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Hispanic Heritage Month Digging through history

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Volume 70, No. 5

September 26, 2013

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opinion

September 26, 2013

#UTPA

Tweet at and follow us @ThePanAmerican

They better be demolishing that house for more parking #utpa -@candyeye00

Honey, I’m a feminist Feminism isn’t sexism, it’s human equality

Hey utpa where can I sign up for “How to talk to people 101” -@karinnni Exhausting cheer practice but hard work and dedication goes a long way . So proud to be a UTPA cheerleader! -@melissagtz93 UTPA football is still undefeated. -@Hector_777 Walking around UTPA at night is so beautiful -@Azeneth_Love

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Vol. 70, No. 5

The Pan American

thepanamerican@gmail.com 1201 West University, ARHU 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 Phone: (956) 665-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 Editors-in-Chief:

Norma Gonzalez Lea Victoria Juarez

News Editor:

Susan Gonzalez

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK

Victoria E. Valdez Copy Editor

Despite a prevailing opinion, feminists aren’t “out to get” men. Their main concern isn’t the bashing of males - it’s about the rights every person deserves and the standards that all genders are held to. This may be the modern age, but unpaid paternity leave, a 23-cent pay difference and less than 20 percent representation of one gender in a leadership position is not equality, nor is it fair. The concept of feminism isn’t even about raising or empowering women to the point of creating superiority complexes; it’s the eradication of traditional gender roles. Feminism, despite what I previously thought, is not sexism. It does not favor or bash one gender over the other. Neither men nor women are the villains, the lack of equality is the main concern. Feminism wasn’t always static, it has gone through three full movements. The initial feminism movement, known as the First Wave which occurred in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, focused on women’s suffrage and had Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony as its most

notable leaders. Lasting only three decades from the 1960’s to the 90’s, and attempting to eliminate gender inequality in culture and laws was the Second Wave of feminism’s priority, but they were unsuccessful. The Third Wave of feminism, stemming from the failures of its mid-nineties

with anyone’s condescending, misogyny or misandry (dislike of men) jokes. It refuses to accept “man-up,” “pussified,” “whipped,” “too girly” or “too sensitive” as insults. It says, “Hire me because I would be a great asset to your company, not another great ass in the office.” It demands that men be held to

Their main concern isn’t the bashing of males - it’s about the rights every person deserves and the standards that all genders are held to. Jon Nutt/The Pan American predecessors, carries into the present and attempts to rectify what the Second Wave started. Third Wave feminists not only fight for gender rights equality, but equality for women of color such as Gloria Anzaldúa, Maxine Hong Kingston and Audre Lorde. Feminism has nothing to do with how much hair is on your body, where you belong or how much clothing you are wearing. Feminism takes appropriated and traditional “gender roles” and tosses them out the window. Feminism respects a man or woman who refuses to put up

the same standards as women and vice versa. It eradicates the notion that women can’t understand comics or sports and can’t have motorcycles or guns. It reaffirms that there are a vast majority of men that respect women and are not sex-crazed animals. It confirms that women are worth more than their appearances and are rational and strong, capable humans. Out of everything, feminism is about respect - respect for wellmeaning men and women. Now before you accuse me of menstruating or leaving my post in the kitchen, ask yourself: why might you need feminism?

Mariano Mora decides to fold his cards instead of betting further after long deliberation Sept. 25. The freshman communications major joined the Texas Hold ‘Em Tournament held at the Student Union. This was the first poker tournament he participated in.

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The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the paper or university.

Itzel A. Lopez/The Pan American


4 3S

3102September ,5 rebmetp26, 2013 eS2013 January 31,

pxe setadilosno c taht tcejorp e vitavonni ni etaudargrednu krow ot ecnahc eht a em gnivig elih ecneirepxe fo st tuohguorht gninrael w ,tes lliks dna sisnoc ssecorp e Th .mul stneduts fo rebm pihsnretni dna ”.hcraeser egde retneC eht fo g un eht esaercni hcraeser etauda gnittuc n i n e r ot tnaSpanp g o r tBy e nem etaudargwas s d ’ n y as chaperone because the group’s were donated by the University. of medical close to the Atlantic Ocean and are own clinic, and it was really helpw t u i e s r g e a v g inU eht ecniS ne tneCanales ot just Jose Julian gnioagcouple ,2102 ni noitac duts gnisaercni dna seerged ME eW“ udE METS“What fo laofaculty ,sobinto i snoPan adviser, Glenn Martinez, we did was split ish students who had an idea of affected by strong storms and hurful to have him along because he T o l S g a itpoAmerican l g l i n V i t n t a lareves sah tnar e n i g i e t c , s s n The i t r ellecxE fo cejorp evfi detc hC dias ”,MET g wen eTh was unavailable u S r t n to make the trip. three groups of two each and we breaking down language barriers in ricanes, which led them to add prepresented nignar ,senilpic s o a n i zraG adnalongside s o l s a m c e s a W a r h g e “ orp ht erehw ,noitc t emtraped eht .scitamehtam n ileM yB us,” he said. sat id M Colegio ETS ehJuan urtsnI desaB eggave n ossefthen t gnireht ahpresentation to each school,” he said.i r“We sentations on disaster relief for the “Since we’re not doctors, we don’t orp ehad METS etmedicine,” tut ciAmeteacher n t a a c i n c i r e o d a e l s l u a m s t a c a n d A a e a C m r h n g t g poleved srossefo aP eTh rednu ruo neht iw sschool in Santo nVillegas idulcni said. “The first a junior high fo tnarg a dedra NATION Jose Alberto to get involved in the University, most recent trip. volunteer medical services and only g r n p slFlores, e e r y airetam lanoita tneduts gnidivorpSTRUGGLING s t r t s l u u o o c t w c a t f a n n s rael stneduts eh aw saw ytisrevinU edivorp retneC mulucirruc a hg cude beamed Domingo, Costa Rica, raeytrip wen gnwith t evah dna(charity eTh cimabroad edaca 4was isahcrup According to theuorWorld talked about the Univerhosted juguetones “Ourybfirst to talk about preventative care, but he ht ygogadgroup -isop( ehtsoyowe’ve lanoitcurtsni st , a 1 l 0 u 2 c e i p r 3 r 1 u g j o 0 n c r 2 i j p h n e c e e n h a pride and joy ated the ThCentral dna and et eexperiences rofyears utsgift luJ ewhich .IBC nIntelligence ht ni yleviwe’ve 000,of gnithat tal ni nwas tceffedone reffowas 72medical o desab METsity Factbook by the and their studying toy drives) active Puerto .yRico Aug. 22hadt the experience 6 $ o o e i t r t o a n c m a o u r i g d t l a o E i r r S p f e o t c o e a imedaca nehtgn tnemtrapeD .S. ht htupon t cfiiceps edam m just bestowed aid iw deher foI didn’t vlov- nai first n o i U e t n r ” y Agency, Costa Rica’s gross domestic there. The second group gave a pretranslation during the Hispanic En27, 2011. get to go to that and took questions from the older t . e e t s g t l h n u n o t i c t i n a e r , r f e h r a akit. o d e t e h s hcuJose r l fo )sevit htiw dengised s seforp etaicossa t s ,tnAlberto detaerc erew stc empolVillegas, eved rofaysenior argorapmeasure of the o nisentation cimeIdwas awthe a gnieband dnhigh e hygiene aca rstill uf eTh capita, about dental and gineering, nScience Technology trip because trying to fix kids in school we went to. tinutratoppoproduct persm o i e t h n T t o U g ehUTPA, i t n i r i d truf rotried r o d e f h a r t o n r t u I c f tnenot f ni stneduts gn erid gevents. esaercofnithe mpito nidnuoWe’re -igne ,ygstatus,” uqget dncountry e yremotional, a f eht getting otarobal wen total output divided tips on proper nutrition and exerWeek my residency his experience, olonhceJose itsissa he was able to osla si paid t ,ecAlberto sobofor neics fo saeWith lalliV but when he saw the teacher’s exrepopulation, bmun eht is $11,900. cise, and the third presentation was that now so it makes it a little rainehthe t ngaps i sreeinraknowledge . by the easier Villegas said. “I lost about a year of fill that we a l u c i r r c u c r I e B upression t C n rof elbaof e C . s c s i t ’ A a a simmehdidn’t P school because weelation tnedofutthe ner si dat tam dknow.” eht dezof s foprimary indica- about CPR and first aid.” na gnireen rawsuch GDP is sone to do.” that.” a i I n S g H o c e e e Th r c y n bple l e l a llecxE fo 00gesture, 0,016$ he M S gnikeeeconomic the full detfinally amitse felt rednu margorP mrof ssergnoC perforDiscussing something so fatal Currently the club stands at s 91 nI Villegas finished na tiw sraey tors ofEaTcountry’s snoitutitsnI gni Jose,59Alberto METS ni impact of what he and his hstudent nWhile I . s e e r g S-cinahowever, mance. the GDP of Costa was difficult to make interesting about 50 paying members, but A DREAMER hisvrerun, after almost e e b d o T psiH . t . c r a A e e h y n S o h . i c n t aorganization a a o e cudE rehgiH eh sa gnikrow were itacutodE ,3102atg102 wondoing. -nu llina fReynosa, nirpof Rica ranks 229 countries, though, he said. only 12 were invited to the trip Born Tamaulipas, three years of leading the club. He t si ohw ,razalaS f o s V o e t l n t i e T crep 52 ,ISH V saw hs dias dia“She when we s ,senwas a dhas ilriAsonahappy ah Aremained iT a derdown “I was part of the third group Costa Rica. The club offers aepoint JoseytAlberto has been liv- eltstepped asc the group’s presiisrevinuVillegas PTU at 20-25 perciremA ta repol poverty e d i s r n o o e g e l l d o e c e t hgave v i aid kit eht2001, cxe yin craesthem ta stnedudent rev ingAinPT er eht afobasic 2,1nearly fo lat20 cent72 for and my presentation was pretty reward system for participating the ts etand trap afirst UUnited audaplans ot years. Members .emit-lStates nhave rgredto finish his degree eeb eone,” luf desince vah ot eht eviecer ot lloto wbecause rnetravel rotnemthey dn a cinand e d MEdidn’t s ’ r of the UTPA medical Spanish orgadepressing,” he said. “I was talking events and the member with the but didn’t have the chance graduate o a l TS sieven p e h s i 3 c H a 0 b h 4 e ,2 dna etaudarg b tsuinmMay. oemotional t lufknahatt si he na tpaid ot said. redbeeuni“I narg outside ,setaudhoped nu 136,61“I’m tnogot nization the country until he going c lla’elittle arg eertog ease this burden about the dangers of choking and I most points gets his or herdtrip f o e h r f a o s n m s o t o sisnocto focus now on s h s e w l e f l o tnecrep 7.88 eunitnBecause that point, but I didn’t want btoaulet lav by visiting razknow oc lliw came a legal resident alaShow areas of didn’t tonmake the prefor by the organization. in time for the school; that off made me waste , eht nunderprivileged s t .reerac lanoissef n o e d d i u 5 t 4 s 2 e e t s audyear oR arg orp sih the ,country. dralocally, h gnikJose TitSshow.” eht( dewolla sah row SAMS trip saera METS sentation a e little more exciting.” they only volunteered to the Dominican Re- .nitime,” he said. “Now the group’s g i r o ) c . X i n t T n a t p a a D r s u g i H ( d e a celebration of World arg METS Th“ maet retoh htake sojonThe iH trip c oWith nébutoR napresident t seitinthe tiw public The Alberto Villegas thought ecngroup utroppo euqinu eics twent taerginaAugust mssergnoisC Minerva Limas and I iw to three schools si APT2012. Sept. 21,eviJose U was gnivorpfocusdiasmarred g ot around the hcountry cGratitude d n lliw tI“ .dDay m a i and handed NO BORDERS their giving internationally, Puerto Rico in 2011 by act adviser (for the d n r i a w a e i a h s r az aal aS23-year-old eht ot stneduts t dasecan .setaudarg tsom nuounofficial nna to take it easy and ”,stneduts out Alberto Villegas, -acude METS stcarttand eht gnivahThe a tahthe aid kits, toothbrushes, journey to their latest trip ing on Caribbean, Spanish-speaking Hurricane Irene, however, group). I’m going etaufirst t d I a S h r H g t a r e m a ” d f . n y o d a u n e w a l r pmaxe of tsofloss, vitisopstudpre-med biology and egeneral oiR ehproximity vorpall a ni rtoothpaste eciof t ni noit v ,elyowasn’t areas, countries offering the venture short .majust studying.” of lasoporand rC nitas ngroup i stnehad rgorkeep sirKsimple as forming an p a ddental dutstorucut p METS ettimbor ies double major, said he has much o gallnitheir .yof us m e l l t a n a V a c a e u e e t d s d which donated bought organization and boarding plane. to the home base Edinburg in and leave behind supplies. He plans on attending medical r u e e n h y a m na hsilbwere b r d G a t n r a g a h o , t r s n p r e o e a v e i e t e t s h r a i e a l t c e c o u n b r t d i o o e t y f d r to be thankful for after traveling to ltnerruc stnedu mehtmost I“ becoming a doctor, like ffe nfundraising a ni oga raey eThe gnirrecent -lwothemaperp voyage with money from oclub group had to prove case of an emergency. He said their school and n k t S g d n n i a y n l s p o a p x t a e n d T n a na ,m ht gniyd rg eht i ygetarts yranil htuoS peed Costa Rica Aug. 16-23 with four dnbefore ae eraprevious a ygolothey pi efforts. Members also handed out a selves to the University to these countries also was even ebetter his father. ew ,sdlefi M ib sa hcusTraveling -itepmoc eht nithan rthe ,stcejbus METS csidretni ETS other members of the Student Assoroan e r u f erofficial morftrips variety of UTPA promotional matewere allowed to become plan low-cost to two because his father came along. t u f aperp dnalettesmembers thgirb a rof ,yrt eht ni egde asojoniH dias ” l l i k ciation of Medical Spanish. His fanuoc r s a h s i l b y a t t , se rials: T-shirts, pens, pencils, school student organization inin2011. budget. “My dad is taekretired utroppo eht nefit within the operating ram labdoctor olg lacigolonhc uo vig era yeTh .lo ot ,arbegla ther, Dr. Jose Joaquin Villegas, acted et evit ohcareas bags and sunglasses, all of which “When we started othe chose tropical that are in Reynosa, but now he runs his t dnclub, s e t a spoithskroThey a .62 yluJ esaeler udarg detinU eht ni , w evitcaretni ni s s e r p a ni e g e a tapicitrap ot tnavdA METS etats-fo-tuo ni sre ot gnidroccA seerged s’rolehc gnimocpu eht f ep htiw krowten dna levart a b fo driht-eno y o eht ,tnoidda nI reffo ot sah ma tsil etelpmoc A .secnerefnoc .sdlefi METS n lno ,setatS rgorp METS eh i era deniatbo e h t s k n a r muroF cimon t secnerefnoc snoitacilppa eh oc t 331 fo tuo 84 r E dlroW suoigitserP no detacol era s htiw gnola ebmun sa setatS enilda det htam fo ytilauq .etisbew METS ed dna ni seirtnuoc dep inU s ’ A P T ole U ekil smargorp h .noitacude ecne ved crae ics dna noitcnujnoc ni na tneduts a ev seR“ ,A ig )METS( -iH namssergno PTU ,2002 nI By Susan Gonzalez -nu ecslots. said Aaron Barreiro, the SGA for 12 available student neirepxe elbara C fo ecffiO eht p m o c n htiw i cinapsiH tsrfi e The Pan American nesoR going president at UTPA. “The final “I really believeodthey’re dias ”,rehto yna ht dezinagro ,a e sojon -lonhceT dna e a htiw itdeinvolves taudarg ohw ,ra kil New committees, or working draft was presented at 3 p.m. to have a lot of input; c n eicS ,gnireenign z E retupmBarreiro, lliw hcihw ,CE oc ni eeraged s’r alaS groups, were formed to gather to the University Council, and a lot of things,” said TSEH .keew yg olehcab d e o t t I r “ o . p 3102 gnimap u s s a h , r 2 p between (Sept. 16) and (Sept. senior pre-med biology 1 s n 7 .tcO ecalp ek student opinions about the new sah dna slevel ll a ti esuaceb detic i ecneics t at xe em tog acauniversity. Officially announced 17) was when we decided how jor. “For example, -tacovda rof led a noitacude METS -inutroinppthe o e h o m t e m l a noitan a emo services (work- evag at the Student Government we would go about filling those demic supportym htuoS gnoma s dnapxe ot yt noitapucco ME ceb ing group), that’s broad, it’s TS gni Association meeting Sept. 18, available positions.” y l t n a egdelso n i m oderp era ohw wonk stneduts saxeT Initially, the plan called for going to have to be broken -ided etisbew a these groups will provide input ot gnidrocca ,ci on a variety of topics, such as all seats to be filled by SGA down by colleges and then pro.tneve launna e napsiH ht ot detac student tuition and fees, and members, but Barreiro wanted grams for every specific college to extend the opportunity to and department. It’s going to be auxiliaries, which provide supthe rest of the student body. pretty involved. I really think port services. “The paper actually said what comes out of these is goNow called Project South Texas, the merger of UTPA just SGA students, but com- ing to be taken into account.” For each available seat, two and the University of Texas at ing out of the meeting I wantBrownsville and the creation ed more students to have an people were selected: a person of a new medical school in the opportunity to be a part of it to fill the position and another Rio Grande Valley has been because it was something really to serve as alternate. SGA will in the works since December important,” Barreiro said. “So I announce the representatives so 2012, when the University of came to (SGA) Vice President students know who to contact if Texas System Board of Regents Erik Sanchez and thought of a they have input to offer in regards to the new university. officially approved the plan. way to get more involvement.” Eleven working groups were “They still have the opportuNow, the plans are starting to take shape with formation of discussed at the SGA meeting, nity to give input...if they have working groups that will in- with each group comprising anything they would like to six seats. UTPA and UTB will suggest, they can contact (the clude student representatives. “I had a meeting with each have six representatives representatives),” Barreiro said. Any decisions or input (University President Robert per group. However, these seats Nelsen) and a number of other are filled not only by students, provided by these working people. We were going through but faculty and administration, groups will be finalized by Januthe working groups and exam- as well. At the SGA meeting, ary 2014, according to Barreiro. ining where we should include students who attended could more student involvement,” nominate themselves or others

Medical Spanish club visits international communities

ekil smargorp hcra tneduts a evig eseR )M ecneirepxe elb ETS( arapmocni na .rehto yna ekil nu

Working groups formed for new university


4

September 26, 2013

Sex offender made public

Battleground Texas responds to concern over Young Democrats situation

New program in disaster studies to be developed

By Susan Gonzalez The Pan American

In the wake of the total of 4 to 7 inches of rain that hit the Lower Rio Grande Valley in the last two weeks, courtesy of Tropical Storm Ingrid, the topic of natural disasters is at the forefront. At UTPA, a new master’s degree program in disaster studies will tackle the subject, examining hurricanes and other disasters. In the program, a disaster is defined as a physical threat that happens in the presence of a vulnerable human population, according to William Donner, an associate professor in the department of sociology and anthropology. Therefore, the program will not only focus on natural disasters, but will also include technological and terror-related occurrences such as chemical spills, bombings and school shootings. “For instance, a very strong tornado may touch down in an empty field or alternatively strike a well-prepared, highly-resilient community, resulting in no fatalities,” said Donner, who is helping launch the program. “On the other hand, densely populated, underprepared communities may experience dozens of casualties if struck by a mod-

erate or even weak tornado.” The degree, expected to be approved in spring 2014, will be part of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and interdisciplinary in nature, meaning it will relate to more than one branch of study. The focus of study will be on the social and economic impacts of disasters, such as how impoverished regions recover from disasters or the financial cost of resulting physical damage. “One only needs to focus on the Indian Ocean tsunami, Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, as well as 9/11, to see how these events impact societies throughout the world,” said Havidan Rodriguez, provost and vice president for academic affairs. The number, scope and type of occurrences worldwide is one aspect the program’s courses will explore. For example, during the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004, an undersea earthquake occurred. The epicenter was off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. It triggered a series of tsunamis that affected contiguous land masses, including Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India and Thailand. More than 230,000 people in 14 countries

The 10 Worst Disasters of the Last Century

1906 San Francisco earthquake fire: An earthquake struck and fires broke out in the city. About 3,000 people died and over 80 percent of the city was destroyed.

died as a result. In addition, the unprecedented growth in the proportion of the population that is exposed to hazards will be another topic of interest. According to a 2012 report by the United Nations, almost 890 million people in the world live in cities that are at risk from at least one major natural disaster, which translates to about 60 percent of people in all urban areas. Students in the program, developed by Rodriguez, Donner and Walter Diaz, dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, will examine the expanding integration of natural science into emergency management research and practice. “The aim of the program is to train graduates in the management of a broad range of threats,” Donner said. In order to achieve this, tentative courses may include disasters and society, emergency management, geographic information systems in disaster and interdisciplinary disaster studies. Other requirements may include classes in the natural sciences, government, communication and culture. Due to the degree’s flexibil-

ity, a student will be equipped to find positions in emergency management, floodplain management or public safety, Donner said. It will also prepare graduates to pursue doctorates in programs in related fields. In addition, students interested in pursuing this program may find classes in statistics, geographic information and social sciences helpful. Natural sciences, especially those addressing hazards, such as meteorology and seismology, may also be beneficial, he added. “As the program evolves, scholars from other departments will be integrated into the program,” Donner said. There are a few programs of this nature around the country. For example, the State University of New York at New Paltz offers a minor in disaster studies and the University of Southern Mississippi offers a certificate in the same area of study. But this program will be the first of its kind in the University of Texas System. Rodriguez, whose academic specialty is in disaster studies, hopes to “develop a strong interdisciplinary program that will serve as a national model.”

1980 Eruption of Mount St. Helens: The deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in U.S. history. It killed 57 people.

not aware of the concern regarding this individual and has taken steps to ensure he is no longer working on anything related to our organization. In the coming weeks, we will launch a new Battleground Texas chapter at UTPA to ensure the students on campus are registered and engaged in the issues that matter to their community and able to vote this November.” Johnson was convicted of first-degree aggravated sexual assault April 28, 2003, and served three years in Garza West Texas Department of Criminal Justice. According to Texas Penal Code Section 22.021, sexual assault of a child is aggravated if the child is under 14 years of age, if a deadly weapon is used, or serious bodily injury is threatened. Information regarding registered sex offenders that attend the University can be found via the UTPA Police Department website.

1918 Spanish flu pandemic: It infected 500 million people across the world and killed 50 to 100 million — 3 to 5 percent of the world’s population at the time.

1938 New England hurricane: The first major hurricane to strike New England since 1869; it was estimated to have killed between 682 and 800 people. 1925 Tri-state tornado: The deadliest tornado in

recorded earthquake in U.S. and North American history, recorded at a magnitude of 9.2

Battleground Texas, a state and federal Political Action Committee founded with the goal of making Texas a swing state, released a statement to The Pan American in response to concern regarding the student president of the Young Democrats at UTPA, Billy Wayne Johnson. It was made public Sept. 23 that 36-year-old Johnson is a registered sex offender. Johnson helped Battleground Texas register voters earlier this month through the Young Democrats organization, according to a photo on the group’s Facebook page. Jenn Brown, executive director of Battleground Texas, thanked Johnson for his work via Twitter. “Battleground Texas is working with students on more than 20 college campuses,” the statement said. “While we carefully vet our staff and full-time fellows, we’re not able to do the same for the thousands of volunteers working with our organization or partners across the state. Battleground Texas was

Source: Popular Mechanics

1910 The Great Fire: A wildfire that burned about three million acres in northeast Washington, northern Idaho and western Montana.

1964 Alaska earthquake: The most powerful

By Susan Gonzalez The Pan American

U.S. history, crossed from Missouri, through Illinois and into Indiana, resulting in 695 fatalities.

1974 Tornado outbreak: From April 3-4, there

were 148 tornadoes confirmed in 13 U.S. states. It extensively damaged approximately 900 square miles.

2005 Hurricane Katrina: The costliest natural disaster, as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the U.S. 1993 Storm of the Century: A large cyclonic storm that formed over the Gulf of Mexico. It was directly experienced by nearly 40 percent of the U.S. population.


September 26, 2013

THE PAN AMERICAN

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September 26, 2013

THE PAN AMERICAN

THE PAN AMERICAN

September 26, 2013

Events Calendar

Timeline 1911-1920:

The Mexican Revolution

1928:

Octaviano Larrazolo becomes the first Hispanic U.S. Senator when he replaces New Mexico democrat Andieus A. Jones, who has died in office.

1929: Several Latino service

organizations, including several in South Texas, merge to form the League of Latin American Citizens. The organization would become the longest-lasting Latino civil rights group in the country.

1932: Benjamin Nathan Cardozo becomes the first Latino named to the U.S. Supreme Court. 1945: In Mendez v. Westminster, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit finds that having separate schools for Mexican-Americans is unconstitutional. 1946: The first Puerto Rican U.S. governor, Jesús T. Piñero, is appointed by President Harry Truman. 1953-1959: The Cuban Revolution

ticed that others tend to involuntarily lose touch with their roots because of outside influences, such as music and American education. “I was raised in McAllen and most of my fraternity brothers are from La Joya, Palmview, the Mission area,” the 21-year-old said. “The way they are is really different from the way my friends are from McAllen. In McAllen, I guess because of the area, I would see people lose their Hispanic heritage quickly because they were trying to fit in with everybody else.” He believes that Hispanics are trying to adapt to the changes in their society. They lose their heritage as time wears on. Despite the transformations that his peers have gone through, Garcia said his culture means a lot to him and he won’t let go of traditions. Sometimes, he even mixes his Mexican and American backgrounds. “I’ve seen people put others down for being Hispanic, and I use that as my fuel,” he said. “My parents came from nothing. They didn’t even finish middle school. So, I’m able to say that I came from that, but I’m now all the way here. It’s how Drake says, ‘We started from the bottom, now we’re here.’” Garcia shows pride in his fraternity and gives the University credit for its involvement in student cultures. “As far as Hispanic Heritage Month, I see a lot of (pride) at Pan Am as well. People are still losing their roots, but we still have this one month devoted to Hispanic Heritage,” he said. “It’s dedicated to show people and remind them where they come from.”

1954:

In the landmark case of Hernandez v. Texas, the Supreme Court rules Hispanics have equal protection under the 14th Amendment, enabling them to legally combat discrimination.

1970: A new provision is added to the Voting Rights Act of 1970, designed to guard against new barriers to political participation, preventing minority votes from being diluted in gerrymandered districts or through elections. 1972: Ramona Acosta Bañuelos becomes the first Hispanic treasurer

of the United States. 1974: Congress passes the Equal Educational Opportunity Act to create equality in public schools, making bilingual education available to Hispanic youth.

1990: Ellen Ochoa becomes the first Latina in space when she serves on the space shuttle Discovery.

1978: The United Nations recognizes Puerto Rico as a colony of the U.S. once it seceded from Spain in 1898, after 400 years of colonial rule.

President George Bush appoints the first woman and first Hispanic surgeon general of the United States, Antonia C. Novello.

1988: Lauro Cavazos be-

comes the first Latino appointed to a U.S. presidential cabinet when Ronald Reagan names him Secretary of Education.

Norma Cantú becomes assistant secretary for civil rights and department of education. President Bill Clinton also appoints 25 Hispanics to posi-

> Sept. 26: Viva Mexico Dance group “Conceptos Entidad Dancistica” will perform an array of Mexican dances. Dustin Sekula Memorial Library 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

> Oct. 10: Letras Sin Fronteras Fusion of poetry and stories from various writers representing Latin America. Dustin Sekula Memorial Library 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

> Oct. 3: La Zapatera Prodigiosa Spanish play by Federico Garcia Lorca. Edinburg City Auditorium 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

> Oct. 11: Noche Bohemia Raul and Rosie Lopez and Bohemian friends. Edinburg City Auditorium 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Tanya Vela/The Pan American

As of fall 2012, 89.2 percent of UTPA’s student population is Hispanic, according to the University’s Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness. So, an ongoing holiday could be of interest to many people on campus. Every year, Hispanic Heritage Month runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. The former date is Independence Day for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua; Mexico’s Independence Day is Sept. 16. President Lyndon B. Johnson created the observation of Hispanic culture in 1968 and 20 years later, President Ronald Reagan expanded it to a full 30 days. Throughout the month, Americans hold special festivities to celebrate the cultures of Hispanics, or people of Spanish, Mexican and Central and South American descent. Salsa music, dances and other forms of Hispanic music are featured to honor the month. UTPA has hosted several events since the month began such as dances and movie showings. Phi Iota Alpha, a fraternity at the University, aims its efforts at the Hispanic community, according to its vice president, Mario Garcia. The civil engineering major said the fraternity has plans for a loteria, a Mexican bingo game, for a charity night during Hispanic Heritage Month to help the United Nations Children’s Fund. “What we’re trying to do is get people to bring their own change to play with and at the end of the night, they will donate it, and that will go towards UNICEF,” he explained. When it comes to Hispanic heritage, the Reynosa-born student no-

Page 7

tions needing confirmation by the Senate.

1993: Federico Peña becomes first Hispanic Secretary of Transportation. Henry Cisneros becomes first Hispanic Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

2001: Rosario Marin is sworn in as the 41st treasurer of the United States, becoming the first Mexican-born citizen to head the Treasury and the highest-ranking Hispanic woman in the Bush Administration. 2002:

In Salt Lake City,

Utah, speedskater Derek Parra becomes the first MexicanAmerican to medal in the Olympics Winter Games, winning the gold and setting a world record in the 1,500-meter race, also setting an American record and winning a silver medal in the 5,000 meter. Speedskater Jennifer Rodríguez becomes the first Cuban-American to compete in the Olympics Winter Games, winning two bronze medals in the ladies 1,000-meter and 1500-meter races.

2004: President George W. Bush appoints Carlos M. Gutierrez to the position of secretary of commerce.

2005: Alberto Gonzales is confirmed as first Hispanic U.S. attorney general. 2008: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, an increase to 45.5 million in population makes Hispanics the nation’s largest minority group.

People are still losing their roots, but we still have this one month devoted to Hispanic Heritage. - Mario Garcia

Phi Iota Alpha vice president

*Source:: Hispanic- American Almanac, Gale, 1997


Page 6

September 26, 2013

THE PAN AMERICAN

THE PAN AMERICAN

September 26, 2013

Events Calendar

Timeline 1911-1920:

The Mexican Revolution

1928:

Octaviano Larrazolo becomes the first Hispanic U.S. Senator when he replaces New Mexico democrat Andieus A. Jones, who has died in office.

1929: Several Latino service

organizations, including several in South Texas, merge to form the League of Latin American Citizens. The organization would become the longest-lasting Latino civil rights group in the country.

1932: Benjamin Nathan Cardozo becomes the first Latino named to the U.S. Supreme Court. 1945: In Mendez v. Westminster, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit finds that having separate schools for Mexican-Americans is unconstitutional. 1946: The first Puerto Rican U.S. governor, Jesús T. Piñero, is appointed by President Harry Truman. 1953-1959: The Cuban Revolution

ticed that others tend to involuntarily lose touch with their roots because of outside influences, such as music and American education. “I was raised in McAllen and most of my fraternity brothers are from La Joya, Palmview, the Mission area,” the 21-year-old said. “The way they are is really different from the way my friends are from McAllen. In McAllen, I guess because of the area, I would see people lose their Hispanic heritage quickly because they were trying to fit in with everybody else.” He believes that Hispanics are trying to adapt to the changes in their society. They lose their heritage as time wears on. Despite the transformations that his peers have gone through, Garcia said his culture means a lot to him and he won’t let go of traditions. Sometimes, he even mixes his Mexican and American backgrounds. “I’ve seen people put others down for being Hispanic, and I use that as my fuel,” he said. “My parents came from nothing. They didn’t even finish middle school. So, I’m able to say that I came from that, but I’m now all the way here. It’s how Drake says, ‘We started from the bottom, now we’re here.’” Garcia shows pride in his fraternity and gives the University credit for its involvement in student cultures. “As far as Hispanic Heritage Month, I see a lot of (pride) at Pan Am as well. People are still losing their roots, but we still have this one month devoted to Hispanic Heritage,” he said. “It’s dedicated to show people and remind them where they come from.”

1954:

In the landmark case of Hernandez v. Texas, the Supreme Court rules Hispanics have equal protection under the 14th Amendment, enabling them to legally combat discrimination.

1970: A new provision is added to the Voting Rights Act of 1970, designed to guard against new barriers to political participation, preventing minority votes from being diluted in gerrymandered districts or through elections. 1972: Ramona Acosta Bañuelos becomes the first Hispanic treasurer

of the United States. 1974: Congress passes the Equal Educational Opportunity Act to create equality in public schools, making bilingual education available to Hispanic youth.

1990: Ellen Ochoa becomes the first Latina in space when she serves on the space shuttle Discovery.

1978: The United Nations recognizes Puerto Rico as a colony of the U.S. once it seceded from Spain in 1898, after 400 years of colonial rule.

President George Bush appoints the first woman and first Hispanic surgeon general of the United States, Antonia C. Novello.

1988: Lauro Cavazos be-

comes the first Latino appointed to a U.S. presidential cabinet when Ronald Reagan names him Secretary of Education.

Norma Cantú becomes assistant secretary for civil rights and department of education. President Bill Clinton also appoints 25 Hispanics to posi-

> Sept. 26: Viva Mexico Dance group “Conceptos Entidad Dancistica” will perform an array of Mexican dances. Dustin Sekula Memorial Library 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

> Oct. 10: Letras Sin Fronteras Fusion of poetry and stories from various writers representing Latin America. Dustin Sekula Memorial Library 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

> Oct. 3: La Zapatera Prodigiosa Spanish play by Federico Garcia Lorca. Edinburg City Auditorium 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

> Oct. 11: Noche Bohemia Raul and Rosie Lopez and Bohemian friends. Edinburg City Auditorium 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Tanya Vela/The Pan American

As of fall 2012, 89.2 percent of UTPA’s student population is Hispanic, according to the University’s Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness. So, an ongoing holiday could be of interest to many people on campus. Every year, Hispanic Heritage Month runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. The former date is Independence Day for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua; Mexico’s Independence Day is Sept. 16. President Lyndon B. Johnson created the observation of Hispanic culture in 1968 and 20 years later, President Ronald Reagan expanded it to a full 30 days. Throughout the month, Americans hold special festivities to celebrate the cultures of Hispanics, or people of Spanish, Mexican and Central and South American descent. Salsa music, dances and other forms of Hispanic music are featured to honor the month. UTPA has hosted several events since the month began such as dances and movie showings. Phi Iota Alpha, a fraternity at the University, aims its efforts at the Hispanic community, according to its vice president, Mario Garcia. The civil engineering major said the fraternity has plans for a loteria, a Mexican bingo game, for a charity night during Hispanic Heritage Month to help the United Nations Children’s Fund. “What we’re trying to do is get people to bring their own change to play with and at the end of the night, they will donate it, and that will go towards UNICEF,” he explained. When it comes to Hispanic heritage, the Reynosa-born student no-

Page 7

tions needing confirmation by the Senate.

1993: Federico Peña becomes first Hispanic Secretary of Transportation. Henry Cisneros becomes first Hispanic Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

2001: Rosario Marin is sworn in as the 41st treasurer of the United States, becoming the first Mexican-born citizen to head the Treasury and the highest-ranking Hispanic woman in the Bush Administration. 2002:

In Salt Lake City,

Utah, speedskater Derek Parra becomes the first MexicanAmerican to medal in the Olympics Winter Games, winning the gold and setting a world record in the 1,500-meter race, also setting an American record and winning a silver medal in the 5,000 meter. Speedskater Jennifer Rodríguez becomes the first Cuban-American to compete in the Olympics Winter Games, winning two bronze medals in the ladies 1,000-meter and 1500-meter races.

2004: President George W. Bush appoints Carlos M. Gutierrez to the position of secretary of commerce.

2005: Alberto Gonzales is confirmed as first Hispanic U.S. attorney general. 2008: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, an increase to 45.5 million in population makes Hispanics the nation’s largest minority group.

People are still losing their roots, but we still have this one month devoted to Hispanic Heritage. - Mario Garcia

Phi Iota Alpha vice president

*Source:: Hispanic- American Almanac, Gale, 1997


Page 8

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ARMY RESERVE

EARNING A DEGREE IS STRONG. EARNING IT WITHOUT INTERRUPTION IS ARMY STRONG. As a Soldier in the Army Reserve, the Army Education Career Stabilization Program (ECS) will allow you to serve your country and earn your degree at the same time. Not only will the Army help pay for your education, offering nearly $25,000 with the GI Bill and up to $4,500 per year in tuition assistance, but you will also develop the confidence, character, and strength to secure your future. For more information, visit goarmy.com/reserve or call 1-800-USA-ARMY.

For more information about ROTC at University of Texas Pan American contact Abel Gonzalez at gonzaleza@utpa.edu or   956-665-3601.

©2009. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved.

September 26, 2013


arts & life

September 26, 2013

Calendar of Events

9

Sept. 26 - Oct. 3

Nothing to Declare but the Clothes on our Backs

South Texas College Pecan Campus Library

Opens Sept. 26 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Viva Mexico!

Dustin Sekula Memorial Library

Sept. 26 6 p.m.

Wake the Dead!

Thirsty Monkey

Sept. 27

8 p.m. - 2 a.m. Native Plants and Their Medicinal Uses Weslaco

Sept. 28 10 a.m.

Alzheimer’s Association Fundraiser

Tipsy Canvas, McAllen

Sept. 29 3 p.m. - 6 p.m.

Story by Audry Ocañas Photos by Adrian Castillo The Pan American Two rival families compete in a dance battle that decides the fate of both in a play riddled with dances, laughs and surprises. Presented by the University Theatre Productions, the Pachanga Latino Dance Comedy will play in the Albert L. Jeffers Theatre at UTPA Sept. 25 to Sept. 29. Audience members will experience a dance battle comedy reminiscent of movies like Bring It On and Step Up, but with a cultural twist. The Cabeza de Vaca family is about to lose its ranch in Starr County and the only way to save it is by winning a dance competition against the Lopez family, who has its eye on the wellknown property. CENTER STAGE From Crawling with Monsters to Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, UTPA has seen its fair share of plays, but none like the Pachanga Latino Dance Comedy. Culture in the Rio Grande Valley is put in the spotlight in a way that hasn’t been

done much before, according to Professor Eric Wiley, writer and director of Pachanga. “We have video-recorded scenes and we have actors and dancers on stage that interact with the video. That’s very experimental,” Wiley explained. “It’s also the first time, that I know of, that we have collaborated with danc-

Each actor admits the new comedy is a different experience. One actor, Maria Alvarado, said her performance in Pachanga was a complete 180-degree turn from what she has previously done. “Not that I have anything against Shakespearean plays, but people grow up with this mentality of ‘I’m just going to go hear

...people grow up with this mentality of ‘I’m just going to go hear words and words and words.’ They get this idea that theater is boring and it’s not. - Maria Alvarado UTPA actor ers and musicians and actors at UTPA on a show that is original and about local culture. Many times we’ve worked on musicals with the music department, but this focuses on the dance.” At least three of the actors in this production have worked with Wiley on Crawling with Monsters, an award-winning docudrama about Mexico’s drug wars and the children affected.

words and words and words.’ They get this idea that theater is boring and it’s not,” the theater/ TV/film major said. “This project is completely different because you have dancing, you have audience interactions, and you have a live band that adds a lot to it.” Wiley explained there is a dance around every corner in the play, displaying campiness that’s part of the action. He said

Fantasmas, Brujas y Espías Brownsville Heritage Complex

Oct. 1 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Prejudice and Pride Screening UTPA Student Union Theater

Oct. 2 7 p.m. War & Peace Screening

UTPA Student Union Theater

Oct. 3 11 a.m. Wednesday Night Comedy Cine El Rey

Oct. 3

8 p.m. - 12 a.m. Second Annual L&LS Pub Crawl 17th Street, McAllen

Oct. 3 8 p.m.

Anna Tirado

the play is heavily laden with the culture that citizens of the Valley have grown up with because most of the dances featured in the show are done at weddings and quinceañeras. The dancers already knew the dances, at least in some form. According to Wiley, the ambition of those involved in the production is not only to celebrate what is already in the Valley, but to be good ambassadors for Latino culture as well. “Like the cumbia, Duranguense, these are dances people know around (the Valley). But up north, these words mean nothing to them,” the professor said. “Most of these dances are unknown to people in New Orleans and elsewhere, so that’s where we’re trying to export local culture to and show the richness of the Valley’s culture.” The Pachanga Latino Dance Comedy will perform nationally, making its way to New Orleans’ Fringe Festival, which is an experimental theater festival held in November. The comedy production then plans to perform elsewhere, such as the Luminaria in San Antonio, an annual onenight arts fair.

SHALL WE DANCE? The cast had been rehearsing every day since Sept. 3 and may be well prepared, but they haven’t had much time for their loved ones. “Sometimes I don’t get to see my family,” said Anna Tirado, one of the protagonists and co-writer of the comedy. “I get home and they’re already asleep and when I wake up, they’re already gone. But we love to be here; we love what we’re doing.” The production of the comedy keeps the audience in mind every step of the way. Actors, such as Tirado, mention they not only want to uplift the spirits of those watching the play, but also hope to create a desire in them to be more involved with theater. “We want the audience to take away happiness, a hunger to come and see another play about us, something similar to Pachanga,” the Hidalgo native said. “We want (the audience) to laugh with us, dance with us and enjoy every part of the play.”


sports

10 September 26, 2013

By Marco Torres The Pan American Fresh from Chicago, the UTPA men’s and women’s golf teams completed the Chicago State University Cougar Classic/ Invitational. Ricky Solis of McAllen finished with a one-over twoday score of 145 (75, 70) to take the individual championship. He finished one stroke ahead of Green Bay’s Joe Collard, Loyola-Chicago’s Alex Cusumano and Ben Holm, who each shot a two-day score of 146. The Broncs as a team shot a final-round team score of 297 to finish in second place with a two-day total of 598, five strokes ahead of St. Xavier at 603. Green Bay won the team championship with a final round 294 for a two-day total of 592. The Bronc men’s team shot a team score of 301 and stood in

second place after the first round of the event at Harborside International Golf Course. As a team, the Broncs were three strokes behind Green Bay, who shot a first-round score of 298, for first. Next for men’s golf is a meet hosted by Houston Baptist University in Missouri City, Sept. 30-Oct. 1. The women’s team finished the two-day Chicago event Sept. 16 in fifth place, 10 strokes behind fourth place Cleveland State University, and 23 strokes behind the winner Chicago State University with a team score of 609. “They played hard in Chicago and worked as a team. As a coach it was a stepping stone for us to see,” said women’s Coach Ofelia Lopez. “We have the ability to play even lower, they just need to trust the

abilities and skills that they have.” Junior Blake Peterson finished tied for eighth and shot a second round 74 at the Cougar Classic. The next task for the women is Sept. 30, when the Texas State Bobcats host the Challenge at Onion Creek in Austin. Lopez said she the team to go out and be competitive, play hard and earn another top-five finish. The goal is to beat the team score of 305 or under. “Right now I have several girls who have stepped up and have been playing well: Blake Peterson, Sam Garcia and Melissa Bernal,” Lopez said. “And with the addition of the others, we make up a good team. All my players can play and with more and more confidence, we can break more records.”

Adrian Castillo/The Pan American

Sophomore Ricky Solis practices at the Los Lagos Golf Club. Solis won the CSU Cougar Invitational Sept. 24 at the Harborside International Golf Course.

WAC play begins Saturday

Arturo Villalobos/The Pan American

Shanice Faison serves the ball during the game against Huston-Tillotson University at the Field House Sept. 21. The Broncs won 3-0.

By Marco Torres The Pan American With conference play only two days away, expectations rise as the Bronc volleyball team gets ready to face the New Mexico State Aggies, the defending Western Athletic Conference champions. “We are using these preseason games to better prepare for the upcoming WAC season. Winning and learning how to win has been important,” Head Coach Brian Yale said. “But competing against teams that are similar to our WAC opponent’s styles of play was equally important. It’s all about preparation.” This is the first season the Broncs are in the WAC and will have a tough opponent in the conference opener. UTPA has a record of 10-6 this season and is off to one the best starts in University history, tied for second with the 1996 club behind the 1971 team with a record of 14-2. “I look for us to keep getting better,” Yale said. “We are definitely better than we were three weeks ago, but we also know that we can continue to be even better.” The Broncs will face off

against the Aggies at 2 p.m. in the Field House. This will also be the Aggies’ first conference game, as they enter with a 5-8 overall record. The program begins their ninth season in the WAC and is 7-1 in conference openers. UTPA will be ready to try and make that mark 7-2.

“It will be nice to start play at home, definitely,” Yale said. “Of our first four opponents, only Utah Valley is familiar with our gym and location. I don’t know if it is an advantage but it certainly doesn’t hurt us at all.” Yale said he thinks that a hectic non-conference schedule

We are using these preseason games to better prepare for the upcoming WAC season. - Brian Yale Head coach

“We are extremely excited to finally be in the WAC and can’t wait to start conference play,” said Maria Kliefoth, a redshirt junior middle blocker. “We have seen a lot of different teams in our tournaments with different skill sets which has given us a good idea of the talent we are up against in conference play.” The Broncs have four straight home games, starting with New Mexico State Sept. 28 and ending with Seattle University Oct. 4.

deprived the opportunity to practice enough, but over the past couple of weeks the women have gotten some of that time back in order to tweak a few things. The team has been working on certain areas of improvement from earlier matches and the practice has allowed the Broncs the opportunity to be as ready as possible when it comes to WAC games. “Winning and learning how to win has been important,” Yale said. “But competing against teams


September 12, 2013 sports

Dodging balls UTPA dodgeball season starts up By Kristela Garza The Pan American Dodge, duck, dip, dive and dodge. The movie Dodgeball, A True Underdog Story released in 2004, first introduced this five-step key to winning dodgeball. Now, students use the intramural sport dodgeball act out the film as a platform to have fun. It is now dodgeball season in Bronc country and, according to Art Cabrera, the intramural coordinator, the film has brought this sport into the limelight. The game’s popularity has steadily increased among the student body. “Dodgeball was started a while back and it’s always been a good, popular, fun sport,” Cabrera said. “This is more recreational than competitive. Sure, the guys out there are competitive and they want to win and they want to play, but they’re out there to have fun.” At various times throughout the year, the Recreational Wellness Center offers a league with groups made up of men’s, women’s and coed teams. During the six-on-six games, competing teams wait on opposite sides of the court while six balls are placed in the middle of the court. To begin, each team’s players run toward the two sets of three balls and try to get as many as possible. The main objective of each game is to eliminate all members of the opposing team by hitting them with thrown balls. REALITY VS. HOLLYWOOD The movie’s story revolves around a group of outcasts that band together to save their gym. In order to do so, the group joins a national dodgeball tournament to win the $50,000 prize. Training montages and wrench throwing ensue. The Average Joes Trainer, Pappy O’ Daniel, throws wrenches at the team stating that if they can dodge a wrench, they can dodge a ball. As stated, the popularity of this film propelled the sport into fashion and now it is in full swing at UTPA. The sport became so popular, a one-time tournament was held last year at the request of the student body. There were 36 games held in one day. “The movie has hurt us and helped us,” Cabrera said with a laugh. “Because teams will come to me and ask, ‘Are the rules just like the movie?’ No, get the movie out of your head. It’s a fun, funny movie but these are the rules...” The biggest discrepancy in the film versus real-life dodge-

ball is the rule that if one player catches a thrown ball, an ousted teammate is allowed to rejoin the game. According to Cabrera, this is not the way it’s played. “(If that were true) we would never finish,” he said.

of this sport begins for the fall and the competitive nature of the players kick in, Cabrera, with the help of the WRSC, will host and organize the games. Other than that Cabrera will also keep his eye on the Campus

They won’t throw at you where you can catch it; they will throw at your legs where you can’t catch it. Next thing you know, boom, you got your legs taken out from under you. - Art Cabrera

Intramural coordinator

FIVE D’S Though the film does create a fun atmosphere, one should not discount the athleticism required to play. With that in mind, the equipment used for these matches are 7-inch, rubber-covered foam balls, so that, the chance of injury is minimal, according to Cabrera. “(There are) seasoned veterans,” Cabrera said. “They will dissect you; they won’t throw at you where you can catch it; they will throw at your legs where you can’t catch it. Next thing you know, boom, you got your legs taken out from under you.” Injury is the last thing on Steven Herrera’s mind. He plays on the team Gang Green and is prepared for the latest season, which began Sept. 23. The 25-year-old is not worried about the rigors or ins and outs of the sport. According to him, athletics and the five D’s of dodgeball will get his team through the season. “We will follow that concept,” Herrera said. “It’ll probably be the only strategy we will have.” Because he has almost zero experience with the sport, aside from watching and occasionally playing, he said he knows his team might be prone to a misstep or two. “I’m pretty sure we can win most of our games,” the Edinburg native said. “This is something new. I’m pretty sure we will struggle in the beginning, but in the end we will pick it up.” Just as the start

Cup, an award given every year to the team that does the best throughout all intramural sports in a given season. Some sports are kickball, handball, softball and flag football. In all sports, last year Kappa Sigma and the coed Kappa Sigma team under the moniker of the Sweethearts, took first place in the Campus Cup. This was the third year that this award was presented to the team receiving the most points throughout the intramural season. The winning group gets the honor of having its team picture and name on the Campus Cup plaque. The deadline for forming dodgeball teams has passed, but teams are still holding tryouts. If a student wanted to, they could go on to IMleagues.com, choose a sport, a team and apply. “It’s all recreational,” Cabrera said. “These games are competitive, but they are for having fun.”

September 26, 2013

weekly updates

11

m e n ’ s c ro s s c o u n t ry Luis Serrano finished in eighth place at the 2013 University of Texas San Antonio Ricardo Romo Classic, Sept. 20 at the National Shooting Complex

men’s golf Ricky Solis won the Colorado State University Cougar Classic Sept. 24 at the Harborside International Golf Course in Chicago

wo m e n ’ s g o l f Junior Blake Peterson shot a second round 74 to finish in a tie for eighth place overall Sept. 17 at the CSU Cougar Classic at Harborside International Golf Course The team shot a score of 316 and stood in sixth place after the first round of the CSU Cougar Classic Monday

men’s tennis Senior Ricardo Hopker won the opening singles match of the 2013 Marco & Co. Catering Islanders Open Sept. 20 in Corpus Christi

vo l l e y ba l l Lost to Texas A&M University Corpus Christi Islanders 3-0 Sept. 20 at the Dugan Wellness Center in Corpus Christi Won against the Huston-Tillotson University Rams Sept. 21 at the UTPA Field House in front of a crowd of 736 and tied the mark for the second best start in UTPA history Lost to Texas Southern University Tigers 3-1 Sept. 23 at the H&PE Arena in Houston


September 26, 2013

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september 26, 2013  

Volume 70 Number 5