Issuu on Google+

DSM-5 Changes

Psychology manual draws criticism

Pages 4-5

Volume 70, No. 11

November 7, 2013

ONLINE CONTENT panamericanonline.com Giving Back

Veterans get free tickets

Boogie Wonderland

Decades-themed dance

Peta2

Farm factory at UTPA

B-ball Exhibition

Men’s team plays first game

Subscribe

The Pan American YouTube channel

VALLEY BOWL COMES TO UTPA STORY ON PAGE 8


2

opinion

November 7, 2013

#UTPA

Tweet at and follow us @ThePanAmerican

Omg, leave it up to me to not know how to use the aisle movers at the library. #UTPA

-@ellems

Girls, there’s a fine line when wearing shortshorts... And that’s below your butt. Thanks #utpa #fashionpolice -@sariscastillo

Can everybody take a second, an thank all the bad bitches at UTPA dressing extra sexy this week so guys can look at the booty #Honest #UTPA -@joshgetsthrowed

Letters to the Editor The Pan American accepts letters of 300 words or less from students, staff and faculty regarding recent newspaper content, campus concerns or current events. We cannot publish anonymous letters or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Please send all letters to:

thepanamerican @gmail.com

Vol. 70, No. 11

The Pan American

Why sex ed. should be taught in grade school Ismael Melendez

Social Media Editor “She’s pregnant.” These words spread through the halls of middle schools and high schools in Texas and the rest of the nation. But many times, students just continue their regular lives, never getting a talk from their parents or educators about having safe sex and healthy relationships. Youths are left to themselves to learn about sex and relationships. Part of the problem stems from parents not knowing how and when to talk about sex with their children. Sometimes, parents don’t have the necessary information themselves. Another problem is that youths do not know where to go for information. With the availability of the internet, Google becomes their best source. The problem is they could be reading misleading or wrong infor-

mation. Teens also talk to their friends or older siblings, but many times their friends and siblings don’t know either, but they act like they do and misinformation continues to spread. Many students learn about their sexuality for the first time when they go to college either on their own or at presentations put on by their university or an organization. The perplexed faces and stares of students as they learn about different birth control methods is priceless. Sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancies, however, are not. It is well known that students in college have sex. Furthermore, nearly half of the 20 million new sexually transmitted diseases are among people ages 15–24 according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. This statistic should be enough to prompt students to use pro-

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

thepanamerican@gmail.com 1201 West University, ARHU 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 Phone: (956) 665-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122

Editors-in-Chief:

Norma Gonzalez Lea Victoria Juarez

News Editor:

Susan Gonzalez

Sports Editors:

Marco Torres Kristela Garza

Arts & Life Editor: May Ortega

Photography Editor: Jon Nutt

Design Editor:

Francisco Rodriguez

Multimedia Editor: Michael Aguilar

Social Media Editor: Ismael Melendez

Copy Editor:

Victoria Valdez

Adviser:

Dr. Greg Selber

Administrative Associate: Anita Reyes

Advertising Manager: Elva Ramirez

Webmaster:

Josue Guzman The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the paper or university.

Mia Infante/The Pan American UTPA guard Shaquille Boga (left) blocks opposing player Robert Eledu Nov. 2. The Broncs beat Texas A&M University-Kingsville in an exhibiton game at the Field House with a score of 74-56.

tection and get tested for STDs regularly. Students should also take advantage of free resources provided by the University and health organizations, such as the Student Health Services. People should not have to go

ment strategies to “delay initiation of sexual activity as part of a continuum of services to decrease the teen pregnancy rate and rate of sexually transmitted infections in youth ages 15-19.” However, Texas continues to

Sex education should include discussion about sex, peer pressure, birth control, LGBQTIA issues, and sexual consent. It should be medically accurate and age appropriate. to college to learn about sex and relationships. Such information is necessary because sex and relationships are part of almost everyone’s life. Texas policy makers are committed to a mostly abstinence-only approach to sexual education, which according to the Texas Department of State Health Services, tries to imple-

have the third highest rate of teen pregnancies in the nation, according to CDC statistics. Teen pregnancies cost taxpayers money and, most importantly, limit the future potential of young mothers. According to the TDSHS, the rate of adolescent mothers is higher for Hidalgo compared to the state

rate, 6.3 and 4.7 respectively. Comprehensive sexual education, which discusses healthy relationships and different types of birth control beyond abstinence, should be taught in grade school. It should be more than one week of health class; there is too much information to cover. Sex education should include discussions about sex, peer pressure, birth control, LGBQTIA issues and sexual consent. It should be medically accurate and age appropriate. Ultimately, health professionals and parents should have more input in coming up with the curriculum and not politicians with a religious or political agenda. Texas needs sexual education to prevent teen pregnancies, STDs, abortions, rape and unhealthy relationships.


Fighting Today For A Clean Tomorrow

4 3

3102 ,5November rebmet31, 2013 peS7,2013 January

pxe setadilosno c taht tcejorp e vitavonni ni etaudargrednu krow ot ecnahc eht a em gnivig elih ecneirepxe fo st tuohguorht gninrael w ,tes lliks dna sisnoc ssecorp e Th .mul stneduts fo rebm pihsnretni dna ”.hcraeser egde retneC eht fo g un e hcraeser etauda gnittuc n i n epo s’ytisrevinU rgrednu tnemegagne tne etaudarg ot gni ht esaercni ot tnaw eW“ eht ecniS ,2102 ni noitac duts gnisaercni o u fo ,sobolalliV anit g dna seerged METS gnitteg i snoitpo lareve ,stcejorp evfi de dE METS ni ecnellecxE fo sirhC dias ”,ME s sah tnarg wen laog tcurtsnoc sah tn TS ni eTh nignar ,senilpic osla eW“ .scitam azraG adnileM eht erehw ,noit emtraped eht sid yB ehtam ni rossef smargorp curtsnI desaB e orp etaicossa METS etaudar tut cimedaca ht METS eht gnireht naciremA naP e g n e l l t a n h e C m g g poleved srossefo rednu ruo neht iw stneduts gni n i d Th u l c n f o i t n a rg a de gnerts ot tnaw div rp ytlucaf sed slairetam lanoit esruoc nrael stn mulucirruc a hg acude wen gnis orp ed yb raey cimeda drawa saw ytisrevinU eTh uorht ygogadep ivorp retneC ahcrup ca -isop( eht yojne uts eht evah dna ,alucirruc lanoitcurtsni st -jorp eTh .IBC g n i h c neduts gnireffo a dna ylevitceffe et eht ni .yluJ etal ni noi 4102-3102 eht rof 000,726$ no desab MET ot noit cime e r t o acud m argorp eht htiw l a i r S e t o a t cfiic m daca nehtgnerts d fo noitnetni eh E fo tnemtrapeD .S.U eht ”.gninrael fo )se ot redro ni deta eps edam ,rosseforp etaic a hcus ,tnempo evlovni ytlucaf eht t htiw dengised v i t e r s c o m e s lev sa na gnieb ot n argorp rew stce saw dnuf eTh cimedaca rieht T o U g ehtruf rof tnem ed rof ytinutroppo i t n i r irehtruf ni stne d o d f a r o n t I c erid gnidnuof e esaercni dna piuqe yrotaroba -igne ,ygolonhc dut ht osla si sobola e l wen t , e cneics fo saera e s gnitsissa lliV rebmun eht ht ni sreerac . a l u c i r ruc IBC retneC s’AP u rof elbawener .scitamehtam d stneduts fo si d eht dezingocer n e c y n b 000,016$ det rawa ISH eTh l e l amrof ssergnoC a gnireen llecxE fo METS gnikees amitse na htiw r e , 5 d 991 nI n u m a r g orP snoi sraey METS ni nI .seerged eb oT .tcA noit tutitsnI gnivreS-cinapsiH .raey hcae e h S . n a sa gnikrow wo a o cudE rehgiH eh itacudE ,3102 gnirps -nu ll a fo tnecr n si t fo V eltiT ep saw ehs dias dias ,senilriA na ohw ,razalaS a dah APTU ytisrevinu ro eg 52 ,ISH V eltiT a deredisnoc ciremA ta repol e l l d o e c ev t hcraeser eht fo i eht ta stnedu cxe yrev 722,1 fo latot APTU .emit-llu trap a neeb eva Claudia Lemus f dellorne dn a c ts etaudargred eht eviecer ot h ot w roBy tnem METS si e d s ’ inapsiH eb tsum r o l e h 3 c a 0 b h 4 ,2 dna etau Pan Americanot lufknaht si dna tnarg otThe eunitnoc ll’eh s ,setaudarg eerg fo era mohw fo dargrednu 136,61 fo stsisnoc nossel elbaulav eunitnoc lliw tnecr p 7.88 ,st razalaSthe t ni 5cost odimpact eerac a senior an- event.ehThe eduts eGardens. Thalia .rMorin, I worked several years eat the ntanical nesoof 42 per individual, measuring taudarg I also plan to R -the ment of Defense todrbe ah gspecifiTS eht( dewolla lanoisseforp sih n i k r o , w s a e r a .ncontinue M i g i E r o T sah tnais ) c S . thropology major, one of according to Ceo, was $489.20 proposed pipeline. Shipment cally used in combat operations School of Rural Public Health X i n e T araising t psiH awareness and a D r u g ( d e a arg METS Th“ maet reh htiw sojo c ot seitinutrop ecneics htiw amssergnthe taerg a si APTU niH nébuR nfighting po eupeople o q more than 1,700 allegfor flight, plus food expenses by rail is currently being conto remove forest cover, destroy in McAllen.” C Keystone Pipeline i n u e v g i n d g i i v o a o s t rpmi ni c lliw tI“ .dias r dna drawa eht d etaudarg tsom e cnuowork al aSenvironment stneduts sthe nna to incorporate ”,stneduts edly affected azby during their.sstay. sidered as an alternative to the crops and clear vegetation near Ineht oaddition, rising XL, eand a c u t d c a e r h M t t t a E g t e n T a t i a h S v udargrednu rof t ISH a fo elpm ah htam dna ”.yaw evfrom tsovorp ecwas itisopAgent axe o i R tal contamination biggest challenge project, according to Reuters. military base perimeters during sea-level at South Padre Island is solar energy.” a ni rof l“The e h t iv ,elyorC n tsir ni noit asoporp a dettim .margorp MET ni stneduts ruo K S .yeinllathe us maet reh dnThe iproject g n i t n a V c a Orange in the area around nfinancing trip,” b21-year-old is undergoing a the Vietnam War 1950s. another concern for Morin and The group u e e d s d u e n y a m b r G a hsilbatsethe a t r aht eveileb od I of students plans gorp eht ni yltn a ,noitacude sreerac rof meh ot troffe na ni o “ e r r t u g c n s i t l r w n a e p g o d a raey efinal erp dthat ut 30 Lavallee. the Mission Helena Chemical Ceo said. “We looked for sponreview.nk gniylpAs more than predict aware of envina saxeto no tnenvironmental pa nai ygresult, dna ,meScientists T hmake arg eht tuoS pothers etarts yranilpics S ht gniydaer era eed dna ygoloib sa chemical idretni Plant during the 1950s. The sors and, thankfully, there exists produced over the next 100 years,ewseas ronmental issues in Texas and , s d hcus ,stcejbucompanies l e fi i M t e p E m T S o c eht ni s METS morf e eht ni erutuf th rof RGV eraperp dnaAgent g g d i r e b a experience affected her life in a solid group of passionate peo- PROBLEMS IN THE Orange, along with other heated by global warming could the Valley. r t o a e s f s o ,y lliks a hsilbatse joniH dias ”,tek ytinutroppo eh ot ,arbegla ram labolg lacig rtnuoc ruo vi more than one way. ple who were able to help fund For several attendees, the t nedeadly chemicals, including the rise by a 1.5 to 3 feet, affect- olo“Banning nhcet evit plastic bags can ot dna spohskro g era yeTh .loohcs etaudarg .62South yluJ esaehelp deing w evitcaChemical tinU l e r “I was born with endocrine our expenses. We are indebted motivation to fight efor climate Helena Plant. coastal areas such as ssreduce e erp a nitons of waste,” anh r e t t n n i i , n e i g e a tapicitrap ot tnavdA METS tats-fo-tuo ni sr eeOften p htiwreferred nidroccA Stefanie Herweck, erged s’raccording problems and a calcified tumor to them.” awareness and cleangnenergy the “en- PadreseIsland, to The ot gnounced krowtentodas o l e h imocpufor c n a b a levart fo driht eht fo tsil etelpm eht ,tnoidHerald. ylno ,setprofessor behind my ear linked back to This year, the Power Shift future generationsrecomes Brownsville and bag ban ocmassacre atS da nI .sdlefi ME -enoEnglish A .secnerof ffo ot sfrom efnMisah margovironmental oc TS ni era denia r e p h M t s E k n T a S r eht after m t b u o r the Agent Orange environ- conference included more their own personalsnstruggles Texas,” Texas leader, at the EAC meeting Oct. secnerethe o F c i m oitacilppa ehsion, f o noc nocE dlroW su t o“If igitswe 331 fTHE erPget the momentum o tuo VALLEY no detacol era s htiw gnola mental pollution in Mission,” than 200 panel discussions, SHIFTING 26. 8 4 r e b m u n sa setatS detin enilda htam fand U o ytilinspired .etisbew METS ed dna auq ni seirby Morin said. “My mother used workshops, concerts, as well as Impacted in Edinburg, we can start tnuocgoing s ’ A depoleved P T U argorp hcraeseR Itekisil smnecessary for all students to work in the Helena Chemi- various speakers, who presented Power Shift, as well as their the domino effect in the Rio . n o i t acude ecneics d “ na noitcnujnoc ni na tneduts a ev , cal Plant in Mission. Conse- about the dangers of fracking personal experiences, the group Grande Valley.” A P T i U g ) , 2002 nI to -nunderstand ETS( importance -iH namssergno u ecneirepxe elb Mthe C fo ecffiO eAccording quently, my sister and I were and coal-mining practices. of studentsci plans to implement to Herweck, if arapmocni ht htiw n odnesoR a p s i of environmental injustice H t s rfi eht dezinagthey dias ”,re born with endocrine problems “I liked the educational what it learned in Pittsburgh Edinburg would ro ,assucceed, o j o -lonhceT a htiw detaudar hto yna ekil n dna ecneicS ,gn g ohwdisruptions crimes rand climate in our , r a i z r and hormone imbalances.” sessions the most,” Ceo, a junow that they have returned to be the third city in the RGV to a e l e a n S i gnE etupmoc ni eer lliw hcihw ,CE ged s’rolehcab TSEH .ban keewbags, Morin was one of seven nior, said. “I didn’t think there the Valley.detroppus sa after Brownsville and y community. g o tI“ .3102 gnirp h ,21-7 .tcO ec sn alp ekPadre members of the UTPA Envi- would be much related to my “We,saash part Island, who comat ti esuaceb detic i ecneics dna sof levthe el llEnvirona ta noitacudSouth x e e m t o g e METStheir ban on bags in Fernandez covda rof leClub, -i-nuAlessandria ronmental Awareness Club who major and kind of expected mental-taAwareness have menced troppo eht em d o m l a noitan a emoce evag htuback b2011. oS gnthe yEAC m dnapmember omaorganization attended Power Shift, a four- more environmental science brought xe ot yt snoitapucco MJanuary ETS gni y l t n a e n g i d m e oderShift lwonk p era to day national climate change subjects, but it was a pleasant skills from Power stratWith o h w stneduts saxeT bag bans already in -ided etisbew a ot gnidrofor conference held in Pittsburgh surprise to see that there was so egize greener compromises in the Valley, and the cca ,ceffect inapsiH .tneve lauareas, Oct. 17-21. The group, along much. I learned about Capital- and experiences. Commission on Environmen- the safety of residential nna eht Hidalgo ot detac County Courthouse with more than 8,000 other ism, the economy, divestment “These issues should not tal Quality held investigations divestment from toxic indus- investing time in Green Inicollege students from across and the profitability of clean be taken lightly,” said Morin, during the late 1990s, the area tries and to create jobs to sustain tiatives, the group of students the United States, traveled to energy sources.” who developed health issues as was declared the top contami- our cities instead of destroying recognizes that there is hope in protest against the country’s One of the best parts of the a result of indirect exposure to nated site in the state of Texas them,” said Alessandria Fernan- the RGV, but still a lot to do. dependence on fossil fuels and conference, according to EAC Agent Orange. “People have and made the federal registry dez, an anthropology major. “It is necessary for all stuwhat they see as environmental members, was exchanging been seriously affected by the as a Superfund site. According “We plan to empower folks dents to understand the imporinjustices, such as the Keystone stories with fellow students environmental injustices in the to the EPA, a Superfund site is around us and drag them out of tance of environmental injustice XL oil pipeline. The potential from the other 720 participat- Rio Grande Valley.” any land in the United States this tunneled harmful lifestyle crimes and climate disruptions pipeline would connect Canada ing colleges. Agent Orange contains that has been contaminated that they are accustomed to.” in our community,” Fernandez to U.S. Gulf Coast refineries. “It was very encouraging to tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin by hazardous waste and poses Currently, members of the said. “We can’t continue waitHosted by the Energy know that we are not alone in (TCDD), the most toxic dioxin a risk to human health and/or Sierra Club, along with help ing generation after generation Action Coalition, Power Shift this battle to save our planet... classified as a human carcino- the environment. from members of the EAC, are for someone else to do it. The is a biannual gathering of en- there are thousands of people gen by the Environmental ProHowever, Mission is not the working on a petition to restrict change starts now with us.” vironmental activists seeking to like us,” said Katie Lavallee, a tection Agency. Birth defects only region facing environmen- the use of plastic bags throughThe seven students who launch campaigns for commu- freshman biology major. “I felt and cancers have been linked to tal issues in the Valley. out the city of Edinburg. attended Power Shift last month nities, states and regions and to proud to represent the RGV exposure, according to several “It is not just Mission,” “Texas is huge, so it can have will be sharing their experiences advocate fracking resistance. because we are on the front- studies conducted by the Amer- Morin stated. “There are 33 a monumental impact on the and knowledge at the Science According to Raul Ceo, a line in most environmental is- ican Cancer Society and Center acres of benzene contamina- nation. Especially if we were Building, Room 1.288 Nov. 7 finance major, despite strug- sues. Whether it’s the Keystone for Disease Control. tion on 23rd Street in McAllen, to turn green and become the from noon to 1 p.m. gling to attain sponsors to cover pipeline, hydraulic fracking… The “tactical herbicide,” as Donna Lake and tons more cas- first sustainable state,” Lavallee their travel expenses, the group or anticipated sea-level rising at referred to by the U.S Depart- es. I have worked directly with said. “I’m excited to be a part of members worked hard for weeks South Padre Island.” ment of Veteran’s Affairs, was a lot of the families affected by the Edinburg Bag Ban committo plan and attend the national U.S. officials are currently developed by the U.S Depart- environmental injustices when tee and Save the McAllen Bo-

ekil smargorp hcraeseR tneduts aagainst Students at Power Shift protest injustices evig )MEenvironmental T S ( ecneirepxe elb arapmocni na .rehto yna ekil nu


Page 4

November 7, 2013

THE PAN AMERICAN

November 7, 2013

Intellectual Disability

DSM-5 draws criticism from mental health professionals

Diagnostic criteria for intellectual disability emphasizes the need for an assessment of both cognitive capacity (IQ) and adaptive functioning. Severity is determined by adaptive functioning rather than IQ score. The term “mental retardation” was used in DSM-IV.

Communication Disorders

By Susan Gonzalez The Pan American

Homosexuality is a mental illness. At least it was according to the second edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a reference book published in 1968. This version of the DSM persisted until a reprint was issued in 1974, after drawing criticism from gay rights activists, as stated in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Nearly 40 years later, the DSM, a manual published by the American Psychiatric Association that provides standard criteria for the classification of mental disorders, is still drawing criticism from mental health professionals, but for different reasons. According to Frederick Ernst, problems with the latest edition range from changes to Major Depressive Disorder to the inclusion of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder. “More than 50,000 mental health professionals signed a petition around DSM-5 to cease and desist,” said Ernst, a professor in the Department of Psychology who wanted the manual’s production to be stopped and not be taken up later. “That’s how bad everyone thought it was.” Ernst, a committee member of Boycott DSM-5, adamantly opposes the latest edition of the manual, which was released May of this year. He serves on the committee with other mental health professionals, such as Dan Fisher, the executive director for the National Coalition

for Mental Health Recovery. “The director of the National Institute of Mental Health went on record saying this is not only a disservice to the people who have been characterized as mentally ill, but (NIMH was) no longer going to fund research on the basis of the diagnostic groups (in DSM-5),” Ernst said. According to Psych Central, the Internet’s largest independent mental health social network, one of the biggest changes was made to the Major Depressive Disorder category. In the DSM-IV, if a person was grieving the loss of a loved one, he or she couldn’t be diagnosed with Major Depression during the first two months of bereavement. In the latest edition, this allotted time period is eliminated, a decision Ernst believes was motivated by the pharmaceutical industry. “Of the committee members (for DSMIV), 56 percent were on the payrolls of the pharmaceutical industry,” he said. “For DSM-5, it was 77 percent. So a lot of (mental health professionals) are suspicious that the influence on DSM-5 was more interested in marketing psycho-pharmaceuticals than in the interest of characterizing suffering in the population for its eventual intervention and treatment.” Bereavement and grief aren’t mental health issues unless the person is exhibiting signs of psychotic or suicidal behavior, Ernst said, and he believes it was

a poor decision to include them in the DSM-5. It could potentially lead to people being prescribed unnecessary medications, such as antidepressants, he said. “It takes a year to two years to get over the loss of a spouse, parent, someone very close,” Ernst said. “Now, the issue of a grief can be changed into a Major Depressive Disorder if, in the opinion of the clinician, the person is not adjusting adequately within t w o

In addition, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, a severe form of premenstrual syndrome, is now categorized as a mental illness. PMDD affects approximately 2 to 5 percent of premenopausal women, according to The American Journal of Psychiatry. To be diagnosed with PMDD, the DSM lists three main specifications: symptoms must correspond with the menstrual cycle for a minimum o f

More than 50,000 mental health professionals signed a petition around DSM-5 to cease and desist. - Frederick Ernst Psychology professor

months of the loss of a loved one. I think it’s a perfectly normal phenomenon and these people are best left untreated because you know the real treatment for that problem is time.”

two successive months, the symptoms disrupt a person’s ability to carry out normal activities and the depressive mood should not be experienced all the time,

only during days leading up to menstruation. One issue with the inclusion of PMDD is that it could potentially be overdiagnosed, said Sarah Gehlert in an October article on the National Public Radio website. Gehlert, who researches women’s health and mental health issues at Washington University in St. Louis, is worried that this could lead to pathologizing healthy women who are experiencing normal hormonal shifts. Ernst agrees with Gehlert. “That is a problem best addressed by a gynecologist,” he said. “It’s a normal, common phenomenon. To pathologize it opens the door for treatment... which could be medication (that is not needed).” For senior psychology major Alfredo De Leon, one of the most important changes made to the manual was in the category of Autism. Instead of having four separate disorders under the umbrella of Autism, there is now a single condition called Autism Spectrum Disorder. With the subdiagnoses eliminated, De Leon thinks there could be benefits to the change, such as being able to determine where a person falls on the spectrum rather than having to follow rigid

criteria for each subcategory. But he also thinks there are drawbacks, since some patients fit neatly into one specific subdiagnosis. “In a way, it’s good, it can be on a rating scale, but it can also be bad. It does away with the variables of each one,” De Leon, who has friends with Autism, said. “They may need treatment for one specific disorder and now that disorder is part of one broad diagnosis, which could prevent them from getting the treatment they need.” However, Jeffrey Lieberman, president of the American Psychiatric Association from May 2013 to May 2014, said changes to the DSM should not be cause for concern and that the manual is a relevant and important diagnostic tool. “It is not a how-to guide on how to practice psychiatry, or any other mental health discipline,” said Lieberman in an article on the Fox News website in November 2012, in response to early criticism of the DSM. “It is a tool with tremendous value for diagnosing patients that should be used as a part of a comprehensive patient assessment.” While De Leon takes issue with some of the changes made to the DSM, he also does not view the manual as the final word in the world of psychology. “For the most part, the DSM is the basic bible for psychologists,” he said. “Of course, for me, I would say to take it with a grain of salt.”

The DSM-5 communication disorders include language disorder, speech sound disorder (a new name for phonological disorder) and childhood-onset fluency disorder (a new name for stuttering). Also included is social (pragmatic) communication disorder, a new condition for persistent difficulties in the social uses of verbal and nonverbal communication.

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a new DSM-5 name that reflects a scientific consensus that four previously separate disorders are actually a single condition with different levels of symptom severity in two core domains.

Schizophrenia subtypes

The DSM-IV subtypes of schizophrenia (paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated and residual types) were eliminated due to their limited diagnostic stability, low reliability and poor validity.

Anxiety Disorders

The DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorder no longer includes obsessive-compulsive disorder (which is included with the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders) or post-traumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder (which is included with the trauma and stressor-related disorders).

Hoarding Disorder

Hoarding disorder is a new diagnosis in DSM-5. DSM-IV lists hoarding as one of the possible symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder and notes that extreme hoarding may occur in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

THE PAN AMERICAN

Page 5


Page 4

November 7, 2013

THE PAN AMERICAN

November 7, 2013

Intellectual Disability

DSM-5 draws criticism from mental health professionals

Diagnostic criteria for intellectual disability emphasizes the need for an assessment of both cognitive capacity (IQ) and adaptive functioning. Severity is determined by adaptive functioning rather than IQ score. The term “mental retardation” was used in DSM-IV.

Communication Disorders

By Susan Gonzalez The Pan American

Homosexuality is a mental illness. At least it was according to the second edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a reference book published in 1968. This version of the DSM persisted until a reprint was issued in 1974, after drawing criticism from gay rights activists, as stated in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Nearly 40 years later, the DSM, a manual published by the American Psychiatric Association that provides standard criteria for the classification of mental disorders, is still drawing criticism from mental health professionals, but for different reasons. According to Frederick Ernst, problems with the latest edition range from changes to Major Depressive Disorder to the inclusion of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder. “More than 50,000 mental health professionals signed a petition around DSM-5 to cease and desist,” said Ernst, a professor in the Department of Psychology who wanted the manual’s production to be stopped and not be taken up later. “That’s how bad everyone thought it was.” Ernst, a committee member of Boycott DSM-5, adamantly opposes the latest edition of the manual, which was released May of this year. He serves on the committee with other mental health professionals, such as Dan Fisher, the executive director for the National Coalition

for Mental Health Recovery. “The director of the National Institute of Mental Health went on record saying this is not only a disservice to the people who have been characterized as mentally ill, but (NIMH was) no longer going to fund research on the basis of the diagnostic groups (in DSM-5),” Ernst said. According to Psych Central, the Internet’s largest independent mental health social network, one of the biggest changes was made to the Major Depressive Disorder category. In the DSM-IV, if a person was grieving the loss of a loved one, he or she couldn’t be diagnosed with Major Depression during the first two months of bereavement. In the latest edition, this allotted time period is eliminated, a decision Ernst believes was motivated by the pharmaceutical industry. “Of the committee members (for DSMIV), 56 percent were on the payrolls of the pharmaceutical industry,” he said. “For DSM-5, it was 77 percent. So a lot of (mental health professionals) are suspicious that the influence on DSM-5 was more interested in marketing psycho-pharmaceuticals than in the interest of characterizing suffering in the population for its eventual intervention and treatment.” Bereavement and grief aren’t mental health issues unless the person is exhibiting signs of psychotic or suicidal behavior, Ernst said, and he believes it was

a poor decision to include them in the DSM-5. It could potentially lead to people being prescribed unnecessary medications, such as antidepressants, he said. “It takes a year to two years to get over the loss of a spouse, parent, someone very close,” Ernst said. “Now, the issue of a grief can be changed into a Major Depressive Disorder if, in the opinion of the clinician, the person is not adjusting adequately within t w o

In addition, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, a severe form of premenstrual syndrome, is now categorized as a mental illness. PMDD affects approximately 2 to 5 percent of premenopausal women, according to The American Journal of Psychiatry. To be diagnosed with PMDD, the DSM lists three main specifications: symptoms must correspond with the menstrual cycle for a minimum o f

More than 50,000 mental health professionals signed a petition around DSM-5 to cease and desist. - Frederick Ernst Psychology professor

months of the loss of a loved one. I think it’s a perfectly normal phenomenon and these people are best left untreated because you know the real treatment for that problem is time.”

two successive months, the symptoms disrupt a person’s ability to carry out normal activities and the depressive mood should not be experienced all the time,

only during days leading up to menstruation. One issue with the inclusion of PMDD is that it could potentially be overdiagnosed, said Sarah Gehlert in an October article on the National Public Radio website. Gehlert, who researches women’s health and mental health issues at Washington University in St. Louis, is worried that this could lead to pathologizing healthy women who are experiencing normal hormonal shifts. Ernst agrees with Gehlert. “That is a problem best addressed by a gynecologist,” he said. “It’s a normal, common phenomenon. To pathologize it opens the door for treatment... which could be medication (that is not needed).” For senior psychology major Alfredo De Leon, one of the most important changes made to the manual was in the category of Autism. Instead of having four separate disorders under the umbrella of Autism, there is now a single condition called Autism Spectrum Disorder. With the subdiagnoses eliminated, De Leon thinks there could be benefits to the change, such as being able to determine where a person falls on the spectrum rather than having to follow rigid

criteria for each subcategory. But he also thinks there are drawbacks, since some patients fit neatly into one specific subdiagnosis. “In a way, it’s good, it can be on a rating scale, but it can also be bad. It does away with the variables of each one,” De Leon, who has friends with Autism, said. “They may need treatment for one specific disorder and now that disorder is part of one broad diagnosis, which could prevent them from getting the treatment they need.” However, Jeffrey Lieberman, president of the American Psychiatric Association from May 2013 to May 2014, said changes to the DSM should not be cause for concern and that the manual is a relevant and important diagnostic tool. “It is not a how-to guide on how to practice psychiatry, or any other mental health discipline,” said Lieberman in an article on the Fox News website in November 2012, in response to early criticism of the DSM. “It is a tool with tremendous value for diagnosing patients that should be used as a part of a comprehensive patient assessment.” While De Leon takes issue with some of the changes made to the DSM, he also does not view the manual as the final word in the world of psychology. “For the most part, the DSM is the basic bible for psychologists,” he said. “Of course, for me, I would say to take it with a grain of salt.”

The DSM-5 communication disorders include language disorder, speech sound disorder (a new name for phonological disorder) and childhood-onset fluency disorder (a new name for stuttering). Also included is social (pragmatic) communication disorder, a new condition for persistent difficulties in the social uses of verbal and nonverbal communication.

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a new DSM-5 name that reflects a scientific consensus that four previously separate disorders are actually a single condition with different levels of symptom severity in two core domains.

Schizophrenia subtypes

The DSM-IV subtypes of schizophrenia (paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated and residual types) were eliminated due to their limited diagnostic stability, low reliability and poor validity.

Anxiety Disorders

The DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorder no longer includes obsessive-compulsive disorder (which is included with the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders) or post-traumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder (which is included with the trauma and stressor-related disorders).

Hoarding Disorder

Hoarding disorder is a new diagnosis in DSM-5. DSM-IV lists hoarding as one of the possible symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder and notes that extreme hoarding may occur in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

THE PAN AMERICAN

Page 5


6

arts & life

November 7, 2013 20th Annual Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival

Nov. Place: Harlingen Municipal 6-10 Auditorium Complex

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Time: Noon- 6 p.m.

Third Annual Beat Poetry & Arts Festival

panels and poetry Nov. Workshops, readings 7-9 Place: Dustin Sekula Memorial

Library, Edinburg Time: Opening reception at 7 p.m.

Nov. 9

Sophie’s 40th Anniversary Outdoor music festival and classic car show

Place: Sophie’s SS Saloon, McAllen Time: 11 a.m. - Noon McAllen Symphonic Band Concert

Nov. Trinity Worship Center, Pharr 12 Place: Time: 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Nov. 13

Wisin & Yandel

Place: State Farm Arena, Hidalgo Time: 8 p.m. - 11 p.m. 2013 Charity Poker Tournament Fundraiser

Nov. Raising funds to fight child abuse 14 Place: The Yacht Club, McAllen Time: 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Second annual Broncsgiving helps families in need By Jaelyn Mcclenahn The Pan American It was announced Nov. 4 that the two Rio Grande Valley metropolitan areas, HarlingenBrownsville and McAllen-Mission, are ranked first and third place on a list of America’s Poorest Cities, compiled by 247wallst. com, a website that deals with global economic issues. About 34 percent of these areas’ households live in poverty, with the second highest rate of all metro areas in America, and about 10.6 percent of all families in these cities earn less than $10,000 a year. As the holidays approach, UTPA organizations, such as the Office for Student Involvement and the Culinary Arts Club, will join forces to help families in need. Broncsgiving, which was started in 2012 by these organizations as well as three others, will aid families in need by donating cans, clothes and books for the second consecutive year. Over 2,000 canned items, not including other types of food such as Ramen Noodles, were donated in four days by students and other members of the community in 2012. Now, the latest event is an

18-day affair that began earlier this month. Boxes were set up in the library lobby, the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building, the Arts and Humanities Building and the Student Union, where individu-

In 2012, Broncsgiving gathered only cans and clothes, but when UTPA’s English Honor Society Sigma Tau Delta heard about the drive, its members decided to add something new to the mix.

We want to show our support for the community and that we, as Broncs, can work together for such a great cause. - Raul Leal UTPA student

als can drop off their items. Broncsgiving kicked off with a can drive Nov. 4 and will continue through Nov. 8, followed by a clothes drive from Nov. 11 to Nov. 15 and a book drive Nov. 18 to Nov. 22. “We want the student body to be well-educated with the issues facing the less fortunate in the Rio Grande Valley, as well as offer different types of opportunities for community service,” said Culinary Arts Club President Bianca Blanco. “Overall, just being able to help out this holiday season is what we are all going for.” Student organizations decided to come together to form one big drive as opposed to holding multiple benefits at different times.

“Sigma Tau Delta always wanted to have a book drive, but could never figure out when a good time to hold it would be,” 20-year-old Blanco said. “This year, they decided to partner up with all the other organizations to add their book drive to the cans and clothes. It just fit perfectly.” Raul Leal, a graduate student, had the idea of bringing everyone together as Broncs to help the community. In doing so, a larger range of people will be able to learn about Broncsgiving and participate. This year, the word is being spread through Facebook and Twitter. Posters are also displayed around campus

and throughout the McAllenEdinburg area, Wal-Mart and H-E-B. According to Leal, the students involved are doing the best they can to make the drive a success. “We are just hoping for everyone to have a great time and feel good that they are helping out the community in a great way, as well as help those in need to the best of our ability,” 21-yearold Leal said. “We want to show our support for the community, and that we, as Broncs, can work together for such a great cause.” According to Leal and Blanco, coming together as one to help not only each other, but the community as well, is what it means to be a Bronc.

UTPA Students Now Have the Opportunity to “Study Away” at Other Universities and Colleges for a Semester or Academic Year

Orientation: Tuesday, November 12, 2013 Time: 12:00 to 1:00pm Location: ARHU 173

Contact Us: NSE at UTPA Lamar Bldg., Room 9a (956) 665-3461 nse@utpa.edu

UTPA is now a member of the National Student Exchange (NSE). NSE provides undergraduates at UTPA “study away” opportunities for either a semester or a full year at any one of over 200 U.S. colleges and universities stretching from Hawaii to Maine (as well as a few in the Caribbean islands). Studying away at another U.S. institution provides students with chances to experience new places and people as well, as take courses at other universities that support and complement their academic work at UTPA. It also looks great on a student’s professional résumé. In most instances UTPA students can study away by paying their regular UTPA tuition, which allows scholarships, grants, and financial aid packages to remain intact. Additionally, students typically take courses away that fit into their UTPA degree plans. For more information, please visit UTPA’s NSE website at www.utpa.edu/nse or contact UTPA’s NSE Coordinator, Dr. Christopher Keller, at nse@utpa.edu. Additionally, to learn more, please attend a NSE orientation on November 12, from 12:00-1:00 in ARHU 173.


November 2013 January 31,7,2013

By Marco Torres The Pan American The Broncs recorded two top10 finishes at the Western Athletic Conference Cross Country Championships Nov. 2 at Jefferson Park Golf Course in Seattle. As a team, the Bronc men finished in fifth place with 117 points ahead of New Mexico State, Grand Canyon and Chicago State. Utah Valley took the team championship with 38 points. The women’s team scored 165 points and finished in sixth place in front of Grand Canyon, Cal State Bakersfield and Chicago State. Idaho took the team championship with total of 25 points. Head Coach Xavier Richardson waited weeks to see how his team would stack up against some of the best runners in the WAC Conference. “Our goals have been the same, which were to show up in Seattle with the best team that

we could be and to compete hard as a team,” Richardson said. Martin Casse, originally from Toulouse, France, followed up his seventh-place showing at the University of the Incarnate Word Cardinal Invitational Oct. 12 with a sixth place at the WAC event, with a season-best time of 25:41.10 in an 8K. Edinburg North alum Luis Serrano, who did not participate in the Cardinal Invitational, returned and finished in 10th place with a time of 25:56.40. “Martin and Luis had exceptional performances in their first WAC Championship. They knew what they would have to do to finish in the top 10. They ran smart and it paid off for the both of them,” Richardson said. “They showed heart and they certainly led the team for us.”

Additionally, Hansel Ibarra, a freshman from Mission, finished in 27th place with a time of 27:00.10. Junior Sergio Mireles recorded a time of

47th with a time of 30:22.70. Idaho’s Nicholas Boersma took the individual title in 25:26.70. “I think the men definitely

a time of 19:17.80 in a 5K run. Senior and fellow Edinburg High alum Robin Galloso finished 28th with a time of 19:22.40. In addition, Beatriz Garza finished in 19:43.60 for 32nd place while senior Tania Fabian ran 38th with a time of 19:56.20. Joanna Martinez also accomplished 20:18.50 for a 41st place finish and junior Ana Martinez came in 52nd, postinga time of 22:28.60. Idaho’s Hannah Kiser took the women’s individual title with a time of 17:15.70. “The women placed higher that they were thought to,” Richardson commented. “We had some great races for most of our girls and they gave it what they

Martin and Luis had exceptional performances in their first WAC Championship. They knew what they would have to do to finish in the top 10. They ran smart and it paid off for the both of them. -Xavier Richardson Head Coach 27:59.40 for a 36th place finish. Sophomore Raymond Flowers from San Antonio, came in 38th place after finishing with a time of 28:11.50 while freshman Arturo Ponce finished in 41st place with a time of 28:43.10. Daniel Loredo rounded out the men’s team as he finished in

weekly updates men ’ s basketball Beat the Texas A&M Kingsville Javelinas 74-56 in an exhibition game Nov. 2 at the Field House Next game is against Sam Houston State University Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. at the Field House

women ’ s golf Junior Melissa Bernal shot a final round 74 to take the individual title at the UTB Ocelot Invitational Nov. 4 at the South Padre Island Golf Club

women ’ s tennis Mariana Ranzahuer defeated Oral Roberts University’s Haley Martin 6-4, 6-0 to win the Flight A back draw championship Nov. 2 at the Sam Houston State Bearkat Classic Reegan Greenwood defeated Oral Roberts University’s Mairead Cleary 6-0, 4-6, 1-0 (14-12) to win the Flight B back draw championship Nov. 2 at the Bearkat Classic Julia Perez won the Flight C back draw championship defeating Oral Robert University’s Nika Munoz 7-5, 4-6, 1-0 (10-3) Nov. 2 at the Bearkat Classic In doubles, Ranzahuer and Greenwood won the doubles back draw championship by defeating Mairead Cleary and Dollar 8-4 Nov. 2 at the Bearkat Classic

volleyball Fell to the Seattle University Redhawks 3-1 Oct. 31 at the Connolly Center in Seattle Lost to the University of Idaho Vandals 3-1 Nov. 2 at Memorial Gym in Moscow, ID Won at home with a score of 3-1 victory over the Texas Southern University Tigers Nov. 6 at the Field House

showed up,” Richardson said. “They were a little daunted by the weather conditions, but they ran hard and they surprised people.” On the women’s side, junior Edinburg native, Rebekah Rodriguez led the Broncs with a 26th place finish as she posted

7

had. At the end of the day, that’s all we can ask of them and they did it.” Richardson said he knows his team has great leaders on both sides and that each team has good support. All he can ask is for his athletes to keep competing hard as they have so far this season. The Broncs will be back into action at the National Collegiate Athletic Association South Central Regional Championships Nov. 15 in Waco.


November 2013 January 31,7,2013

VALLEY BOWL Story by Kristela Garza Photos by Michelle Garcia and Jon Nutt The cold crisp air gave way as team after team took the field in the 11th annual Valley Bowl Nov. 2, on the fields behind UTPA’s Wellness and Recreational Sports Complex. The Valley Bowl is a Valley-wide flag football competition between area universities. This year the participating schools were UT-Pan American, UT-Brownsville, South Texas College, Texas Southmost College and Texas State Technical College. The competition is held at a different location every year and this marked the first time UTPA was given the opportunity to host it. This gave the UTPA teams a home field advantage. Despite the total of 10 men’s teams and five co-rec teams (co-ed) that participated. These three UTPA teams, comprised of UTPA students, made it to the Valley Bowl: men’s teams The Really Hot Guys, Nemesis and Gang Green,

a co-rec outfit. These three were chosen to represent UTPA by a ranking system. In order to play, each team had to win their respective school-wide flag football competitions. Amy Lynn Treviño, a junior who plays for Gang Green, was grateful for the tournament’s move to Edinburg. “It’s better than going to Brownsville or Laredo,” Treviño said. “It’s pretty cool and everyone is competitive, but the sportsmanship is there too.” REPRESENTING UTPA Despite the fact that schools from all over the Valley were represented, the top spots were earned by the three participating UTPA teams. First place in the all-men’s division went to The Really Hot Guys and second went to Nemesis. The co-rec team, Gang Green won second in their section losing only to UTB, The Hustlers. Now the UTPA teams are allowed to compete at the region-

al level and have the possibility to move on to nationals at the University of West Florida on Jan. 3-5, 2014. One of the University teams, The Really Hot Guys, aka Team Slow goes all over Texas to compete, explained Fernie Salinas, a sophomore at UTPA and a three-year flag football veteran of a team that’s played together for about six years. “We travel on a select team outside school,” Salinas said. “We have a pretty good sponsorship and we travel to Houston, Dallas, San Antonio Laredo. It’s pretty fun...we all are friends and we just ended up getting good.” He, and those on teams Nemesis and Gang Green, predicted they would sweep the competition, and they did, ending most of their games by mercy rule. That rule comes into play when a sports event is ended early because one team has a presumably insurmountable lead over the other team.

In total, The Really Hot Guys played five games until

facing the UTB, the Hustlers, who forfeited the title game due to personal reasons. “We have a lot of experience and we know how to play with each other (as a team). We just

Guys, to attend the Valley Bowl, but this year UTPA allowed the top two clubs: Nemesis and The Really Hot Guys, to compete. Now that his team has broken

Only positive benefits can come out of the Valley Bowl. We are hoping that a lot more teams come out to represent Pan Am and our league. -Robby Nieto Nemesis team captain

know the game a little better,” Salinas said.

Meanwhile, the Nemesis team has been attempting to make the Valley Bowl for four years, according to captain Robby Nieto, former Donna High School football player. According to Nieto, UTPA previously only allowed the top team, usually The Really Hot

through and placed, Nieto looks forward to the future of the intramural sport. “Only positive benefits can come out of the Valley Bowl,” Nieto said. “We are hoping that a lot more teams come out to represent Pan Am and our league. Ideally, we want it to stay here, ‘cause we are the home team, but as long as we get to represent Pan Am here or anywhere else, we

8

think it’s just going to be beneficial to the University.” REGION TO NATION The main prize to the winners of the Bowl, aside from medals and plaques, was a spot in the region VI regionals in Lubbock at Texas Tech University. In total, there will be 150 teams and 1,800 athletes at the event, which happens Nov. 22-24. After regionals, 48 teams and 580 athletes will advance and receive an automatic bid to participate in the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association Championship Series National Flag Football Championships at the University of West Florida in Orlando. With regionals closing in and the three UTPA teams searching for sponsorship to continue their season, Nieto looks back grateful for the competition overall. “We appreciated the opportunity to play, finally,” Nieto said with a laugh. “You know, we were just looking to represent Pan-Am pretty well.”

The University hosted the Valley Bowl Nov. 2. The Valley Bowl is a Valley-wide flag football competition between local universities and colleges. Pictured right in the gray is The Really Hot Guys, a traveling team also known as Team Slow. In baby blue is Nemesis, also a UTPA team. At the end of the day, RHG took home the men’s overall title, followed closely by Nemesis in third, while Gang Green took second in the co-ed division.


November 7, 2013