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Volume 67, No. 3

Mexico observes 200th birthday SPECIAL DIESCISÉIS DE SEPTIEMBRE EDITION

September 16, 2010

More details about 1810 independence

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Video:

Student Union Diesciséis de Septiembre Fiesta on panamericanonline.com

Civil rights progress Lady Broncs in Mexico despite increase violence expectations Commentary by Lupe Flores

Page 11 Page Commentary: 2 - Big business might have packed their bags, but A&L they never leftEditor

Despite a harsh beginning, UTPA volleyball looks to start conference with a clean slate.

Page 3 town - Jobs after Page 11 -Symphony Holiday gift guide Valley Parking hall graduation becoming scarce Orchestra opens at UTPA meetings stir response

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ELI:14La escuela para Page - Q&A with volleyball player Rebecca Toddy ayudar a cumplir el sueño americano

Are you ready for fantasy football?


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September 16, 2010 Vol. 67, No. 3

Commentary

Sometimes total control in life can be overrated

“Kilgore Trout once wrote a short story which was a dialogue between two pieces of yeast. They were Benny Salinas discussing the A&L Editor possible purposes of life as they ate sugar and suffocated in their own excrement. Because of their limited intelligence, they never came close to guessing that they were making champagne.” Somewhere in Kurt Vonnegut’s rambling and sometimes nonsensical novel “Breakfast of Champions” is

a deep desire to recapture identity. The characters in the novel feel they are slowly losing their identity to a consistently mechanized and commercialized environment. Two months from turning 20, I’ve been thinking about this a lot. I’ve always complained about how futile it seems to live constantly in preparation for the next stage in your life (i.e. work hard in high school to get into a good school to get a good job to feed your family to retire well to not leave your kids debt). And while I’ve always been a proponent of experiencing for the sake of experiencing, I stood firm in the belief that you should at least have a say about purpose, some big-

picture ideal that guides actions. I’m beginning to have my doubts. While free will seems self-evident (I’ve never believed in destiny or an all-seeing creator moving us whichever which way his or her whims take us), the idea of forcing a self-determined purpose seems absurd. It seems like a negation of yourself and a loss of identity. We spend so much time clinging desperately to the steering wheel that life’s curves turn into obstacles instead of just the natural progression of life. I know this sounds like some stoned slacker philosophy (puff puff, exhale “Just live your life man” passes the bong to the left). But it’s not that simple. By forcing our wills on life

we’re left with an unnatural version of ourselves, an inorganic version of life. One can make the argument that passivity gets a person nowhere. Surely taking action against wrongs and ethical mistakes is appropriate and expected of a decent human being. But the notion that one needs to “grab life by the balls” and control destiny in order to ensure financial stability or happiness is misguided. Grabbing anything by the balls is almost never a good idea, and in life’s case just leaves you trying to grab a massive boulder with bare hands. Call me naïve but I like thinking the universe drops good people off at nice stops. The surprises are inevitable but that’s kind of the beauty.

Re: Article, “Fears Intensify as Border Violence Escalates,” August 5, 2010. This University’s name, our mission, our unique geographical and cultural nature, all justify a focus on Mexico. However, I was disappointed with the front page article alleging “intensification” of violence coming from Mexico. Why join the chorus of negative Mexico-bashers? Why invent a front page “graphic” map of Mexico, replete with large scale words such as “RAPE,” DEATH,” “TERROR?”

1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 Phone: (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the paper or university.

EDITOR IN CHIEF: Kristen Cabrera kmcabrera22@gmail.com NEWS EDITOR: Roxann Garcia roxx.gar11@gmail.com ONLINE/SPANISH EDITOR: Denisse Salinas dns_145@hotmail.com ARTS & LIFE EDITOR: Benny Salinas 9_benny_9@live.com

Letter to the Editor To the editor:

THE PAN AMERICAN

Why no verifiable sources, save concerned students’ disturbing personal stories? Why no consultation with experts on Mexico here at the University –professors in History, Criminal Justice, Sociology or Political Science? One could simply “Google,” check sources, most indicating there is little to no “bleed over” on this side of the border. One should not creditserving, alarmist statements by Gov Perry, in the midst of a campaign or those by Gov. Brewer of Arizona, in the midst of a lawsuit. One major source, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection Report,

indicates the “U.S.-Mexican border is safer than other parts of the country.” (Rio Grande Guardian, June 7, 2010). Main stream media report low U.S. border violence. On the Mexican side, the situation is, indeed, grim; our students from Mexico have legitimate concerns. But how does spreading hysteria by parroting Fox TV-like statements of fear and loathing help the situation? For a university newspaper there is not even the Rupert/Murdoch/Fox motive of advertising revenue to explain sensationalism. Are students not taught to avoid “yellow journalism?”

A university newspaper should be more universal, responsible and thoughtful. We owe it to our neighbors, to improved relations between our two great countries – the U.S. and Mexico. We need them; they need us. Let’s not give in to hyperbole (“the country is under siege”) or apolitical dreams (“pray for a miracle”). We need to focus on substantiated facts and realistic proposals, rather than histrionics. Dr. Gary Mounce

SPORTS EDITOR: Sara Hernandez shernandez261@gmail.com PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR: Alma E. Hernandez alma.e.hdz@gmail.com SENIOR DESIGNER: Jennifer Tate jen489@gmail.com DESIGNERS: Alexis Carranza alexis091@aol.com Ashlynn Biel ashlynn.biel@gmail.com ADVISER: Dr. Greg Selber selberg@utpa.edu ADMINISTRATIVE ASSOCIATE: Anita Reyes areyes18@utpa.edu ADVERTISING MANAGER: Mariel Cantu spubs@utpa.edu WEBMASTER: Jose Villarreal josemvillarrealcs@gmail.com

Delivery

Thursday at noon Letters to the Editor

Elias Moran/THE PAN AMERICAN

The Pan American accepts letters of 300 words or less from students, staff and faculty regarding recent newspaper content, campus concerns or current events. We reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. We cannot publish anonymous letters or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Please send all story ideas to thepanamerican@gmail.com. Individuals with disabilities wishing to acquire this publication in an alternative format or needing assistance to attend any event listed can contact The Pan American for more details.


September 16, 2010

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Town hall meetings elicit responses By Roxann Garcia The Pan American Soon after the week’s second townhall meeting was adjourned Friday, different segments of the university began to mingle about continuing discussion of the ongoing parking situation on the west side of campus. A range of concerns had been expressed at the meeting, as faculty and students weighed in about the switch from reserved to resident parking early in August. The faculty of the College of Arts and Humanities has been circulating a petition protesting the change and been active on e-mail brainstorming about solution. Students in the dorms, who got the good end of the stick, have largely been in favor of the decision. After two meetings last week to discuss the issue, the administration is working to smooth all concerns out and move forward. Marty Baylor, VP of business affairs, is new to the university ballpark and couldn’t have been greeted with a bigger problem to start with. But the Illinois native says parking is a concern at every university. “I think it’s a good dialogue and

a great first step,” said Baylor, who replaced James Langabeer at the start of August. “This is something every university deals with and it’s not something that can’t be improved. I just think the most important thing is to include everyone in the decisionmaking process.” UTPA Police Chief Chief Roger Stearns agreed with Baylor, saying that the meeting was a step forward in informing the university community better about the changes and benefits that could arise from the recent decisions. He continued via e-mail, noting the goal of the meeting, the second in four days on what has been the hottest campus topic of the new semester so far, was to inform and increase understanding of the issues at hand. “How well the gathering went is going to differ among individuals based on their perspective but I hope that they can appreciate the efforts of the students, faculty, staff and committee as well as our campus partners,” Stearns said. “Everyone who is involved is working with sincerity to ease the parking and traffic

SEE PARKING || PAGE 7

Andrew Sanchez/THE PAN AMERICAN

TOWN HALL - UTPA Police Chief Roger Stearns speaks with students immediately following the town hall meeting Friday in the Student Union Theatre to address parking lots B and B-1.

CPS group sessions facilitating war therapy Collaboration with Veteran Service Center seeks healing for UTPA’s battle families By Pamela Morales The Pan American

Nine years ago, the U.S. war against terrorism began and hundreds of thousands of fathers, mothers, siblings, children and close family relatives have served. The anniversary of 9-11 passed last week but the ramifications of the conflict are being felt every day. Over 5,000 families have witnessed the heartbreak of seeing a loved one return in a coffin, 32 groups from the Valley alone. Some would say it’s an honor to die for one’s country, while others might ask, “Is this war really worth the loss of my loved one?” Regardless of politics, the difficulty in comprehending such a loss is a reality for many. With over 600 veterans enrolled at the University, soldiers and their families have become a priority for the new Veteran Services Center and the Counseling and Psychological Services. “We looked into the needs for veterans,” said Andres Tapia, a clinical therapist with Counseling and Psychological Services. “And what ways we could better assist and help out; not only veterans but everything that touches veterans. One of the things we learned is that when a veteran serves, it’s not just the veteran that

serves, it’s the entire family.” Last semester the Service Center cranked up its operation to facilitate academic success for veterans on campus and the newest innovation involves Counseling and Psychological Services in collaboration with Tropical Texas Behavioral Health Clinic. The groups have created a monthly meeting group called Warrior Families. So far, there have been two meetings since July and the fruits of the labor have been mainly consciousness-raising so far. Tapia said he and his people have tried to adjust to the mood and current concerns of the families in attendance. “We always need to be aware of what needs are out there and address those needs,” Tapia said. “I think it’s very relevant right now. I think it’s going to be for the long haul because I don’t see combat operations necessarily stopping soon. There is no time frame. And for whatever reason we need to modify the group or bring about new groups or add other things, we will.” The group sessions are not only for UTPA students but also for anyone wanting to learn how to cope with the deployment of family members including in-laws. One of the most common difficulties for most families is when a husband deploys, leaving his wife to take the roles

of mother and father, breadwinner and housewife. Sometimes the return of a veteran changes the relationship causing a ripple effect on the family. The group meetings will consist of discussing what problems a family member or the whole family find difficult; the search is for middle ground and to have families connect and realize they are not the only ones going through a difficult time. Participants are to help each other exchange ideas and suggestions of how to cope. Although Tapia said the group has no end date, Anna Castillo, veteran adjustment specialist at Tropical Texas Behavioral Health Clinic, says otherwise due to a grant given by the state legislation only to the behavioral health clinic. “The grant basically is partnering with five community partners and of course, the university is one of them,” said Castillo. “I spoke with Andres and we came up with this family support group.” UTPA and Tropical Texas Behavioral Health Clinic are among five community partners that have banded together that created a group session concerning families. “The need appears geared towards families. That is something that

SEE WARRIOR || PAGE 7

Roxann Garcia/THE PAN AMERICAN

IN SESSION - Counseling and Psychological Services has teamed up with the Veteran Services Center to ease the process in dealing with the loss of a loved one. Andres Tapia (pictured), a clinical therapist for CPS, is at the forefront for the group.


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September 16, 2010

NEWS

Expanded Early Warning System to help students keep pace by the Division of Academic Affairs in 2000 and is currently selffunded and overseen by Ana Maria What worked well for newcomers Rodriguez, interim provost. “What we focus on in this program on campus is now being applied to those who have been here for is fifty percent academic advisement fifty percent retention years. The University Retention and Advisement Program has made some initiatives,” Lopez said. “As far as changes to its Early Warning System our advisement we really advise junior and senior students in specific advisement program. calculations. Marta Lopez, 49, the director for URAP, “ Based on research nation Within notes that the program wide, it has been found r e t e n t i o n component of has expanded in the last year to include academic advisement is it, when the program was advisement for one of the strongest tools created, a lot students and faculty involved in upper in helping students feel of the program was targeted level classes. that they belong within towards first“The Early year retention.” Warning System is an the institution. ” The System intervention program operates on a where faculties are Marta Lopez c a m p u s - w i d e able to notify students URAP scale, servicing in case any issues advisers for all arise with their class departments. performance,” Lopez “The student development stated. “At this point it is available to all faculty teaching undergraduate specialists are assigned to each of courses, so it can be from English the seven colleges,” Lopez said. “And they are the ones that are the 1301 up to a 400 level course.” The program was first established front line people that will work with the students. They do the advisement By Belinda Munoz The Pan American

for our advisement component.” The program has been helpful for first-year students as they begin the transition to college curriculum, and second-year students as they ask questions and seek a role at the university. Retention rates were in the 50s in 2001-2002 and rose to 67% in later years. Recently the new rate has been recorded as 72%. “Based on research nationwide, it has been found that academic advisement is one of the strongest tools in helping students feel that they belong within the institution,” Lopez stated. “The first year here, it’s really about adapting to the university. The second year is different because they have already been at the university, they already know what to expect. They are being faced with questions as far as, is this really the program that is right for me.” The EWS helps increase retention university is by monitoring student’s grades during the semester. “Since we don’t have mid-term grades at UTPA, a lot of students really don’t keep up with how they are doing in their classes,” Lopez explained. “It’s a way of letting the

students know between the first and the middle of the semester how their progress is going. If it’s not going the way they think, then they still have time to improve and make the changes needed to pass the course.” In order to let students know about their current grade status, members of the advisement program ask faculty to generate student reports online, to be viewed by each departmental adviser. Students can learn more about their grades by meeting with any advisor from their designated department of study or by visiting an advisor from the University Retention Advisement Program, who are located in Southwick Hall. According to Lopez, the University Retention Advisement Program is greatly indebted to professors who initially supply the program with the each student’s academic status. “This division is faculty-led. It’s a collaborative effort between advisers and faculty and basically we need the faculty to begin the process,” Lopez insisted. “They are the ones that really know how the student is doing in the classroom.” Once student reports have been completed online, professors can

send academic notifications to individuals in need of support, through Bronc mail. The e-mails encourage the student to see an adviser, though it is not mandated. According to Lopez, a student can struggle for many reasons, such as poor study skills or not seeking extra tutoring for challenging subjects. Once an adviser pinpoints the problem, it is common for a determined student to bounce back. “We found that a lot of students ended up passing the course just by having someone say, ‘This is what you need to do to pass this particular course,’” Lopez said.

Contact: University Retention Advisement Program

Marta Lopez 956-665-7126 mlopez@utpa.edu

Hanging in there:

UTPA graduate Guillen took advantage of tuition waiver to overcome obstacles and find success By Alejandra Martinez The Pan American When Harlingen native Deborah Guillen moved to Edinburg in 2003 to attend The University of TexasPan American, she was convinced she wanted to pursue a career in nursing. But after two years she came to realize that it wasn’t the right path, and thus decided to switch to social studies composite, in which she graduated last month. As a Harlingen High graduate, Guillen thought about attending the University of Texas at Austin but decided the cost was too high and chose UTPA; there she could move in with her sister, already a student here. However after two years, Guillen was forced to quit her studies due to financial issues. “I was really nervous. I applied for financial aid and didn’t get it. I applied for scholarships and didn’t get them,” the 25-year-old recalled. During her time off she worked for the University Bookstore and in 2007 became an accounting technician for the Office of Accounts Payable on campus, a job she currently holds. “I had started working full time and I had just gotten married so I

didn’t qualify for financial aid,” she said. “And trying to go to school full time was not an option.” It wasn’t until summer 2008 that she resumed studies at the university, with help from the Employee Educational Benefit Program, a tuition waver offered to people who have been employed by the university for a year. The waiver offers tuition assistance for a total of six hours per fiscal year. Still, for Guillen, it wasn’t enough to enable her to stay in school, so in 2009 she applied for the Angel Investor Program. This is a scholarship available to employees that have been working full time for two years, funded by UTPA faculty and staff whose donations provide financial assistance to the staff that serve students. “It’s really helpful because the only other option for staff is the Employee Educational Benefit Program, but it’s a first-come, firstserve basis, and it’s a limited amount they cover,” Guillen said. After her return to school, Guillen decided nursing was not it. She started taking courses in history and economics and took a liking to them. “My second semester I was part of the History Club, I knew I liked

history, I had always liked it,” Guillen recalled. “But the more I got involved with other people, with the professors and the department and just seeing their passion for it…it helped me see that maybe nursing wasn’t the only option for me, maybe there’s something else.” Although she enjoys her work as accounting technician, Guillen says that one of the things she’d most like to do is teach. She is also considering pursuing a government position to apply the knowledge from her major. She says that whatever she decides to do, she’d like to remain in the Valley, especially Edinburg, which is now her new home. Guillen takes pride in having done everything she could to finish college. Working full time and going to school part time wasn’t easy, she says, especially after being away for two years. “The most challenging part is trying to readjust and finding that balance between studying, coming to classes, and work and still having a little bit of time for yourself,” she said. Guillen and her husband of three years currently live in Edinburg and they commute on bicycle to and from work every day.

Tammy Ayala / THE PAN AMERICAN

HAPPY GRAD - Harlingen native Deborah Guillen persevered through many obstacles and eventually earned a degree from UTPA.


September 16, 2010

NEWS

Page 7

PARKING

continued from Page 3

Andrew Sanchez/THE PAN AMERICAN

TOWN HALL - Close to 100 students, faculty and staff gathered last Friday in the SU to discuss the recent parking situation which affected faculty, staff and students on campus.

ACTION RECAP The dynamic meeting took place at the Student Union Theatre as seats were filled even before the gathering began. Big names along with general parking students and residents walked into the theater to voice their concerns.

In a crowd close to a hundred Parking Manager Melissa Sandoval and Chief Stearns led into the discussion. A slideshow was displayed prior to the open forum, listing reasons as to why the Parking and Traffic Committee decided to redistribute lot B to residents only, moving faculty over one to lot B-1 in front of the University Center. The decision resulted in the loss of one space bringing the 145 count to 144 parking spaces. “What used to be lot J was taken up by Unity Hall when it was built a few years back,” Sandoval said during the meeting. “Soon after, they received their parking but other dormitories still had not.”

Andres and I talked about. Apparently every veteran has Post Traumatic to my understanding is that he has a Stress, but these kinds of group group with the veterans. And part sessions, what it does is allows any of this grant, if veteran to be able something already to express their is in place, great feelings or . . . but if there is understand what something that they’re going “We always need to aware through or be able we can initiate, which I saw as of what needs are out there to communicate an opportunity about anything.” and address those needs. ” to do so at the According to university, I did.” the Associated Press, research Noel Ysasi, has revealed manager for the that many Veteran Services veterans become Center, said Andres Tapia correctional and that although Clinical Therapist police officers. the center is not In a report last entirely involved year, it estimated with the group meetings, the events are a step in the an annual suicide rate of 34.8 per right direction for the University as 100,000 for correctional officers in the state of New Jersey, based on a whole. “We need to work with veterans,” suicides from 2003 to 2007. The Ysasi said. “It’s stereotypical that rate was 15.1 per 100,000 for New

Jersey police officers and about 14 per 100,000 people for all New Jersey males between the ages of 25 and 64. The suicide rate for military members is higher than for the civilian population, and reached an all-time high last year. Ysasi also stressed that the existence of group sessions is a sign that many individuals are becoming aware of veteran needs. “I think awareness has come about amongst everybody, society, the university,” he suggested. “There’s a sense of awareness that there’s a need to work with veterans . . . I think, it’s important that the awareness has hit everybody for the most part . . .we’re educating ourselves of veterans.” The meetings are held on the Tuesday of the month in Room 307 in the University Center at 6 p.m. For further information, call Counseling and Psychological Services at (956) 665-2574.

difficulties facing our campus.” One individual who wasn’t in attendance at the meeting but did comment on the situation was President Robert Nelsen. The president was away on a business trip in Washington D.C. Nelsen admits that just like everyone else he is concerned with the parking situation at the university and notes that changes must be made. He admits that there was a lack of communication regarding the recent events. “We are instituting procedures for a better flow of communication in the future and I’m pleased with the recent

forum,” he said. “It is a good step but we must work on becoming proactive.” The president notes that at the current time the university lacks the funding required to add more parking, but that he is looking forward to working with Baylor and the committee to see what can be done.

WARRIOR

continued from Page 3

The parking manager explained during the presentation that 667 residents live on campus with 283 parking spaces available to them. Of the 667 there are 558 that hold a parking permit. With the recent decision the number was bumped up to 428. In the spring a survey was taken of residents through Assist regarding parking on campus. The majority yearned for closer access and complained about the parking influx that seems to overcome lot B-1 that they previously shared with general parking holders. This was evident during the meeting as a petition to keep the spaces circulated a crowd of residents on one side of the theater. Elizabeth Ramos, a nursing student from Harlingen, was at the forefront for the petition making sure it was passed through student to student. Once the floor was open for questions the line began to stretch with faculty, staff and students eager to share opinions among the crowd. Several residents were concerned with the idea of sharing the lot with faculty; instead some mentioned possibly sharing with general parking on lot B-1. “We’ve all agreed in sharing the lot with general parking holders since they are the ones who lost the spaces,” Ramos said. “We don’t think it’s fair that faculty are fighting over spaces that didn’t belong to them in the first space; they didn’t lose any spaces.” Faculty members, on the other hand, expressed discontent with the lack of communication between the committee and the university community, and complained about having been booted out of their spaces. “Is there any way in knowing whether it is residents who use the

designated lot or if say other dormitories are parking there as well?” Kristine Wirts, chair of the COAS College Council asked during the meeting. Sandoval noted that residents at all dormitories are encouraged to use the specific lot or other designated lots. “We are hoping that residents living in those dormitories take advantage of those parking spaces because there is no more room for overflow parking in the overflow parking lots,” she said. “But from what we can see so far, the lots have not been utilized to the full effect.” Wirts continued to inquire whether the committee would be interested in designating parking lots C and C-1, located in front of the Social and Behavioral Sciences building, as a residential and general parking lot. She said that some 200 faculty members have been displaced from their college. Other concerns were from students about parking in general. One noted that he didn’t find out about the decision from the committee but by word of mouth. Joe Caraveo also asked specifically about general students. “I’m one of the 18,000 students who found out about this change after the decision was made,” he said. “What about the other students? What about general parking students and the needs of these students?” Lot counts are being made right now to see if residents are utilizing the spaces. A decision to designate added parking from lot B to faculty will be made at the end of this week. A possible 40 to 50 spaces are in question. The Police Department is expected to be observing traffic and counting cars for the next month at least.


THE PAN AMERICAN

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September 16, 2010

Celebrando el Bicentenario Mexicano

1.

de un nopal, la cual es resaltada por los colores verde, blanco y rojo, que simbolizan la esperanza de un mejor futuro, la unidad del pueblo y la sangre derramada por los héroes nacionales. Otro emblema irrenunciable de nuestra mexicanidad, es el Himno Nacional Mexicano, el cual mezcla religión con fuertes amenazas sangrientas a quiénes atenten contra la soberanía de la nación. Estas líricas guerreras surgen en el año de 1853, cuando Antonio López de Santa Anna lanza una convocatoria con el fin de encontrar un canto patriótico. Francisco González Bocanegra resulta el poeta ganador, y Jaime Nunó, un músico catalán, fue el encargado de componer la música. El Himno Nacional se cantó por primera vez el 15 de septiembre de 1854, en el Teatro Santa Anna. Este año, los mexicanos celebran las fechas que marcaron el inicio del progreso y continúan en la búsqueda de una mejor nación. A pesar de la violencia existente en el país, producto del crimen organizado, el pueblo de México siempre conserva la esperanza y celebra con gran júbilo las fiestas patrias.

Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla: También conocido como Padre de la Patria por comenzar el movimiento por la Independencia de México.

2.

José María Morelos y Pavón: Se unió a la inserrucción de Hidalgo y tras su muerte, tomó las fuerzas insurgentes.

3.

Juan Aldama: Insurgente mexicano participe en laIndependencia y fue fusilado junto con Allende, Jiménez y Santa Maria.

4.

Josefa Ortíz de Domínguez : “La Corregidora”, puso bajo aviso a los líderes del movimiento de Independencia tras haber sido descubiertos

5.

Vicente Guerrero: Asumió responsabilidades de mando a las órdenes de Morelos después de unirse al movimiento para independizar a México.

2 Junta conspiratoria de México para establecer un gobierno independiente.

5 de agosto de 1808

Se descubre la conspiación de Valladolid que buscaba lograr independizarce.

20 de diciembre de 1809

Grito de Dolores que inicia el levantamiento encabezado por el cura Miguel Hidalgo.

16 de septiembre de 1810

Miguel Hidalgo es fusilado y decapitado en Chihuahua.

30 de julio de 1811

Se promulga en Apatzingán Decreto constitucional para la libertad de la America Mexicana.

22 de octubre de 1814

Morelos es fusilado en San Cristóbal Ecatepec.

22 de diciembre de 1815

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Mini-biografías sobre los héroes de la Independencia:

Historia por Denisse Salinas y Karen Velásquez • Diseño por Jennifer Tate

Según la leyenda, a 130 años de la Mariano Abasolo. creación del Quinto Sol - mito náhuatl Debido a que el pueblo era un fiel que expone la creación del mundo seguidor de la iglesia, es que Hidalgo, el actual - Huitzilopochtli, dios azteca Padre de la Patria, fue puesto al mando del sol y la guerra, ordenó a su tribu de la revuelta ya que los insurgentes comenzar el peregrinaje en busca de un sabían que era la mejor manera de lograr lugar llamado Tenochtitlan. que el pueblo se levantara Los aztecas junto con en armas y luchara por su siete tribus nahuatlacas “ Sin importar el tamaño libertad. salieron de Chicomostoc, de la ciudad o pueblo en Los insurgentes actualmente Zacatecas, con donde nacen los hombres planeaban comenzar la idea de encontrar la tierra o mujeres, ellos son el movimiento de prometida. Sabrían que independencia en finamente del tamaño de habían llegado al encontrar Octubre, pero debido un nopal sobre una roca y su obra, del tamaño de su a que sus intenciones sobre él un águila devorando voluntad de engrandecer fueron denunciadas a las una serpiente. De acuerdo a y enriquecer a sus autoridades, tuvieron que Gutierre Tibón, investigador hermanos.” adelantar la insurrección italiano – mexicano (1905 para la madrugada del 16 Ignacio Allende -1999), el águila devorando de septiembre de 1810. Militar a la serpiente en el lago Es así como Hidalgo simboliza el lugar final del ejecuta el tan famoso Grito éxodo azteca. de Dolores, al hacer un El pueblo del Sol se fundó para llamado al pueblo para desconocer a la más tarde convertirse en una colonia autoridad virreinal tañendo la campana española y finalmente, en una nación de la parroquia de Dolores, Guanajuato y independiente y a principios de 1798, gritando “¡Viva la Virgen de Guadalupe!, cuando, inconformes con la desigualdad ¡Viva la América española!, ¡Viva social de la Nueva España, criollos, Fernando VII!...”, dando inicio a la indígenas y latifundistas comenzaron las Guerra de la Independencia de México. rebeliones en contra el dominio español. Hoy, a 200 años del comienzo de Sin embargo, ninguna tuvo éxito hasta la guerra de la independencia, los el año 1810 cuando es descubierta la mexicanos cuentan la Enseña Nacional “Conspiración de Querétaro”, encabezada para recordar sus raíces y aquella historia por Miguel Hidalgo y formada por Miguel de los antepasados en la búsqueda de la Domínguez, corregidor de Querétaro, y su tierra prometida. esposa, Josefa Ortíz de Domínguez, y los La Bandera Mexicana es adornada con militares Ignacio Allende, Juan Aldama y el águila devorando la serpiente encima

THE PAN AMERICAN

September 16, 2010

Iturbide y Guerrero firman plan de Iguala donde se declara la independencia de México.

24 de febrero de 1821

Consumación de la Independencia y entrada de Iturbide a la ciudad de México.

27 de septiembre de 1821

3

Sefirma el Acta de la Independencia del Imperio Mexicano.

28 de septiembre de 1821

Iturbide es coronado emperador como Agustín I de México.

21 de julio de 1822

5

4

Agustín de Iturbide es fusilado en Tamaulipas por declarase traidor a la patria.

24 de julio de 1824

Comulgación de la Primera Constitución de la República Federal de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos.

Guadalupe Victoria se convierte en el primer presidente de México.

3 de octubre de 1824

10 de octubre de 1824


THE PAN AMERICAN

Page 8

September 16, 2010

Celebrando el Bicentenario Mexicano

1.

de un nopal, la cual es resaltada por los colores verde, blanco y rojo, que simbolizan la esperanza de un mejor futuro, la unidad del pueblo y la sangre derramada por los héroes nacionales. Otro emblema irrenunciable de nuestra mexicanidad, es el Himno Nacional Mexicano, el cual mezcla religión con fuertes amenazas sangrientas a quiénes atenten contra la soberanía de la nación. Estas líricas guerreras surgen en el año de 1853, cuando Antonio López de Santa Anna lanza una convocatoria con el fin de encontrar un canto patriótico. Francisco González Bocanegra resulta el poeta ganador, y Jaime Nunó, un músico catalán, fue el encargado de componer la música. El Himno Nacional se cantó por primera vez el 15 de septiembre de 1854, en el Teatro Santa Anna. Este año, los mexicanos celebran las fechas que marcaron el inicio del progreso y continúan en la búsqueda de una mejor nación. A pesar de la violencia existente en el país, producto del crimen organizado, el pueblo de México siempre conserva la esperanza y celebra con gran júbilo las fiestas patrias.

Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla: También conocido como Padre de la Patria por comenzar el movimiento por la Independencia de México.

2.

José María Morelos y Pavón: Se unió a la inserrucción de Hidalgo y tras su muerte, tomó las fuerzas insurgentes.

3.

Juan Aldama: Insurgente mexicano participe en laIndependencia y fue fusilado junto con Allende, Jiménez y Santa Maria.

4.

Josefa Ortíz de Domínguez : “La Corregidora”, puso bajo aviso a los líderes del movimiento de Independencia tras haber sido descubiertos

5.

Vicente Guerrero: Asumió responsabilidades de mando a las órdenes de Morelos después de unirse al movimiento para independizar a México.

2 Junta conspiratoria de México para establecer un gobierno independiente.

5 de agosto de 1808

Se descubre la conspiación de Valladolid que buscaba lograr independizarce.

20 de diciembre de 1809

Grito de Dolores que inicia el levantamiento encabezado por el cura Miguel Hidalgo.

16 de septiembre de 1810

Miguel Hidalgo es fusilado y decapitado en Chihuahua.

30 de julio de 1811

Se promulga en Apatzingán Decreto constitucional para la libertad de la America Mexicana.

22 de octubre de 1814

Morelos es fusilado en San Cristóbal Ecatepec.

22 de diciembre de 1815

Page 9

Mini-biografías sobre los héroes de la Independencia:

Historia por Denisse Salinas y Karen Velásquez • Diseño por Jennifer Tate

Según la leyenda, a 130 años de la Mariano Abasolo. creación del Quinto Sol - mito náhuatl Debido a que el pueblo era un fiel que expone la creación del mundo seguidor de la iglesia, es que Hidalgo, el actual - Huitzilopochtli, dios azteca Padre de la Patria, fue puesto al mando del sol y la guerra, ordenó a su tribu de la revuelta ya que los insurgentes comenzar el peregrinaje en busca de un sabían que era la mejor manera de lograr lugar llamado Tenochtitlan. que el pueblo se levantara Los aztecas junto con en armas y luchara por su siete tribus nahuatlacas “ Sin importar el tamaño libertad. salieron de Chicomostoc, de la ciudad o pueblo en Los insurgentes actualmente Zacatecas, con donde nacen los hombres planeaban comenzar la idea de encontrar la tierra o mujeres, ellos son el movimiento de prometida. Sabrían que independencia en finamente del tamaño de habían llegado al encontrar Octubre, pero debido un nopal sobre una roca y su obra, del tamaño de su a que sus intenciones sobre él un águila devorando voluntad de engrandecer fueron denunciadas a las una serpiente. De acuerdo a y enriquecer a sus autoridades, tuvieron que Gutierre Tibón, investigador hermanos.” adelantar la insurrección italiano – mexicano (1905 para la madrugada del 16 Ignacio Allende -1999), el águila devorando de septiembre de 1810. Militar a la serpiente en el lago Es así como Hidalgo simboliza el lugar final del ejecuta el tan famoso Grito éxodo azteca. de Dolores, al hacer un El pueblo del Sol se fundó para llamado al pueblo para desconocer a la más tarde convertirse en una colonia autoridad virreinal tañendo la campana española y finalmente, en una nación de la parroquia de Dolores, Guanajuato y independiente y a principios de 1798, gritando “¡Viva la Virgen de Guadalupe!, cuando, inconformes con la desigualdad ¡Viva la América española!, ¡Viva social de la Nueva España, criollos, Fernando VII!...”, dando inicio a la indígenas y latifundistas comenzaron las Guerra de la Independencia de México. rebeliones en contra el dominio español. Hoy, a 200 años del comienzo de Sin embargo, ninguna tuvo éxito hasta la guerra de la independencia, los el año 1810 cuando es descubierta la mexicanos cuentan la Enseña Nacional “Conspiración de Querétaro”, encabezada para recordar sus raíces y aquella historia por Miguel Hidalgo y formada por Miguel de los antepasados en la búsqueda de la Domínguez, corregidor de Querétaro, y su tierra prometida. esposa, Josefa Ortíz de Domínguez, y los La Bandera Mexicana es adornada con militares Ignacio Allende, Juan Aldama y el águila devorando la serpiente encima

THE PAN AMERICAN

September 16, 2010

Iturbide y Guerrero firman plan de Iguala donde se declara la independencia de México.

24 de febrero de 1821

Consumación de la Independencia y entrada de Iturbide a la ciudad de México.

27 de septiembre de 1821

3

Sefirma el Acta de la Independencia del Imperio Mexicano.

28 de septiembre de 1821

Iturbide es coronado emperador como Agustín I de México.

21 de julio de 1822

5

4

Agustín de Iturbide es fusilado en Tamaulipas por declarase traidor a la patria.

24 de julio de 1824

Comulgación de la Primera Constitución de la República Federal de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos.

Guadalupe Victoria se convierte en el primer presidente de México.

3 de octubre de 1824

10 de octubre de 1824


10

September 16, 2010

VSO to open at UTPA’s Fine Arts Center

After viewers said goodbye to the Brit America loved to hate, Jennifer Lopez will join “American Idol.” Reports say Lopez joined the show for a stunning $12 million a season.

A simple lie turns Olive Penderghast into the school floozy and turns her world upside down. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s high school required reading, “The Scarlet Letter,” is re-imagined as a high school comedy in “Easy A,” coming to theaters this Friday.

Alma E. Hernandez/THE PAN AMERICAN PLAY ON, PLAYERS - The Valley Symphony Orchestra, shown performing at the McAllen Convention Center earlier this year, will begin its 2010-2011 season Sept. 30 at UTPA’s Fine Arts Auditorium. The VSO consists of 75-musicians who perform a standard symphonic repertoire and will open pieces by Brahm, Poulenc, and Beethoven’s “5th Symphony.” By Yngrid Fuentes The Pan American

After two albums and 10 million copies sold, Maroon 5 will release their third effort, “Hands all Over,” on Sept. 21. Recorded in Switzerland, the album is “more organic, almost closer to our first record than the last.”

This isn’t your grandma’s ice cream. A marijuana vendor in California has begun selling pot ice cream. One half pint of the dessert is said to be as potent as eight joints.

With performances from Dahlia Guerra, dean of the College of Arts and Humanities, and Daniel Steenken, The University of Texas-Pan American premieres the 2010-2011 season under the direction of maestro Peter Dabrowski, musical director and conductor of the Valley Symphony Orchestra. The performance is slated for Sept. 30 from 8 p.m. to 9:45 at the Fine Arts Auditorium. Founded in 1952 under the direction of Charles Magurean, the VSO, the first music organization in the RGV, has a long, close relationship with UTPA, since it originated under the auspices of Pan American College as a group of volunteer musicians performing free concerts in the lower Valley. “We began as an ensemble of volunteer musicians that would get together weekly at the Pan American College (before it was part of the UT system) and rehearse and then perform across the Valley,” said Monica Folk, VSO executive director. With the university providing rehearsal space, office space, the Fine Arts Auditorium and some

instruments belonging to the music department at no charge, the relationship doesn’t stop at its origins; it continues throughout history, since some VSO musicians work for the university, including maestro Dabrowski. “Some of our musicians are UTPA music faculty, we have 10 members from the music faculty that regularly perform with us,” Folk said. “We also have a handful of students that are either working on their bachelors or on their master’s degree in music. Plus, last year, when Doctor Nelsen [UTPA president Robert Nelsen] came last January, he was onstage with the symphony and we helped introduce him to the community.” When it was created, the orchestra performed annually in Hidalgo County and Reynosa, Mexico. Until 1967 the symphony was under the sole support of the university, after that, it started performing in Harlingen. The group has also done its thing in several Mexican cities such as Monterrey, Saltillo, and Ciudad Victoria. The orchestra was then and still is comprised of Valley musicians and university students. With the mission of “engaging, inspiring and

educating through excellence in and Beethoven’s “5th Symphony.” UTPA students will have the live performance of great music,” opportunity to get according to a discount to the its website at shows and dress valleyorchestra. rehearsal the night org. The VSO before the main consists of a “Itʼs really interesting concert for $5. 75-musician “It’s really o r c h e s t r a because people can see interesting that performs what goes into making the because people a standard can see what goes symphonic orchestra concert work. into making the repertoire and And they can use the dress orchestra concert commissioned work,” Folk said. works. rehearsal ticket as a five“And they can use F r o m the dress rehearsal S e p t e m b e r dollar discount for the ticket as a fivethrough April, concert ticket if they want dollar discount the orchestra will for the concert have six concerts, to come back and see the ticket if they want three at the Fine whole thing.” to come back and Arts Auditorium see the whole and the others thing. It’s going at the McAllen to be a really Civic Center season Auditorium. Monica Folk great and we hope The reperVSO executive director that everybody toire of the opencan come to the ing night inconcert.” cludes Brahms’ For more “Tragic Overexec@ ture,” Poulenc’s “Concerto for information contact 2 pianos in D minor” with Dha- valleyorchestra.org or b.cortina@ lia Guerra and Daniel Steenken, valleyorchestra.org


September 16, 2010

ARTS AND LIFE

Page 11

Despite violence, civil rights progress Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla and Francisco I. Madero would be sickened to see how Mexico has deteriorated but the nation offers some promising innovations.

IMAS continues Art Hour Lecture Series with Modern Art By Benny Salinas The Pan American

Photo Illustration by Alexis Carranza/THE PAN AMERICAN

Commentary By Lupe A. Flores The Pan American

It’s true that the causes which Hidalgo, Madero and others like Emiliano Zapata fought and died for - cultural (and personal) freedom from institutionalized oppression - turned out just as bloody as the cartelinduced violence we see permeating the news media in cities and states throughout both countries today. It’s sad to see such liberties, which undergird current national and universal issues such as immigration, healthcare, spiritual freedom and samesex marriage, being jeopardized in the hands of inefficient governmental entities and underground social interactions that sprung out of the need for underprivileged classes to survive. As noted by Fransisco A. Rosales in “Chicano! The History of the Mexican-American Civil Rights Movement,” it’s true

that byproducts of the Mexican Revolution from 1910-1917 were, in fact, drug and human smuggling as well as border violence. But unlike Madero and Zapata, Hidalgo knew little of what would happen in the coming decade after his Grito de Dolores on the night of Sept. 15, 1810: 11 years of struggle and death. It was not until dawn of the next day, Sept. 16, that he marched in with the revolutionary army to Guanajuato, Mexico, then a colonial mining center, where his soldiers took hold of and killed a workforce of Spaniards and Criollos there. The victims had no sympathy for the lowest suffering class of Mexico’s social system: Mexican-born Spaniards, Mestizos and Amerindians. We now know this lack of sympathy showed a greater ignorance on behalf of Spain, a blind spot that seems to have trickled down to the current world-view of many acculturated folk living in Mexico. Colorismo, or intra-ethnic discrimination due to one’s skin tone which many in modern Mexico believe is a deterrent to opportunity and thus success - is alive and well, as researched by Alejandro Lugo in his ethnography “Fragmented Lives, Assembled Parts:

Culture, Capitalism and Conquest in the U.S.-Mexico Border.” Zapata, Pancho Villa and many other leading figures in the Revolution fought countless regimes that tried to institutionalize a Western mindset to capitalize and oppress indigenous peoples; peoples who were already dealing with the fact that they were a conquered nation, now merely trying to survive. In his study, Lugo argues that the Spanish and subsequent American conquest and colonization are still in full effect today throughout areas in Mexico ridden with American factories, like in Ciudad Juarez, that employ - and exploit - its working class. To this day, their struggle continues and Mexico still finds itself the subject of ridicule and false defeat. But despite the stereotypes in America about the Mexican and a false sense of superiority, there is something to be learned about human rights and equality from the Mexico we so love to bash. In late December 2009, Mexico City became the first jurisdiction in Latin America to legalize same-sex marriages; the law became effective March 4. On Aug. 10, the nation’s Supreme Court ruled such marriages

constitutional and required all 31 states to uphold the licenses, granting virtually all marriage rights gay couples. Although the law gives the states no timetable of when to start the recognition, this is a widely positive leap into the game of human rights. That said, it’s no surprise that a juxtaposition of discourses on seemingly different issues of interest comes clearly in view. Mexico‘s history and current events are important to everyone living in its neighboring country, the United States, especially now that the formers is taking greater steps to promote social equality. And in these times of anniversary, in a state which was once considered by its conquerors “greater than Constantinople and Rome,” and which unlike ours, is still plagued by constant and concentrated civil violence fueled by America’s appetite for self-destruction, it is possible to learn from some of Mexico’s policies. We just must take the time to internalize what really matters: the people, not the institutions, and the inalienable rights they are all born with.

McAllen’s International Museum of Art and Science will continue its lecture series this Sunday with a talk on Modern Art by Amanda Canales, the museum’s curriculum developer and docent from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. It’s free for members and four dollars for non-members. Canales developed the series late last year as a way of furthering the public’s art education, with lectures delivered every two to three months. The first one took place in December and focused on the museum’s stained glass collection as well as the art forms of destruction, reconstruction and revival. Attendance for the first get-together was small, about 30 to 40 people. However as the event progressed so did attendance, with the last event attracting over 100 visitors in July to listen to Canales lecture on 16th- and 17thcentury Europe during the Renaissance and Baroque art movements. This Sunday Canales, who has conducted every lecture so far, will focus on Modern Art, a movement spanning 70 years. She plans to analyze the works of artists from Vincent Van Gogh and Stuart Davis to Georgia O’Keefe and Victor Vasarely. Also opening at IMAS this week was the “Este es mi Mexico” children’s display, which includes drawings from around the world displaying their connection with the country. Children age seven to 12 submitted work with the museum selecting 120. Starting Wednesday the museum will display some of the best works until Oct 31. Though this is the 13th year the museum has held the competition, the bicentennial of the Mexican Independence makes this year’s deal more special. The museum is also running a display by Texas native Charlie Criner titled, “Where I Came From,” and Mexican artist Alejandro Benassini’s “Inside Silence.” The latter display aims to examine the different ways of viewing silence. Canales hopes to continue the Art Hour’s growth, with lectures happening more often and eventually featuring professionals from other areas. The group is also working on introducing a bilingual version of the lecture series, though no date has been set. For more information, contact the IMAS at (956) 682-1564


Page 12

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September 16, 2010


September 16, 2010

13

Exitoso escritor Texano visita el Valle

Andrés Tijerina enseñó sobre la cultura y tradición Texana en Edinburg

Por Sergio Giron The Pan American

Hace exactamente dos siglos se empezó a combatir una guerra contra la opresión, la esclavitud y la burguesía, en la que grandes héroes dieron su vida por la libertad del pueblo y la Independencia de México. Doscientos años después, este territorio por el que nuestros insurgentes pelearon luce muy distinto al que contemplaron alguna vez; ya que

áreas donde importantes batallas fueron peleadas entre el régimen hispano y “la nueva España” ahora están situadas dentro del territorio tejano. Sin olvidar este ultimo hecho histórico, el Museo de Historia del Sur de Texas localizado en el corazón de la ciudad de Edinburg, invitó a aquellas personas que están interesadas en la cultura y la tradición texana a conocer a uno de los más grandes expertos en el tema, Andrés Tijerina, profesor de la Universidad de Texas A&M. El pasado domingo, 12 de septiembre, Tijerina acudió a una de las galerías del museo con el fin de compartir sus puntos de vista sobre la cultura e historia del estado, responder las preguntas de los interesados, y presentar y firmar algunas de sus obras literarias. Durante el evento que tuvo una duración de aproximadamente dos horas, se

debatió sobre los puntos de vista de sus libros: “El Imperio Texano”, “Texanos y Texas Bajo la Bandera Mexicana” y “Liderazgo Texano en la Texas Mexicana y Revolucionaria”. Pero sobre todo se habló de los problemas actuales por los cuales la cultura auténtica del estado está sufriendo de desaparición. “Siento un gran privilegio al poder conocer al Dr. Tijerina, mi hijo compró un libro suyo como proyecto para su clase de historia y desde entonces yo los he buscado todos”, comento Jennifer de la Garza al terminar el evento al que acudieron alrededor de 18 personas. “Nosotros hemos vivido en Texas durante muchas generaciones pero nunca nos enseñaron cuales eran nuestras verdaderas raíces y como eran los colonizadores mexicanos que llegaron”. Una vez concluida la presentación, Tijerina y el resto de la audiencia fueron dirigidos rumbo al lobby del museo donde se dió el tiempo para la firma de libros y la oportunidad de saludar al reconocido profesor. Después de haber tenido la oportunidad de conversar con Tijerina, el profesor de historia de secundaria, Fred Rodríguez, opinó

suficientes espacios. Se han creado rumores sobre expandir el estacionamiento, según Sandoval los planes que tenían para expandirlos hacia el lado oeste por el lado del estacionamiento “P” y “Region One” fueron cancelados debido a los recortes del presupuesto de la escuela, a pesar de que esto sería un gran progreso. Se toma alrededor de 25 a 30 minutos para encontrar un estacionamiento y esto puede ser algo estresante, sin embargo, segun Sandoval, a mediados del semestre esto podría mejorar; también agrega que este año ha sido el que se ha visto con un número inusual de vehículos transitando por la zona. La búsqueda de estacionamiento puede mejorar incrementando el número de los estacionamientos como también el cumplimiento coherente de la comunidad universitaria. Sin embargo, construir un estacionamiento de dos pisos ayudaría a todos los estudiantes a evitar caminar las grandes distancias. “Yo sugiero que dividan las zonas según la clasificación de estudiantes”, comentó Lucy Rodríguez, alumna de UTPA. “También opino que los precios de los permisos se deberían reducir a la mitad, ya que algunos es-

tudiantes gastan ese dinero y al final no es posible usarlo por no haber suficientes espacios disponibles”. El congestionamiento vehicular y ocupación de zonas prohibidas

sobre lo aprendido en el evento del desde la ciudad de Brownsville reconocido experto. acudieron a obtener una firma del autor “Uno tiende a olvidar los orígenes para su libro “El Mesquite, historia de de Texas, viendo a los Vaqueros de los primeros asentamientos españoles Dallas o a los Astros de Houston”, entre Nueces y el Río Grande”. comentó, “y se “Nosotros aunque olvida el papel somos de Chicago y la influencia “ Uno tiende a olvidar los cuando vinimos de aquellos que a vivir aquí nos orígenes de Texas y del se arriesgaron sentimos con la

a venir a este obligación de papel y la influencia de lugar ya sea conocer más sobre aquellos que se arriesgaron desde el sur o el estado que nos desde el norte, abrió las puertas a venir a este lugar ya ahora creo que hace quince años, sea desde el sur o desde entiendo con es ampliamente más claridad recomendable”. el norte, ahora creo que mucho del folk Es de esperarse entiendo con mas claridad popular”. que esta festejada Sin duda visita por parte del mucho del folk popular. ” el Museo de Dr. Tijerina traiga Historia del nuevas cosas que Sur de Texas se reflexionar a los lució invitando asistentes, los Fred Rodriguez cuales la próxima al literario, ya que acudieron al vez que coman un Maestro de historia evento personas plato de “chilli”, que deseaban emocionados desde vean a un vaquero con su sombrero tiempo atrás conocer a Tijerina. y espuelas o siembren un árbol de “Vinimos por las firmas, pero también nueces recordaran quien trajo todas buscando un libro que nos falta para estas tradiciones y cuál ha sido su la colección”, afirmaron Ramón y influencia en la historia del estado de Cecilia Greenfield-Arriaga, quienes la estrella solitaria.

Buscar estacionamiento se vuelve una tortura diaria para estudiantes Por Alejandra Román The Pan American En algún momento de la vida universitaria, todos han sido victimas del lío que es encontrar un espacio disponible para estacionarse, de acuerdo con Melissa Sandoval, Gerente de Servicios de Estacionamiento, la Universidad de Texas-Pan Americana solo cuenta con 6,303 estacionamientos, 4,705 están disponibles para los estudiantes y 1,727 estacionamientos para los maestros y el personal de la universidad. “En solo este semestre se vendieron aproximadamente 12,000 permisos de estacionamiento los cuales fueron solicitados por los estudiantes y 1,727 permisos fueron vendidos a la facultad y el personal” mencionó Sandoval. “Es impresionante la diferencia que hay entre cuantos permisos fueron vendidos y cuantos están disponibles”. En realidad no existen suficientes estacionamientos para todos los estudiantes, y es complicado ya que nadie se quiere estacionar lejos. La universidad necesita mas estacionamientos por que son necesarios para evitar estacionarse en las calles solo por no contar con

como entradas a casas o carros sobre las calles son solo algunos de los problemas que se viven en la zona universitaria por falta de estacionamiento. Al final, los estudiantes

tienen que continuar levantándose más temprano y esperar a alguien que desocupe un lugar para ellos ganarse un espacio disponible a tiempo para llegar a sus clases.

Freddie Martinez /THE PAN AMERICAN

ESTACIONAMIENTO - Cada vez es mas difícil encontrar estacionamiento debido al gran número de alumnos que asisten a UTPA, y al concluir las clases el congestionamiento, al igual, se vuelve molesto para todos.


Page 14

September 16, 2010

ESPAÑOL

Alumnos internacionales acuden al ELI como recurso Por Carlos Arteaga The Pan American

La Universidad de Texas-Pan Americana es reconocida tanto por su alto nivel académico como por su diversidad cultural, con esto, las barreras y problemas en la comunicación entre los estudiantes de diferentes nacionalidades siempre se hacen presentes. Cada día en la universidad, cientos de estudiantes extranjeros que buscan lograr el tan afamado “sueño americano” se esfuerzan por aprender a escribir, hablar e interactuar con sus compañeros por medio del idioma mas utilizado para la enseñanza didáctica en el mundo: el inglés. Para cumplir el propósito de tener una comunicación efectiva en la institución estudiantil, fue creada una escuela especial que forma parte importante de la formación de profesionistas exitosos para el futuro: El Instituto del Idioma Ing lés (ELI por sus siglas en inglés).

El ELI es una escuela dedicada a la enseñanza y perfeccionamiento del idioma inglés, la cual ha recibido gente de diversas partes del mundo como lo son Brasil, India, Japón, México, Venezuela y muchas otras, siempre recibidos con el mismo objetivo de ayudarlos a triunfar. Este instituto contiene diferentes programas como el intensivo, clases sabatinas y los cursos de verano. “Se va a clases de lunes a jueves 7 horas al día”, comentó Esmeralda García, ex alumna del ELI. “Vas desde las 8:30 hasta las 15:30 horas, contando con dos recesos, uno corto de 15 minutos y uno largo de hora y media; dependiendo del nivel en el que el estudiante se encuentre dan también 2 horas de laboratorios”; El curso intensivo contiene gente de diversas nacionalidades que buscan en su mayoría ingresar a UTPA. Otro de los cursos con los que el instituto cuenta es con el curso semi-intensivo que se lleva acabo los martes y jueves de 18 :00 a 21:00 horas, además del curso sa-

batino de 9:00 a las 13:00 horas, el y darte una evaluación en cuanto cual es excelente para personas que a tu pronunciación, gramática, fluidez entre trabajan o careotros”, afirmó cen de tiempo. Cynthia Loera “Las clases son muy “Mas allá de ser profesores alumna de las clases sabatidinámicas, y de inglés, también pueden ser nas. los profesores El instiresuelven toconsejeros, ya que la mayoría tuto también das tus duson extranjeros y muchos no se encarga de das. Todos los fomentar el días cuentas tienen a sus familias cerca, crecimiento con dos horas por lo tanto, en caso de tener cultural de sus de laboratoalumnos, pues rio de comun problema, te pueden además de ser putación en una escuela de donde además ayudar. ” inglés, también de practicar es una escuela tus habilidades de vida, ya que de escuchar, se interactúa hablar y escriKarla Barragán día con día con bir en inglés, Ex-alumna del ELI personas de también pudiferentes paredes tener una tes del mundo conversación con un compañero del salón y que y se insita a comentar en las clases se produzca una grabación, la cual acerca de las diferentes costumbres el profesor puede escuchar después de cada uno y conocerse mas por

medio de convivíos y festejos. Karla Barragán, alumna graduada del ELI comentó que los profesores son muy buenas personas, con buena preparación e inspiran confianza para preguntar en caso de que se tenga alguna duda relacionada con los temas vistos. “Son flexibles teniendo un límite”, comentó Barragan, quien es ahora estudiante en UTPA. “Mas allá de ser profesores de inglés, también pueden ser consejeros, ya que la mayoría son extranjeros y muchos no tienen a sus familias cerca, por lo tanto, en caso de tener un problema, te pueden ayudar”. La búsqueda de un buen lugar para aprender inglés es un trabajo duro pero la universidad ofrece estos programas con el fin de que los estudiantes no vallan tan lejos y se acostumbren a la vida universitaria antes de ingresar. El ELI sin duda es una parte importante de UTPA pues para muchos marca el inicio del arduo camino de los extranjeros en este país.

Freddie Martinez /THE PAN AMERICAN

A SIMPLE VISTA- El edificio del ELI está localizado enfrente de Recursos Humanos, en la calle Schunior, donde diariamente alumnos asisten como requisito para entrar a la universidad.

UTPA, mucho mas que una simple universidad pública

Por Larissa Garza The Pan American

Muchos piensan que por ser una rama de la Universidad de Texas en Austin la Universidad de Texas - Pan Americana es una escuela sin chiste. UTPA, aparte de ser una de las escuelas públicas más prestigiadas de Estados Unidos, está entre las mejores 100 universidades para hispanos en el país. The Hispanic Outlook in High-

er Education, es una revista dedicada a ser la fuente de noticias e información para la comunidad de estudios superiores. Y de acuerdo con ellos UTPA es el segundo en la nación en conceder licenciaturas, cuarto en el número de maestrías y décimo noveno en el número de doctorados asignados a Hispanos. “Antes, no era ‘cool’ atender a UTPA. Pero ahora con los programas que han sido expandidos, UTPA

se está ganando su lugar. Tan solo toma nota de nuestro Departamento de Comunicación”, dijo Frederick Mann, encargado de Bronc Radio TV, organización que regresó a casa 17 premios en los premios de la Asociación Intercolegial de Prensa de Texas. En total las publicaciones Panorama, el periódico The Panamerican y Bronc Radio TV ganaron en total 31 premios. Siendo una de las universidades

más grande dentro del Sistema UT y la décima en la nación, UTPA es la universidad a la que más asisten estudiantes México Americanos en Estados Unidos. 85% de los estudiantes enrolados en el programa de honores Baylor pre-medical en UTPA son aceptados al graduarse. También, 95% de los estudiantes en el Instituto de Preparación para Escuela de Leyes de UTPA que han aplica-

do a la escuela han sido aceptados tan siquiera a una. “El estado y el país están viendo haber como hacemos las cosas en UTPA, y estos rangos demuestran que la universidad no es tan solo un líder ofreciendo educación de alta calidad a los estudiantes, pero un líder en servir a su comunidad,” dijo el Presidente de UTPA Robert S. Nelsen a la Oficina de Relaciones de la Universidad.


Pick ‘em right, keep it up, brag about it

By Dionicio Rodriguez The Pan American It’s that time of the year again. School has started which means that the next big break is Christmas. And unless you truly enjoy working instead of not doing much you will need some sort of entertainment to get you through. Luckily the start of school and end of summer also means the beginning of football season! High school, college kids, and grown men around the country, and increasingly the world, prepare to showcase their talents and hard work they’ve put in during the offseason. As if men, and sometimes women, needed another excuse to light the grill up and ice down some cold beverage of choice on NFL Sunday, fantasy football adds to the almost religious Sunday experience of avid fans around the country. Alex Sotelo, a 23-year-old senior criminal justice major at UTPA, says fantasy football is something he has enjoyed for some time now. “Lots of trash talking, complaining, cheating and whining going on!” Sotelo exclaimed. “People making dumb trades, drafting the wrong players. At the end of the day it is a very fun experience.” But the Comrade Factor is what it’s all about for Lucio Rodriguez, a 22-year-old senior marketing major. “The drafting, the trading, the interaction with your friends is what it’s about for me,” he said. “I’ve been playing for three years and last year I was in the semifinals. That’s close enough for me.” Some players take it a little more seriously, making a point to have a good draft with the right combination of starters and bench players to suit their fantasy roster. The performances of the real-life players they select add up to a game within the game, the magic of fantasy football. Nathan Garza, a 22-year-old business management senior takes it about as seriously as fantasy football can be taken before one begins to get worried about them. “I like having bragging rights over my friends,” he explained. Anyone can make a good first round pick; this year 2009 leading rusher Chris Johnson of the Tennessee Titans was the automatic opener. Last year was Adrian Peterson from The Minnesota Vikings; easy enough, but it’s the picks that come after that make an efficient fantasy team. “Consistency is the name of the game when it comes to fantasy.” insisted Christian Trevino, a graduate student in education administration. “The order of your selection plays a big part in what players are available.” Fantasy football is here to stay and will be the cause of many celebrations and headaches throughout the virtual sports world for years to come.

September 16, 2010

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Lady Broncs shooting for conference With only one game left in the nonconference season, the Lady Broncs are ready to turn the page, when they expect to pick up momentum for what has been the focus the entire year. “We start conference on Saturday, so that’s what we’ve training for and that’s why we’ve been playing all these tough teams,” fourth-year head coach Angela Hubbard said. “We’re just going to keep our goal in mind and keep focused on the end, which is to do well in conference.” It has not been an easy road for the Lady Broncs. After starting the season winning one and losing two at the home opener tournament at the end of last month, the program hasn’t been able to pick up a win in the nine games since. Still, everybody seems to be on the same page when it comes to maintaining a good attitude in preparation for the conference season that starts Saturday at Houston against HBU; the team faces Texas Southern Friday. “I think they are doing a pretty good job on knowing why we’re out here and why we’re playing who we are… keeping their goals in mind,” Hubbard said. Monday evening, the WRSC volleyball court, where the team has been hosting home games due to the remodeling of the field house, witnessed sacrifice and excitement from the part of both the team and the fans. Although the space devoted to supporters is considerably smaller than the bleachers of the old gym, the noise and support from family, fellow students and staff could be sensed in the entire 156,000-square-foot complex that rumbled on each close play or point scored by the Lady Broncs. The team fell to Texas State in three sets (25-16, 25-14, 25-14); despite

a good attitude, the squad failed to maintain a constant and effective attack that could seriously damage the Lady Bobcat defense. “I think we came out with good, high focus, but what happened is we let them get on the run and we weren’t able to break it,” said libero Kristi Garcia, a sophomore Nikki Rowe graduate. “We’re a better team than we showed today.” For this reason, Hubbard mentioned that working on fixing these errors is going to be the base of the next few days’ practice. The women are going to keep their eyes focused on maintaining the good things achieved while fixing those that impede the team to function appropriately to grasp a win. “I think we started up very well, they played calm, collective and they did some really great things, unfortunately we had a few too many errors here and there,” Hubbard said. “We’re just really going in and work on cutting out those errors and figure out why we’re having them and what we need to do in order to cut them down.” But losing is losing, and the Lady Broncs are not satisfied with Monday’s performance or with the way the season has turned out. The beginning of Great West play seems like the perfect opportunity to make things right, so the team is looking to take advantage of the new beginning. “It was a hard loss, we came in focused thinking we were going to be successful,” outside hitter Kaitlin Vasquez of Garland said. “I think we’re going to start on a clean slate and be more focused and so now our focus is going to be plain conference, nothing else, no other games, just conference.” The next home match for the Lady Broncs will be Monday against Prairie View A&M at 7 p.m. at the WRSC.

the team’s first tournament, UTPA had a good performance. “My goals for this year are to grow as a golfer and win a tournament and this is a good way to start,” Camey said. Ofelia Lopez, coach and director of men’s and women’s golf, was proud of her team, which was No. 9 after one day and concluded the Champions Circle tournament at No. 10. “This tournament was something to set our goals and standards,” Lopez said. “It was our first tournament and a short-term goal, and it gets better each time it goes on.” Susannah Grunden from Bowling Green State won the tournament, hitting a two-under-par 70, while North Texas won the team’s competition with a score of 872.

This year the captain title will be held by Hocott and as the fall season starts she wants to become a leader in many ways. “As a senior I want to be an example for my teammates and become bullet-proof,” she noted. “Senior year goes by so fast and I just have to play to my abilities.” Lopez also explained that last year’s team was just going through the motions at times, and there was little competition among the members. “Now we have girls that are hungry and they are pushing each other because they have individual goals they want to accomplish,” she said. “Each year we learn something new… nobody is going to be afraid about success or failure.”

By Sara Hernandez The Pan American

Alma E. Hernandez/The Pan American

hard hands - Sophomore Kristi Garcia receives a serve Monday at UTPA’s fall 3-0 against Texas State. The Lady Broncs assure that things will get better once conference play starts Saturday.

NEXT HOME GAME

Sept. 20 • 7 p.m. • WRSC • Prairie View A&M

Women’s golf launches season at North Texas Classic By Astrid Villegas The Pan American The Lady Bronc golfers are rolling now, as the season started with the Worldlink North Texas Fall Classic Monday and Tuesday at Forth Worth; there the women finished in 10th place with a score of 942. The next tournament will be Sept. 20-21 at the Cincinnati Bearcat Classic. The team returns two seniors from last year team, Haley Hocott and Melinda Uriegas, a pair of juniors in Majo Camey and Sarah Kothny, plus a newcomer in freshman San Antonio native Elena Arroyo, who graduated from Winston Churchill High School. The tournament started with two rounds of 18 holes Monday. Camey was tied in 13th after the first round

and Hocott was two shots behind with an opening round 73. “Monday’s round was good but the second round I feel like we got drained and tired and the second round wasn’t as good as first round,” said Hocott, a senior from San Antonio. Camey shot eight over par 80 in the afternoon session to finish seven shots off the lead going into Tuesday’s final round. “As a team we played good for the first round and that’s what we are going to try to do for the next tournament,” said the Guatemala native. “I think I played good and I was also very focused… I’m happy with my performance.” On Tuesday at 8 a.m. the final round of tournament began and consisted of 18 holes. Camey said that for it being


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the pan american

Septemeber 16, 2010

September 17, 2010  

Volume 67 Number 3

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