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Volume 67, No. 07

The Pan American

October 14, 2010

Presidents Day SGA, Nelsen talk issues, Bronc pride to students during UTPA Spirit Week

By Pamela Morales The Pan American

It was an event of green, orange and white, with students, faculty and staff coming together to express support for the university. An event, at which issues were communicated to higher administrators from students, and vice versa. Wednesday night the Student Government Association celebrated the 6th Annual State of the Student Body Address at the Student Union Theatre. This affair usually occurs every September at the University Ballroom but this time, a new executive team decided to change it up a bit. The inaugural event was presented in 2005 by former SGA president Edward Adrian Sandoval at the Student Union but then moved to the University Ballroom, with a formal banquet setting. For the most part, it was limited to senators and two invited students from each college. Erika Perez, one of the longest-serving members of SGA, is a graduate senator who said that in previous years the group didn’t reach to many constituents; she added that that the transition into the Student Union would bring curious students around. “In the way traditions have changed, we are now able to reach more students and have it more open and students are able to attend the address,” said Perez, a graduate pursuing a master’s in counseling. “Before, it was limited seating with a banquet setting. Now, we can have as many students as we can fit.” The school’s president and vice-president, Alex Rodriguez and Mark Allen, said they wanted more space because the State of the Student Body Address is one of the most

Page 2 - Big business might Letters totheir thebags, editor have packed but they never left

important SGA moments. One of their main goals is to capture the attention of students, to get them more involved with issues affecting the student body at UTPA. “The importance of this event is to connect with our constituents,” said Rodriguez, a senior majoring in business administration. “We need to make sure we address the issues that we are working on.” Another factor that proved challenging was finding a time slot before late October, and to clear space on the packed calendar of President Robert Nelsen. Allen said the president was out of town during the initially

Page 3checks - Jobs after UTPA off with graduation becoming scarce Nike in vendor deal

planned date, and the group did not want to wait too long and lose the sense of urgency. “Spirit Week fell right in that happy little median,” explained the senior social studies composite major. “We were able to talk with UPB…they graciously donated their time of a planned event, and gave it (Student Union) to us.” The executive leaders were excited about getting more students. In addition, the new deans of the split college, science and engineering, were invited. Rodriguez said having students become aware of the new administration and the new administration

Page 11 - Holiday gift guide Chicano poet laureate visits Student Union

meeting with students was another way to solve problems. “Also, not only do we want you to get to know us,” Rodriguez explained during his speech. “You have the opportunity to meet our team leadership…the administration. You are more than welcome to join our meetings and give us your insight.” THE ADDRESS AND ITS CROWD Since the address became part of Spirit Week, many athletes and staff of the athletic department were present to support one of

Page - Q&A with volleyball Días14Internacionales player Rebecca Toddy

2010 a promover paz

See SGA || Page 6

Tennis player continues to shine


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October 14, 2010

Letters to the Editor

Key source corrects misconceptions Dear Editor, Last week, I was interviewed for the Pan American regarding the cultural implications of Hestec. What followed was a published piece that accounted for a rather queer misinterpretation of my speech. Somehow my narrative was changed from the detached “student laments the lack of diversity on campus” into “poor black kid feels lonely and left out in Pre-dominantly Hispanic School.” Somehow, the issue went from “cultural implications” to “racial dimensions” regarding the event (Yes, there’s a difference). Ironically, I was portrayed as championing the “Us vs. Them” mentality-the very mentality that I wish to avoid at all costs. All inaccuracies aside, I would now like to make my point. As aforementioned, I have a lament for the lack of diversity on a university

campus. This is due to me viewing the meaning of ‘University’ to be “Unity in Diversity.” If we lack either one of those necessary components, then our overall educational experience is likely to be hindered as a result. Therefore, the University should make a concerted effort to facilitate diversity on its campus. That goes for all schools, whether or not I am talking about this great campus of the upper Valley, or the all-black campus of Southern University in Louisiana (which my cousin attended). That’s it. Controversial, right? So what accounts for these misrepresentations in speech? Perhaps it is our sound-bite culture, which, appealing to the attention span (or lack thereof) of the average American, believes dense feelings and ideas can be communicated through one-line

quotations. Perhaps this story was written before I even spoke, and all that was needed was a name. Perhaps it was my thick Nigerian accent (I’m working on it, trust me). All jesting aside, I would like to make it clear that I do not blame the reporter. Yet regardless of the cause, I believe that we should be able to communicate our points to one another effectively, making a special effort to understand not only what is being said but also understanding the speaker (especially when the piece will be read and interpreted by others). With that said, I think it is safe to add “misinterpretation” right above “lack of diversity” in my personal list of “things I despise with a lukewarm passion.” Sincerely, Miki Ehimika Senior political science major

Spanish section praised by faculty Dear Editor: Felicidades! Congratulations, to you, to the Pan American newspaper for its articles and columns in Spanish.

Also, thank you for your coverage of the fight to restore the voting site on campus. Thanks also to Dr. Nelsen and to all the students who got involved.

- Dr. Gary Mounce Political Science Department

A different view on guns, and the power they give

Dear Editor, The fact that higher gun ownership levels are strongly correlated with higher gun fatalities does not elucidate anything new or substantial to the concealed firearm dilemma. No one is denying that guns are dangerous. Just as no one is denying automobiles and skydiving are dangerous. States with more guns will have more gun fatalities, just as states with more automobiles will have more automobile fatalities, and states with higher skydiving rates will have higher skydiving fatalities. So? Twelve other states still have a higher gun-wielding population per capita than Louisiana, the state who leads the US in firearm fatalities. Gun ownership isn’t the issue. Despite legal measures, guns will always be accessible in the States. If an individual cannot purchase a gun legally because of a criminal history or psychological condition, he will be able to obtain one via the black market. The issue here is mass shootings and how to end them in the quickest possible manner to save lives. Let’s take a brief look at some of the most publicized shootings in recent American history. Virginia Tech, shooter kills 32 before killing himself; Columbine High School, shooters kill

13, before killing themselves; Fort Hood, shooter kills 13, before he is shot by a police officer. Notice anything? It appears when shooters go on rampages they do so without intention to surrender. Someone has to “take them out” before they stop, and it’s either going to be themselves, via suicide, or someone else with a gun. Even Charles Whitman, who the author mentioned briefly, had to be shot by Austin PD before he stopped shooting. By the author’s line of reasoning, she would rather the shooter decide when innocent people stop getting killed, than a policeman, or civilian with a concealed handgun license. How many more people do you suppose would have died at Fort Hood had not a police officer made the “lousy idea” to stop Nidal Hasan by shooting him? It’s clear, he who has the gun decides when the shooting stops. The question is, would you rather the “decider” be a psychopath without regard for human life, a policeman who will take ten minutes to arrive on scene, or a civilian already at the scene who has been properly trained by the state to use a firearm? Nicole Cantu BA History/Philosophy 2009 LAC Philosophy tutor

Vol. 67, No. 7

THE PAN AMERICAN

Illustrated Commentary

1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 Phone: (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122

The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the paper or university.

EDITOR IN CHIEF: Kristen Cabrera kmcabrera22@gmail.com

DESIGNER: Alexis Carranza alexis091@aol.com

NEWS EDITOR: Roxann Garcia roxx.gar11@gmail.com

WEBMASTERS: Jose Villarreal josemvillarrealcs@gmail.com

ONLINE/SPANISH EDITOR: Denisse Salinas dns_145@hotmail.com

Selvino Padilla selvinop3@gmail.com

ARTS & LIFE EDITOR: Benny Salinas 9_benny_9@live.com SPORTS EDITOR: Sara Hernandez shernandez261@gmail.com PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR: Alma E. Hernandez alma.e.hdz@gmail.com SENIOR DESIGNER: Jennifer Tate jen489@gmail.com

ADVISER: Dr. Greg Selber selberg@utpa.edu ADMINISTRATIVE ASSOCIATE: Anita Reyes areyes18@utpa.edu ADVERTISING MANAGER: Mariel Cantu spubs@utpa.edu DISTRIBUTION MANAGER: Steven Kennedy srkennedy56@yahoo.com

Delivery: Thursday at noon Letters to the Editor

Elias Moran/THE PAN AMERICAN

The Pan American accepts letters of 300 words or less from students, staff and faculty regarding recent newspaper content, campus concerns or current events. We reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. We cannot publish anonymous letters or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Please send all story ideas to thepanamerican@gmail.com. Individuals with disabilities wishing to acquire this publication in an alternative format or needing assistance to attend any event listed can contact The Pan American for more details.


October 14, 2010

Athletics signs deal to ‘just do it’ King satisfied with three-year vendor agreement with Nike, wants to strengthen Bronc brand

By Roxann Garcia The Pan American The University of TexasPan American athletics department announced Monday an apparel agreement with Nike Corporation, and students throughout campus can’t be happier. M e l i s s a Vicinaiz, a 21-yearold early education major, expressed her excitement over the deal by pointing to the well-known swoosh on her Nike T-shirt. “It’s exciting because it’s an athletic company that everyone is familiar with,” the former wrestler from Los Fresnos said. “It’s going to look even better in orange and green.” Director of Athletics Chris King is also pleased with the partnership; he’d sought to unify all team sports under one umbrella, raising awareness and interest in the university’s athletic product and brand. Nonetheless the Pennsylvania native stressed the difficulty in getting the agreement approved for the university. The concept of partnering with

an apparel corporation was first initiated shortly after King arrived last October. First the department had to present different bids or cost through university purchasing. It also had to detail and justify

w h y Nike was the corporation to go with above all others such as Adidas and Under Armour. Around the country, most Division I programs are already affiliated with one of the big names. “We ended up going with Nike not only because of their reputation for design and apparel but also their appeal towards athletes and students,” King said. King stated the 3-year agreement goes into effect as of now. All sports with the exclusion of baseball can start ordering team apparel with the Nike logo on it. Baseball was excluded because of a Reebok contract achieved earlier with Head Coach Manny Mantrana. “Whenever someone is very successful they build a relationship with

the vendor,” King said. “Based on the

anticipated success for the program they will likely continue to work together and Nike was nice enough to exclude baseball for now.” Included in the baseline package is a percentage discount off of apparel and footwear, added gear for coaches, plus a laundry list of free products to choose from. Nike benefits will also be provided in terms of the Bronc Athletic Fund through donations in the future. The BAF is an organization support group that donates money for operating procedures and scholarships. King also noted the new contract will generate revenue for the athletics department since all proceeds will go back to athletics. Since the fiscal year has already begun, the department will be on a pay-as-you-go plan until the following year. Teams and coaches can now start ordering apparel and footwear, which is a great thing, King noted. Typically, the director continued,

teams will pre-order equipment prior to the season and it usually arrives by summertime, just in time for the games. Some sports such as tennis and golf start at different times so they run the risk of receiving equipment later, King said. Other vendors, he continued, didn’t lay out as many offers because they just couldn’t compete with Nike’s package. Student-athlete Omar Doria is fired up to be teamed up with Nike. The biology major originally from Edinburg arrived in the fall of 2006 at the university as a distance runner. “Nike is the best choice you can make in the sports world,” he said. “Olympians and worldclass athletes were products made by them. Just wearing their stuff makes you think and feel like you can get there, too.” The 22-year-old athlete continued to express his excitement for the Nike products by admitting that the product he’s looking forward to the most are Nike spikes. “They’re very light and when you’re running you feel lighter mentally and physically,” he said. “It makes you faster in reaching your goals.”

University on treasure hunt for booty Committee seeks vendor to supply official UTPA class ring By Pamela Morales The Pan American

Freddie Martinez/THE PAN AMERICAN

DON’T BE FOOLED BY THE ROCKS WE GOT - Big-time vendors display their ring proposal to UTPA representatives last week.

Since 1927, there have been many traditions come and go on campus. A recent favorite has been Midnight Madness, which happens this week and annually celebrates the first official day of basketball practice. In the spring semester, students may enjoy the peak of basketball season by attending homecoming festivities held around campus to crown the new court. As for hardware, there is no “official ring” at UTPA, but students in the past have picked and chosen from among a number of different ones. Now the university hopes to begin a tradition: hosting a ring ceremony for graduating seniors, where their rings will be presented in a formal fashion. The Official Ring Committee, appointed by the

vice president of business affairs and approved by then assistant to the president, Carol Rausch, is on a journey to find a vendor that will capture the main objective: help market and manufacture the ideal UTPA class ring. “We want this ring to reflect the traditions of the university,” said Leticia Benavides, director of auxiliary and print services, at a meeting Oct. 7. “And instill that sense of pride for our students.” On Oct. 6, the committee met with the first vendor, Balfour, from Austin, and its platform was presented. The company was founded in 1913 and is now one of the top manufacturers of high school and college incentives such as letterman jackets. The following day, Herff Jones from Indianapolis sent a local

SEE RING || PAGE 7

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DREAM Act rally set for Friday night

By Roxann Garcia The Pan American Students hoping to support the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act can attend a rally held by the Coalition for Educational Opportunity on the Chapel Lawn at 5:30 p.m. Friday. Student Josse Alex Garrido, originally featured in The Pan American and The Monitor, recently stepped into the limelight hoping to gain attention to the cause. “I’m much excited about the rally,” he said. “I think it’s a wonderful way to make our campus aware of this very important measure.” Garrido entered the United States at age 13 along with his family of four. Upon graduating in the top 10 percent of his class at Sharyland High School in 2006, Garrido was soon informed that his family faced possible deportation. This is one of many cases in the Rio Grande Valley, Garrido said. At the University of Texas-Pan American alone he suspects more than 600 students are undocumented citizens. Many of them have excellent grades, outstanding academic achievements, and are a valuable asset to the university and the community as a whole, Garrido said. The undocumented student adds that many are being punished for a decision their parents made when they themselves were just minors. With the current immigration system, these students live in a legal limbo, he continued. His goal is to raise community awareness on the circumstances while also encouraging those affected to speak out. After making his cause public, Garrido has received some negative feedback from locals about his situation. But that hasn’t stopped the 22-year-old psychology/philosophy double major. “My family is terrified because of the threatening messages I’ve received,” he said. “They care about my safety but I am confident that our community has alot of well-intended and caring people.” The DREAM Act offers alien students who fall under certain criteria - such as good moral character, arriving in the U.S. as minors, and having been in the country continuously for at least five years prior to the bill’s enactment with the opportunity to earn conditional residency upon completing two years in the military or two years at a four-year institution of higher learning. The alien students would then obtain temporary residency for a six-year period. Currently the immigration fight continues, as DREAM activists strive for change despite the recent decision in September by the Senate to turn down the act. “I must say that I had done little or nothing at all compared to the arduous work of my friends who supported me from the very beginning,” Garrido concluded. “This rally is a team effort.”


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October 14, 2010


October 14, 2010

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NEWS

Alma E. Hernandez/THE PAN AMERICAN

BRONCS IN THE HOUSE - Junior Alfredo Gonzalez,and freshman Anysa Salinas decorate a Jeep on Oct. 11, the ďŹ rst day of Spirit Week, sponsored by SGA and the Greek Council.


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October 14, 2010

NEWS

Economics, finance proceed with changes toward real-world focus By Belinda Munoz The Pan American Like most disciplines on campus, the Department for Economics and Finance has made changes to curriculum since a state mandate ordered a decrease from 124 to 120 credit hours for all university degrees three years ago. While some of the courses remain the same in terms of course content, they are also beginning to invoke more real world references/assignments. The department offers bachelor’s degrees in business administration, economics, and finance. Alberto Davila, economics professor here since 1996 and department chair since 1997, says changes made in curriculum in 2007 for the Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) in Economics and Finance programs are the result of the mandate and a constant desire for enhanced teaching. “There have been some slight changes in the curriculum,” Davila stated. “They are more just changes that we have felt are necessary for our students to get a better education.” The College Curriculum Committee, a university-wide body responsible for carrying out the mandated degree plan changes, relied on Davila and Dave Jackson, professor of finance, to serve as require representatives for their department. Both were present when the decisions to collapse/remove certain courses and change degree requirements were made. Marie T. Mora, professor of economics who has worked with the economic department with her husband, Davila, since

2002, explains that she has not personally added information to course contents. Instead, Mora is emphasizing the same information about economics, by applying it to current/hot topic issues, such as the recent economic recession. This means referencing the U.S. economy to better explain what a recession is, how to best establish a business during a weak economy, and how to adjust/begin to recover once the economy is out of a recession. This sort of emphasis on a real-life approach allows students to consider issues that concern the whole nation. “I’ve been teaching since 1995 and the economy has gone through really good periods and bad periods,” said Mora, originally from New Mexico. “I do try to bring in a lot of the real world examples. My lectures are reflecting what is happening right now. We are focusing more on, ‘what does it mean to be in a recession?’ because the U.S. recently just moved out of a recession.” Mora, who often teaches a Principals of Macro Economics class, addresses how problems in the economy can be related to different government organizations. “(Here) we are looking at some of the basics behind our overall economy,” she said. “We look at employment issues. We also talk a little bit about the role of government and the role of the Federal Reserve System.” The country has officially been out of the recession since mid 2009, but it doesn’t seem like it sometimes, as unemployment is still 9.6 percent. Due to Mora’s expertise on employment issues, she was one of 14 economists asked to

participate in a 90-minute meeting at the White House, Oct. 5. The goal was to discuss ways that the government can help stimulate national employment growth for the United States. There is still much to be decided on the matter. “ lot of ideas were thrown out, Mora said. “It was only ninety minutes, so not much was accomplished. I think the plan is to have people continue to have some input. So they may have some conference calls.” Back on campus, Mora is also concerned with the number of students pursuing a major in economics. “We don’t actually have that many econ majors,” she said. “We teach a lot of students but that is because to be part of our College of Business, students are required to take a certain number of econ classes to give them a good foundation. Our department is also mixed with the finance faculty so we have a lot of finance majors.” The department has about 200 students majoring in finance and

about 20 in economic. Last year, about 100 finance majors graduated, as opposed to about 10 in economics. Davila insists that the graduation statistics regarding the BA, BBA and Finance programs within the department are questionable, the result of student decisions to change majors, which results in fluctuating expectations for graduation. “My experience with the number of majors is that some of those numbers are somewhat deceiving, in that students declare a particular major and right there at the end, they shift to finance or they shift into economics,” Davila suggested. “Most of the time it’s because students start taking courses and they realize, ‘this is closer to what I want to do.’ Many of these courses they take later in their academic career. ” No matter what the numbers of economic majors are, Davila feels that the most important thing is that students pursue what they are truly passionate about.

can have activities and cooperate in different initiatives…that is exciting and I think the Student Government Association is a great vehicle for that.” In his address, Rodriguez talked about important issues, including a student referendum for an international student scholarship fee. He asked students to show up to meetings and give their opinion on new policies or proposed ones. After Rodriguez’s speech, President Nelsen spoke about his support for issues such as the DREAM Act, advocating that 602 students should not be deprived of an education. He used another example about his belief in the students at UTPA.

“Some if you may have heard that Nelsen got a little mad,” said the self-proclaimed cowboy. “I was at a presentation that was being done in the College of Arts and Humanities about advertising and writing. . .the person who was doing the presentation started talking down to the students, saying that it’s really hard and you probably won’t get the chance to be… successful...I got up and in Spanish said how much I believed in the students here, how much I believed they can be successful , and that they will be successful…and it’s because of who we are at Pan Am… and what we want to do.”

The address ended with Nelsen’s speech and afterward, door prizes were given out to ticket holder winners. Outside the Student Union Theatre, a reception was held for students, staff and faculty. Among the attendees was Miguel Angel Ramirez, an expected May 2011 graduate, who said the evening marked the first he has heard Nelsen. Ramirez agreed that the search for a replacement for John Edwards, the vice president for enrollment and student services retiring this year, should be a success. “I’m sure they will do a good job in replacing John Edwards,” commented the double major in political science and history, referencing the search committee appointed by Nelsen. One of the important issues

Mora’s trip to D.C. was eye opener

Freshly out of recession, the U.S. is now focused on how to cut an unemployment rate that is steady at 9.6 percent. The U.S. Council of Economic Advisors held a meeting at the White House earlier this month to address ideas on how the government can help stimulate national employment growth. While President Obama was not in attendance, UTPA’s Marie T. Mora, economics professor for the Department of Economics and Finance, was one of 14 economists invited to participate in the brainstorming session. “I was invited there to talk about employment growth and the concerns that the administration had about unemployment,” Mora said. With unemployment still high as compared to pre-2007 levels, it feels as if the country is still in jeopardy. “The U.S. is technically not in a recession right now,” Mora said. “We supposedly moved out of one, back in the middle of 2009, but unemployment has continued to deteriorate. So the concern is ‘how do you reverse those trends?’” Reversing the state of joblessness is a daunting task and it is inevitable that other D.C. meetings will be needed in order to achieve a successful plan. Mora noted that during her visit to the nation’s capital, the short duration of the meetings limited the amount of specifics the panel could come up with. She believes there will be more such opportunities in the future to contribute to the dialogue either live or through conference calls and video hookups.

SGA

continued from Page 1 their biggest cheerleaders. Chris

King, director of athletics, sat in the second row with the track and basketball players, cheering on the SGA president as he spoke. Also in attendance was Andrew Haring, associate athletic director for external operations, who said although he just joined UTPA in February of this year, it was exciting to be part of something that exemplifies pride. “I think we’re excited about the partnership between Student Government Association and department of athletics,” said Haring, a former member of the athletic department at The University of Texas-San Antonio. “We really feel that our student-athletes are part of the university and they represent the student body. So whenever we

mentioned was the remodeling of the Business Administration Building. “The business building is kind of old,” said Martha Moreno, a junior accounting major. “We need an improvement.” Throughout the reception area, students spoke with the members of SGA, deans of the colleges, athletes and Nelsen, exchanging ideas and solutions for issues such as parking and tuition/fees. It was a night of networking, creating an atmosphere of pride, and bringing the university community closer together. “We had a great turnout, a lot of students came,” said Allen after the event. “We’re looking forward to the added exposure…to really get out there to be connected with the student body.”


October 14, 2010

NEWS

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Latest speaker pours forth on borderless world “We have over 200 countries. And for 90 percent of the world’s population, these borders don’t The University of Texas-Pan matter a great deal,” he said. “90 American welcomed its second percent of the world’s people distinguished speaker of the season never leave the country where Monday night. Global political they were born in.” Khanna went on to discuss the economist and geo-strategist Parag Khanna addressed students, role that borders play in different faculty and staff at the fine arts parts of the world. He discussed auditorium in a presentation several topics such as the migration called “Invisible Maps: Building a of Chinese people into Russia and Mongolia, the conflict on the Borderless World.” “Do we live in a borderless world?” Middle East and the current wave asked Khanna, a former foreign policy of violence hitting the U.S.-Mexico advisor to Barack Obama during his border, among other issues. “There are many ways in which we presidential campaign. can redraw some “For many of the lines on the of you, in the map and change physical sense, or transcend the answer “ Rather than being afraid the borders would be no,” and potentially he said. “And stabilize the intuitively as this of remapping the world, region,” he said young generation referring to the that you are, the I think that we should war-torn countries answer is yes. of the Middle But in fact, the embrace it. ” East. world today has He said that more borders Parag Khanna g e o p o l i t i c s than any time in was much like Global political economist history.” climate change K h a n n a in the way that it noted that the makes a slow but number of countries has doubled from the 100 great impact to our daily lives. He nations that existed in 1945 when also said that people should not be the United Nations was founded, afraid of the birth of new nations. “Rather than being afraid of and with that increase in the number of countries, more borders remapping the world, I think that we should embrace it,” Khanna said. have emerged as well.

By Alejandra Martinez The Pan American

“Because if we build the lines such as the pipelines, railroads and highways, we would get the world we want, which is a borderless world.” Khanna is director of the Global Governance Initiative and senior research fellow in the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation. In 2008 he was named one of Esquire’s “75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century” and he was one of fifteen people featured in WIRED magazine’s “Smart List.” Khanna earned a bachelor’s degree in international affairs and a minor in philosophy from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He holds a master’s degree from Georgetown’s security studies program and is currently working to obtain a Ph.D. in international relations at the London School of Economics. Khanna’s work has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Forbes, Newsweek, The Guardian, to name a few. He has also been featured on CNN, BBC, PBS, Al Jazeera International, NPR, and other media. The next scheduled speakers for the 2010-2011 series are David Gergen, senior political analyst for CNN and former presidential adviser on Feb. 23; and Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, author and host of the PBS program “NOVA Science Now” on March 28. For more information contact the Student Union at (956) 665-7989.

Freddie Martinez/THE PAN AMERICAN

BORDERLESS - Distinguished speaker Parag Khanna gets ready for his speech in front of UTPA students on Oct. 10.

Scholarship season opens with long RING list of possible award destinations

continued from Page 3

By Karen Antonacci The Pan American

As tuition has steadily increased over the past five years at UTPA and across the nation, the online application for Excellence and Departmental Scholarships is becoming a better and better option for students who need a little extra financial aid. “I won $500 a semester funded by General Motors my freshman year,” said Jazmin Rodriguez, a sophomore public relations/ advertising major, and two-time scholarship winner. “It helps a lot in paying for tuition and books.” In 2010, approximately $1.2 million went to 900 students through the Excellence and Departmental scholarships, UTPA Scholarship Office director Griselda Cabrera said. The application became available online Sept. 1 and will remain available at www.utpa.edu/ excellence until the deadline, Jan. 15, 2011. The online application has been

offered since 2002 and presents many benefits for applicants, as Rodriguez notes. “The application online is very easy and accessible, everyone on campus should do it,” she advised. The online application process also makes it easier on the UTPA Scholarship Office “The majority of [the students’] information is retrieved from the student information system, Banner. This includes their address, major, minor, G.P.A., etc.” Cabrera explained. “There is no paperwork to submit to our office, the students can complete the entire process online: application, essay, and letter of recommendation.” According to www.utpa.edu/ excellence, the Excellence and Departmental scholarships are not renewable – students must reapply every year. Most are available to all majors with a minimum gradepoint average of 2.5 and full-time enrollment status. Most require U.S. citizenship or legal permanent resident status.

International students, however, are still encouraged to apply. Award amounts vary depending on funds, and recipients are selected on a competitive basis with priority given to students who have not received an institutional scholarship.

representative from McAllen to speak with the committee. That group manufactures class rings at The University of TexasSan Antonio and Our Lady of the Lake. Oct. 8 was Jostens, a vendor already familiar with UTPA’s University Bookstore for its presence as an affiliate for manufacturing graduation invitations, plus cap and gowns. None of the companies had artists present a sketch of a UTPA ring because the committee would like the design to be based on the committee’s specifications, said Benvides. It was also noted by Lynda Lopez, director of special projects from the president’s office, that the committee wants to hear from their “most important constituents,” students. In order to that, a survey will be circulated asking students for ideas. Most of the questions will ask students, faculty and staff, even alumni wishing to participate, what symbols he/she believe are primarily associated with the university. Another goal is to find out what the respondent believes is the most important tradition. The survey is expected to give the committee ideas

it can use to prepare the final design. “The intent is to have the design elements capture the spirit of what UTPA means to the majority of survey respondents,” Benavides said. “To help us design the perfect design” read the first version of a survey, written by Lopez, who presented the survey to the committee Oct. 7, insisting on the urgency of getting as much input from every walks of life at UTPA. Alex Rodriguez, Student Government Association president, is part of the committee and he said he’s come to understand that he is part of a very big event. “When all of us (the ring committee) are having a discussion about the ring,” Rodriguez said, “I realize how we are not only talking about a ring, but a tradition that may last for generations.” The vendor will be chosen by the end of this month and deliberations are ongoing for an official ring presentation, to be implemented in Fall 2011. To fill out the survey, please log on to: http://www.utpa.edu/ officialringsurvey. The survey will close two weeks after it is opened.


THE PAN AMERICAN

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October 14, 2010

By Lupe A. Flores The Pan American Despite a predominantly Judeo-Christian spirit blanketing the United States, some organizations on college campuses find themselves composed of student ministries with a mission to recruit others into their respective denominations. The goal for some is inclusion. At The University of Texas-Pan American there are cultural organizations – albeit a few – that serve as a Mecca for inter-religious activity that to some may seem an irregularity. Among the 19 organizations listed as “religious” with the Office of Student Development, only two are of a different faith than Christianity. However, some, like the Muslim Student Association, have become inactive due to little or no student participation, according to Jorge Zamora, coordinator of student development. But this is not necessarily a referendum on the faith itself. “That’s the main reason why we find ourselves with such a small number of these (clubs),” he said. “The demand gets lost, not necessarily the interest.” Cultural organizations on campus have fallen victim to the problem of inactivity. Exactly seven of the 11 listed with the OSD have been inactive as of February 2010, according to its Website. Six of the organizations cater to black, Asian and Indian students while the remaining five are mainly MexicanAmerican-influenced, like Cosecha Voices. The Indian Culture Association is an active club that suits diverse tastes. Spirituality usually lies within culture and for ICA, founded seven years ago, the culture of spirituality isn’t necessarily monotheistic or even theistic, for that matter. “There are students who practice Sikhism and Jainism, religions that are of high practice in India,” said President Sherley Edinbarough, 20. “There are also students who practice no religion and are of an atheist or deist nature.” Paradoxically, there are students involved in ICA who do practice Christianity and its various branches like Catholicism, Protestantism and Baptism. In India, where the population surpasses one billion, there are an estimated 25 million practicing Christians, less than 5 percent of its population. In 2008, The New York Times published an article highlighting atrocities perpetrated against Indian-Christians, who were forced by a sector of Hindu extremists to break away from the faith and convert, or be sent into exile. Since the nation’s founding in 1947 there has existed conflict between competing communities in the region - where different religions reign, the most recent involving predominantly Muslim Kashmir in the middle of an autonomy battle between India and neighboring Pakistan, a nation looked upon with skepticism by the former because of its Islamic practices.

Edinbarough, a Brownville native who’s been Christian-Catholic all her life, is determined to create greater awareness of the importance of having diverse belief systems on campus, especially in today’s highly globalized and digitized world. “In the world we live in now, we experience a greater chance for inter-religious and inter-cultural mingling,” the biology pre-med major said. “Thus it is crucial that one is open and receptive towards another’s differences and practices even if one doesn’t engage or necessarily agree with the other’s practice. “If we shut off something just because it is alien or doesn’t bode well with our current ideology,” she continued, “then it would be a world without growth.” INCLUSIVELY INDIAN Edinbarough said ICA’s mission is to promote awareness of Indian culture on campus through events such as dances, festivals, educational workshops and speakers. In April, the association had its annual Sahana Night, where members conduct an Indian fashion show displaying couture and dance styles. In September the group celebrated the Indian Harvest Festival or Onam Festival, where Indian foods are sampled and time is dedicated to helping students understand and appreciate the country. “Students of all backgrounds are invited to join. The only prerequisite is an interest in India’s cultural heritage,” Edinbarough said. In fact, that’s how she became involved, through personal interest. “I love the culture and its rich heritage, and I wanted to help carry on this cultural gift while enhancing my own life with it,” she said. Treasurer Nita Sharon Thomas, born in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and a native of Delhi, India, is one of the 30 members in the association. The 21-year-old pre-med biology major has been involved since she enrolled at UTPA in 2007. Before moving to the Rio Grande Valley at age 15 from New Delhi to attend P-SJ-A North High School in 2005, she attended

a Catholic convent in her homeland and said it took her six months to get over the culture shock. “The co-ed education was new and I had never heard of multiple-choice exams or seen a scantron before,” she said. “But I got accustomed and I enjoy it here.” Now well on her way into medical school, Thomas reveres her experiences with ICA, an organization she believes has been important to her development. “Since I’m Indian, it was automatic for me to join,” she noted. “When I entered, the seniors involved had founded ICA and they encouraged and influenced me. It’s a great way to learn about India with all of our activities.” The majority of students in the association are Indian, but Thomas said continuing club events is a perfect way to attract student interests and work against the notion that India, the world’s largest democracy, is simply another lowincome country in religious turmoil with little to give. “Even though we’re mostly Indian here (at ICA) and even though our country is having problems with religion, our club isn’t having such issues,” she said. “We work united despite what’s going on outside.” The ICA will have its first meeting of the semester Oct. 7 and has yet to set a date for the usual movie night in late October. In November, a five-day Indian light celebration known as the Diwali Festival falls on Nov. 5. ICA plans to celebrate at Victoria Palms Resort in Weslaco sometime in early November. For more information on how to become a part of the association or for event details, e-mail the club at icassocation@gmail.com.

Design by Alexis Carranza The Pan American

October 14, 2010

THE PAN AMERICAN

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THE PAN AMERICAN

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October 14, 2010

By Lupe A. Flores The Pan American Despite a predominantly Judeo-Christian spirit blanketing the United States, some organizations on college campuses find themselves composed of student ministries with a mission to recruit others into their respective denominations. The goal for some is inclusion. At The University of Texas-Pan American there are cultural organizations – albeit a few – that serve as a Mecca for inter-religious activity that to some may seem an irregularity. Among the 19 organizations listed as “religious” with the Office of Student Development, only two are of a different faith than Christianity. However, some, like the Muslim Student Association, have become inactive due to little or no student participation, according to Jorge Zamora, coordinator of student development. But this is not necessarily a referendum on the faith itself. “That’s the main reason why we find ourselves with such a small number of these (clubs),” he said. “The demand gets lost, not necessarily the interest.” Cultural organizations on campus have fallen victim to the problem of inactivity. Exactly seven of the 11 listed with the OSD have been inactive as of February 2010, according to its Website. Six of the organizations cater to black, Asian and Indian students while the remaining five are mainly MexicanAmerican-influenced, like Cosecha Voices. The Indian Culture Association is an active club that suits diverse tastes. Spirituality usually lies within culture and for ICA, founded seven years ago, the culture of spirituality isn’t necessarily monotheistic or even theistic, for that matter. “There are students who practice Sikhism and Jainism, religions that are of high practice in India,” said President Sherley Edinbarough, 20. “There are also students who practice no religion and are of an atheist or deist nature.” Paradoxically, there are students involved in ICA who do practice Christianity and its various branches like Catholicism, Protestantism and Baptism. In India, where the population surpasses one billion, there are an estimated 25 million practicing Christians, less than 5 percent of its population. In 2008, The New York Times published an article highlighting atrocities perpetrated against Indian-Christians, who were forced by a sector of Hindu extremists to break away from the faith and convert, or be sent into exile. Since the nation’s founding in 1947 there has existed conflict between competing communities in the region - where different religions reign, the most recent involving predominantly Muslim Kashmir in the middle of an autonomy battle between India and neighboring Pakistan, a nation looked upon with skepticism by the former because of its Islamic practices.

Edinbarough, a Brownville native who’s been Christian-Catholic all her life, is determined to create greater awareness of the importance of having diverse belief systems on campus, especially in today’s highly globalized and digitized world. “In the world we live in now, we experience a greater chance for inter-religious and inter-cultural mingling,” the biology pre-med major said. “Thus it is crucial that one is open and receptive towards another’s differences and practices even if one doesn’t engage or necessarily agree with the other’s practice. “If we shut off something just because it is alien or doesn’t bode well with our current ideology,” she continued, “then it would be a world without growth.” INCLUSIVELY INDIAN Edinbarough said ICA’s mission is to promote awareness of Indian culture on campus through events such as dances, festivals, educational workshops and speakers. In April, the association had its annual Sahana Night, where members conduct an Indian fashion show displaying couture and dance styles. In September the group celebrated the Indian Harvest Festival or Onam Festival, where Indian foods are sampled and time is dedicated to helping students understand and appreciate the country. “Students of all backgrounds are invited to join. The only prerequisite is an interest in India’s cultural heritage,” Edinbarough said. In fact, that’s how she became involved, through personal interest. “I love the culture and its rich heritage, and I wanted to help carry on this cultural gift while enhancing my own life with it,” she said. Treasurer Nita Sharon Thomas, born in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and a native of Delhi, India, is one of the 30 members in the association. The 21-year-old pre-med biology major has been involved since she enrolled at UTPA in 2007. Before moving to the Rio Grande Valley at age 15 from New Delhi to attend P-SJ-A North High School in 2005, she attended

a Catholic convent in her homeland and said it took her six months to get over the culture shock. “The co-ed education was new and I had never heard of multiple-choice exams or seen a scantron before,” she said. “But I got accustomed and I enjoy it here.” Now well on her way into medical school, Thomas reveres her experiences with ICA, an organization she believes has been important to her development. “Since I’m Indian, it was automatic for me to join,” she noted. “When I entered, the seniors involved had founded ICA and they encouraged and influenced me. It’s a great way to learn about India with all of our activities.” The majority of students in the association are Indian, but Thomas said continuing club events is a perfect way to attract student interests and work against the notion that India, the world’s largest democracy, is simply another lowincome country in religious turmoil with little to give. “Even though we’re mostly Indian here (at ICA) and even though our country is having problems with religion, our club isn’t having such issues,” she said. “We work united despite what’s going on outside.” The ICA will have its first meeting of the semester Oct. 7 and has yet to set a date for the usual movie night in late October. In November, a five-day Indian light celebration known as the Diwali Festival falls on Nov. 5. ICA plans to celebrate at Victoria Palms Resort in Weslaco sometime in early November. For more information on how to become a part of the association or for event details, e-mail the club at icassocation@gmail.com.

Design by Alexis Carranza The Pan American

October 14, 2010

THE PAN AMERICAN

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October 14, 2010

Revolutionary laureate takes UTPA

As if we don’t already see enough of Ryan Seacrest, the reality producer, radio personality and “American Idol” host is in talks to launch a music, pop culture and lifestyle oriented cable network.

Johnny Knoxville and his gang of careless misfits are back with their third effort, this time presented in 3D - an effect that is sure to have audiences grimacing in their seats. “Jackass 3D” hits theaters this Friday.

Tammy Ayala/THE PAN AMERICAN WRITE ON- “Write, write, write and write some more,” Alberto Baltazar Urista Heredia offers as words of advice for UTPA students Monday evening at the Student Union Theater. The poet spoke of his past, the Chicano movement, and the education system. By Benny Salinas The Pan American

“Only by the Night” catapulted the Kings of Leon to mainstream charts in 2008 and their fifth album “Come Around Sundown” is sure to keep them there. With singles sounding similar to breakout hit “Use Somebody,” the boys will be selling out arenas for another year.

Google has announced that it has been testing self-driving cars on the streets of California for months. The only accident to occur in the 140,000 miles logged was the result of a human error.

The man walked slowly from his seat in the Student Union Theater towards the steps by the stage. With his oversized shades on he felt around with his cane, bumped into the stairs, pretended to trip, got up and continued to feel around with his cane. The almost filled auditorium began to giggle. After a few moments Alurista found his way to the podium on stage and removed his glasses. “Sorry about that guys, I had a little trouble on the way up here,” Alurista said through the laughter filling the room. “I’m getting paid for this so I better stick to the script.” Throughout Monday evening’s presentation humor was prevalent, even as Alurista discussed problems in race, the education system and his past. Between poems he discussed the Chicano movement and the writing process, reciting an unfinished poem as part of the discussion. Born Alberto Baltazar Urista Heredia in Mexico City, Mexico in 1947, Alurista moved to the United States when he was 13. He began writing poetry at a young age, using it to benefit as often as he could.

“The first girlfriend I got when I was a kid in Mexico I got when I wrote her a poem,” Alurista said. “My friends picked up on this and started paying me to write poems for them to give to girls. I was a commercial success.” Though he started with love poems, his concerns moved quickly to politics and activism, using his poetry to express those views. While in college he began the San Diego State University chapter of Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán (“Chicano Student Movement of Aztlán”), and organized students in favor if the United Farm workers Grape Boycott. During the First National Chicano Youth Liberation Conference in 1969 a 21-year-old Alurista read a poem entitled El Plan Espiritual de Aztlán. The poem so captivated the youth there they adopted the poem as the preamble of the political manifesto of the Chicano Movement. On Monday, Alurista had the audience recite this poem with him with enthusiastic response. Together they read the short poem outloud: “In the spirit of a new people that is conscious not only of its proud historical heritage but also of the brutal ‘gringo’ invasion of our territories, we, the Chicano inhabitants and civilizers of the northern land of Aztlan from whence came our forefathers,

reclaiming the land of their birth and Chicanos was eighth grade,” Alurista consecrating the determination of our said. “Today it’s still the same. We people of the sun, declare that the call haven’t changed. And that’s how you of our blood is our power, our respon- measure growth, by the education.” sibility, and our inevitable destiny.” Alurista went on to say that “YankeeAlurista landia,” as he refers called the poem to the United States, a response quesneeds to help get tions of where “ The first girlfriend I Chicano students to at Chicanos were least the 10th grade. got when I was a kid in from. Aside from the “America is a political aspects of AlMexico I got when I wrote continent, not a urista’s presentation he her a poem. My friends country,” Alurista also gave writing adsaid. “Therefore vice. He offered three picked up on this and we are all pieces of advice: 1) started paying me to Americanos. We The only to get better are of the nation of is to write constantly, write poems for them, Aztlan.” 2)trust only your heart to give to girls. I was a When asked and mind and 3) don’t about the state give up, keep at it. commercial success. ” of the Chicano “If you’re good movement now people will catch during the Q&A on,” Alurista said. section of the “You’ve just got to event Alurista keep writing, keep replied, to much Alurista believing in what surprise, that you’re doing.” Revolutionary poet almost nothing Though his had changed. advise was initially “When I for aspiring writers, wrote El Plan Espiritual de Aztlan the it became evident by the end of the average dropout, and I call it dropout night that he was speaking to every but it’s really pushout, grade for person in attendance.


October 14, 2010

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ARTS AND LIFE

Def Jam poet concludes Dia de la Raza Joe Hernandez-Kolski visits Student Union Cafe, muses on race

different and raising that awareness and embracing that difference that we have while learning about each other.” Creative writing graduate student Under a blinding spotlight, five student poets took the stage at the Veronica Sandoval, also known as Student Union-turned -coffee-house Lady Mariposa, was the first to step Tuesday evening before handing the up to the microphone with poems for mic over to Def Jam poet “Pocho” Joe her spoken word album “Hecha En El Valley.” She explained that her poem Hernandez-Kolski. “The goal of [our] multicultural titled “Be it if I could” is poetic middle programming is to create cultural finger to a past performance invitation awareness amongst the UTPA com- that asked her to forgo the barrio-type imagery prevalent munity and to of her work for allow us to see something “with things from a difless frijoles” and ferent perspective “ It was interesting that “more universal.” and become more “I can’t do acceptable of difwe still have a lot of the that,” the Sullivan ferences amongst same issues being that we City native said, people,” said citing the lines Rigoberto Gutiergrew up in two completely where she recalls rez, a sophomore her uncle playing communication different places. Thereʼs corridos on the studies major and this invisible connection front lawn and the University Proimage of the Virgin gram Board Heribetween language and Mary tattooed tage Committee the importance of it in on a cholo’s Chair. chest. “There’s The UPB and our lives. ” no one thing that Office of Student fits everyone. Development partAnything that you nered up for the event to mark the Joe Hernandez-Kolski write is going to have you. I can’t end of Hispanic Def Jam poet erase the aesthetics Heritage Month, of my culture.” which concludes Following the tomorrow. The students, Hernandezpoetry slam also marked Columbus Day and its Latin Kolsi opened with a lively rendition of BeAmerican counterpart, Dia de la Raza. yonce’s “Single Ladies” dance routine. A Chicago native born to a Mexican “Yes, the majority of us might be Hispanic, but all of us have different back- mother and a Polish father, the poet spoke grounds,” said Tania Chavez, a com- of how he realized that he was ethnically munication graduate student and UPB different from some of his family memintern. “I think it brings up that we’re bers at three years old when his paternal

By Nadia Tamez-Robledo The Pan American

grandmother introduced him to her friends as “Joey, my Mexican grandson.” While never meant to hurt him Hernandez-Kolsi, said that the comment was the start of his earlier aversion to his Latino heritage. “I didn’t want to be Mexican,” he said. “There was something wrong about being Mexican.” Hernandez-Kolsi began reconciling his duel identity at the age of 12 when he spent the summer with family in Mexico to learn Spanish. “I realized that a lot of who I am inherently comes from that culture,” he said. “I didn’t realize I was allowing myself to be defined by the stereotypes, allowing myself to be defined by what you see on TV.” Sandoval took notice of a skit in which Hernandez-Kolsi remembered hiding under a table as a child as his mother and aunts spoke Spanish, wishing he could understand their “secret language.” “It was interesting that we still have a lot of the same issues being that we grew up in two completely different places,” she said. “There’s this invisible connection between language and the importance of it in our lives.” In addition to his mixed culture, Hernandez-Kolsi touched upon on his “lack of Chicanoness,” his status as a feminist, and his 20 rules for college students. “Some poets are very angry,” he said. “I’ve gone through some of that, and so has my poetry, but I’d rather focus on the internal. Hopefully people will identify with that, and that’s what I want. I feel like everyone wants the entire world to say to them, ‘You’re not the only one going through this.’”

Mayra Godinez/THE PAN AMERICAN

RHYMIN’- Joe Hernandez-Kolski, a spoken word poet, performs his “Refried Latino Pride” routine Tuesday, Oct. 12. Hernandez combines comedy, social commentary and personal stories to make up his act.

Author Cynthia Orozco to visit STC this month

By Carlos Arteaga The Pan American

This month is definitely an important one for South Texas College as it continues to celebrate the Hispanic Heritage Month, after President Lyndon B. Johnson recognized the contributions of Hispanics in the United States by instituting celebration 42 years ago. To open up the month’s activities of cultural awareness, the school recognized the Second Annual Hector P. Garcia Day Celebration, at the Mid-Valley Campus. The presentations and lectures will be going on all month, from the past September 16, to conclude this October 14.

The month of activities included everything from Hispanic films and conferences on historic achievements, to lectures and presentations from some of the most recognized Hispanic speakers in the United States. As part of the festivities, one of the names that jump the page is Cynthia Orozco’s. She will close the series of presentations and lectures by discussing her book Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. in STC’s Pecan Campus Rainbow Room. In 2009, Orozco released, “No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement.” Orozco teaches history at Eastern New Mexico University in Ruidoso, focusing on world humanities, Western civilization

OCT. 14, 7 PM

STC PECAN CAMPUS LIBRARY RAINBOW ROOM and local history. She was recently appointed to the New Mexico Humanities Council by Gov. Bill Richardson. She obtained her BA from the University of Texas at Austin and her MA and Ph.D from UCLA. She is the co-editor

of “Mexican Americans in Texas History,” and the associate editor of “Latinas in the United States: An Historical Encyclopedia,” and served as research associate at the Texas State Historical Association, where she wrote 80 articles on Texas History for the New Handbook of Texas. Orozco has also worked as research associate at the Institute of Texan Cultures in San Antonio. The conference poses a refreshing and path-breaking view of the roots of Mexican American social movement organizing in Texas, with new insights on the struggles of women to participate and define their roles in this social movement. The lecture will conclude with a book signing session open to the public.


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October 14, 2010


14 de octubre del 2010

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Semana Internacional en busca de paz mundial

Facilitando y motivando el desarrollo de programas internacionales en las áreas de investigación, publicaciones, educación continua, desarrollo de Pocos estudiantes tienen la opor- facultad y alcance comunitario. tunidad de viajar a España para ver “Lo que tenemos es un proyecto personalmente las obras de Picasso, que decidimos tomar para celebrar a Marruecos para disfrutar de autén- nuestra cultura”, comentó Yvonne tica comida marroquí, o a Sudamérica Quintanilla, directora de la oficina de para presenciar los bailes de los ma- Programas Internacionales. “Somos chetines; es por eso que la oficina de un campus sumamente internacional, programas internacionales se dio a la por lo tanto, esta es una excelente tarea de traer estas, y otras atracciones oportunidad para aprender sobre internacionales a la Universidad de nuestras diferencias culturales”. Texas-Pan AmeriAunque la secana durante los mana internacional días internacionapodría ser con“ Somos un campus les del 16 al 18 de siderada una celnoviembre. ebración nacional, sumamente internacional, La semana inno todas las univerpor lo tanto es una ternacional, o sesidades la celebran, mana de educación forma parte de la excelente oportunidad internacional, es iniciativa de cada para aprender sobre el resultado de la universidad llevar iniciativa conjunta a cabo esta celnuestras diferencias del departamento ebración y el modo de estado y el dede celebrarla. culturales ”. partamento de Para los días educación de Esinternacionales tados Unidos; con 2010 en UTPA, el el propósito de celcomité de eventos ebrar la importaninternacionales cia y los beneficios estableció como que ofrece la edutema “logrando la Yvonne Quintanilla cación internaciopaz mundial”. Programas Internacionales nal en EU y alre“El año pasado dedor del mundo. lo mas relevante Con el propósito era el seguro de promover conciencia internacional médico, por lo tanto, el tema del y multicultural, tanto en la universidad año pasado estaba relacionado con como en la comunidad; la oficina de medicina y cuestiones de salud programas internacionales ofrece y sociales”, explicó Quintanilla, programas que incluyen estudios “Esta año lo mas relevante es la en el extranjero, intercambios guerra y temas relacionados con académicos, eventos internacionales, inmigración, por eso escogimos el presentaciones y conferencias. tema ‘Alcanzando la Paz Mundial’”. Por Yngrid Fuentes The Pan American

“El tema es muy general, y lo dejamos así deliberadamente para que profesores y presentadores hablen de todas las posibilidades bajo esta ‘sombrilla’; vamos a tener discuciones sobre derechos humanos, justicia social, los cuerpos de paz, y debates sobre paz y guerra”. Como invitado especial, Días Internacionales recibe al General de División Alfred Valenzuela. “Valenzuela es considerado uno de los 100 hispanos mas influyentes en la nación, el ayuda con el entierro de sus soldados y le da reconocimiento a nuestros imigrantes”, comentó Quintanilla. “Escribió un libro sobre los inmigrantes que se enlistaron para obtener ciudadanía, enfocándose en los que murieron y no pudieron obtenerla a pesar de haber dado sus vidas”. Quintanilla tambien explicó que Valenzuela va a estar dando autógrafos durante su visita. Algo nuevo en los Días Internacionales 2010 van a ser las presentaciones de los estudiantes. “Vamos a tener estudiantes dando presentaciones, y eso es algo bueno, es algo que no habíamos hecho antes”, explicó Quintanilla. “Yo soy profesora y siempre me gusta presumir a mis alumnos, asi que platicamos como comité y decidimos que tenemos alumnos talentosos que tienen una voz y deberíamos darles una plataforma para expresarse”. Quintanilla también comentó que los Días Internacionales solían ser una celebración de una semana, pero debido a cortes de presupuesto tuvo que ser reducido a tres días, mas, como Quintanilla dijo, “es cuestión de calidad, no cantidad, cualquiera puede dar cantidad, pero nosotros buscamos dar algo bueno”.

Los Días Internacionales van a ser celebrados martes, miércoles y jueves; el martes y jueves van a ser de presentaciones, paneles de discusión y películas, el jueves va a ser la feria de estudios en el extranjero y noche de cultura. “Este año vamos a tener bailarines de tai-chi que van a hacer bailes de espada, vamos a tener a los machetines que vienen de Sudamérica y van a presentar en sus trajes tradicionales”, dijo Quintanilla. “Otra cosa que vamos a tener es un chef marroquí, así que todos van a tener la oportunidad de comer comida marroquí”. “También estamos trabajando con las organizaciones estudiantiles, cada organización va a escoger un país y traer comida de dicho país, vamos a tener mariachi, música salsa y tambores africanos, vamos a tener un poco de todo”. Otra atracción significativa van a ser las exposiciones de arte por parte

de artistas anónimos y del museo IMAS. “Estamos trabajando con el museo internacional de McAllen y van a traer obras de Picasso”, reveló Quintanilla. “Estoy emocionada por eso, ¿cuántos estudiantes tienen la oportunidad de ver a Picasso?, no muchos, como no puedo llevar a los estudiantes a España a que vean a Picasso, traeré a Picasso a los estudiantes”. Quintanilla enfatizó que la noche cultural es totalmente informal, invitando a los estudiantes a traer una manta o cobija, sentarse en el pasto y disfrutar de la música y la comida. “Simplemente quisimos darle a los estudiantes la oportunidad de comunicarse y aprender los unos de los otros de sus culturas, a veces estamos tan ocupados en nuestras vidas que olvidamos mirarnos y decir ‘hey, no he tenido la oportunidad pero me gustaría conocerte’”.

UTPA celebra décimo aniversario del concurso tradicional de fajita

Los platillos serán degustados por 100 personas, además de un jurado encargado de seleccionar al ganador. Por Karen Velázquez The Pan American

El Consejo del Programa Universitario (UPB por sus siglas en inglés) estará celebrando por décima ocasión el concurso a la mejor fajita en el campus de la Universidad de Texas- Pan Americana el próximo 15 de Octubre en el estacionamiento lote F a las 16:00 horas. Con motivo de la semana del “espíritu escolar”, se llevará a cabo un concurso que motive a la población universitaria a unirse y convivir de manera sana. Las actividades extracurriculares, son parte esencial para el desarrollo estudiantil y son una prioridad en UTPA. “El concurso

de fajita es una actividad que ayuda rez considera que las competencias escolares ayudan a promover la cona los estudiantes a vivencia entre estu“Es muy importante que tener deseos de ser diantes y miembros del staff”, dijo Mari se realicen actividades mejores y exigirse más a sí mismos. González, miembro La competencia de Oficina para el De- como estas ya que sarrollo Estudiantil. ayudan a desestresarse se llevará a cabo únicamente en“Es muy importante que se realicen del trabajo y de la tre 16 miembros organizacioactividades como escuela y pasar un rato de nes estudiantiles, estas ya que ayuy empleados de dan a desestresarse agradable”. los departamendel trabajo y de la tos de la univerescuela y pasar un Erika Gutierrez sidad. Después de rato agradable”, Estudiante de mercadotecnia haberse inscrito en dijo Erika Gutiérla Oficina para el rez, estudiante de mercadotecnia de UTPA. Gutiér- Desarrollo Estudiantil. Los partici-

pantes se darán cita en el lote F del estacionamiento universitario a las 16:00 horas para recibir el número que indicará dónde colocarán su mesa. La fajita deberá estar terminada para las 19:30 y no se contará con tiempo extra. Las recetas gourmet no serán permitidas en este concurso, ya que una de las bases es usar únicamente ingredientes secos en la preparación de la fajita. Con esto se busca despertar la creatividad de los competidores y lograr una buena receta a partir de ingredientes básicos. Uno de los premios otorgados será el “favorito de la gente”; aproximadamente 100 personas podrán degustar los platillos y seleccionar

su favorito mediante una votación. Sin embargo, habrá una mesa de jurados que se encargará de tomar la desición final y nombrar al ganador. Así mismo, se designará un ganador para la mejor decoración de mesa. Todas las mesas deberán haber sido decoradas para las 19:00 horas, y deberán ser alusivas al tema “espíritu escolar”. La mesa ganadora será la más creativa, mejor relacionada al tema, y en general deberá contar con una buena presentación, además de limpieza. “Esperamos que acudan a la competencia a disfrutar de una buena cena y se animen a participar en las diversas actividades que existen dentro del campus”, finalizó González


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October 14, 2010

Vijayaragavan’s back on track

With the help of teammates and coach, the India native picks up momentum after a slow start and will play the second round of a professional tourney today. ers of all socioeconomic backgrounds. Hopker, who made it to the second round, and Cirilo, who lost in the first, were backing Vijayaragavan to make UTPA’s No. 1 male tennis player, sure he stayed motivated until they Aswin Vijayaragavan, stands alone in had to go back to Edinburg to return to Austin as he prepares for the second school Tuesday. That same day, Vijayaragavan round of the main draw at the Roger Beasley Volco 2010 Hill Country earned his fourth consecutive win in the tournament after beginning Classic that will begin Thursday. But not really. The senior has had the season with losses at the Baylor the support of his teammates, who Invitational and the D’Novo/ITA have stayed alert of every move the Championships. The senior mentioned that winning India native has made since he started is something that he needed in order playing at the tournament Saturday. to regain confi“They were dence and get back cheering for me the entire time,” “Iʼll play my best and if on track. “I was pretVijayaragavan ty disappointed said. “The ones they play better than me Iʼll with the way I at home kept was playing, my texting me; that congratulate them, if not Iʼll coach and teamjust shows how mates kept telling much they care send them home.” me that it was all and how much in me,” he said. bonding we “Without them it have come to. I Aswin Vijayaragavan would be impossipromise I won’t Senior ble. It’s the entire let them down.” team’s success.” His teamVijayaragavan mates stayed in contact with him and head coach defeated the University of Texas’ Alex Chris Taylor; they were supporting Hilliard 6-0, 7-5 to advance to the sectheir friend and asking the coach ond round of the main draw that will for updates on each of his matches be played Thursday. The journey at the Pro Classic befor the event. Only Vijayaragavan, Ricardo Hopkins and Victor Cirilo gan Saturday when Vijayaragavan won a 6-3, 6-2 decision against Brazilattended the Hill Country Classic. The professional tournament gath- ian Clayton Almeida. He then defeated ers 96 professional players from all American Austin Gonzales in three around the world at the Polo and Ten- sets the following day and continued nis Club located in Austin. It’s part of to beat David Holliner, also an Ameria series of professional events held can, Monday. “This tournament is very importhroughout the United States that offer money and ATP points for partici- tant, it’s a professional tournament and I needed a big confidence boostpant players. The tournament benefits Academic er,” Vijayaragavan admitted. “I’ve Excellence for the Student Athlete, a beaten good guys and it makes me nonprofit school for elite junior play- feel very happy.”

By Sara Hernandez The Pan American

Taylor explained that having Vijayaragavan competing against highly ranked players at prestigious tournaments like the Hill Country Classic brings a positive factor for both the player and the team. “This is important in a couple of levels,” Taylor said. “ For him, because he had a couple of losses early in the season… to go out there and get four wins at ATP play is a big deal, it’s a great achievement, and at the team level it’s great for the program to have qualifying players in these kind of events.” Teammate and roommate Beau Bernstein, who participated with Vijayaragavan at the D’Novo/ITA Championships Oct. 2, said that the team is proud of the way their teammate has improved lately, putting UTPA’s name high at the Hill Country Classic. “Aswin is representing the team exceptionally well right now. He has picked up his game to another level since last year and his hard work is evident,” he said. “We are all excited to have Aswin as our teammate.” From a draw of 64 players, eight made it to the main competition, where 32 top competitors contend for a $1,500 prize. Six of the eight qualifiers are nationally ranked. Vijayaragavan and Derek Difazio are the only two nonranked players. In 2008, Vijayaragavan lost at the Texas Invitational in three rounds against No. 7 Dmitri Kutrovsky from Texas. At the possibility of competing against a nationally ranked player again, as he will face the winner between Matthew Short and No. 5 Jordan Cox, Vijayaragavan said that now that his attitude has changed from the first matches of the season, when he felt great pressure to perform well and it kept him from playing the way he expected.

Daniel Flores/THE PAN AMERICAN

IN STYLE - Senior Aswin Vijayaragavan will keep receiving the support of his teammates and coach when he plays in the second round of the Hill Country Classic Thursday. Now he’s focused on enjoying what he likes doing most and letting things evolve the way they’re meant to. “I know I have to believe in myself, do what I’ve been doing,” he said. “I

have to have fun, that’s what’s going to give me success. I’ll see what happens. I’ll play my best and if they play better than me I’ll congratulate them, if not I’ll send them home.”

Aswin’s history at UTPA

Named Second Team All-Southland

Advanced to No. 60 ITA/ 10th in South Central Region

2009 Southland All-Academic Team

2009 Southland Conference Player of the Year

Made qualifying round at ITF Touney in Iran

2010

Played No. 7 nationally ranked Dmitri Kutrovsky; lost in two sets.

2009

Migrated to the U.S. to be part of UTPA Tennis

2008

2002

Became No. 1 player in India

Wins four at Hill Country Pro Classic in Austin


Golf teams step it up

October 14, 2010

By Astrid Villegas The Pan American

Alma E. Hernandez/THE PAN AMERICAN

YOUNG LEADER - Sophomore Kevin Kirakossian is expected to be one of the leaders in the team; he and Brandon Reynan, also a sophomore, are the most experienced Broncs.

Coach Ofelia Lopez was all over the place Monday and Tuesday when the men’s and women’s UTPA golf team competed in Huntsville for the Sam Houston State Harold Funston Classic. Even though the men and women competed on different courses, Lopez was able to coach both teams during their playoff rounds. The Lady Broncs finished the twoday event in third place shooting a tournament best of 314 in the last round and a total of 952. The men team shot 305 in each of the first two rounds of the tournament for a final score of 906 that placed 13th. “I am proud of them but I know we could do so much better… they shot pretty consistent and they worked hard which it showed,” said the men’s and women’s director. “There were no injuries and no troubles out in the course,” Lopez said. “I also had no conflict and I was there to coach both teams.” On Monday the men struggled and had mistakes that placed them 14th after the first two rounds of the tournament. “We made a couple of errors around the green and also a

Volleyball back in trouble, opens Field House today By Dionicio “Nune” Rodriguez The Pan American A bye week usually comes in handy for sport teams. The Dallas Cowboys came into the week with a 5-0 record in games following an off week, but did not extend that perfect mark, losing to the Tennessee Titans. The Bronc volleyball team suffered a similar fate last weekend, taking 12 days off and then going down to a formidable opponent in the University of South Dakota. Much like the Cowboy game this weekend, the Broncs fought hard and swapped the lead and momentum with the Coyotes, but were not able to pull through in the end. The final was 26-24, 25-17, 25-18, dropping UTPA to 2-2 in conference play and 6-14 overall. The Broncs had been riding a recent high with three wins in a row behind Offensive Player of The Week and outside hitter Marci Logan. They did not compete at that level against USD, though. “We were simply outplayed,” Laredo native Arian Bermea said. “I believe that we were a better team but they came out and played to win.” Senior Logan led the Broncs with eight kills, a slight dropoff from the last game against Chicago State where

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she recorded 10. Corpus Christi native unit’s best friend as it gets ready to deMeghan Fichtel also recorded eight kills, but the newly remodeled UTPA Field House against Utah Valley State. All followed by Ijanae Holman with seven. “We put up 70 digs in three sets 2010 home games for the Broncs have but our offense did not show up, and been held in the Wellness and Recreation Sports Complex due to renovawe struggled never making adtions, and everyone is eager justments and producto get back on the court ing several unforced to baptize a new home errors,” Head with a win today Coach Angela against Utah Valley Hubbard said. University. “We scouted UTPA vs. Utah Valley “This makes the Dakotas Oct. 14 us want to come well and knew 7 p.m. back and get-erexactly what done,” exclaimed they were goUTPA Field House Rita Gonzales, the ing to do and senior setter from what we needed Phoenix. “It doesn’t to do to be suchelp that we have to praccessful against them. tice on a court that we won’t When it came match time play on anymore, but we’ll go twice we did not execute what we knew.” Some would argue that the time off as hard this week in practice and get took the edge off the Bronc charge, but ready for this next game against Utah the team isn’t making any excuses for Valley University.” At 2-2, the Broncs have some the outcome. “We just need to work on adjust- ground to make up in the Great West ing a little faster to different teams,” Conference. The slack period is over sophomore outside hitter Holman ex- and it’s time to advance. The women plained. “Lack of communication also feel they are up to the challenge. “We’ll finally be able to play in played a big role against this weekend. Having a week off had nothing to do the UTPA Field House,” Bermea said. “We want to use that incentive to show with us losing.” Short-term memory will be the just how talented this team can be.”

couple of pot holes,” Lopez said, Lopez, they will be practicing eight “Overall the guys enjoyed it and hours a week. “We are going to use our prachad fun, this is the stepping-stone tices in advantage to prepare when into the spring.” Things went better for the Lady we come out in the spring,” Lopez said. “They are Broncs; they going to need to had junior continue to preMajo Camey “ I am proud of them but pare themselves end in sevmentally and enth place I know we could do so much physically.” and lead the The Broncs, team with a better… they shot pretty who still have score of 227. two tournaments A l s o , consistent and they worked to go this semesHaley Hocott ter, boast Kevin and Samantha hard which it showed.” Kirakossian and Garcia shot Brandon Reyna an 82 to finish as the most extied in 24th with a threeperienced players round score Ofelia Lopez and team leaders. of 250. “Kevin and Golf director This tourBrandon won last nament marks year’s conference the conclusion of the fall season for and they continue to step up in the the women’s program. season to take those leadership roles,” “I had a good semester and feel Lopez said. very confident,” Camey said. “We still This weekend the Broncs team have to keep working with our team to travels to San Antonio for the Lone be better next semester.” Star Invitational before heading to Once both squads are done with Missouri City for the HBU Husky their fall season they will continue to Invitational; the Lady Broncs will rehave practices and get ready for the sume practice and wait for the spring spring semester, when, according to season’s start, Feb. 13 in Victoria.

MIDNIGHT MADNESS

FRIDAY @ UTPA FIELD HOUSE Tailgate and burning of the letters starts 7 p.m. Midnight Madness - 9:15 p.m.

WRSC SCHEDULE WRSC FLAG-FOOTBALL ALL-STAR GAMES Oct. 14 • 5-8 p.m. • WRSC Intramural Field HOME

VISITOR

TIME

Back that Pass Up All Day Rx Stunnas Raptors plan B

We Run It The Punishers Mustangs Wracking Crew Gators

5 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 p.m. 9 p.m.

SPIRIT WEEK 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT Oct. 15 Final rounds will be held at the Field House in conjunction with Midnight Madness

ALL-TERRAIN VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT Saturday, Oct. 23 • 10 a.m. Games will be played on grass, sand and hardcourt. Entry Fee: $20 First 20 Co-Rec teams will be accepted

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE WRSC Flag-Football story and photo gallery


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THE PAN AMERICAN

October 14, 2010


October 14, 2010