Crystal Glass & ExterioLrLsC Wabash, IN 46992

260-563-1911

B

(* !# $)& ' "! !# $$% $%

1692

ANGEL SHEPHERD and her family were presented with the keys to their new home in Roann as part of the Habitat for Humanity program. According to Mike Davenport, project leader, the house took workers – anywhere from six to nine guys each day – over nine weeks to finish. The house became the 13th Habitat for Humanity house constructed within Wabash County. Pictured are (from left): front row, Keydan Shepherd, Marshall Carter; second row, Patty Huff, Kim Hecht, Angel Shepherd; third row, Mike Davenport, Pastor Erin Huiras, and Roger Tate . (photo by Brent Swan)


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

URBANA

Mary Ann Mast

260-774-3432 • 1-800-886-3018

MORE ONE WEEK for local (Urbana) families to contact the Mini Mart if food is needed for the holidays. The Urbana Lions Club, Urbana Yoke and the Parish, Mini Seven-Mile Mart are cooperating to provide help to individuals and families in the Urbana area who are experiencing the consequences of unemployment or other negative conditions in our economy by providing food for the holiday season. If anyone who has an Urbana address or Urbana phone number is interested in more details, please contact Lisa or Jeff at the Mini Mart by Dec. 18. SHARP CREEK: Dec. 16 – Wildcat Pride Reward Movie from 1 to 3 p.m., and Student Council members will help at Operation Elf after school until 5:30 p.m.; Dec. 17 – Sharp Creek Staff C h r i s t m a s Appreciation breakfast at 7 a.m., also end of the 1st Semester and the 2nd Nine Weeks; Dec. 20-31 – No School! Christmas Break. School resumes on Jan. 3. SHARP CREEK WILDCAT PRIDE winners drawn on

Dec. 3 were Grant Dale, caught doing good by Mrs. Schenkel when he held the door open for her and other students, and to Logan Cox who was nominated by Mrs. Winters for helping her carry things into school. Grant received a free Value Meal and a Frosty from Wendy’s and Logan received an IU shirt donated by Spiece. Mrs. Schenkel and Mrs. Winters each received a World’s Finest Chocolate Bar. THANK YOU Wendy’s and Spiece! REMC CALENDAR ARTWORK CONTEST: Any Indiana student attending a public or private school or schooled at home who is currently in grades kindergarten through high school senior may participate. “Students do not have to be consumers of an REMC. Artwork can be submitted by teachers, 4-H leaders, or others as a group or class project or by individual students or their parents or guardians.” Students may enter as often as they wish. The winning drawings (by grade level) will be published in an annual calendar. Artwork will be due in February although a definite date has not yet been announced. Students who are interested should contact an art teacher for details. FROM NORTHFIELD YEARBOOK STAFF: 2011 Shield

Yearbook is on sale for $55 through Jan. 16, 2011. They make great Christmas gifts and there are several ways to place an order. (1) Pick up an order form by Northfield’s main office door. (2) Go to the Yearbook website (www.msdwc.k12.in.u s/msdclass/johw/pub lications.htm) to print an order form OR order online through Jostens (credit and debit cards are accepted). (3) Order with a credit card through the “Online Payments” link on the Northfield home page. PARENTS CAN USE SCHOOL COMPUTERS FREE: Don’t forget that Northfield has a computer set up for parent usage from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. It can be used to access the credit card payment site, Medicaid application forms, MSD job applications, and the Parent Connect (to check on your child’s grades.) URBANA YOKE PARISH: Those serving during the 9:30 a.m. worship service on Dec. 19 are: Worship Leader – Brian Chamberlain; Head Usher – Terry Krom; Acolytes – Noah and Layne Denton; Greeters – T.J. and Dillin Layne; Liturgist – Cathy Christie; Nursery – Tanner Chamberlain; Organist – Nancy Miller; Pianist – Janene Dawes. New church yearbooks will be printed on Jan. 15. If there are any changes or additions that need to be

URBANA HISTORY: Two new members were installed into the Urbana Lions Club by Lions District 25-G Governor Nov. 22. From left to right: new member Ed Howard, DG Paul Russell, new member Jerry Long, sponsor Lowell Karns, and sponsor Steve Gilbert. (photo provided)

made, please report them to Church Secretary Nancy Chamberlain. If members have not signed up to help with the worship services in 2011, please do so on the schedules at the back of the sanctuary. PRAYER CONCERNS: Please add Jerry Warnock, who had heart tests on Dec. 8, and the family and friends of Howard Brembeck, who died on Dec. 5 at the age of 100. Howard was a 1928 graduate of Urbana High School. Roberta Stewart, who has been at Parkview for a little over a month, hopes to be home by the time you read this. Her husband, Bob, wants to thank “all of you for your cards and emails – they have really helped in the recovery process.” anyone who For would like to send a C h r i s t m a s g r e e t i n g / g e t well/thinking of you card or note to Roberta, her home address is 1510 Bendham Drive, Fort Wayne, IN 46815. Continue to remember those who are recovering from illnesses or accidents – Wanda Frehse, Monica Harrell, Marcia Sommers, Deloris Greenlee, Larry and Doris Eads, Kerry Schannep, Carol Porcenaluk, Jim Wilson, Jack and Jeannine Young, and Doug Rice. BRUNCH BUNCH met on Dec. 8 at 8 a.m. at Pam’s Café with the following people present: Peggy and Chad Dilling, Jim and Anne Bell, Helen Dawes, Phil Weck and Jan Weck, Max and Ruth Reed, and Donna Russell. BIRTHDAYS: Dec. 16 – Helen Dawes, Ruby Glassburn, Monica Harrell and Marcia Sommers, Laura Baer, Joe Wilcox, and Leslie Land. Dec. 17 – Jayden Marshall Peas, Carole Christie, Megan Koerner, Lynn Lacanfora, Ben Hoagland. Dec. 18 Stacy Baer, Charles Elliott, Stuart Elliott, Douglas Martin, Mark Vigar. Dec. 19 – Delores Wilcox, T. J. Layne. Dec. 20 – Chad

31

NEW HIRE: Effective Dec. 1, Jim Connelley has joined the sales staff with Troxel Equipment Company. Connelley will be working out of the Bluffton store and is looking forward to taking care of all of your John Deere needs. He has 37 yeas of experience in agriculture sales and strives to provide the best customer service possible. Connelley can be reached at 800-876-9351 or on his cell phone 260438-4782. His email address is Jim Connelley@TroxelEquipment.com. (photo provided) Howard. Dec. 21 – Tony Uggen, Tyler Vigar, Heath Lambert. Dec. 22 – Michael Snell, C l a y t o n Chamberlain, Asia Miller. A N N I V E R SARIES: Dec. 17 – Shannon and Dick Tracy. Dec. 19 – Brad and Jill Vigar. Dec. 22 – Marvin and Marilynn Miller. NEWS ITEMS may be mailed to me at mamast1906@comcast.net or sent to me at 1906 N 100 W, Wabash, IN 46992.

" $

# # !

Woods Framing & Art

70 W. Market St. Historic Downtown Wabash 260-563-1915

1698

Available For Adoption At The Wabash County Animal Shelter: 810 Manchester Ave. • 260-563-3511 Monday - Friday 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Kennel #1511

Kennel #1498

“Pet of the Week” photos are taken each Friday. If the pet featured has already been adopted, many others are still waiting for good homes!

J&K’s M E G A

PET!

• FUL L L I NE OF PET S UPPL IES • • F in d Us O n F ace boo k! •

WABAS H 1 425 N. C a s s S t, Wa b a s h Cr o ss i ng • 260 - 56 3- 03 52


32

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU!!! NEW LISTING

1351 N WABASH - This home has a lot to offer, 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Kitchen/D.R, Spacious Family Room with Wood Burning Insert, Great Kitchen for entertaining. Newer Anderson Windows throughout the home, Hardwood Floors and Tile, Ceiling fans in all rooms, plus a Hot Tub Room for relaxing. Great Location on the North Side. 4-Car Heated Garage all on 2.39 Acres M-L makes this property one of a kind. $184,900 MLS No: 77059555

1355 MIDDLE - This is a Fannie Mae Homepath property. This property approved for Homepath Mortgage financing. This property approved for Homepath renovation Mortgage Financing!! 4 bedroom 2 bath home. Newer roof and newer furnace. Must see for the money!! $35,350 MLS No: 77064688

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

220 N WASHINGTON - ROANN - Lots of updates to this one story home located in Roann. Cozy 3 bedroom 1 bath with large fenced-in backyard including new deck. Newer windows, furnace, water heater, and roof. Large master bedroom with vaulted ceiling. Great landscaping. Northfield Schools. Call Jeremy today at 260-330-3413. $59,900 MLS No: 77064443

1787 SNYDER ST - Nice single story home with large family room. You will love the size of this large backyard. Wait till you see the space offered by the walk-in closet in Master bedroom. A lot of charm to be found in this home. A nice property in a quiet, low traffic neighborhood. Call Cody today at 330-3420. $79,000 MLS No: 77064640 NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

3898 W OLD US 24 - This is a Fannie Mae Homepath Property. This home is approved for Homepath Renovation Mortgage Financing. 4 Bedroom, 2.5 bath home in Northfield Schools on 3.98 Acres. Over 3000 sq ft of living space. A must see!!! $99,500 MLS No: 77064655

T 123 532 N. CASS ST., WABASH, IN 46992 260-563-7478 or • 1-800-523-0477

975 MICHIGAN - This is a Fannie Mae Homepath Property. Approved for Homepath Mortgage Financing. 2 bedroom 1 bath home. Great deal for the money. $17,000 MLS No: 77064656 Jennie Terrell, Owner, Broker ............260-571-1246 Steve Peebles, Broker ....................260-571-7332 Kay Eads, Sales Associate ............260-571-3376 Ray Bland, Broker ..........................260-563-3839 Pam Simons, Broker ......................260-571-4414 Phil Eakright, Sales Associate .... 260-377-9330 Jan Bailey, Broker .......................... 260-571-0890 Jeremy Steele, Sales Associate ....260-330-3413 Cody Lambert, Sales Associate ....260-330-3420

Ted Yoder to perform on Dec. 19 Ted Yoder plays the hammer dulcimer and its like nothing you have heard before. Yoder’s skill garnered attention in July 2010 when he won the title of Kentucky State Hammered Dulcimer Grand Champion and on Sept. 18 he advanced to the National Hammer Dulcimer Championship and now holds the title, “2010 National Hammer Dulcimer Champion.” It is amazing what one man can do with two hammers, 91 strings, a few digital toys and a lot of ingenuity. Some of Ted’s public events include the opening act at the Blue Gate Theater, Gebhard Woods Dulcimer Festival, Gaither Fall Festival, Charley Creek Arts Festival, Day of Healing and Bill and Gloria Gaither’s company Christmas party. Yoder’s music has been influenced by the music of Acoustic Alchemy and Rich Mullins. Like his predecessors, his composition and arrangements are fresh, energetic pieces of art. Yoder’s debut album, an EP titled “Hymns”, was released in July 2009 and already he has independently released his second album, an EP of acoustic songs titled “Songs From Walnut Valley.” It features songs that Yoder

performed in competition for the title of National Grand Champion in Winfield, Kan. Most of the songs on this CD were composed by Yoder, exclusively for performance on the hammer dulcimer and this recording really shows the sparkle of Yoder’s musical expression. Yoder was set to release his first fulllength CD, an album of Christmas music, in November 2010. Yoder grew up in a small town in Indiana and learned at an early age how to please a

crowd, singing four-part harmonies with his parents and five siblings. The love of performing was deeply embedded through those experiences and today he still loves to sing an occasional folk song in his concerts. Yoder naturally progressed from singing and piano lessons in childhood to keyboards and drum programming in his teenage years. When he was married in 1997, he and his wife, Donna, were already dreaming of purchasing a hammered dulcimer, so when his in-laws gave

them the money as a wedding gift they were ecstatic. Thirteen years later, they find themselves busy with six wonderful children, ages 12 to 2 years, and two very large and beautiful dulcimers. Yoder’s current repertoire includes Christmas music, modern contemporary music, a sprinkling of classical selections, hymns, his own original compositions and even a few Beatles’ tunes. Yoder will perform Dec. 19, 10:45 a.m., at Wabash Alliance Church.

Planning the Future of Wabash County Through Your Eyes Starting in January 2011 the Wabash County Plan Commission will begin the process of writing the new county comprehensive plan.

This process will involve numerous public meetings held throughout the county to gather input from the general public.

! !

!

! !

!

Meeting times, dates and locations are as follows: *) 4 )0 -4 /$ &!/*) !#%*) "*- '! . )/ ) 2 2 *2).$%+.

*) 4 )0 - 4 /$ "*)/ %)! *((0)%/4 0%' %)# % !-/4 ) '/5 *2).$%+

0!. 4 )0 -4 /$ %( !- -!./ ..!( '4 **( *-/$ ) $!./!- $!./!- *2).$%+

0!. 4 )0 - 4 /$ *0-/ *0.! *((%..%*)!-. (!!/%)# -**( * '! *2).$%+

0!. 4 )0 -4 /$ #-* *((0)%/4 0%' %)# #-* *2).$%+

" 4*0 $ 1! )4 ,0!./%*). +'! .! '' /$! .$ *0)/4 ' ) *((%..%*) ""% ! 3/ *- 3/

1674

ED AND VAUDENE (RAILSBACK) FRENCH, Silver Lake, will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Dec. 24. The couple was married Dec 24, 1950, in Silver Lake, by Rev. Levi Hill. Ed is a retired farmer and electrician and is now pastor of West Eel River Brethren Church. Vaudene is retired from Little Crow Foods. The couple has three children, Gary French, Wabash; Ron (Valerie) French, Okemos, Mich.; and Kathy Judy, Peru. (photo provided)


30

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

New surgeon general’s report shows immediate need for strong tobacco control programs

NEW HIRE: Effective Dec. 1, Jim Connelley has joined the sales staff with Troxel Equipment Company. Connelley will be working out of the Bluffton store and is looking forward to taking care of all of your John Deere needs. He has 37 yeas of experience in agriculture sales and strives to provide the best customer service possible. Connelley can be reached at 800-876-9351 or on his cell phone 260-438-4782. His email address is JimConnelley@TroxelEquipment.com. (photo provided)

Letters to the editor policy The editorial staff of The Paper invites readers to submit letters to the editor on timely issues. To ensure fairness to everyone, we have established the following guidelines: Mailed and faxed letters must be signed. All submissions, including by e-mail, must include an address and daytime telephone number for verification. The editor reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and readability. Also, per the editor’s judgment, personal attacks, inflammatory statements and legally objectionable material will not be printed. The editor must also limit readers to submitting a maximum of two letters per month, regardless of whether previous letters have been published, due to space allotments in each weekly issue. Please limit all letters to 500 words or less.

" Envelopes Business Cards Letterheads Full Color Brochures

$

!

#

Let Us Print For You!

The Paper Printing Fast Turnaround • Low Prices 1586

A new U.S. Surgeon General’s Report was released Dec. 9 that provides a stark reminder of how lethal and addictive smoking is for everyone. This report underscores the importance of actions to prevent kids from starting to smoke, helping smokers quit and protecting everyone’s right to breathe clean air. “Exposure to tobacco smoke causes immediate damage to your body. The next cigarette you smoke can be the cigarette that is the trigger for a deadly heart or asthma attack, or damage your DNA which can lead to cancer,” says Dan Gray, Wabash County Tobacco Free Coalition coordinator. Efforts are always being made to educate the youth of Wabash County about the dangers of tobacco and cessation provide classes for all that are ready to quit their tobacco use. Educating is the beginning of prevention. There are County Town Hall meetings being scheduled in February to educate Wabash County Hoosiers the dangers of secondhand smoke and what can be done to protect the health of all Hoosiers in Wabash County. In the new report there is biological evidence that suggests each cigarette is doing immediate damage and the sooner the smoker quits, the better. The message is clear, it is important to act now to reduce adult smoking in Indiana. The report also finds that today’s cigarettes are designed to deliver nicotine more efficiently to the brain, addicting kids more quickly and making it harder for smokers to quit. Today’s tobacco products are designed for addiction. “This report stresses the need for a strong tobacco prevention and cessation program like we have had for the last 10 years in Indiana. Reducing tobacco use is one of the most effective ways to protect our state’s health and prevent deadly and costly diseases such as cancer and heart attacks by preventing kids from starting and helping adults quit,” added Dan Gray. The Surgeon General’s report details the serious health effects of even brief exposure to tobacco smoke. It concludes that: Tobacco smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals, including

hundreds that are toxic and at least 70 that cause cancer. Every exposure to the cancer-causing chemicals in tobacco smoke can damage DNA in a way that leads to cancer. Exposure to secondhand smoke has an adverse immediate impact on the cardiovascular system, damaging blood vessels, making blood more likely to clot and increasing risks for heart attack and stroke. Smoking makes it harder for women to get pregnant and can cause miscarriage, premature birth and low birth weight. It also harms male fertility. According to Surgeon General Benjamin, Regina “There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke. Every inhalation of tobacco smoke exposes our children, our families, and our loved ones to dangerous chemicals that can damage their bodies and result in lifethreatening diseases such as cancer and heart disease.” It is imperative for Indiana to continue its

progress; in 2009, smoking rates declined to an historic low rate of 23.1 percent representing a highly significant downward trend in adult smoking between 2001-2009 (down from 27.4 percent in 2001 to 23.1 percent in 2009). Indiana now has 208,000 fewer smokers than just 10 years ago, but nevertheless Indiana still ranks below nearly every other state in the country (Indiana ranks 45 in smoking rate). There are still more than one million smokers in Indiana and the costs continue to mount up. Each year there are 9,700 deaths in Indiana due to tobacco use. There are over 194,000 Hoosiers living with serious tobaccorelated illness. The tobacco use burden to the Indiana economy is $7.7 billion in annual costs. Indiana spends a total of $487 million each year on Medicaid payments caused by tobacco use. The report and related materials can be found at www.surgeongeneral.gov. For any information,

to schedule someone to speak about the dangers of tobacco and secondhand smoke, or cessation classes, call Dan at 563-7727. Cessation classes are offered at the YMCA once a quarter, there is also a 1-800-QUIT-NOW call that can be made for free counseling and NRT. We all need to work together to protect the health of everyone in Wabash County by being aware of the dangers of secondhand smoke in public areas and doing something to prevent it. Just as the Surgeon General alliterated, “There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke. Every inhalation of tobacco smoke exposes our children, our families and our loved ones to dangerous chemicals that can damage their bodies and result in lifethreatening diseases such as cancer and heart disease.” Wabash County Tobacco Free Coalition is a Youth Service Bureau program. Youth Service Bureau of Wabash County is a United Fund agency.

ANGEL SHEPHERD and her family were presented with the keys to their new home in Roann as part of the Habitat for Humanity program. According to Mike Davenport, project leader, the house took workers – anywhere from six to nine guys each day – over nine weeks to finish. The house became the 13th Habitat for Humanity house constructed within Wabash County. Pictured are (from left): front row, Keydan Shepherd, Marshall Carter; second row, Patty Huff, Kim Hecht, Angel Shepherd; third row, Mike Davenport, Pastor Erin Huiras, and Roger Tate . (photo by Brent Swan)


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

URBANA

Mary Ann Mast

260-774-3432 • 1-800-886-3018

MORE ONE WEEK for local (Urbana) families to contact the Mini Mart if food is needed for the holidays. The Urbana Lions Club, Urbana Yoke and the Parish, Mini Seven-Mile Mart are cooperating to provide help to individuals and families in the Urbana area who are experiencing the consequences of unemployment or other negative conditions in our economy by providing food for the holiday season. If anyone who has an Urbana address or Urbana phone number is interested in more details, please contact Lisa or Jeff at the Mini Mart by Dec. 18. SHARP CREEK: Dec. 16 – Wildcat Pride Reward Movie from 1 to 3 p.m., and Student Council members will help at Operation Elf after school until 5:30 p.m.; Dec. 17 – Sharp Creek Staff C h r i s t m a s Appreciation breakfast at 7 a.m., also end of the 1st Semester and the 2nd Nine Weeks; Dec. 20-31 – No School! Christmas Break. School resumes on Jan. 3. SHARP CREEK WILDCAT PRIDE winners drawn on

Dec. 3 were Grant Dale, caught doing good by Mrs. Schenkel when he held the door open for her and other students, and to Logan Cox who was nominated by Mrs. Winters for helping her carry things into school. Grant received a free Value Meal and a Frosty from Wendy’s and Logan received an IU shirt donated by Spiece. Mrs. Schenkel and Mrs. Winters each received a World’s Finest Chocolate Bar. THANK YOU Wendy’s and Spiece! REMC CALENDAR ARTWORK CONTEST: Any Indiana student attending a public or private school or schooled at home who is currently in grades kindergarten through high school senior may participate. “Students do not have to be consumers of an REMC. Artwork can be submitted by teachers, 4-H leaders, or others as a group or class project or by individual students or their parents or guardians.” Students may enter as often as they wish. The winning drawings (by grade level) will be published in an annual calendar. Artwork will be due in February although a definite date has not yet been announced. Students who are interested should contact an art teacher for details. FROM NORTHFIELD YEARBOOK STAFF: 2011 Shield

Yearbook is on sale for $55 through Jan. 16, 2011. They make great Christmas gifts and there are several ways to place an order. (1) Pick up an order form by Northfield’s main office door. (2) Go to the Yearbook website (www.msdwc.k12.in.u s/msdclass/johw/pub lications.htm) to print an order form OR order online through Jostens (credit and debit cards are accepted). (3) Order with a credit card through the “Online Payments” link on the Northfield home page. PARENTS CAN USE SCHOOL COMPUTERS FREE: Don’t forget that Northfield has a computer set up for parent usage from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. It can be used to access the credit card payment site, Medicaid application forms, MSD job applications, and the Parent Connect (to check on your child’s grades.) URBANA YOKE PARISH: Those serving during the 9:30 a.m. worship service on Dec. 19 are: Worship Leader – Brian Chamberlain; Head Usher – Terry Krom; Acolytes – Noah and Layne Denton; Greeters – T.J. and Dillin Layne; Liturgist – Cathy Christie; Nursery – Tanner Chamberlain; Organist – Nancy Miller; Pianist – Janene Dawes. New church yearbooks will be printed on Jan. 15. If there are any changes or additions that need to be

URBANA HISTORY: Two new members were installed into the Urbana Lions Club by Lions District 25-G Governor Nov. 22. From left to right: new member Ed Howard, DG Paul Russell, new member Jerry Long, sponsor Lowell Karns, and sponsor Steve Gilbert. (photo provided)

made, please report them to Church Secretary Nancy Chamberlain. If members have not signed up to help with the worship services in 2011, please do so on the schedules at the back of the sanctuary. PRAYER CONCERNS: Please add Jerry Warnock, who had heart tests on Dec. 8, and the family and friends of Howard Brembeck, who died on Dec. 5 at the age of 100. Howard was a 1928 graduate of Urbana High School. Roberta Stewart, who has been at Parkview for a little over a month, hopes to be home by the time you read this. Her husband, Bob, wants to thank “all of you for your cards and emails – they have really helped in the recovery process.” anyone who For would like to send a C h r i s t m a s g r e e t i n g / g e t well/thinking of you card or note to Roberta, her home address is 1510 Bendham Drive, Fort Wayne, IN 46815. Continue to remember those who are recovering from illnesses or accidents – Wanda Frehse, Monica Harrell, Marcia Sommers, Deloris Greenlee, Larry and Doris Eads, Kerry Schannep, Carol Porcenaluk, Jim Wilson, Jack and Jeannine Young, and Doug Rice. BRUNCH BUNCH met on Dec. 8 at 8 a.m. at Pam’s Café with the following people present: Peggy and Chad Dilling, Jim and Anne Bell, Helen Dawes, Phil Weck and Jan Weck, Max and Ruth Reed, and Donna Russell. BIRTHDAYS: Dec. 16 – Helen Dawes, Ruby Glassburn, Monica Harrell and Marcia Sommers, Laura Baer, Joe Wilcox, and Leslie Land. Dec. 17 – Jayden Marshall Peas, Carole Christie, Megan Koerner, Lynn Lacanfora, Ben Hoagland. Dec. 18 Stacy Baer, Charles Elliott, Stuart Elliott, Douglas Martin, Mark Vigar. Dec. 19 – Delores Wilcox, T. J. Layne. Dec. 20 – Chad

31

NEW HIRE: Effective Dec. 1, Jim Connelley has joined the sales staff with Troxel Equipment Company. Connelley will be working out of the Bluffton store and is looking forward to taking care of all of your John Deere needs. He has 37 yeas of experience in agriculture sales and strives to provide the best customer service possible. Connelley can be reached at 800-876-9351 or on his cell phone 260438-4782. His email address is Jim Connelley@TroxelEquipment.com. (photo provided) Howard. Dec. 21 – Tony Uggen, Tyler Vigar, Heath Lambert. Dec. 22 – Michael Snell, C l a y t o n Chamberlain, Asia Miller. A N N I V E R SARIES: Dec. 17 – Shannon and Dick Tracy. Dec. 19 – Brad and Jill Vigar. Dec. 22 – Marvin and Marilynn Miller. NEWS ITEMS may be mailed to me at mamast1906@comcast.net or sent to me at 1906 N 100 W, Wabash, IN 46992.

" $

# # !

Woods Framing & Art

70 W. Market St. Historic Downtown Wabash 260-563-1915

1698

Available For Adoption At The Wabash County Animal Shelter: 810 Manchester Ave. • 260-563-3511 Monday - Friday 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Kennel #1511

Kennel #1498

“Pet of the Week” photos are taken each Friday. If the pet featured has already been adopted, many others are still waiting for good homes!

J&K’s M E G A

PET!

• FUL L L I NE OF PET S UPPL IES • • F in d Us O n F ace boo k! •

WABAS H 1 425 N. C a s s S t, Wa b a s h Cr o ss i ng • 260 - 56 3- 03 52


32

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU!!! NEW LISTING

1351 N WABASH - This home has a lot to offer, 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Kitchen/D.R, Spacious Family Room with Wood Burning Insert, Great Kitchen for entertaining. Newer Anderson Windows throughout the home, Hardwood Floors and Tile, Ceiling fans in all rooms, plus a Hot Tub Room for relaxing. Great Location on the North Side. 4-Car Heated Garage all on 2.39 Acres M-L makes this property one of a kind. $184,900 MLS No: 77059555

1355 MIDDLE - This is a Fannie Mae Homepath property. This property approved for Homepath Mortgage financing. This property approved for Homepath renovation Mortgage Financing!! 4 bedroom 2 bath home. Newer roof and newer furnace. Must see for the money!! $35,350 MLS No: 77064688

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

220 N WASHINGTON - ROANN - Lots of updates to this one story home located in Roann. Cozy 3 bedroom 1 bath with large fenced-in backyard including new deck. Newer windows, furnace, water heater, and roof. Large master bedroom with vaulted ceiling. Great landscaping. Northfield Schools. Call Jeremy today at 260-330-3413. $59,900 MLS No: 77064443

1787 SNYDER ST - Nice single story home with large family room. You will love the size of this large backyard. Wait till you see the space offered by the walk-in closet in Master bedroom. A lot of charm to be found in this home. A nice property in a quiet, low traffic neighborhood. Call Cody today at 330-3420. $79,000 MLS No: 77064640 NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

3898 W OLD US 24 - This is a Fannie Mae Homepath Property. This home is approved for Homepath Renovation Mortgage Financing. 4 Bedroom, 2.5 bath home in Northfield Schools on 3.98 Acres. Over 3000 sq ft of living space. A must see!!! $99,500 MLS No: 77064655

T 123 532 N. CASS ST., WABASH, IN 46992 260-563-7478 or • 1-800-523-0477

975 MICHIGAN - This is a Fannie Mae Homepath Property. Approved for Homepath Mortgage Financing. 2 bedroom 1 bath home. Great deal for the money. $17,000 MLS No: 77064656 Jennie Terrell, Owner, Broker ............260-571-1246 Steve Peebles, Broker ....................260-571-7332 Kay Eads, Sales Associate ............260-571-3376 Ray Bland, Broker ..........................260-563-3839 Pam Simons, Broker ......................260-571-4414 Phil Eakright, Sales Associate .... 260-377-9330 Jan Bailey, Broker .......................... 260-571-0890 Jeremy Steele, Sales Associate ....260-330-3413 Cody Lambert, Sales Associate ....260-330-3420

Ted Yoder to perform on Dec. 19 Ted Yoder plays the hammer dulcimer and its like nothing you have heard before. Yoder’s skill garnered attention in July 2010 when he won the title of Kentucky State Hammered Dulcimer Grand Champion and on Sept. 18 he advanced to the National Hammer Dulcimer Championship and now holds the title, “2010 National Hammer Dulcimer Champion.” It is amazing what one man can do with two hammers, 91 strings, a few digital toys and a lot of ingenuity. Some of Ted’s public events include the opening act at the Blue Gate Theater, Gebhard Woods Dulcimer Festival, Gaither Fall Festival, Charley Creek Arts Festival, Day of Healing and Bill and Gloria Gaither’s company Christmas party. Yoder’s music has been influenced by the music of Acoustic Alchemy and Rich Mullins. Like his predecessors, his composition and arrangements are fresh, energetic pieces of art. Yoder’s debut album, an EP titled “Hymns”, was released in July 2009 and already he has independently released his second album, an EP of acoustic songs titled “Songs From Walnut Valley.” It features songs that Yoder

performed in competition for the title of National Grand Champion in Winfield, Kan. Most of the songs on this CD were composed by Yoder, exclusively for performance on the hammer dulcimer and this recording really shows the sparkle of Yoder’s musical expression. Yoder was set to release his first fulllength CD, an album of Christmas music, in November 2010. Yoder grew up in a small town in Indiana and learned at an early age how to please a

crowd, singing four-part harmonies with his parents and five siblings. The love of performing was deeply embedded through those experiences and today he still loves to sing an occasional folk song in his concerts. Yoder naturally progressed from singing and piano lessons in childhood to keyboards and drum programming in his teenage years. When he was married in 1997, he and his wife, Donna, were already dreaming of purchasing a hammered dulcimer, so when his in-laws gave

them the money as a wedding gift they were ecstatic. Thirteen years later, they find themselves busy with six wonderful children, ages 12 to 2 years, and two very large and beautiful dulcimers. Yoder’s current repertoire includes Christmas music, modern contemporary music, a sprinkling of classical selections, hymns, his own original compositions and even a few Beatles’ tunes. Yoder will perform Dec. 19, 10:45 a.m., at Wabash Alliance Church.

Planning the Future of Wabash County Through Your Eyes Starting in January 2011 the Wabash County Plan Commission will begin the process of writing the new county comprehensive plan.

This process will involve numerous public meetings held throughout the county to gather input from the general public.

! !

!

! !

!

Meeting times, dates and locations are as follows: *) 4 )0 -4 /$ &!/*) !#%*) "*- '! . )/ ) 2 2 *2).$%+.

*) 4 )0 - 4 /$ "*)/ %)! *((0)%/4 0%' %)# % !-/4 ) '/5 *2).$%+

0!. 4 )0 -4 /$ %( !- -!./ ..!( '4 **( *-/$ ) $!./!- $!./!- *2).$%+

0!. 4 )0 - 4 /$ *0-/ *0.! *((%..%*)!-. (!!/%)# -**( * '! *2).$%+

0!. 4 )0 -4 /$ #-* *((0)%/4 0%' %)# #-* *2).$%+

" 4*0 $ 1! )4 ,0!./%*). +'! .! '' /$! .$ *0)/4 ' ) *((%..%*) ""% ! 3/ *- 3/

1674

ED AND VAUDENE (RAILSBACK) FRENCH, Silver Lake, will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Dec. 24. The couple was married Dec 24, 1950, in Silver Lake, by Rev. Levi Hill. Ed is a retired farmer and electrician and is now pastor of West Eel River Brethren Church. Vaudene is retired from Little Crow Foods. The couple has three children, Gary French, Wabash; Ron (Valerie) French, Okemos, Mich.; and Kathy Judy, Peru. (photo provided)


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

33

“A different kind of real estate company” 2305 E. 1000 N., NORTH MANCHESTER BRAND New 40 yr Warranty Steel Roof. 5 acres ground with a portion of that as income from cash rent farm. 3 bedroom 1 new bath with many updates, newer carpets & laminate floors, large utility room w/double closets, Eat in kitchen and separate dining, natural woodwork, open landing & 2 full bedrooms up. Front porch has been finished & heated w/built in bench storage/sitting for a great family rm/play room. Deck in back & kids play set stays, workshop w/200 amp service & other outbuildings. Call Lori Siders for MLS# 77062894 $99,900 PRICE REDUCED

105 E. KENDALL ST., LAFONTAINE Great home price to sell! Newer construction in LaFontaine. 3 bedrooms, one bath with 1,512 sq ft living space and a 1 car attached garage. Sellers are willing to modify the floorplan at the buyers request, Bring Offer!! Call Marie Lloyd for MLS# 77060136 $65,000

FRANCES KIPP (left), Peabody Retirement Community resident, received a delightful belated birthday present from her granddaughter, Anne Klokow (right). Anne treated Frances to a 20-minute helicopter flight over Peabody and North Manchester. Anne is currently enrolled at Indiana University’s Medical School studying for her physician’s degree. She is a former U.S. Marine Corps Captain in helicopter flight services. Frances commented, “I thoroughly enjoyed floating in the air.” (photo provided)

Music and hot cider to be offered at Old German School on Dec. 19

ABASH REALTY, LLC

WABASH REALTY, LLC

WHY RENT! Located on the north Who says you can't have it all? 41 Broadmoor Dr., 3779 S 300 West, side of Wabash this three bdrm, Country living close to town! Enjoy Wabash Wabash MLS 77064037 • $76,900 1.5 bath home is ready for you to MLS 77064103 • $122,900 this beautiful ranch brick home that move right in! Formal LR, galley includes everything needed to kitchen w/range and refrigerator, make life good! Let's not forget all great family room in back opens to the new updates and newer listed chain link fenced back yard. Add an appliances. Have you called the extra large utility/mechanical room moving van yet? and attached 1+C garage (workshop on one side for dad!) with a great yard make it one great buy! Very nice open concept home w/formal 24 Garden Dr., 634 Crown Hill Dr. W., VERY MOTIVATED SELLER LISTliving rm and dining rm combo, family ED TO SELL QUICKLY - this home Wabash Wabash rm w/gas log fireplace opens to the MLS 77064245 • $239,900 kitchen. Kitchen has island and loaded MLS 77064532 • $159,900 is move in ready. Over 2660 sq ft, 4 bdrms, 2 baths, great kitchen/and with cabinets! 4-5(5th rm is used as breakfast bar opens to family rm den/rec room for kids at top of stairs), and also to great deck in back 2.5 baths, laundry on 2nd level is great w/fenced back yard! Basement has plus lots of walk in attic storage space! rec rm and kitchenette to entertain, Attached 2+C garage, patio, GFA heat attached 2+C garage, GFA heat, and central air! Cement drive, new landcentral air. This is a must see home scaping. Open double stairway and so in great location! much more! Very nice, economical 3 bdrm, 1 This is a nice 3 bdrm home on a 240 Birchwood Ct., 556 Shea, Wabash bath home with living room, and Wabash MLS 77064571 • $69,800 quiet street. With the dining/kitchen combined, and formal LR and 1 MLS 77064581 • $73,000 kitchen/dining room combo which has new carpet! GFA heat, central bath, and enclosed front porch. air, attached garage and nice yard, Vinyl replacement windows, GFA all in great location! heat, and a 2C detached garage make this a great family home! Motivated seller!

MASTER BEDROOM could be on main 20 Garden Dr., 388 W. Market St., floor, or the upper level w/master baths Wabash Wabash and walk-in closets! Entry has open MLS 7706608 • $339,000 MLS 77064324 • $45,000 stairway and opens to formal LR, or can go to kitchen w/great island and all kitchen appliances stay! Kitchen is also open to the family rm w/fireplace, wood trim and custom blinds throughout. GFA heat and central air, spacious 3+C attached garage. Corner lot, circle drive to front entrance and motivated sellers!

Attention investors!! Newer roof, new vinyl siding and newer replacement windows. Upstairs is gutted and needs to be finished. Stove and refrigerator in each apartment plus gas heater. Landlord pays gas, electric, and water bills on all three. Seller anxious to sell and will consider all offers.

Christy Kisner, Broker/Owner Ph: 260.563.4962, Cell: 260.571.2485 Marilyn Boardman, Sales Associate • 260.312.2094 - Sue Dickos, Sales Associate • 260.571.5639 Dianne Duffy, Sales Associate • 260.571.7615 - Athelia Chain, Sales Associate • 260-568-1215 Donna Siders, Sales Associate • 260-571-1892 - Scott Bowman, Sales Associate • 260-403-2379 Ed Gilbert, Sales Associate • 260-560-0253

NEW LISTINGS • NEW LISTINGS • NEW LISTINGS • NEW LISTINGS

NEW LISTINGS • NEW LISTINGS • NEW LISTINGS • NEW LISTINGS

Traditional Christmas music will blend with the spicy aroma of hot cider at the third annual program at the Old German School on Dec. 19 at 6:30 p.m. Lighted luminaras will guide the path to the building where the Sharp Creek Singers will entertain, accompanied by guitar and dulcimer. The Christmas Story in St. Luke will be read in German and Melissa Westfall, a sixth-generation descendant of the original Schenkel family will sing Stille Nacht. The school was built in 1887 by members of the St. Paul Evangelical Church in the German Settlement to teach religion in the German language. After many years of use as a Parish Hall, the building fell into disrepair. It has now been restored and contains many exhibits, which interpret the history of the German settlement. The German School is located three miles north of U.S. 24 west of Huntington on the Wabash-Huntington County Line Road (3995 N 1000 W). Admission is free and the public is invited to attend. For more information call 260-356-4218.

PRICE REDUCED TO $65,000!

646 Spring St. Beautiful older home with lots of updates, 3 bedrooms plus landing used as a 4th bedroom, 2.5 baths. New laminate floors, vinyl windows, siding, plumbing, electric wiring and more. Large lot in town with privacy fence, 1 car detached garage and deck in back. Dry unfinished basement gives you lots of storage. New front porch and landscape make for a welcoming entrance. Call Lori Siders for MLS# 77064347. Priced at only $114,900! 1539 MEADOW ST. Remodeled home on quiet street, this home has what you are looking for with new windows, siding, flooring and more. 3 bedrooms plus a landing used as a 4th bedroom. Large updated bath. Gorgeous eat in kitchen with all appliances staying plus a bar area. Guys check out the 2 plus car detached garage. Covered front porch and patio doors out to back deck for your outdoor enjoyment. Home is tastefully decorated and ready to move in. Call Lori Siders for MLS# 77064371. Priced at only $77,900! 5 Ulen Dr., Wabash Nice home on large corner lot close to pool, schools and shopping. Newer carpet in living room and bedroom (over beautiful hard wood floors). 2 bedrooms plus utility room/office that could easily be converted to a nursery/toddler room. Spacious 3-Season room across the back of the home with a view of the back yard. Partial privacy fence in rear along with 1 1/2 car attached garage. Call Elise Metz for MLS #77064376. Priced at only $69,900! 651 W. MAPLE ST. “Seller says make him an OFFER!” Comfortable cozy home with a wooded view off the back deck, plant your garden and watch it grow. This 2 bedroom home has been very well maintained, furnace professionally serviced yearly, new roof siding and storm windows in 2004, newer 100 amp service and water heater. Detached garage with new garage door and off street parking. Come take a look. MLS # 77055026

PRICE REDUCED TO $52,500!

1863 S. LAKEVIEW ESTATES As a Member of Lakeview Estates you have 90 acres of woods to enjoy and hunt in along w/pond for fishing. Make us an offer!! So many nice features in this home you will want to see Hand Crafted wood chair rails, trim, baseboard and even solid oak doors, solid oak Mantle over gas log fireplace in the family room that also features windows all across the back of home looking out to the wooded lot. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Kitchen completely remodeled in last couple years comes with ALL appliances. In back enjoy a covered deck, gazebo w/cable TV, and a large 2 story woodshop w/electricity. Heated garage and so much more. $120,000. Call Lori Siders to see MLS# 77057500. 11779 S. 100 WEST, LAFONTAINE PRICE REDUCED $259,900! Just a ten minute drive to your new home on a quiet 7.43 acre lot. This home has been completely remodeled in the last five years. Stamped concrete walk & patio filled with flowered gardens, enter from your country porch to Hickory Hardwood floors, kitchen and family all open with large kitchen island & bar stools. Kitchen has custom built cabinets, Corian counter tops & stainless steel appliances stay. Ceramic tile bath floors and shower. 2 bedrooms on main level and 2 plus a 3rd bedroom or large game room on 2nd floor. Total sq ft is 2,799 w/new finished upstairs game room. Hydro Heat GeoThermal for an average total electric bill of only $160.00 month, no gas. There is a 2 car garage, farm barn, fenced pasture & many other buildings. Included is a guest house, mother inlaw quarters or rental w/2 bedrooms & one bath. Qualified buyers only. Call Lori Siders for your private showing for MLS#77062493. 514 N. MIAMI PRICE REDUCED $59,900! Sellers say bring offer. We've done some work to make home more move in ready just for you!! All new paint in most rooms, bath has new flooring, kitchen cabinets sanded and varnished, some new lighting installed. New plants, mulch & outdoor lighting have all been completed. Carpets professionally cleaned all you have to do is pack your bags. All appliances stay including washer & dryer. Finished room in basement makes a great game or hobby room. Waterproofing system in basement. Call Lori Siders MLS#77058775 $59,900 1015 CAMBRIDGE DR. This 4 bedroom, 1 & 3/4 bath home is in Northfield schools, but the convenience of city living. All kitchen appliances stay in this eat in kitchen w/ceramic floors. Living rm features beautiful hardwood floors & a wood burning fireplace. Home is total electric & energy efficient. All new in last few years Windows, Siding, Garage door, Patio door, gutters & soffit. Great home in a great neighborhood. Call Lori Siders today for MLS # 77063788 priced at $121,900.

NOW LEASING

THE VILLAGES OF WABASH, CONTACT GREG METZ FOR INFORMATION 55 and Older Complex

40 E. Hill St., Wabash • 260-563-6469 www.mrffinancial.com Greg Metz - 260-563-6469 • gmetz@mrffinancial.com Lori Siders - 260-571-5568 • lsiders@mrffinancial.com Eric Rish - 260-906-6602 • erish@mrffinancial.com Marie Lloyd - 260-571-4161 • mlloyd@mrffinancial.com Elise Metz - 260-377-9651 • emetz@mrffinancial.com


34 Fruit Basket Inn under new ownership www.thepaperofwabash.com

by Aaron Turner When Robert and Eileen Sklar first saw the “For Sale” sign strategically placed behind some bushes of the Fruit Basket Inn, located at 116 W. Main St., North Manchester, the Philadelphia duo with Indiana ties didn’t think much of it. But on their return to the bed and breakfast a year later the sign was more visible, displayed very plainly in the business’ front yard. “We were just in awe that the Fruitt Basket was for sale,” Eileen said. “We’ve been coming here for a few years, and to know that it was on

the market just about broke our hearts.” Eileen, primarily, has the ties to North Manchester. Her grandparents grew up in North Manchester and she is very familiar with the Wabash County area. Robert, on the other hand, has family in the big cities. But after the two talked, both decided that the opportunity to own a business in a small town was just what they wanted. So on Oct. 25, after three years of staying in the four-room inn, the couple shored up financing and took possession. Since then, it’s been a whirlwind of activi-

ty and well-wishes. “Every place we go, whether it’s to the grocery or just in town, people are always coming up to us and thanking us for keeping it open and welcoming us to town,” Eileen said. “We’re so happy to be here. It’s refreshing after being in the big city for so long.” The facility, which originally opened as a bed and breakfast in 1987, maintains most of its original woodwork, which dates back to the 1800s. “We figure the house dates back to the turn of the 19th Century,” Eileen said. “There’s so much history that goes along

with this place that we just had to give it a try.” The Sklars said they just wish to provide a service to the North Manchester community. “Whether it’s helping with Little Sib weekend at the college, or like when two ladies came up from Indianapolis for shopping at the local stores, we hope we can help fill a need,” Eileen said. And, the transition to Middle American life isn’t too bad either. “In Philadelphia, our kids could play on our street, but that was about it,” Eileen “Now, our said.

% !% #$ ' " #$ % !% #$ "

APPRAISALS & REAL ESTATE 28 E. Hill St., Wabash Phone 260-563-2812 or 260-563-2811

" "

123 www.lundquistrealestate.com T 890 Pike St

29 Chrysler Ave

' % !% #$ " $ # ' & % !% #$

83 N Wabash

"#

284 N Miami

NEW LISTING

$38,500 / MLS# 77064605

$99,900 /MLS#77063211

• 4 Unit w/ great cash flow! • Being sold "as is". • Partial New Roof • Hardwood floors refinished lower level • Chimney is tuck pointed on the cottage $35,900 / MLS #77063962

120 S Arnold, Roann

2863 S 700 W

1248 N Wabash

• Lots of possibilities!

• 2-year old ranch

• 4BR’s, 2 BA’s & Large Rooms!

• city utilities, southwood

• 2 C Det Garage • Partially fenced yard

schools • 3 BRs/2BA’s/2Car Att Garage

• 3-Bdr, 1.5 baths • 24 x 32 det gar

• Affordable home in rural setting. • Newer furnace, central air,

• Large sunroom

and water heater.

• Lg FR w/Gas Fp

• Motivated seller!!!

$104,900 / Mls #77064295

1456 Glenn Ave

MLS 77064449 / $29,900

• Open concept Kitchen & FR

• Southwood Schools

• Family room with fireplace

• Lots of recent major updates

• Large 24x32 Garage

• 3-Bdr, 2-Baths

• 45x200 foot lot

• Nice original trim and doors Mls 77064461 / $88,600

$49,900 / Mls# 77064470

1040 Washington St (Lagro) 1341 Columbus Street REDUCED

• Well maintained 2 bedroom 1 bath home • Home has open concept • 1.5 car detached garage • Partially Fenced Yard $49,900 / Mls# 77064337

• Very Affordable 3-4BR Home

• Newly remodeled!

• Fenced Yard

• Newer Windows,Kit,Bath.

• Lg Shed & 24x30DetGarage $24,900 / MLS # 77062096

105 W St Rd 124 NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

• Very nice home in Roann

• Very nice 2.0 story home • 4-bedroom, 2-baths • Too many updates to list • Beautiful new custom kitchen • 2 Car Detached Garage $114,900 / Mls # 77064035

• Refinished Hw floor, new carpeting & paint $64,900 / MLS # 7706183

108 Western Ave REDUCED

• Private Setting in town! • 3BR,2BA w/all appliances • 1CAtt/1CDet Garages $49,900 / MLS# 77063878

December 15, 2010

ROBERT AND EILEEN SKLAR are the new owners of the Fruit Basket Inn, located at 116 W. Main St., North Manchester. (photo by Eric Christiansen) daughter has a watch, and she can walk to the library and be back by a certain time. “It’s just a quality of life issue that we really appreciate, and we

hope we can help elevate that quality of life for anyone that visits North Manchester. “Apparently the Fruitt Basket Inn has been the best kept

secret in the area.” The facility has a website, www.fruitbasketinn.com, that will eventually feature tours of the rooms available and all the amenities.

Hunger in Wabash County addressed at local sites Second Harvest Food Bank of East Central Indiana supplies a growing demand of food pantries, shelters, soup kitchens, and other agencies that feed the hungry in Wabash County. Wabash County has reached a record milestone for food distribution this year. Three agencies receive food from Second Harvest Food Bank including two pantries and one youth program. Fellowship Food Pantry has seen more large families coming to the pantry for help. “We are glad for what we get from Second Harvest Food Bank of East Central Indiana. The commodities have helped tremendously these last few months. We are able to give out a

variety of items,” said Rowena Greer, Fellowship Food P a n t r y Coordinator. This year through November, Second Harvest Food Bank of East Central Indiana has distributed 491,653 pounds of food through Wabash County programs, compared to 288,102 pounds during the same time last year, representing a 71 percent increase. Lois Rockhill, Second Harvest Executive Director, is excited about reaching a new milestone for food distribution, saying, “Our total distribution this year throughout East Central Indiana will be nearly 8.5 million pounds. That is up from 5.5 million last year. While we are pleased to be able to address hunger

with more food, we have 73,000 people in this region who are food insecure— they are not always sure there will be food to put on the table, the money is just not there. We are so thankful for the thousands of people who reach out, through Second Harvest, to make a difference for their neighbors. With their help, we will continue to work toward a hunger free community.” In Wabash County Second Harvest Food Bank of East Central Indiana serves Fellowship Food Pantry, Wabash County Council on Aging, and the Youth Service Bureau of Wabash County. Food for hunger relief is also distributed through the Second Harvest Tailgate Program.

Toyota of Warsaw www.toyotawarsaw.com. 448 West 250 North Located at the intersection of US 30 and St. Rd. 15 in Warsaw, IN

TOYOTA’S BIGGEST SALES EVENT OF THE YEAR

(574) 267-4636 (866) 583-3812

1551


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

35

Big Buck Contest enters final weekend Rodmaker buck pushed out of top three

JoAnn Boggs 9 pts. 129 5/8”

Scott Eads 12 pts. 164 7/8” by Brent Swan As the 2010 Big Buck Contest draws to a close, a new entry has

overtaken Jacob Rodmaker for third place. Rodmaker’s buck,

entered during youth season in September, remained in the top three throughout

archery and firearm seasons and most of muzzleloader season before Scott Eads’s 12point, 164 7/8 inch buck, outscored the Rodmaker entry by 3 3/8 inches. The top two entries remain the same, Jim

2010 Big Buck Leaderboard Overall Jim Wallen Ryan Sorrell Scott Eads Jacob Rodmaker Matt Warren Jerry Holmes Tanner Chamberlain Scot Miller Trent Boggs Robert Music Dan Barton Ryan Barton Tony Hoover Jason Small Laura Enix George Penix Molly Tomlinson Jeremy Stephens JoAnn Boggs Tracy Dempsey Andrew Bolinger James Walker Gene Tomlinson Travis Tackett

26 pts. 16 pts. 12 pts. 13 pts. 11 pts. 12 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 9 pts. 9 pts. 13 pts. 9 pts. 14 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 9 pts. 10 pts. 11 pts. 9 pts. 8 pts. 9 pts.

200 1/2” 191 3/8” 164 7/8” 161 1/2” 160 7/8” 157” 156 1/8” 154 1/2” 154 1/8” 150 1/4” 150” 148 1/2” 148 3/8” 146 1/8” 143 7/8” 142” 136 7/8” 136 7/8” 129 5/8” 128 1/8” 120 3/4” 120 1/8” 112 1/8” 105 7/8”

Men’s Jim Wallen Ryan Sorrell Chad McAtee (f) Scott Eads Jerry Holmes Scot Miller Trent Boggs Robert Music Dan Barton Tony Hoover Jason Small George Penix Jeremy Stephens James Walker Gene Tomlinson

26 pts. 16 pts. 16 pts. 12 pts. 12 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 9 pts. 13 pts. 9 pts. 10 pts. 10 pts. 9 pts. 8 pts.

200 1/2” 191 3/8” 171 1/4” 164 7/8” 157” 154 1/2” 154 1/8” 150 1/4” 150” 148 3/8” 146 1/8” 142” 136 7/8” 120 1/8” 112 1/8”

Ladies’ Laura Enix Molly Tomlinson JoAnn Boggs Tracy Dempsey

14 pts. 10 pts. 9 pts. 10 pts.

143 7/8” 136 7/8” 129 5/8” 128 1/8”

Youth Jacob Rodmaker Matt Warren Tanner Chamberlain Ryan Barton Andrew Bolinger Travis Tackett

13 pts. 11 pts. 10 pts. 9 pts. 11 pts. 9 pts.

161 1/2” 160 7/8” 156 1/8” 148 1/2” 120 3/4” 105 7/8”

Wallen with his 26point, 200 1/2 inch buck, and Ryan Sorrell with his 16point, 191 3/8 inch buck. Laura Enix remains the women’s division leader for the second consecutive week with her 14-

point, 143 7/8” nontypical trophy. Rodmaker’s buck, although out of the top three overall, remains atop the youth division standings. Each division winner will receive a certificate for a free deer

processing from Ballschmidt Family processing. The overall top three grossing entries will receive a tiered prize package, which includes: First – A free shoulder mount courtesy of Barton, Steve Barton’s Taxidermy; and $150 gift cards to Just Hunt, Bass and Bucks, Wabash Big R and Wabash True Value. Second – $100 gift cards to Just Hunt, and Bucks, Bass Wabash Big R and Wabash True Value. Third - $50 gifts cards to Just Hunt, Bass and Bucks, Wabash Big R and Wabash True Value. To date, 27 bucks have been scored at The Paper with an average of 11.29 points and 147 1/3 inches. This year’s contest will end Dec. 20 at 9 a.m., with a final leader board to be published in the Dec. 21 edition of The Paper. All entries are also pictured in the Big Buck Contest album on Facebook.

2 01 1 C H E V Y C R U Z E

STK#11MC224

I T ’ S F U N T O D R I V E! ESPECIALLY PAST THE GAS PUMP. 22 CITY / 35 HIGHWAY WITH AUTOMATIC TRANS

I N S T O C K! $ Sale price includes all rebates and incentives. Sales tax not included.

17 965 No worries.

473 S. Miami St. • Wabash

260-563-2123 888-563-2148 HOURS: MON.-FRI. 8-6 • SAT. 8-2 SALESMAN: Herb Smith, Josh Steele, Mike Holland, Dave Dorais

(OR APPOINTMENT ANYTIME)

1749


36

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

CHURCH DIRECTORY WABASH PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 1830 S. Wabash St. Wabash, IN

563-1173

1100 N. Cass St. Wabash, IN

563-1046 HOURS: M & F 9 a.m.-7 p.m. T-W-Th 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Gospel Light Assembly of God, 347 Southwood Dr.; Neil Jeffrey, pastor. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. (all ages); Morning 10:30; Evening Service 6:00 p.m., Kids’ Korral Wednesday Midweek Service 7:00 p.m., Youth Meeting 7:00 p.m. Calvary Chapel Worship Center, north of corner of U.S. 24 & S.R. 13 (619 N. S.R. 13) in Wabash; phone 563-7849; Don Cogar, Senior Pastor. Sunday Bible Classes at 9:00 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:00 a.m.; Evening Praise & Worship, 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday Prayer, 7:00 p.m.; Shockwave Youth Meeting Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. Handicapped Accessible. Sweetwater Assembly of God, 2551 State Road 114 East, North Manchester, IN; phone 260-982-6179; Pastor Chad McAtee. Sunday Morning Worship 9:00 & 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Outreach & Youth Ministry 5-7 p.m.; Wednesday Evening Service 6:30 p.m. Adult Bible Study/Youth Discipleship/Kidz Zone (ages 3 yrs.-6th grade). BAPTIST Calvary Baptist Church - GARBC, 1399 Falls Ave., Wabash. 9:30 a.m. Sunday School classes for all ages. 10:30 a.m. Sunday morning worship 6:00 p.m. Sunday evening service and T.O.C. (teens). Pastor Matt Haynes. Awana meets on Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. for children ages 3 to 12. Nurseries are provided. Phone 260-563-3837. Wheelchair accessible. Emmanuel Free Will Baptist, 129 Southwood Dr., Wabash; Rev. Douglas K. Phillips, pastor. Phone 563-3009. Worship 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m.; Wednesday Morning Prayer Service 11 a.m.; Wednesday Prayer Meeting & Bible Study 7 p.m.; Bus transportation available, call 563-3009. Erie Street Free Will Baptist Church, 1056 Erie Street, Wabash; phone 563-8616; Hobert Meek, pastor, 563-8616. Sunday School, 10:00 a.m.; Worship Service, 11:00 a.m.; Youth Service, 5:00 p.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday Prayer Service, 6:00 p.m. Transportation and nursery available. Sunday morning radio broadcast from 8:30 to 9:00 a.m. Sundays mornings on Oldies 106. Grand Street Baptist Church, 1655 Grand Street, Wabash; John Denniston, pastor, phone 765-981-2868; church phone: 5638409. Sunday School 10:00 a.m.; Morning Service 11:00 a.m.; Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday Evening 6:30 p.m. BRETHREN CHURCH Harvest Fellowship Church, 255 N. Miami St. (Bowen Center), Wabash, IN 46992 Pastor Bruce Hostetler, Church Office: 260563-4282 We can't change yesterday, (It doesn't matter where you've been) we don't know what may happen tomorrow (that's why we want you to know Jesus as your Savior) we care about where you are now, that's why today is "THE PRESENT" Our worship teaches "To Know Christ and Make Christ Known". Sunday Fellowship & Coffee Time - 10:00A.M. Praise Singing & Worship time 10:15 Sunday morning Fellowship and Snack time 10:00 A.M. Praise Singing & Worship 10:15 A.M..Wednesday night - 6:30-8:00 P.M., Discipleship Class, Act of Fear, Place: Bowen Center. Liberty Mills Church of the Brethren, 103 North Third St., Liberty Mills, IN; Church Phone: (260) 982-6169. Pastor: Kelly Beutler; Associate Pastor: Erin Huiras. Sunday Schedule: Traditional Worship: 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School All Ages: 9:45 a.m.; Fellowship Time: 10:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship: 11:00 a.m. Roann Church of the Brethren, corner of Chippewa & Beamer Sts. in Roann; phone (765) 833-9931; fax (765) 833-6561 Sunday School: 9:00 a.m.; Worship: 10:00 a.m.; Children’s Worship: 10:00 a.m. Our Worship Leader for the month of December is Kevin Musselman. The Greeters will be Russell and Marie Krom and Ted and Delina Brower. Pastor Brad Eckerley will be sharing the message with us. We invite you to come and worship. Men’s Bible Study meets Wednesday mornings at 6:30 a.m. “The Source” Youth Ministry meets every Sunday at 6 p.m. Small groups meet at 6:00 p.m. Sunday evenings.

Your Ad Here! Call ‘the paper’ at 260-563-8326

Call ‘the paper’ at 260-563-8326

Wabash Church of the Brethren, 645 Bond Street, Wabash (just south of Falls Ave.); phone (260) 563-5291; Pastor Kay Gaier. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m., nursery available, everyone welcome. Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. Bible Study; Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. Choir. Handicap Accessible. CATHOLIC St. Bernard Catholic, Corner of Cass & Sinclair Sts.; Fr. Sextus Don, Pastor. Parish Office and Rectory: 207 N. Cass St., phone 563-4750. Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 p.m.; Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. (Sept. thru May); 8:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. (June thru August); CCD 9:30 a.m. each Sunday during school year. Weekday Masses: Mon., Wed., Fri., 5:30 p.m.; Tues. & Thurs. 8 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation 4:15 -5:15 p.m. Saturday or anytime by appointment. St. Patrick Catholic, Lagro, Mass at 12:30 p.m. first Sunday of each month. CHARISMATIC Victory Christian Fellowship, Discover abundant life and victorious Christian living! Worship services: Sunday 10:00 a.m.; Wednesdays 7:00 p.m. Christian Bookstore: Tuesday through Friday 9:00-12:00, 1:00-5:30, also before and after all services. All in our new facility at 112 W. Main St. Church: 260-982-8357; Bookstore: 260-982-8317. Tim Morbitzer, pastor. www.victory4u2.com God bless you! Come as you are! CHRISTIAN Dora Christian Church, located 1 1/2 miles South of Salamonie Dam, Lagro; phone 260-782-2006. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Early Service 8:15 a.m.; Church Service 10:30 a.m. Minister: Steven L. Witt. LaFontaine Christian Church, 202 Bruner Pike, LaFontaine; Phone 765-981-2101; Pastor Rick Smalling; Youth Pastor Jared Kidwell. Sunday School 9:00 a.m.; Worship 10:00 am. Nursery Available. Wabash Christian Church, 110 W. Hill St., Wabash; phone 260-563-4179; Rev. Fred Dorisse; Worship Service 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Nursery provided. CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH Christian Heritage Church, 2776 River Rd.; Tim Prater, pastor. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Study, 9:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.; Radio Ministry 8:30 a.m.-9:00 a.m. Sunday WKUZ 95.9 FM. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE Wabash Alliance Church, 1200 N. Cass St., 563-8503; Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. (Kidz Worship, ages 4 through Grade 3); Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday Evening Family Night: activities include AWANA (6:30 p.m.); Alliance Allies (Teens) 7:00 p.m.; Adult Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 p.m. Nursery provided. Handicap Accessible. CHURCH OF CHRIST Bachelor Creek Church of Christ, 4 miles north of Wabash on St. Rd. 15; phone 563-4109; website: http://www.bachelorcreek.com; Solomon David, Senior Minister; Michael Eaton, Worship Minister; Cheryl Eaton, Director Of Music & Arts; David Lloyd, Children’s Minister; Linda Mirante, Associate Ministries; Aaron McClary, Minister of Connections; Kathy Henderson, Director of “Happy Days” Preschool. Dual Bible School & Worship, 9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Boundary Line Church of Christ, 1 1/2 mile North of LaFontaine, Corner Roads 390E & 900S; NonInstrumental; phone (765) 981-2056 or 981-2728. Bible Study Sunday Morning 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship 4:00 p.m.; Handicap Accessible.

DAYWALT Pharmacy 948 N. Cass St. Wabash, IN

563-4155

SQUIRREL CREEK

Your Ad Here! 532 N. CASS ST., WABASH, IN 46992 T 260-563-7478 123 1-800-523-0477

Church of Christ at Treaty, 5 Miles South of Wabash on St. Rd. 15 to 50 E, (N about 1000 feet); Doug Oakes, minister; Artie Weisenbarger, youth minister. Church phone (765) 981-4345. Bible School 9:00 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:00 a.m.; Sunday Evening Services 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study 10:00 a.m. Wednesday evening meal at 5:45 p.m. Adult study & youth activity for all ages begins at 6:30 p.m. Church of Christ at Wabash, 1904 N. Wabash St., Wabash (corner of N. Wabash St. & State Route 24); Evangelist Guy G. Provance Jr.; office phone 563-8234. Sunday School 9:00 a.m.; Worship Hour 10:00 a.m.; Evening Worship Hour 6:30 p.m.; Mid-Week Bible Study & Youth J.A.M. Program on Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m. Classes & activities for all ages. CHURCH OF GOD (ANDERSON) First Church of God, 525 N. Miami St., Wabash; church 563-5346; Robert Rensberger, pastor. Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. for all ages; Continental Breakfast at 10:00 a.m., Sunday Morning Worship at 10:30 a.m. Nursery care is available during worship service. Stair lift available. COMMUNITY CHURCH Grace Fellowship Church, 4652 S. 100 W., Wabash; phone 260-563-8263; Pastor Bill Bowling. Sunday Morning: Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Service 10:30 a.m. Sunday Evening Service: Faith In Action 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday Evening: Bible Study & Prayer Meeting 6:00 p.m. FRIENDS CHURCH Wabash Friends Church, 3563 S. St. Rd. 13, Wabash; phone 563-8452; www.wabashfriends.org; email: becky@wabashfriends.org; Alex Falder, lead pastor; Scott Makin, Director of Counseling; Rich Davis, Adult Fellowship and Outreach Co-Pastor; Sandy Davis, Adult Fellowship and Outreach Co-Pastor; Patrick Byers, Director of Youth and Contemporary Worship; Wes Ball, Worship Pastor/Choir Director; Kathy Jaderholm, Children’s Pastor. First Service 8:00 a.m.; Second Service 10:30 a.m.; Third Service 10:35 a.m.; Sunday School 9:15 a.m.; Youth Group 6:30 p.m. Handicap Accessible. LUTHERAN Zion Lutheran (Missouri Synod), 173 Hale Drive Sunday SChool 9:15am Morning Worship 10:30am. Pastor Galen Drawbaugh will continue teach the Epistle of 1 Peter in the Adult Bibleclass. Pastor will give the children’s lesson. Elder is Kevin Teulker, Communion Assistant is Troy Roser. Living Faith Church - a new mission congregation meets Sundays at the Charley Creek Inn. Worship service at 10:30 am. Faith enrichment classes for all ages at 9:30 am. Fellowship time after worship. The scripture for the second Sunday in Advent is Romans 15:4-13 and Matthew 3:1-12. We welcome you to join us for worship, inspiration and fellowship. Handicap accessible. CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES Congregational Christian Church, 310 N. Walnut Street North Manchester, IN 46962. Pastor JP Freeman & Sebrena Cline, Assoc. Lay Minister. Service times: 8:30 – Early Bird Traditional Service; 9:30 – Contemporary Praise Service; 11:00 – Blended Service; Nursery provided during all services. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Encouraging Truth Ministries, Nixon Room in the Honeywell Center; Pastor Jackie Weaver; phone 765-8334793. Sunday School 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. New Foundations Ministries Freedom Center, 111 Falls Ave., Wabash; phone 260-569-0630; Pastor Rick Tolley. Sunday Adult Bible Study & Fellowship 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7pm Bible Study. Center for biblical council by appointment.

Your Ad Here! Call ‘the paper’ at 260-563-8326

Bulk Foods 13653 N. 500 E. Roann, IN 46974

574-893-1942

Niconza Christian Fellowship Church, 4 Mile North of Rt. 16, 3 Mile South of Disco, Miami/Wabash County Line Road 13718N 700E, Roann, Indiana 46974. Sunday Praise & Worship Service begins at 9:00 AM. The youth will join with the adults for Praise and Worship in the sanctuary, and then move to the west rooms for Children’s Church. Special music will be presented during the service. Pastor Phil is bringing a series of messages on Pray & Fasting: when, where and how, in the morning service. Everyone is welcome! We are a Full Gospel Community Church where Spiritual gifts and talents operate. There is always an opportunity for one on one ministry for your special needs. You are invited to join us Sunday as we worship and hear from God through the preaching of His Word and the moving of the Holy Spirit! Get your prayer request to the prayer group by calling the church office at (260)-306-2030; by sending them E-Mail to (niconza@msn.com); or by sending them regular mail to Niconza Christian Fellowship Ministries, 300 W 4th Street, North Manchester, Indiana 46962 St. Paul’s County Line Church, 3995N 1000W, Phone 786-3365. Non-Denominational. Pastor Conrad Thompson. Sunday School at 9 a.m. Worship at 10 a.m. Youth program 6-8 p.m. on Sunday. Wednesday night Bible Study at 7 p.m. PRESBYTERIAN Presbyterian Church, 123 W. Hill St., Wabash; phone 260563-8881; fax 260-563-8882; Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.; Fellowship 11:30 a.m. (Winter Hours) Every Wednesday at 9:00 a.m. Prayer Partners at Mary Henderson’s home. e-mail: woffice@wabashpresbyterian.com; website: WabashPresbyterian.com, handicap accessible sanctuary. UNITED METHODIST Christ United Methodist Church, intersections of Wabash, Stitt & Manchester Ave.; phone 563-3308. Phil Lake, pastor. Facilities & provisions for the physically handicapped, hearing & sight impaired. Air conditioned. Chapel Worship 8:00 a.m.; Sanctuary Worship 10:00 a.m. with pre-school childcare, Multi-Media Worship W/Praise Team & Band; Sunday School 9:00 a.m. First United Methodist Church, 110 N. Cass St. (corner of Cass & Sinclair Sts.) in Wabash; phone 260-563-3108; fax 260-563-3109. Senior Pastor David Cross, Sunday worship services - 8:00 a.m. Rise & Shine; 9:00 a.m. Christ Alive Alternative Worship; 10:00 a.m. Mid-Morning Worship; 9:00 & 10:15 a.m. Sunday School for all ages. Music mignistries share each week in variety of choirs and instrumental talents. Jr. Church & nursery provided. Totally handicap accessible. Everyone welcome. KIDS FIRST REGISTERED CHILD CARE MINISTRY is a weekday program available for infants 4 weeks to 5 yrs. Accepting children full or part time. Pre-School Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Call 260-563-7665. LaFontaine United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 57 (Kendall & Main St.), LaFontaine; Phone: 765.981.4021; Email: lafontaineumc@embarqmail.com Pastor Brad Garrett. Sunday School 9:15 – 10:00 a.m.; Worship 10:15 a.m. Nursery is provided; Men’s Fellowship is the 1st Sunday of each month 8:00 a.m.; Prayer and Share every Wednesday 5:45 p.m.; Bible Study every Thursday morning 10:00 a.m. North Manchester United Methodist Church, 306 East Second St., North Manchester; (260) 982-7537; Pastor Kevin G. Dekoninck. (260) 578-2160; Worship 8:15 a.m.; Coffee Fellowship Time 9:00 a.m.; Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

Allen Insurance 85 Manchester Ave. Wabash, IN 260-563-3600

Kirtlan Automotive Machine & Repair Service Steve Kirtlan, Owner & Staff 750 S. Cass St. Wabash, IN 46992

260-563-0848


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

STINSON’S TRADING POST “BUY” • “SELL” • “TRADE” Hours: Tues.-Sat. 9-5 Old Game Systems • Old Games • VCR Systems VCR Tapes • Records • 8 Track Medical Equipment • • Tools • Dishes • Etc 5 Rooms All Different • 1/2 Block Long

98 W. CANAL STREET John: 260-571-6674 Barb: 260-571-6675 WABASH, IN 46992

AMERICAN EAGLE +# -

*+& -

+# - +%!# 0

1 '."& *" &+" $ & '%% ) " $ 1 & * ("& ,$ ! ' # + "& $$* + 1 ()"& $ & ( 1 . )"- . 0* 1 !), ) )"%%"& 1 ,++ ) $ &"& 1 ''% "+"'&* 1 ',* %' $"& &+ )"') /+ )"') 1 &*+ $$ . ) *

+##

,-%( -#,

& ) $ / - +"& ) "& $ )"& "&"*!"& #* 1 & "& 1 +"' 1 '% ( ") , ! ') 1 1 1

37

We’re Always Taking Bookings! LAYCOCK -HUGHES Jeff Laycock Home Phone: 765-475-0725 Lic. #AUO1043695

Terry D. Hughes 2611 S. 100 E. Peru, IN 46970 765-473-4739 Lic.# AU01020269

+ )"*) *,, ., $*(# # ( %' +( $*-( %' !*( 0 /// #' /) $*(# !*(

GIROD’S

If we cut your tree, we will grind the stump for free! Bucket trucks, tree topping, tree removal, lot clearing, stump grinding 24 hr. Emergency Work Free Estimates • Fully Insured

CONSTRUCTION AMISH CREW

Interior & Exterior Construction Garages • Decks • Pole Barns Remodeling Free Estimates

Mention this ad and get 15% off!

260-330-3241

For More Information Call Driver 260-368-7297

$"

Joe’s Diner ALL-U-CAN-EAT ALASKAN WHITE FISH

New Roofs, Metal Roofing, Rubber Roofs, Facia and Soffit, Specializing in Roof Ventalation

EVERY FRIDAY FROM 3:00-8:00 MEAL INCLUDES CHOICE OF POTATO OR VEGETABLE AND SALAD

ALSO ON ON FRIDAYS, WE HAVE FROG LEGS & JUMBO FRIED SHRIMP!

Free Estimates & Insured Paul Little-Owner

Corner of Hwy 13 & 24 • 260-569-9697 Carry-Out Available

765-981-4812 Cell: 260-571-4812

Steiner Electric 765-833-7801 or 260-571-7801 • Electrical Service & Repairs • Economically Priced • Handyman Service/Home Improvement

( )

!

$ "

%

!&

Tomlinson

Appliance Service

COUPON

$ 00

1 OFF

$) #

Your perfect • Wrinkles removed in about an hour. • Furniture moved for free. wedding starts • FREE estimates. with invita• Insured. tions. You buy it, I install Come in and any flooring let us show or will remove those wrinkles out of your carpet. you invitations, Call Tracy 765-667-4786 765-667-8111 Call Tracy announcements napkins, bridal books If we cut your tree, we will grind the stump for free! & Bucket trucks, tree topping, tree removal, lot clearing, stump grinding accessories 1499

(260) 563-6500 (260) 571-6517

Lunch Buffet

&* #

(carpet, vinyl, laminate & hardwood)

We Service All Makes & Models

Mike Sharp | Gene Tomlinson

( $#' - # & ! % &' - &% #(&, - ! (& ! - # $+' $$&' - $$ # - ) $&

Got Wrinkles?

! % ! $ ) !( !' ) &%% # " # #'

#( # #

K-C

GARAGE DOOR SERVICE

Residential Garage Door & Opener Sales, Service & Installation

24 hr. Emergency Work Free Estimates • Fully Insured Mention this ad and get 15% off!

1303 N. Cass, Wabash

Complete Repair & Service For Most Brands Spring Replacement - Torsion & Extension

260-330-3241

LIMIT 4 PER COUPON. Good thru 01/01/11. Not valid with any other discounts or promotions. Valid only in Wabash.

239 Manchester Ave., Wabash, IN 46992 John Kime---260-563-4919 Toll Free---888-663-4919

Monday-Friday, 11am-1:30pm 563-8885

...Continued on page 39

563-8326 ‘the paper’


38

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

‘the paper’ of Wabash County, Inc., P.O. Box 603, Wabash, IN 46992. Classified Ads: $7.00 for first 20 words in advance: 15¢ each word thereafter. Deadline 12:00 noon on Monday

Auctions THURSDAY JANUARY 6, 2011 5:30 P.M. Location: 872 N 600 E, Lagro, 6 miles east of Wabash on SR 24 to 600 E, thence south approx. 1 mile to site. Articles: Tract1: 11 partially wooded acres w/1568 sq. ft.; 3 bdrm home, attached garage, 2 outbuildings, fenced yard. Tract2: 10.32+/partially wooded acres w/potential bldg. site or recreational grounds. Owner: Gloria Leonhardt. Auctioneer: Ness Bros. MONDAY DECEMBER 18, 2010 10:00 A.M. Location: 8230 Old Rd. 30 W, Etna Green. Articles: Antiques & Collectibles, household goods. Owner: Mary Evans. Auctioneer: Mark Metzger Auctioneering.

SATURDAY JANUARY 1, 2011 9:00 A.M. Location: Take SR 114W of N. Manchester to CR 200W, then go north 1 1/2 miles or take SR 14 east from Silver Lake to Co. Farm Rd., then go south to auction site. Watch for auction signs. Articles: Tractors, duals, parts, weights, farm equipment, livestock equipment, hay equipment, trucks, misc. hay & guns. Owner: Area Farmers. Auctioneer: Mark Metzger Auctioneering.

Wabash City LIGHTHOUSE MISSION Thrift Store storewide 1/2 price sale, 7 days, Dec. 1623, new inventory daily, 806 N. Cass St., 9-4, closed Dec. 24,25,26, Merry Christmas! Luke 2.

$ ! () ! ( ( $*#), # % # #) #(*' # # , !$$ # )$ ' ) $# ! % ') ) " # $' *!! ) " $ !% #$ +% ' # ' &* ' %! ( ( # ' (*" )$ !% $+ *#) # )$# 1222

Other Rummage

Lost & Found

Mt. Etna Saw Mill Barn Sale Heated Tues. Dec. 14 & Wed., Dec. 15, Noon6pm,,Sat. Dec. 18 10-4 & Tues. Dec. 21, 12-5. Rain or shine, From Wabash, Hwy 15 south ,turn left onto Hwy 124, go ½ mile past Hwy 9 Red barns on left. Cash Only No Checks, Snowblowers, leather & winter coats $10$40, hunting clothes, large selection of tools , axes, wedges & chains , Shop Smith bench drill, chain saws, table saws, air tools, compressors, welders, grinders, drills, engine hoist, tool & truck boxes, jacks, car ramps, tow straps, come along, baby beds, Pack n Plays, gates, kitchens, Tonka trucks , horses , Barbies, kick & punching bags, turkey fryers, fireplace mantles-$50, grates & accessories, cookwear, smokers, DVDs & VHSs, lots of home décor, pet carriers, cages, kitchen table & chairs, dressers, wood stove.

LOST: FEMALE Boxer, white & brown brindle, goes by Jazz, pink & purple collar, went missing in Manchester Ave. area, REWARD offered, 260-571-9158 or 260-5714329.

".+

P.O. Box 603 Wabash, IN 46992 (260) 563-8326

--+ -3$/ $/2("$

5 *$!, $,"$ (,$0 5 (1"' !,)0 5 -,#0

1$2$

-, ,#$/0-,

3 POINT hitch, 7 ft. wide grader blade, $350; 46” Sony rear projector TV, $100, 260-563-3482. GOOD APPLIANCES: used washers, dryers, ranges & refrigerators. 30 day warranty! 35 E. Canal St., Wabash, 260-563-0147.

!

1&/%"3 ,.

$0

&%+&/%"3

,"++ ,0,. ,10& 2"(*"#*& 50'& -"-&.6 4

IBM, APTIVA, Windows 98 tower w/keyboard & mouse, $75, 260-563-5564. WHIRLPOOL GAS Dryer, heavy duty, large capacity, good condition, no issues, works fine, $100, Northfield area, 260-443-2050.

.$"(!* (,1$/ /("(,& !** -#!4

Real Estate

Babysitting WILL BABYSIT 1st shift, rates vary, 260-571-6440.

Services BANKRUPTCY: Free initial client conference. Discharge all or most consumer debt. Chapter 7 & Chapter 13 relief available...we can save your home. Zimmerman Law Office, PC, Attorney Alan J. Zimmerman, 81 E. Hill St., Wabash, 260-563-2178.

3 PIECE camel leather furniture set: couch, side chair & ottoman, $700, 260-5637251.

& $

! " ! %

"!

!

%

! !

#

# !" ! $

! #

! " &

1595

Gloria Leonhardt - Seller Auction Manager - Andy Eckert - Cell #224-9058 Statements made the day of auction take precedence over previous printed materials or any oral statements.

For a Free Recorded Message, Call 1-877-297-7407 ID 6500

260-356-3911 or 800-356-3911

#AC39600001

www.NessBros.com

ANTIQUES WANTED: Paintings, pottery, lighting, signs, guns, knives, coins, jewelry, quilts, clothing, rugs, furniture, Boy Scouts, railroad & military items, esp. WWII. Call 260-569-1865. I may pay more!

Farm

! " 1732

4x5 ROUND bale: grass hay, Brome Orchard, fescue, off ground, covered, 1st-cattle, $25; 2nd & 3rd-horses & cattle, $40, 260-571-4430, Wabash area.

ROUND BALES: Grass, mixed, alfalfa-orchard, $20$45. Also small square bales, 260-228-0138.

872 N 600 E - Lagro, IN

Tract 2: 10.32+/- partially wooded acres with potential building site or recreational grounds. Bid on individual tracts or as a whole unit. Inspect - Arrange Fiancing- Bid Your Price!

Wanted

AKC CHOCOLATE Miniature Pincher puppies, males-$450, females-$495, 765-244-9478.

21.32 Acres - 2 Tracts

230 Buchanan St. - Lagro, IN

WABASH 2-WAY Radio: police scanners, CB’s, base station, repeaters, GPS systems & repair. Also buying laptops, computer towers, ipods & other electronic devices, 235 Southwood Dr., 260-563-5564.

Pets

Country Home on 11 Acres + 10.32 Acres

Thurs, Jan. 6 @ 5:30 Auction Held at Lagro Community Center

LYNN’S CUSTOM Butchering. We are state approved! Accepting deer. State checking station, 2165E 400S, Wabash. Coolers available. We are a Feed the Hungry drop off station. 260-563-2673.

"

%

AUCTION

Tract 1: 11 partially wooded acres w/1568 sq. ft. 3 bedroom home, 20x28 att. garage + 2 outbuildings and fenced yard.

Fearnow Enterprize, Inc. 4!'-- "-+

$350 CHERRY Sleigh Bed, NEW, Solid Wood w/NEW PILLOWTOP Mattress Set, un-opened, (260)493-0805.

#

south approx. 1 mi. to 872N 600E Lagro, IN.

!4,$

A BRAND NEW KING PILLOWTOP Mattress Set, $225, Still in Factory Plastic (260)493-0805.

SPAULDING TF1000 basketballs, 28.5 diameter, available at ‘the paper’.

/) ,. (.$1*"0(,+

Located 6 mi. east of Wabash, IN on St. Rd. 24 to 600E, thence

!/#(014 -!# 5 1

$125 QUEEN PILLOWTOP Mattress Set. NEW in Plastic, Can Deliver (260)493-0805

BOOTS NOW OPEN, muck boots, best prices around; Mickey Mouse boots, $59.95. Graber’s Welding, 8350S 850W, South Whitley. 1 mile east of old Dexter Axle, 2 1/2 miles north of 114 on 850W. 260-723-4172 ext. 1

"#"/' 4

Open House: Sun, Dec. 19 from 1-2 & Wed, Dec. 22 from 5-6

(") $!/,-3

GLASS SQUARE coffee table w/black & brown wood, perfect condition, 260-5631826.

GOOD CONDITION items to sell, 765-981-9505, king comforter & matching curtains, $30; crib toddler mattress, $30; office chair (black & gray), $30; infant car seat & 2 bases (blue & brown), $75; large pet carrier, $35; treadmill, $200.

" &

PERSONAL INJURY: Free initail client conference, no recovery, no fee, contingent fee agreement available, over 20 years of experience. Zimmerman Law Office, PC, Attorney Alan J. Zimmerman, 81 E. Hill St., Wabash, 260-563-2178.

BEAUTIFUL BERNE floral sofa & loveseat, $500; nice beige leather Lazy Boy, $150, 260-563-1855.

CRAFTSMAN TOOLS: 16” scroll saw, 6 1/8 jointer-planer, 12” bandsaw, disc & belt sander, router table, Stihl 034 chain saw, 260-3441481 or 260-224-2861.

&&)' .!## + "!% ''#! +!&%* * ) %!% % ! + * % &% , +!% . # !% + *+* .!+ (, #! ! % ! + * &% 0 &%#0 + !+* % . +) !# ) $ %, +,)!% #& +!&% !% &)+ % *+ ) % ! % ''#! %+* .!## % +& )!% + !) &.% . # !% (,!'$ %+ !% #, !% #$ + #&- * % *# - * !% &) ) +& ) !- + *+

-.+

-,1!"1

-/ %$!/,-3

REDUCED PRICE: wood entertainment center for 27” TV, great condition, $75, 260-571-6510.

MAYTAG ELECTRIC dryer, almond, $75, 260-563-7278 after 5p.m.

1179

-3 0 '$ (+$ 01(+!1$0

-/+!**4 ,#$/0-, /-1'$/0 /$$ $/2("$

CLEAN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET new, never used, still sealed in original wrapper (SACRIFICE), $125, 574-834-2100.

50'& -"-&.6

With Macintosh Computer Skills

THE PAPER of WABASH

DELL Z500 laptop, DVD/CD, internal drive, $165, 260563-5564.

5 HP, 22 in. Craftsman snowblower, $250, 765-618-7641.

WANTED FULL-TIME GRAPHIC ARTIST We have a position available in our pre-press department, producing our weekly newspaper. We are looking for a motivated individual who can work flexible hours and care about the quality of work he/she produces in a deadline environment. Willingness to work with several software programs including Quark XPress and Adobe Creative Suite plus good typing, spelling and design skills are necessary. Send resume or fill out application at:

Articles For Sale

SONY 35MM Cyber-shot DSC-H7 digital camera includes: 74mm lens VF74CP, software disk (includes handbook), USB cord w/AV connectors, 4GB memory stick PRO DUO w/adaptor, 2 batteries w/charger, carrying case, lens cloth, $400, 260-5714420.

CRAFTSMAN 21” snowthrower, electric start, new, $250, 260-774-3404.

1 & 2

& + -# )&

( -$(' (+-#

Real Estate

1 1/2 STORY Farmhouse for sale, but needs moved from property. House in decent condition, $1,500 obo. Buyer assumes costs for moving. Call for details, 260-5710137.

Mobile Homes

BUYING MOBILE homes, 260-563-5564.

' # ,- +

% ! + * $,*+ $ + + &##&.!% +& &%*! ) # !% )& , +!&% /' )! % .& &) $&) 0 )1* # !% /' )! % )! +!&% % #, ')!%+ ) !% / ## %+ .&)" % ++ % % !*+&)0 )&- % ' % !#!+0 &)" * + $ &) !% ' % %+#0 !#!+0 +& #! + # * &% ) ,# ) *!* &)" %0 * ! + !'#&$ &) ** ') $'#&0$ %+ ), + *+ % , ('%1 *. %$!$ ' , +$(., ))%$ '-, ' ,- ' ))%$ -$(', 0$%% ('%1 "$/ ' -# ,$"' 1 )#(' %%, )% ,

GRASS HAY, 1st cut w/some clover & alfalfa, $3 per bale, 260-782-2210.

Single & Sectional Homes New & Used 3 Miles South of Wabash -- '

260-563-8078 “Family Owned & Operated” Over 38 Years in Business

239


www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010

39

‘the paper’ of Wabash County, Inc., P.O. Box 603, Wabash, IN 46992. Classified Ads: $7.00 for first 20 words in advance: 15¢ each word thereafter. Deadline 12:00 noon on Monday

1999 Sectional Home

28x60, 1456 s.f., Great Room, 3 BR, 2 BA, $37,900 Set up in park near Wabash.

260-571-4042 or 260-377-9265

For Rent NORTH MANCHESTER: 3 bdrm, 2 bath house available immediately, new carpet & paint, $600 deposit, 260578-3400. NICE 1 bdrm apt. w/appliances, $400/mo. plus deposit & utilities. 1040 Columbus St., 260-5711892. 1 BDRM house for rent, northside. stove, refrigerator, washer/dryer hook ups, $90/wk. plus deposit, 765863-1453 or 260-563-1556. 3 POSSIBLY 4 bdrm home, $500/mo., $500 deposit, you pay utilities, 1060 Columbus St., 260-519-0114. SM. 2 bdrm house suitable for single or couple, no children or pets, water & heat provided, $495/mo., deposit & lease required, available after Jan. 5, 260-563-2373.

1 BDRM upstairs apt., stove, refrigerator, $90/wk., plus deposit, 260-563-1556 or 765-863-1453. 2 BDRM w/combined bathroom & utility room, totally electric, 1 car garage, Southwood Schools, must see to appreciate, no pets, $475/mo., $700 deposit. Call anytime after 8:30 a.m., 260571-3842. DUPLEX FOR rent, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, private entrance, laundry room, dining room, eat in kitchen, 260-571-7294 or 260-563-7294. MINI FARM w/mobile home, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, set up for horse, dogs & chickens, Southwood School District, rent/buy, $400/mo., 260-5632404.

3 BDRM, 1 bath duplex, newly remodeled, no pets, prefer non-smoker, $125/wk., $500 deposit, references required, 260-5712277.

1977 CHEVY 1/2 ton pickup, re-built transmission, tune-up, new brakes, runs good, $800 obo, 260-2250226.

Auto

1998 OLDSMOBILE INTRIGUE, 3.8L V6, Alloy Wheels, CD, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, Clean Local Trade, Green w/Tan Cloth, $4,495 #204Y, Wabash (800)573-1175, denneymotorsales.com.

2001 FORD Windstar Mini Van, $3,000 obo, 106K miles, new alternator, tires & battery approx. 3 yrs. old. For more information call 260-563-3991 after 4p.m.

2003 CHEVROLET MALIBU, 3.1L V6, Alloy Wheels, Keyless Entry, Spoiler, CD, Power Windows & Locks, Clean Local Trade, Silver w/Gray Cloth, $5,495 #299Y, Wabash (800)573-1175, denneymotorsales.com.

632 N. Allen St., 3 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath, 1400 sq. ft., C/A, gas heat, 1 car garage, $600/mo. plus deposit, 260224-6071.

2007 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX, 3.8L V6, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Tinted Windows, 100,000 Mile Warranty, Red w/Charcoal Cloth, $12,995 #349X, Wabash (800)5731 1 7 5 , denneymotorsales.com. 2008 SATURN OUTLOOK XR, All Wheel Drive, 3.6L V6, Heated Seats, Alloy Wheels, Power Seats, Quad Bucket Seats, 3rd Row Seat, 100,000 Mile Warranty, Lt. Bronze w/Tan Leather, $24,995 #382X, Wabash (800)573-1175, denneymotorsales.com. 1999 CHEVY Ext. cab, 4X4, $5,500 obo, 260-571-4874. 2009 PONTIAC G5 GT COUPE, 2.2L 4CYL, 30+MPG, Alloy Wheels, Cruise, Power Windows & Locks, Spoiler, Tinted Windows, 100,000 Mile Warranty, Silver w/Charcoal Cloth, $12,995 #348X, Wabash (800)573-1175, denneymotorsales.com.

4 BDRM, 1 1/2 car garage, newly remodeled, dishwasher, A/C, $700 deposit, $600/mo., no pets, 260-5713842. SMALL 1 bdrm house for rent in Urbana, $300/mo., 260-774-9311, leave a message will call back ASAP.

2000 GMC YUKON XL SLT 2500 4X4, 6.0L V8, Polished Alloy Wheels, New Tires, Sunroof, Rear DVD, Quad Bucket Seats, 3rd Row Seat, Clean Local Trade, Dark Blue w/Gray Leather, $9,995 #303Y, Wabash (800)5731 1 7 5 , denneymotorsales.com.

Electrical • Plumbing General Contracting Decks • Fences

JANEWAY’S HANDYMAN SERVICE

2 BDRM ranch duplex, south side of Wabash, $400 per month plus utilities, 260-5637743.

Home: 765-833-2025 Cell: 765-226-0661 DUMP TRUCK SERVICE Haul It In or Away

DOWNSTAIRS 2 bdrm, washer/dryer hook up, $350/mo. plus deposit, you pay electric, 260-563-4059. COUNTRY HOME for rent, 4 bdrm, Northfield school district, C/A, W/D hook up, gas heat, lg. yard, 2 car garage, dishwasher, $600/mo., $600 deposit required, elec. included, references, 765833-6536 or 765-833-4601.

2008 CHEVROLET COBALT LS, 2.2L 4CYL, 4 Door, CD, A/C, Automatic, Driver Info Center, 100,000 Mile Warranty, Silver w/Gray Cloth, $9,995 #369X, Wabash (800)573-1175, denneymotorsales.com. 1989 FORD ESCORT LX, 4 dr., 4 CYL, automatic, great transportation, fully serviced, ready to go! ONLY $895 call 260-571-1780.

2008 PONTIAC G6 SEDAN, 2.4L 4CYL, Remote Start, Driver Info Center, Cruise, All Power Options, Automatic, 100,000 Mile Warranty, Silver w/Charcoal Cloth, $12,495 #356X, Wabash (800)573-1175, denneymotorsales.com.

84 DODGE Rampage, 4CYL, automatic, runs great, good tires, $1000 obo, 260571-3912 or 260-571-3914.

FOR SINGLES ONLY If you are single, lonely or just looking for someone new to talk with,you may place a For Singles Only ad by sending, in 55 words or less, a brief description of yourself and your interests and the type of person you are seeking for a companion to: For Singles Only, ‘the paper’, P.O. Box 603, Wabash, IN 46992, or you may bring your ad into the office. Enclose $7 for 2 weeks, plus your name, phone number and full address for our records. No names should appear in the copy of your ad. We will assign your ad a file number and forward replies to you, or you may pick them up in the office. All ads and replies must conform to good taste. ‘the paper’ reserves the right to edit or reject any ad. Singles ads must be received in our office before noon on Friday the week before the first publication. Interested parties may answer For Singles Only ads by writing ‘the paper’, P.O. Box 603,Wabash, IN 46992. Please keep replies within the bounds of good taste, and BE HONEST!

64 YR. OLD SWM, looking for a sincere, caring SWF. I am retired & enjoy fishing, traveling & auctions. Prefer non-smokers, an occasional glass of wine is fine. Please send responses to Box 617A, c/o ‘the paper’, P.O. Box 603, Wabash, IN 46992.

JOIN OUR TEAM SMALL COMPANY LOOKING TO HIRE: CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SALES SUPPORT REPRESENTATIVE LOOKING FOR AN INDIVIDUAL WITH STRONG VERBAL AND WRITING SKILLS. EXPERIENCE WITH EXCEL AND MICROSOFT WORD A PLUS. APPLICANT MUST POSSESS A WILLINGNESS TO BE FLEXIBLE WITH JOB DUTIES AND EXPECT TO DO A VARIETY OF DIFFERENT TASKS THROUGHOUT THE SEASONAL YEAR. HIGH MECHANICAL APTITUDE AND LIGHT CARPENTRY OR CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE WILL HELP YOU GET THIS JOB. ADDITIONALLY, APPLICANT MUST POSSESS THE ABILITY TO WORK WITH CUSTOMERS IN A PROMPT EFFICIENT AND POLITE MANNER. GOOD LISTENING SKILLS ARE REQUIRED AS YOU WILL BE THE EYES AND EARS OF THE OWNERS, ENABLING THE COMPANY TO UNDERSTAND OUR COMPETITION, OUR CUSTOMER, AND OUR PRODUCT’S PERFORMANCE. TRAVEL IS REQUIRED. SEND RESUMES AND SALARY REQUIREMENTS TO: ATTN: SALES SUPPORT P.O. BOX 211, WABASH, IN 46992 1743

CNA-HHA Full-Time & Part-Time Now Available In Marion WE OFFER • Weekly Competitive Pay • Flexible Schedule • Insurance • Friendly Office Staff At Advantage, you can make a difference. Experience home care like never before, where the ratio is one to one and your licensed safety is always our number one concern. Come and make a difference in someone’s life. Apply today!

K&L Construction

1501

Residential and Commercial • Fully Insured

Concrete Work, Block Work, Additions, Decks, Doors, Siding and Remodeling 260.568.1167 or 260.571.3151 tes ima t s eE Fre

Insu

red

A to Z EXTERIORS

INTERIORSLLC

! • Roofing • Remodeling • Siding • Room Additions • Windows • Doors • Decks

Your Ad Here Call 563-8326


40

www.thepaperofwabash.com

December 15, 2010


Dec. 15, 2010