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Volume 65, No. 7

October 9, 2008

SINCE 1943

T CAMPUS

Enrollment climbs, more classrooms needed By J.R. Ortega THE PAN AMERICAN The University of Texas-Pan American has seen a gradual increase in total enrollment. Like many growing learning institutions, the need for classroom availability along with university expansion is a given. In recent years, professors from departments have increasingly been asked to relocate, according to an academic term summary report. Next semester’s schedule shows UTPA is

running out of classrooms. Dena Edge, special projects coordinator for Resource 25, said departments first send out their classroom requests and if days and times begin to conflict, then R25 gets in contact with those departments and asks for faculty to choose a different day and time. “It varies from term to term,” said Edge about rescheduling. “As the university grows, our goal is to try and keep departments and colleges in their own departments.” UTPA’s enrollment in fall 2007

was at 17,435, according to the Office of Institutional Research. R25, the university body overlooking all scheduling processes including classroom availabilities for each semester, recently sent an e-mail with the academic term summary report to various UTPA departments so faculty could better situate their classroom needs for the spring 2009 semester. Edge said the e-mail was not meant to alarm faculty, but rather to give departments ample time and opportunity to prepare for next semester. She

added it is R25’s purpose to have many of the room assignments finalized before students begin registering for the spring semester. Currently the university has 129 lecture classrooms, 126 of which are smart classrooms, equipped with various technologies like audio/visual equipment and computer capabilities. “Bottom line: We have to look at how many classes are offered [by all departments],” she said. She said there are some time slots that are “prime-time,” Tuesday and

Thursday anywhere from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and that rescheduling usually occurs during this heavy-traffic period. It is these “prime-times” that keep departments across the university on their feet. Dahlia Guerra, dean of the college of arts and humanities, said faculty’s competing scheduling interests are taken into consideration. “We’re trying to meet student needs,” she said. “It is important to do careful classroom planning. We want to be able to provide classes that

SEE ENROLLMENT || PAGE 11

T NATIONAL

Hillary Clinton returns to rally Valley voters New York Sen. endorses Rick Noriega, attends fundraiser

By Brian Silva THE PAN AMERICAN

Roxy Solis/THE PAN AMERICAN SUPPORT - New York Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton endorsed Rick Noriega at a press conference last Thursday at McAllen-Miller International Airport.

Before rows of Valley politicians Friday at McAllen-Miller International airport, Sen. Hillary Clinton announced her endorsement of U.S. Senate Democratic nominee Rick Noriega, as he stood by her side. The Democratic figure representing New York touted Noriega’s long experience as a colonel in the Army National Guard, and positions on issues like veterans affairs, health care, the economy, and education as reasons for Texans to vote for him. Clinton told the group of elected officials and reporters that this election was pivotal and the citizens of the Valley need Noriega in Congress. “I’m here asking for your help to send Rick Noriega to the U.S. Senate,” Clinton said. “We need his

leadership… he has the kind of leadership that Americans and Texans need. You see elected officials from this area standing with him because they need him as a partner in Washington.” Noriega is currently running behind incumbent John Cornyn in the polls, but an endorsement from one of the nation’s best-known public figures might give him a boost with a month to go before the vote. A Rasmussen Poll conducted on Sept. 29 puts Noriega at 43 percent with his opponent Cornyn at 50 percent, with a poll sampling error of 4.5 percent. Clinton said the Noriega campaign asked her to come down to Texas and help out with efforts to rally support. Clinton also said she came down to help with fundraising

SEE CLINTON || PAGE 11

T COMMUNITY

Edinburg reaches, celebrates centennial anniversary By Ana Villaurrutia THE PAN AMERICAN As 60-year Edinburg native Yolanda Morin made her way toward Miss Edinburg’s ornately sequined cape, something else in the South Texas Museum’s Centennial Salute exhibit caught her attention: an old-

INDEX

fashioned Coke machine. “I remember these Coke machines, we used to use those when I was young,” said Morin to her four grandchildren and two daughters. “You put in the money and open the little door.” That was the case for the more than 500 patrons who attended the South

OPINION

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Texas Museum’s Edinburg’s centennial celebration earlier this week. The event helped kickoff a weeklong list of events geared toward recognizing the city’s 100-year run. At the event, State Rep. Aaron Pena and Edinburg Mayor Joe Ochoa regaled visitors of the city’s history. Pena told the story of how

NEWS

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Edinburg founding fathers Dennis Chapin and John Closner were embroiled in “election hell.” The county seat was coveted by many Hidalgo cities, including Mercedes and Hidalgo, but the little brush land city of Edinburg, now Chapin, won overwhelmingly. In one night, the county records

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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were moved from Hidalgo to Chapin via a train of covered wagons and its county seat was also hastily built out of wood. A year later, a more permanent office was built for the seat and the first railroad brought the city into the twentieth century. Like many other

SEE EDINBURG || PAGE 11

SPORTS

PG.

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UTPA Generations: The Series Watch for Bronc history lessons intermittently throughout the semester Aug. 25 - Introduction Sept. 4 - ‘20s & ‘30s Sept. 25 - ‘40s & ‘50s

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Oct. 16 - ‘60s & ‘70s Nov. 6 - ‘80s & ‘90s Dec. 3 - 2000 & Beyond

October 9, 2008

THE PAN AMERICAN

T OPINION

End of campaign brings waiting game Brian Silva REPORTER The campaign is over. Actually, it’s over for Texans. The registration campaign, that is. Finally, no more over excited poli sci nerds sticking flyers in my face telling me to register. I admire their persistence, though. Someone’s got to stick sense into the faces of the unregistered demographic. But maybe those without that sense should stay in their category, since such a simple action is only followed up by a strenuously intelligent action. Now, most of us who are in the empowered demographic will wait to cast a ballot on the pivotal day. Or, those impatient of us will succumb to the excitement and cast a ballot early in the preceding weeks to Election Day. It’s a dead hope to watch candidates give a clear concise argument for their position. In the weeks ahead

V 65, No. 7

lie murky arguments with the opposition. Thus, democracy will be better served if those empowered put on some blinders and focus on finding the truths of any campaign. Remember, our strategery as voters in 2000 got us what we voted for. When that day comes, it’s a day set for morning people and night people alike. Night owls, just get up a little early. Getting there is easy for most, since most polling places in urban areas are in short walking distance. If you don’t want to walk or if the south Texas sky happens to shed a drop of rain and you can bare the touch of it, just call a poli sci nerd. I’m sure their natural caffeine-like enthusiasm for the day will get you to the poll. No excuses. Just cast.

Oct. 9, 2008

1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 Phone: (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 www.utpa.edu/dept/panamerican EDITOR IN CHIEF J.R. Ortega / ortega.e.jr@gmail.com NEWS EDITOR Abigail Muniz / abby.muniz@yahoo.com A&E EDITOR Laura Garcia / laurad500@hotmail.com SPORTS EDITORS Ramiro Paez / ramiropaez@aol.com Gregorio Garza / the_nataku@yahoo.com PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Roxy Solis / roxysolis34@yahoo.com DESIGN EDITOR Roy Bazan / rbazanzz@yahoo.com COPY EDITOR Adriana Acosta / acostaa@hotmail.com REPORTERS, DESIGNERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS Alvaro Balderas Russen Vela Isaac Garcia Andrielle Figueroa Onydia Garza Ben Briones Rick Gamez Ana Villaurrutia Pedro Perez IV ADVISER

Dr. Greg Selber --- selberg@utpa.edu SECRETARY

Anita Reyes --- areyes18@utpa.edu ADVERTISING MANAGER Samantha Quintana --- spubs@utpa.edu

**Delivery** Thursday at noon The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the paper or university.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Pan American accepts letters of 300 words or less from students, staff and faculty regarding recent newspaper content, campus concerns or current events. The Pan American reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. The Pan American cannot publish anonymous letters or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Please send all story ideas to thepanamerican@gmail.com. Individuals with disabilities wishing to acquire this publication in an alternative format or needing assistance to attend any event listed can contact The Pan American for more details.

WTF!? No one told me about any deadlines!

Illustration - Anthony Salinas

T OPINION

Aggravation over graduation Abigail Muniz NEWS EDITOR “Omigod, did you apply for graduation?” Those were the first nervous words out of an old friend’s mouth when I bumped into her recently, after months during which we had not seen each other. I nodded, calming her fears that maybe we would not get to both walk across the stage in May. Numerous seniors, including my jittery friend, scrambled to the Office of the Registrar Sept. 15, some enraged, others relieved that they had

barely made the deadline to turn in their application for graduation. Traumatized students from the colleges across campus became aware through word of mouth, a few fliers that sparsely dotted the campus, or by sheer luck: the news was that the deadline to sign up for one of the most important days of their lives had almost passed them by. In years past, large posters lined the walkways at UTPA, advertising the deadline, but this semester was quite different. Not only were walls bare of notice, one had to navigate the nebulous pages of the school’s Web site in order to stumble across

the information. Yes, if someone has invested four years of their life toiling over term papers and mustering their last ounces of strength at 4 a.m. to stay awake and pore over Plato’s Republic for a test, maybe they should also be able to take it upon themselves to find out when the glorious day will be. The truth is that students tend to rely on higher authorities to guide them especially on the most important year of their college career; and yes seniors should get it together, but what was the reason for the lack of promotion?

T LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Falsehoods alleged in MEChA story Dear Editor, In the article “MEChA remembers past Mexican massacre,” by Janette Solis, there are several notable discrepancies that I wish to have clarified. The piece concludes in stating that no officers of the organization returned emails or phone calls. Being that MEChA practices the democratic process in all group affairs, the responses to the interviewer’s questions were submitted to all members, and they were answered thoughtfully and collectively; I, as a current officer, simply submitted the responses. Most disappointing, however, are the reporter’s choice of words. The word perceived when stating, “…founded nationally in 1969 in response to the perceived long-time

discrimination against Chicanos and Latinos,” could imply that discrimination did not take place, but was merely the imagination of a marginalized group. Any UTPA history course dealing with Chicano or border studies can offer a chronology of events that clearly define discrimination and hate crimes against Mexicans and Mexican Americans. Along with other dynamics, the inception of this organization was an outgrowth of the anti and prosegregation sentiment of the time— the civil rights movement. Another word of concern in a statement regarding the Tlatelolco massacre is alleged. Although, the numbers of students murdered remain controversial, it is acknowledged to have occurred by the Mexican and American governments. In fact, by utilizing the Freedom of

Information Act, The National Security Archive at George Washington University obtained declassified documents proving US involvement primarily through the notorious CIA. Our event was to remember those who lost their lives for democracy and to reflect on social participation today. Its relevance persists still through the era of the US Patriot Act, our wars waged on Iraq and Afghanistan, and the blatant militarization of our border. Also, on a minor note, it was the 40th anniversary not the 14th. Samantha Garcia Vice President of MEChA Graduate Student - Biology


Dates to Know: 2008 Majors Fair Thursday 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. University Ballroom October 9, 2008

Poker Tournament Tuesday 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Student Union

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THE PAN AMERICAN

T CAMPUS

Great expectations for charitable campaign By Abby Flores THE PAN AMERICAN The University of Texas-Pan American has helped the State Employee Charitable Campaign (SECC) improve the quality of life for people in local communities since 1994. Last year UTPA raised approximately $19,800 and this year’s goal is $25,000. Established by legislation in 1993, SECC’s purpose is to allow state

employees of Texas to donate to a variety of local, regional and nationwide charities, helping the less fortunate that need assistance of any type; participants include every state agency in the Rio Grande Valley. For Human Resources Associate and SECC coordinator Gilbert Perez Jr., making a difference through this year’s campaign is the main priority. UTPA would like to see more staff and faculty participate to help make a change for those in need.

“The more The Valley camawareness, the “With the number of paign goal for 2008 more successful employees here, I wish there is $250,000 and to we can be. We would be more participants. help reach it, Perez want to spread the has begun to e-mail We could all help make a and notify all faculword, that together we care,” Perez difference.” ty and staff. Also, said. “By having pre-coded pledge more individuals Janette Garcia forms have been donate at least $2, UTPA HR sent to all employwe can make more ees that contributed of an impact as opposed to just the last year. When making pledges or donations, payroll deduction is only returning contributors’ donations.”

available for full-time employees. But, all employees are able to make a one-time donation by cash, check or money order. Donation forms are available at the Human Resource office or can be filled out through the Web site at h t t p : / / w w w. u t p a . e d u / h u m a n r e sources/SECCMAIN.htm and should be dropped off through campus mail or personally delivered. In preparation, a kickoff meeting

SEE SECC || PAGE 12

T HEALTH

UTPA promotes disability awareness By Janette Soliz THE PAN AMERICAN More than 30 students participated in the Disability Awareness Day’s White Cane March on Monday to help raise awareness among students, faculty and staff and the community about the problems facing the visually impaired. This is not the first year that Disability Awareness activities have been carried out on campus. October is Disability Awareness Month and the DAD’s planning committee wanted to spread awareness to the next level. All events are sponsored by UTPA’s Empowerment Zone, Workforce Solutions, Division for Blind Services, a state agency, Student Government Association and Career Services. Bruce Reed, dean of the College of Health Science and Human Services,

spoke about the importance of making sure people with disabilities can navigate their way through the world. “People with disabilities want access to society, work, community involvement and relationships,” he said. Reed, who suffers from muscular dystrophy, added that 54 million Americans have a documented disability, including 45,000 people aged 16 and up in the Rio Grande Valley. Jayshree Bhat, disability program navigator and Project RISE director from Workforce Solutions, helped coordinate the event and congratulated participants on taking a walk in a visually impaired person’s shoes. Project RISE (Regional Initiative for Supported Employment) is a three-year grant-funded project that is creating new opportunities for high school seniors in special educa-

SEE MARCH || PAGE 12

Onydia Garza/THE PAN AMERICAN

INSIGHT - Participants for Disability Awareness Day’s White Cane March walk down Troxel Lawn on Monday. The walk, which began at the Social and Behavioral Sciences building and ended at the University Ballroom, was the kickoff to a week of events.

T ENTREPRENEURSHIP

CoBA raises business interest through contest By Abigail Muniz THE PAN AMERICAN

With successful projects like the Mercado Delta in Edcouch offering opportunities for local entrepreneurs to develop a business, The University of Texas-Pan American is intent on supporting students with similar ventures. To that end, The College of Business Administration is hosting The Great Business Idea Contest, in which students will be able to expose an innovative idea in a fun way. Deadline for the contest is Nov. 11. “It’s an elevator pitch,” said Penny Simpson, management marketing

and international business professor. Smolarski said. “It was on a smaller “In other words, if you have an idea scale without prize money and we had and you want to share it with some a pretty good response.” venture capitalOne similarity ist, then you “The college is very interest- between last year’s might catch them ed in encouraging students project and The Great in the elevator Business Idea Contest is that stuand you just toward innovation.” dents had the chance have a minute or two to pitch your Penny Simpson to make a YouTube Management marketing idea to them.” presentation out of According to professor their idea. Last year though, there was no Jan Smolarski, accounting and business law profes- prize money and only students in the sor, this isn’t the first year CoBA has College of Business Administration taken on a venture such as this. participated. “We had a test run last year,” Any student on campus will be eli-

gible to enter the contest, which will allow them to present their idea in a YouTube video. The prize for a student group will be $1,000 and qualification for enrollment in a special entrepreneurship course offered by Smolarski in the spring. CoBA’s goal is to get students to be original so that the department can help them get their idea more developed. “The college is very interested in encouraging students toward innovation,” Simpson said. “[CoBA] is trying to get them to be creative and to help them implement the ideas.” Much like CoBA, the Mercado Delta project has similar goals. The

$3.1 million endeavor of U.S. Congressman Ruben Hinojosa was created to help the Delta region’s economy by giving opportunities to local entrepreneurs. The Delta region includes communities such as La Villa and Edcouch. According to the Small Business Development Center at UTPA, there were 9,338 small businesses reported in Hidalgo County in 2007 alone. UTPA student Felix Garcia, the National Hispanic Professional Organization president on campus, said he believes this contest has the potential to benefit all UTPA students.

SEE IDEA || PAGE 12


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Dates to Know: Guitar Hero Tournament Oct. 13 3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Student Union Game Lounge October 9, 2008

Spin Your Beat Oct. 14 6 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Courtyard

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THE PAN AMERICAN

T MUSIC REVIEWS

T TV CORNER

McMahon tells life through music By Marco Carbajal THE PAN AMERICAN “And even if your voice comes back again, maybe there’ll be no one listening.” Andrew McMahon wrote those lyrics in the midst of a two-year battle with leukemia that threatened to not only take his voice, but his life. He needn’t have worried, though. Now in remission, he and his band Jack’s Mannequin returned better than ever Sept. 30 with their second album “The Glass Passenger.” Fortunately for McMahon, the future looks crystal clear. Jack’s Mannequin is a group from Orange County, Calif., that was formed in 2004 while McMahon was on a break from touring with his first group, Something Corporate. McMahon began writing songs that he thought were too different to use as material for the punk-sounding Something Corporate. Using his own money, he produced the songs himself and garnered the attention of Maverick Records; soon McMahon came together with Bobby “Raw” Anderson, Jonathan Sullivan and Jay

McMillian to form Jack’s Mannequin. However, on the day that Mannequin finished their first album, “Everything in Transit” in 2005, McMahon was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and all tour plans were scrapped. During his twoyear ordeal, McMahon underwent two rounds of chemotherapy and a stemcell transplant with his sister Katie serving as the donor. Both procedures worked and McMahon was given a clean bill of health in 2007, leaving him with a new lease on life and a non-profit cancer research organization he started called The Dear Jack Foundation (www.dearjackfoundation.com), which the band routinely holds benefits for. Their sophomore effort from Sire Records definitely reaches new musical heights with catchy, driven beats and ethereal vocals that could help solidify alternative piano rock as a new staple in music. To say that the new album’s raw emotion was inspired by McMahon’s recent cancer scare would be a gross understatement. While still managing to remain

fresh and deliciously pop-esque, the songs are littered with lyrics confronting fear, uncertainty and ultimately, hope. One perfect example is a track entitled “Swim” on which McMahon sings, “You gotta swim/ swim for your life/ swim for the music that saves you/ when you’re not so sure you’ll survive.” The ballad “Annie Get Your Telescope” is another awesome piece with beautiful orchestration, and another gem is “American Love,” on which McMahon laments about love slipping away. Other powerful tracks include the upbeat “Crashin’” on which McMahon contemplates what his life will be like after recovery, and “Caves,” where a slow, ballad-like beginning crecendoes into McMahon belting, “we’re not gonna lie/ son, you just might die.” While the lyrics can be dark at times, the almost ‘80s vibe the music has going adds a little fun to the reality and emotion behind the music. The album’s first single “The Resolution,” is currently No. 29 on the Billboard Hot Modern Rock Tracks Chart. The video for the single

was written and directed by “Twighlight” author Stephanie Meyer and is already in heavy rotation on MTV and VH1. Anyone who hasn’t heard of Jack’s Mannequin should definitely get schooled. This awesome new album blends intimate lyrics with a great pop sound that you just know will soon be featured on TV dramas like Grey’s Anatomy and The Hills. Chances are, if you enjoyed groups like The Fray, Snow Patrol and Ben Folds, you will definitely appreciate all that The Glass Passenger has to offer. Get in on the band now, while they’re still relative newbies. Grade: B+

PHOTO FROM AMAZON.COMR

Jenny Lewis serves up Southern blues By Isaac Garcia THE PAN AMERICAN There has been a vast increase in the number of female singer/songwriters releasing music this year, making it difficult to sort out true talent from a buffet of musical filler that has unfortunately become as marketable as Britney Spears. Thankfully, the powers that be, have sent the musical veteran, Jenny Lewis, to save the day with her angelic voice, earnest lyrics and at times, a dirty mouth. Probably the most gleaming example of consumer pap in the past few months is singer Katy Perry, whose breakout hit, “I Kissed a Girl,” topped the charts in 20 countries, including the United States, according to Billboard. Perry, whose lyrics include,” I kissed a girl and I liked it,” and “You’re so gay and you don’t even like boys,” is dominating the airwaves with a purely filler and marketable sound that is both deliberate and well crafted. But on Sept. 23, the 32-year-old Lewis came to wash the filler blues

away, or maybe bring the actual blues back. “Acid Tongue” marks Lewis’ second venture as a solo artist as she joined forces with musicians The Watson Twins for her first solo endeavor, “Rabbit Fur Coat,” in 2006. Lewis’ lyrical genius and folkdriven sound were deep and touching as she sang in retrospect with lyrics like, “I was born secular and inconsolable. I heard that he walked, he walked the earth. God goes where he wants and who knows where he is not. Not in me.” This time around Lewis delivers a simply crafted “Acid Tongue” that blurs the lines between a timeless classic country, pop, folk, indie, Southern blues album that captures the truest essence of a live performance. Don’t let “Acid Tongue’s” genreblurring sound lead to a belief that it is overly produced and thought out. Lewis couldn’t have delivered a more stripped and raw-sounding album. Standout tracks include: The title track showcases Lewis’ vocal and musical simplicity while

confessing her troubles through lyrics, “To be lonely is a habit, like smoking or taking drugs. And I’ve quit them both. But man, was it rough.” “The Next Messiah,” is an almost 9-minute long Southern opera that Lewis describes as an ode to Barbara Streisand and the devil that was tracked completely live. “Jack Killed Mom,” makes listeners feel like they are in a Southerngospel church, while Lewis’ alto vocal range beautifully peaks and wails to the melody. “Carpetbaggers,” features music veteran and old-timer Elvis Costello melodically harmonizing his raspy voice with Lewis’ angelic chorus as they sing, “They come to town when the war is over. Dirty boots in the middle of the night. Trolling the bars, hitting on the soldiers. Boys give it up without a fight.” Other collaborators in the album include guitarist M. Ward, singer and actress Zooey Deschanel. Lewis is no stranger to exploring her musical outlets and seems comfortable in any genre and setting, from leading vocals, playing guitar, or even

playing the piano. Since 1998, Lewis has fronted the Los Angeles based: indie-rock band, Rilo Kiley, releasing a total of five albums from the indie/folk inspired “Take- Offs and Landings” in 2001 to the politically charged “More Adventurous” in 2004, and most recently the sexually and sultry “Under the Black Light” in 2007. Having been around for many years, Lewis holds the edge over the vast growing number of female songwriters that have emerged in the past few years, and “Acid Tongue” proves to be a perfect example. Grade: A-

PHOTO FROM AMAZON.COM

“Fringe” By Isaac Garcia THE PAN AMERICAN Albert Einstein once famously said, “Technological progress is like an ax in the hands of a pathological criminal.” “Fringe” is a new series that premiered Sept. 9, exploring the realm of horrific possibilities that Einstein once spoke of. Created by J.J. Abrams, (“Alias,” “Lost”), “Fringe,” airs every Tuesday at 8 p.m. on FOX, and looks at the results of technological and scientific experiments by so-called fringe science. These experiments are orchestrated by an unknown, Frankenstein-like organization that brings people back from the dead, employs strange LSD trips into the unconscious mind and infects a flight of passengers with a horrific flesh eating chemical, using the unsuspecting public as its guinea pig. Starring Australia native Anna Torv as FBI agent Olivia Dunham, John Noble (“The Lord of The Rings: Return of The King”), as mentally unstable scientist, Walter Bishop, and Joshua Jackson (“Dawson’s Creek”), as Peter Bishop, Walter Bishop’s skeptic son, “Fringe” follows their quest to uncover the truth and prevent mad scientists from manipulating the public. In the process, they uncover a conspiracy of massive proportions. Fringe science is best described as a branch of science that is purely speculative, unorthodox, and considered hearsay by the mainstream scientific community. However, “Fringe” isn’t the first series to venture into the scientific unknown. The plot might seem a bit familiar as shows like “The X-Files” and “The Twilight Zone” has provided the ingredients for its recipe. “Fringe” draws from “The X-Files” for a believer/skeptic dynamic, government conspiracy and search for the truth, and weird science and unexpected twists from “The Twilight Zone.” Consider “Fringe” a modern update to its inspirational predecessors. But why should people tune in? Aside from its theatre-like special effects, there are interesting characters - especially the lovable yet insane mad scientist, Bishop. FOX has just ordered a full season consisting of a total of 22 episodes.


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

October 9, 2008

October 9, 2008

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

What does choice really mean? By Laura Garcia THE PAN AMERICAN “If you ask me what I came to do in this world, I, an artist, I will answer you: I am here to live out loud.” Acclaimed French author Emile Zola BIRTH OF AN ARTIST Luis Contreras is doing just that. Living out loud, this is the philosophy that underpins his passion and life’s work. “We become artists because we want to say something. My art is my communication. The way a writer uses words, I speak with images,” Contreras said. A Mission native and a University of TexasPan American alum, the 28-year-old received his undergraduate degree in fine arts (painting and drawing concentration) from UTPA in 2004 and a master’s of fine arts in printmaking from the Ohio State University in 2006. At some point in their lives artists should ask themselves a seemingly simple question: “Why do I make art?” Some may shrug their shoulders, while others may give a deer-in-the-headlights look. For Contreras, the answer comes easily. “As an artist, a thinker, I challenge myself constantly in order to evolve.” Contreras credits his early interest in art to his father, a painter. Playing shadow to his father’s creativity, he was always fascinated at how a few drawn lines can eventually transcend into a figure. As he grew up and gained a better understanding of art, he took the aesthetic on its own route, as art and everything it encompasses just felt right to him. He eventually stepped away from drawing and now specializes in mixed media and conceptual art. Mixed media is the usage of different forms and mediums including but not limited to paint, ink and collage. All are combined through a process of layering. It is important for the artist to

Design by Rick Gamez

Photos by Luis Contreras. All artwork is ©

choose a sturdy foundation and work from there, allowing enough time for all layers to dry. Conceptual art is derived from an idea and usually involves research as well and tedious planning. “I walked through a building trying to exit. I found the exit sign and it gave me two options, take the right hallway or the left one. I took one, then backtracked to and through the other to find that both exit doors were actually only fire escapes. There really wasnt an exit. I was given options, but then had them taken away,” said Contreras. Contreras cannot stress enough that he wants his work to contain substance, striving for it to be meaningful, both to himself and to audiences. Of all his inspirations and influences, he attributes education as the biggest motivator. “Education is the finest thing that ever happened to my art. My art along with my philosophies, is where it is at today because of how my education trained me to see and think,” Contreras said. Other influences include professional artists Barbara Kruger and Jasper Johns. His admiration for Kruger, currently a professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, is due to her use of black-and-white images to convey an ambiguous message. Kruger is best known for pieces such as: “I Shop Therefore I Am” (1990) and “Face It!” (2007). Contreras had the opportunity to view her exhibit while he attended Ohio State. Johns is best known for his “Target” series where he painted targets onto panels. His raw approach is what caught Contreras’ attention. He currently resides in Connecticut and his work is represented in nearly every major museum. IN HIS ELEMENT Contreras is full-time practicing artist who runs a studio at the Upper Valley Art League and up until recently was also the curator there. Retired painting professor Stephen Pentak, once asked him, “What is it about your work

that in ten years people will look at it and know that it’s one of yours?” Pentak’s question caused Contreras to constantly question his work and in turn, help him realize what kind of legacy he hopes to leave behind. “Questioning allows me to reinvent my work visually, constantly. A certain aspect or layer of information can be used in my work that people do not often see,” he said. “Those are the attributes, a result of constant questioning, that will hopefully gain some recognition in ten years or when I am no longer around.” All of Contreras’ work shares a common bond, being thematically linked in the search to express the question of choice. His earlier prints were on display at the “Everything’s Going to be OK” exhibit at the Mexic-Arte Museum in Austin. “Where would we be without instruction?” he asks. He describes it as someone being placed somewhere in an unfamiliar situation, becoming forced to trade independence for instruction,” he said. We may sometimes wander this world being led by signs that practically force our every move and somehow we never seem to question it. His exhibit featuring his installation, “An Independent Follower” opens today at the Arts Center in Corpus Christi. The installation requires the viewer to participate becoming the missing element. A maze is printed on sheets of paper, and is then pasted onto panels in traditional billboard fashion; the panels are then suspended from the ceiling down a corridor. The face of each panel depicts the back of a figurative image, the panels then become a crowd. “The maze forces that reliance on signs in order to conduct ourselves. In general, the figurative form is trusted because of what it represents: us,” the artist explains. “We understand and can cope with the actions of another figure. We rely following someone when they guide the way.” Other works include prints, billboards and

street signs he calls “physical print.” One piece titled “Unititled Think” depicts a stop sign but instead of the word STOP, the word THINK is shown. Throughout the evolution of his work, he’s learned that different things can be done, not so much to improve the work but to fine-tune the idea and the point he is trying to get across. Contreras has adopted the less-is-more concept during the creative process, which helps when he lays down his idea in a particular medium. “You don’t have to bombard people, if one word explains it, use it,” he explained. ARTISTIC DUTIES Contreras is also a part-time lecturer at UTPA, and through his drawing and design classes, he hopes to expose students to modern art and get them to take an interest in it. He feels it is important to challenge a student and ask, “What can you do and why do you do it?” While not everyone may be an art fanatic, there are enough people in the Valley who have made it a priority to enable the Valley’s art scene to flourish. Still, it pales in comparison to that of bigger cities such as Austin and Dallas. However, with new construction on an “Art Village” in McAllen’s Art District, it may be possible to eventually reach the level of the more cosmopolitan places. Contreras believes more public art, public critique and open studio sessions will help the area scene mature. He is an enthusiast of public art because it allows the artist to relay a message to a mass audience, versus gallery exhibits that have limited exposure. “A great example of public art is the Christo Gates at Central Park in New York that was shown in 2005,” he added. Contreras is currently working on a traffic sign series, in which he juxtaposes images from the street; his plan is to present them in a way that challenges one’s conditioning and perception of what is familiar.


Page 8

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

October 9, 2008

October 9, 2008

Page 9

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

What does choice really mean? By Laura Garcia THE PAN AMERICAN “If you ask me what I came to do in this world, I, an artist, I will answer you: I am here to live out loud.” Acclaimed French author Emile Zola BIRTH OF AN ARTIST Luis Contreras is doing just that. Living out loud, this is the philosophy that underpins his passion and life’s work. “We become artists because we want to say something. My art is my communication. The way a writer uses words, I speak with images,” Contreras said. A Mission native and a University of TexasPan American alum, the 28-year-old received his undergraduate degree in fine arts (painting and drawing concentration) from UTPA in 2004 and a master’s of fine arts in printmaking from the Ohio State University in 2006. At some point in their lives artists should ask themselves a seemingly simple question: “Why do I make art?” Some may shrug their shoulders, while others may give a deer-in-the-headlights look. For Contreras, the answer comes easily. “As an artist, a thinker, I challenge myself constantly in order to evolve.” Contreras credits his early interest in art to his father, a painter. Playing shadow to his father’s creativity, he was always fascinated at how a few drawn lines can eventually transcend into a figure. As he grew up and gained a better understanding of art, he took the aesthetic on its own route, as art and everything it encompasses just felt right to him. He eventually stepped away from drawing and now specializes in mixed media and conceptual art. Mixed media is the usage of different forms and mediums including but not limited to paint, ink and collage. All are combined through a process of layering. It is important for the artist to

Design by Rick Gamez

Photos by Luis Contreras. All artwork is ©

choose a sturdy foundation and work from there, allowing enough time for all layers to dry. Conceptual art is derived from an idea and usually involves research as well and tedious planning. “I walked through a building trying to exit. I found the exit sign and it gave me two options, take the right hallway or the left one. I took one, then backtracked to and through the other to find that both exit doors were actually only fire escapes. There really wasnt an exit. I was given options, but then had them taken away,” said Contreras. Contreras cannot stress enough that he wants his work to contain substance, striving for it to be meaningful, both to himself and to audiences. Of all his inspirations and influences, he attributes education as the biggest motivator. “Education is the finest thing that ever happened to my art. My art along with my philosophies, is where it is at today because of how my education trained me to see and think,” Contreras said. Other influences include professional artists Barbara Kruger and Jasper Johns. His admiration for Kruger, currently a professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, is due to her use of black-and-white images to convey an ambiguous message. Kruger is best known for pieces such as: “I Shop Therefore I Am” (1990) and “Face It!” (2007). Contreras had the opportunity to view her exhibit while he attended Ohio State. Johns is best known for his “Target” series where he painted targets onto panels. His raw approach is what caught Contreras’ attention. He currently resides in Connecticut and his work is represented in nearly every major museum. IN HIS ELEMENT Contreras is full-time practicing artist who runs a studio at the Upper Valley Art League and up until recently was also the curator there. Retired painting professor Stephen Pentak, once asked him, “What is it about your work

that in ten years people will look at it and know that it’s one of yours?” Pentak’s question caused Contreras to constantly question his work and in turn, help him realize what kind of legacy he hopes to leave behind. “Questioning allows me to reinvent my work visually, constantly. A certain aspect or layer of information can be used in my work that people do not often see,” he said. “Those are the attributes, a result of constant questioning, that will hopefully gain some recognition in ten years or when I am no longer around.” All of Contreras’ work shares a common bond, being thematically linked in the search to express the question of choice. His earlier prints were on display at the “Everything’s Going to be OK” exhibit at the Mexic-Arte Museum in Austin. “Where would we be without instruction?” he asks. He describes it as someone being placed somewhere in an unfamiliar situation, becoming forced to trade independence for instruction,” he said. We may sometimes wander this world being led by signs that practically force our every move and somehow we never seem to question it. His exhibit featuring his installation, “An Independent Follower” opens today at the Arts Center in Corpus Christi. The installation requires the viewer to participate becoming the missing element. A maze is printed on sheets of paper, and is then pasted onto panels in traditional billboard fashion; the panels are then suspended from the ceiling down a corridor. The face of each panel depicts the back of a figurative image, the panels then become a crowd. “The maze forces that reliance on signs in order to conduct ourselves. In general, the figurative form is trusted because of what it represents: us,” the artist explains. “We understand and can cope with the actions of another figure. We rely following someone when they guide the way.” Other works include prints, billboards and

street signs he calls “physical print.” One piece titled “Unititled Think” depicts a stop sign but instead of the word STOP, the word THINK is shown. Throughout the evolution of his work, he’s learned that different things can be done, not so much to improve the work but to fine-tune the idea and the point he is trying to get across. Contreras has adopted the less-is-more concept during the creative process, which helps when he lays down his idea in a particular medium. “You don’t have to bombard people, if one word explains it, use it,” he explained. ARTISTIC DUTIES Contreras is also a part-time lecturer at UTPA, and through his drawing and design classes, he hopes to expose students to modern art and get them to take an interest in it. He feels it is important to challenge a student and ask, “What can you do and why do you do it?” While not everyone may be an art fanatic, there are enough people in the Valley who have made it a priority to enable the Valley’s art scene to flourish. Still, it pales in comparison to that of bigger cities such as Austin and Dallas. However, with new construction on an “Art Village” in McAllen’s Art District, it may be possible to eventually reach the level of the more cosmopolitan places. Contreras believes more public art, public critique and open studio sessions will help the area scene mature. He is an enthusiast of public art because it allows the artist to relay a message to a mass audience, versus gallery exhibits that have limited exposure. “A great example of public art is the Christo Gates at Central Park in New York that was shown in 2005,” he added. Contreras is currently working on a traffic sign series, in which he juxtaposes images from the street; his plan is to present them in a way that challenges one’s conditioning and perception of what is familiar.


Page 10

October 9, 2008

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

T CULTURE AND FILM

Golden age of Mexican Cinema revisited By Russen Vela THE PAN AMERICAN Anyone who is anyone knows about the Golden Age of Hollywood cinema; it lasted from the end of the silent era in the late 1920s to the late 1950s. That era produced such movie stars such as Marylin Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Marlon Brando, Katherine Hepburn, Grace Kelly and Cary Grant, just to name a few on the big screen, and viewers worldwide grew to idolize them and fantasize about dreams of Hollywood. However, while there is much talk about the Golden Age of Hollywood cinema, there was also a similar period in Mexico. The Golden Age of Mexican cinema took place during the 1940s and beyond up until the early 1980s. The most prominent during this period was Mario Moreno, better known as Cantinflas. The film Ahí está el detalle (There is the Detail) in 1940 made Cantinflas a household name, and he became known as the “Mexican Charlie Chaplin” to Americans. Now the classic Mexican era will get some publicity, thanks to an exhibit at South Texas College that began Sept. 18. Rogelio Agrasánchez Jr., the son of retired Mexican movie producer Rogelio Agrasánchez Sr., has donated some of his own and his father’s movie memorabilia to STC’s Pecan Campus Library Art Gallery. His memorabilia consists of vintage lithographs and posters from the Golden Age of Mexican cinema, not only from his favorite films, but also from ones his father produced and distributed. “My father was first a film distributor and afterwards a Mexican movie producer during the 1970s and 1980s,” Agrasánchez Jr. said. “He started distributing films in the 1960s, and then he later established his company and in 1970 produced his first movie.” Agrasánchez Sr. made a movie

called Los Campeones Justicieros (The Champions of Justice) that was about five masked wrestlers who fought against a mad scientist and his army of powerful midgets. It was a big box-office success in Mexico and after it was in the can, Agrasánchez Sr. made more films, and before he retired was in on 75 projects in all. Agrasánchez Jr. noted that his father’s themes derived from action and fantasy stories. “Since action movies were most popular, my father decided his first film would have to have a lot of car chases, fights and explosions,” he said. The Mexico City-born Harlingen resident continued telling proud stories about his father, even boasting that the elder Agrasánchez shot one of his action pictures at South Padre Island in 1979, a first for Mexican cinema. The movie dealt with the famous mystery of the Bermuda Triangle and its title was Misterio en las Bermudas. Urban comedies were also a favorite among Agrasánchez Sr.’s resume. Among his productions was, La Pachanga, which won several awards in Mexico and in Europe. A vintage poster from that film, done by famous caricaturist Ernesto “Chango” García Cabral, is featured at the STC library exhibition. When asked why he wanted to donate the material to the gallery, Agrasánchez Jr. simply explained that they capture the spirit of the movies. “They are wonderful caricatures of Mexican comedians like Tin Tan, Resortes, Cantinflas, Joaquín Pardavé,” said Agrasánchez Jr. “They also feature sexy images of actresses like Amalia Aguilar, Silvia Pinal and many other famous actresses who could rival in looks and talent; the Hollywood actresses.” The posters and lithographs were created as advertising material but Agrasánchez Jr. insists they are true works of art, adding that one can

admire the perfection of the lines, the sense of perspective and the unity and synthesis of the whole drawing. “You don’t need to be a fan of Mexican cinema to enjoy and appreciate this fine art,” he said. “This type of art is most appreciated by collectors all over the world.” Sofia Perez, the art gallery assistant for the STC Library Art Gallery program, was enthusiastic about the exhibit being shown at the gallery. “This exhibit is really worth coming to see,” said Perez. “We are displaying a very special and unique collection of original 1940s & ‘50s cinema lithograph prints from Mexico that features the distinguishable caricatures and illustrations by Ernesto García Cabral.” Perez, a graduate of Southern Methodist University in Dallas with a degree in art history gave further information on how she got to meet and set up the exhibit with help from Agrasánchez himself. “I had heard of Mr. Agrasánchez’s film archive and collection through some very close friends of mine,” the McAllen native

said. “I then contacted him in regards to his collection of original film posters designed by Ernesto García Cabral and proposed an exhibition to be held at our Library Art Gallery.” The turn out so far, Perez exclaimed, has been wonderful. During the opening night of the exhibit the gallery had about 80 people attend, walking about the gallery, admiring artifacts of the golden age. Agrasánchez is determined to preserve artifacts that tell the history of the great days of the Mexican cinema for generations to come. “It is a work of love,” said the archivist, who is also a researcher and author of Mexican cinema history books. “It has become my passion. Promoting the appreciation of Mexican cinema from the Golden Age and the people who made it inspires me to make research and to write and publish books.” Agrasánchez Jr. has been in this profession since 1988. Agrasánchez’s archive gallery is located in Harlingen, Texas where he explains that the work done in the archive is to contribute to the study and

FILMS COME ALIVE - A collage of the Mexican Golden Age of Cinema by Ernesto “Chango” Cabral.

appreciation of Mexican cinema produced from the 1920s to the 1980s. Its basic tenet is that all films are a valuable part of history and singular expressions of culture. Agrasánchez also states that the archive is a preservation of all sorts of documents, publications and, in some cases, artifacts that are relevant to the history of Mexican cinema; in the future, professionally designed facilities will hold these collections. People wanting a taste of the good old days should go see the poster exhibit at STC Library Art Gallery. And for those who are not interested in Mexican cinema, it is still very intriguing and fascinating because of the intrinsic value of Cabral’s caricature art posters, with Agrasánchez background and history tied to them. Monica Rodriguez, a sophomore art major, thought that the exhibit was a good thing to showcase what she thinks are better posters than the typical Hollywood posters. “I think that the posters for the Mexican cinema are more dramatic and more powerful than the old Hollywood posters,” said Rodriguez. “The colors are more vibrant, they, the posters get the message or theme of the movie across to the audience, and they make for excellent pieces of art to decorate a fancy house.” The Edinburg native said she would be attending the exhibit once she had the chance, because she would love to see the posters up close and admire their uniqueness. This exhibit premiered at the Pecan Campus Library in McAllen Sept. 18 will last until Oct. 30. Then it will go to other STC venues in Weslaco and Rio Grande City, appearing at the STC Mid-Valley Campus Library Art Gallery in Weslaco from Oct. 30 through Dec. 12, 2008 and at the Starr County Campus Library Art Gallery in Rio from Feb. 5 through March 6, 2009.

T SEEN AND CAPTURED

Test your skills The University of Texas-Pan American Disability Awareness Days (DAD) presents canvas paintings by blind artists. The artists invite you to interpret the artist’s vision and guess the title of the abstract paintings. Be the first person to guess it correctly and win prizes. Attend the technology fair today to find out if your guess is right. The winner will be announced at the Network Social from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Student Union. For more information, please call 381-2468 or e-mail question to dads2008@gmail.com CAN YOU GUESS? - (RIGHT) Senior

Gabriel Fuentes views one of the abstracts set up in the library. The paintings were all done by blind artists.

Roxy Solis/THE PAN AMERICAN


October 9, 2008

Page 11

NEWS

CLINTON continued from Page 1 efforts. Later in the evening she attended a private fundraising event. As she asserted her confidence in his leadership abilities, Clinton said Noriega’s military experience is a great asset and will aid him in his representation of Texas in the U.S. Senate. Noriega served multiple tours of duty, from fighting terrorism in Afghanistan to commanding the Laredo Sector during Operation Jumpstart, an operation where the Army National Guard assisted the U.S. Border Patrol in securing the southwestern border with Mexico. On the issue of immigration,

Clinton said Noriega is for “smart immigration reform.” Both politicians addressed locals’ concerns about the need for a veterans hospital. Noriega, a former four-term Texas State Representative from Houston, said he served his country with a lot of veterans who were from the Rio Grande Valley. “My commitment to the veteran community is that this (a veterans hospital) will be my first priority going into the U.S. Senate,” he said. “My work in the Texas Legislature has been successful because we stand up and fight for veterans and for the

families of Texas.” Clinton said there has been some progress on South Texas veterans’ issues, but that it’s been difficult considering cutbacks made by the Bush administration. Addressing the current economic crisis, Clinton said it’s a difficult time in America because of market turmoil. “The credit markets are basically frozen. People can’t get money to buy homes or cars,” she stressed. “We don’t have a lot of time in our economy to turn things around, and that’s why we need another Democrat in the U.S. Senate. All those who supported

me need to redouble their efforts to support Rick Noriega.” On another issue, Clinton said both she and Noriega want to see health care for every single American. Currently there are 46 million citizens without basic coverage, and the issue has occupied the presidential candidates during their debate season, which rolled on Tuesday at Nashville. “If people understand what’s at stake, they’ll vote in Rick Noriega,” the former First Lady said. “I hope I’ll have the honor of serving with him in the U.S. Senate.” Commenting about elections

nationwide, Clinton said she believes it will be a tremendous year for Democrats. “It could be one of those great moments in American history where the stars come into alignment,” she said. “Imagine a Democratic president, a Democratic House, and a Democratic Senate that is more than just a razor-thin majority… how much we could accomplish.” To this end, Clinton, who was defeated in the primary season by Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois, repeated that she is a firm supporter of the Obama-Biden ticket.

cities in its time, both the seat and the railroad would sustain Edinburg for about 100 years. “Today we stand in probably one of the most prided buildings, the museum; a place where you can look back those hundred years and experience it,” Ochoa said. The celebration was a time for many to commemorate lost and found pieces of history from early Edinburg, but it was also a time warp for many Edinburg citizens that contribute to the city today. Lynne Beeching, marketing director at the museum, was thrilled to show the public the museum’s collections. “We’re pretty excited about showing the museum to the public, we have a wonderful treasure here,” said Beeching. “People are always blown away when they come here.” Beeching’s family has been firmly rooted in Edinburg for three generations. She recalled a vibrant downtown area in the 1950s, with a drive-in theatre where Wal-Mart now stands on University Drive. “It was a lot smaller and much livelier downtown area, there was less crime and more of an open community,” said Beeching. The Pan American University alum, who received her bachelor’s in history in 1975 and marketing in 1978, said she remembers a smaller university with numerous campus

clubs and organizations. “I was involved with Kappa Delta and the Greek council, it was great, just the size I was accustomed to,” said Beeching, though she doesn’t really know what UTPA is like now. In another part of the museum, Pena viewed old pictures of Edinburg and recalled the city’s change from a town of veiled segregation to a more integrated whole. “When I was a boy, Hispanics were just being elected [in office] and Edinburg was segregated informally with the majority of Hispanics living on the east side and Anglos on the west side,” Pena said. “Now all our children are expected to graduate together.” Pena, who played around UTPA as a boy, also recognized the institution as a place that has put Edinburg on the map. “It will always be the intellectual spirit of the Valley,” said Pena Old photos and artifacts of Edinburg’s 100-year-long transition lined the museum, cataloging civic and political life. The kickoff was a moment of recollection and family gathering for Morin’s grandchildren and daughter, Letty Dominguez. Dominguez, who also grew up in Edinburg, said she recognized an old picture of the Golden Jersey Creamery with its cow mascot hanging above the sign.

“I remember when this cow was there, you used to go get the milk there,” said Dominguez, who brought her son along with her. “That was the only milk you could get here in the city.” The visit to the museum was a long time coming for Dominguez. “We haven’t been to this museum since we were 9 [years old], it’s nice to see what they have changed,” she said. Events throughout the week included a parade and Edinburg’s biggest birthday cake on Monday and an essay contest held by the city’s independent school district.

the university to expand westward, but that idea has run into a snag because UTPA is virtually landlocked. “All the land around the university is built up to the perimeter of the university,” he said, looking at an aerial map of the university. And this is not a problem limited to the Valley’s higher education apparatus. The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s fall 2007 Academic Space Projection Model shows that The University of TexasAustin is at a shortage of 1,423,175 square feet while UTPA is at a shortage of 326,742 square feet. Despite the shortage, McMillan said the software R25 uses, an algorithm called S25, helps make the process easier. “The system organizes classes effi-

ciently,” he said. “It’s going to schedule a large number of classes in a high-demand period.” McMillan added that Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Paul Sale and other administrators recently visited Austin to discuss the university’s need for more space. However, with funding from the state decreasing in the past five years, funding the construction – even if the university has the space – is difficult. For now, McMillan said the university’s short-term goal is to add more night classes, plus offerings on Friday afternoon and even Saturday. “Meeting the demands for growth is going to be critical for this university,” said McMillan. “The population here [Valley] is growing faster than many other areas.”

EDINBURG continued from Page 1

Ben Briones/THE PAN AMERICAN

HISTORY - Jessica Garza, a 19-year-old junior pre-med/biology major, looks at Edinburg’s growth over the years.

Centennial Events Oct. 9 Literary Day 6 p.m. Dustin Michael Sekula Library Oct. 10 Ribbon-cutting at The Depot 10 a.m. 602 W. University Drive Oct. 11 Genealogy Day 10 a.m. Dustin Michael Sekula Library

ENROLLMENT continued from Page 1 we need.” Guerra, accompanied by Rebekah Hamilton, associate dean of the college of arts and humanities, said it is of the college’s interest to make sure

professors teach a full load. “The worst case scenario is changing the class to a different time and day,” Hamilton said. Guerra added that low enrollment is

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Fall 2007 Academic Space Projection Model University of Texas at Austin University of Texas at San Antonio University of Texas at Arlington University of Texas at El Paso University of Texas at Dallas University of Texas at Brownsville University of Texas-Pan American University of Texas at Tyler University of Texas of the Permian Basin * Parenthesis denote square feet shortage

(1,423,175) (745,671) (596,509) (432,743) (402,579) (352,204) (326,742) (136,694) 21,798

one of the reasons classes are cancelled while students are enrolled in the class. However when students have not been enrolled and class rescheduling is still in the “strategic planning” stage, classes may be dropped, according to Guerra. She added that although this may be inconvenient for some professors, it means great things are happening at the university. “It’s a good problem because it means we are growing,” she said about the matter. The number of undergraduates graduating under the College of Arts and Humanities has more than doubled, according to a graph provided by CoAH. Dennis McMillan, associate vice president for enrollment and student services, said long-term goals are for


Page 12

SECC continued from Page 3 was held Oct.2 at the Student Union’s Palmetto Room to inform departmental designees with information needed to help raise awareness. Posters were hung around campus and information was posted on BroncNotes to get the word out. UTPA had an increase in contributions from approximately $13,600 in 2005 to $19,800 in 2007. According to Perez, name and amount donated cannot be disclosed. As of now, $5,500 has been raised. Janette Garcia, UTPA Human Resource associate and Immigration Coordinator, said she hopes the

turnout this year will be much better. “With the number of employees here, I wish there would be more participants. We could all help make a difference,” she said. Currently, there are 1,865 staff employed at UTPA. In contrast to last year, Perez has planned for more meetings with departmental designees to help provide more knowledge, instead of just one meeting. By contributing to the Valley’s Boys and Girls Club, The Salvation Army, United Way of South Texas, Food Bank of RGV and American Red

October 9, 2008

NEWS

Cross/South Texas Chapter, which are just some of the charities, SECC provides assistance to the elderly, shelter and food for the homeless, assistance in research for cancer and AIDS victims, as well as help for natural disaster relief victims. “It’s a human obligation. We’re to help, there’s always someone less fortunate,” said Edcouch-Elsa resident Delia Riojas, HR administrative associate. Donating $2 a month for one year can assist a homeless person with one day of food and shelter and also help provide meals for a homebound senior

citizen, this according to The Rio Grande Charity Listing for SECC. Giving up taken for granted luxury items may be part of the routine. “Who doesn’t spend $2 a month? Buying a Coke from the vending machine is almost the same price,” Garcia said. The national SECC program runs from Sept. 1 through Oct. 31, while UTPA’s campaign is from Oct. 1 until Oct. 17, allowing all forms to reach the Human Resources Office with enough time to be processed to the state auditor’s office by Oct. 31. All pledge forms are due at the

Human Resources Office by 5 p.m. on Oct. 17. For more information contact Gilbert Perez Jr. at (956) 384-5025.

MARCH continued from Page 3

Disabilities Health Screening & Assistive Technology Fair 10:00 a.m. to 2 p.m. DADs Networking Social & Recognition 2 p.m. to 4 p.m Student Union Commons

“I think it’s offering some space for become entrepreneurs one day. entrepreneurship to be a little more “The objectives are to get students emphasized here thinking innovativein this university,” “I think it’s offering some ly, to get them to Garcia said. “It space for entrepreneurship to think toward entreencourages and be a little more emphasized preneurship and to inspires students encourage teamto pursue the cre- here in this university...” work and leadership ativity part of their within the team,” Felix Garcia minds.” Simpson said. “And Garcia also said NHPO President just to have fun.” students from Smolarski every college should take advantage of encourages all students to participate. the contest since it will allow them to “It’s a very good exercise in dealexpose a unique idea they may have ing with creativity,” he said. “Even if never been able to bring to life. you’re planning to work in a large “This contest could be used as an company. Large companies someavenue to help [students] materialize times run into problems finding cresomething that they may have thought ative business ideas.” up in the past,” he said. All UTPA students are eligible to The goals of the contest, accord- participate in groups of two to five ing to Simpson, are to have students members. Competitors will have to also focus their attention on leader- write a two-to-three page business ship and how it can help them proposal about their idea as well as

develop a video no longer than 500 seconds which will be submitted on YouTube. Entries are due Nov. 11. For more information visit: http://coba.utpa.edu/greatbizidea2008.

eat Business Gr 1st place $1,000 2nd place $500 3rd place $250 Entries Due Nov. 11

a

Thursday events

IDEA continued from Page 3

Ide

Disability Awareness Days

Onydia Garza/THE PAN AMERICAN

BLIND EXPERIENCE - Marcos Silva, Student Government Association president, takes part in Monday’s White Cane March along with 30 others.

The

tion programs through interagency Marcos Silva, Student collaborations. Government Association president, “With close to 300 UTPA students attended the event and said the march with reported disability, it is high time experience was an eye-opener and that we get the campus community that occasionally bumping into peoinvolved in disability awareness activ- ple put things into perspective. He ities which will suggested that prior benefit everyone “People with disabilities knowledge could at the end,” Bhat also be a benefit. want access to society, work, said. “Being familiarThe walk began community involvement and ized already around at the Social and and relationships.” campus and knowBehavioral ing where things are Sciences building Bruce Reed helped me know and ended at the College of Health Science and where to go,” he U n i v e r s i t y Human Services dean explained. Ballroom, with all Cheryl Whitten, blindfolded partica rehab counseling ipants trying to understand what it’s graduate student, lost her vision two like to be sightless. They were instruct- years ago in September because of ed to use a cane, moving it in a 10-to-2 diabetes, after a stroke in 2005 had clockwise movement, to let the stick caused loss of sight in her right eye. lead and help prevent them from bumpWhitten recalled the first time she ing into things. had to use a cane, saying she was At first, the students walked with dependent on the assistance of family fear of not knowing what lay ahead members to hold her hand. of them, but after careful guidance by “One night after church, I was instructors from the Division for dropped off at home and I stood in Blind Services, they managed to pick front of the gate not knowing how to up the pace. enter my home,” said the Edinburg Joyce Rodriguez, one of the native. Eventually, my dog came to instructors who specialize in mobility me and I held on to him as he took and orientation with the DBS, said me to the front door of my house. I visually impaired students on campus felt like my world was shrinking, so use other senses to help them get after that moment I decided to use a around, and that the university has cane.” sought to construct other built-in aids. She added that using a walking aid DBS is a state agency and is part of allowed her to regain the freedom to the Department of Assistive & Rehab go places on her own. Services on campus, which provides Other upcoming events for DAD’s various services to individuals who week on Oct. 9 are Health Screening are blind or visually impaired. & Assistive Technology at the Student “The sidewalks make a sound that Union Commons from 10 a.m. to 2 echoes under the sidewalks that help p.m. and a DAD’s Networking Social the visually impaired know where & Recognition at the Library Court they’re going,” Rodriguez said. yard from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.


October 9, 2008

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Dates to Know:

Page 14

Cross Country

Men’s Tennis

Houston Baptist Invitational Friday Houston

UTSA Invite Friday-Saturday San Antonio October 9, 2008

THE PAN AMERICAN

T SOCCER CLUB

Broncs run by ‘Cats, women dropped by Big XII schools By Alvaro Balderas THE PAN AMERICAN

2-3-1 with two stoppers. We did this to add a little bit more defense and stop their penetrations.”

The University of Texas-Pan AmeriLADY BRONCS can men’s soccer club got its second win It is not often that UTPA athletics of the season at the UTPA intramural practice field Saturday by defeating gets the opportunity to play against the Texas State University 4-2 with the help University of Texas at home, but Sunof tally-man Juan “Puma” Reynoso, day, the women’s soccer club had that occasion and went down 3-0. who scored a hat trick. “I think we spread the ball wide Uncertain about the style of play from the San Marcos squad, the when we needed to, which helped us Broncs started the game with a 3-2-4- open the game more giving us the ad1 formation in order to establish a feel vantage,” Texas coach Travis Mackwell said. “It looked like they (UTPA) for the game. It did not take long for the Broncs were tired and we had more subs. We (2-1-1 now) to sense the Bobcats style made adjustments from the first half to and in the sixth minute of the first half, the second especially to the field conReynoso scored the first goal. The dition, which was a factor.” The Lady ‘Horns’ persistent play Bobcats responded quickly, tying the was too much as they outshot the score up in the 16th minute. Senior goal scorer Reynoso admits women 22-5. The first two goals came in the first he has a little bit of pressure every game because he is the reigning most half during the 17th and 30th minutes valuable player of the conference, an with a third tacked on in the second just accolade he attained by being the top before the game was over. “As a coach, we always want things goal scorer in the conference with 11 goals. This year he has four goals in to come out right,” women’s coach Hugo Zuniga said. four games. “We were look- Upcoming Soccer Schedule “We did what we Men’s could but our team ing for a win and I @Lamar 3 p.m. was fatigued. We think we got it for Oct. 11 @Texas A&M 1 p.m. have not worked at the first time playing Oct. 12 all during this week as a team. When we Women’s due to various reaplay like this it is Oct. 25 vs. Texas Tech 5 p.m. sons. Today’s outeasy to get goals,” @San Marcos come is similar to Reynoso explained. “This team was not a strong team but it what happened against the University of gave us confidence. If we would have Texas-San Antonio and our conditiontied or lost, our confidence would have ing. All in all, I liked that we showed degone down. This will help us going up termination and did not give up.” At times the Lady Broncs (1-3-1) against Texas A&M, which will be a showed some sparks and gave the tough game.” An opportunistic Broncs squad Longhorn squad trouble, but an obvitook advantage of momentum and ous lack of legs had the squad ailing. “I think we have to concentrate and were able to break through with three more goals, including one from mid- practice more as a team, especially get fielder Jose Ramon in the second half. more conditioned. I think we did what The Bobcats did not give up but we could,” said Lady Bronc sophoinstead pressed the Broncs well more Arnela Torres. throughout the game and were able to BAYLOR penetrate down the middle, giving Against another Big XII squad the UTPA some trouble. Through adjustments from head coach Marcelo day before, the Lady Broncs had a perSchmidt, the men were able to modify formance to forget as they lost 4-1 correctly, giving them a well-earned against Baylor University, also at home. A powerful Baylor team proved to be victory. “I think it was a good game. Once we too much for the women, who had far had a few minutes to assess the situation fewer scoring chances, as would be the and figure out what they were doing, we case the next day. The Lady Bears had found our first goal on a break through 15 goal opportunities compared to four play,” Schmidt said. “It gave us what we for UTPA. Thirteen more corner kicks needed in terms of energy and enthusi- helped the Lady Bears set up important asm. From there it was pretty much, not opportunities like the one that led to a necessarily downhill trip, but an easy their first goal in the 32nd minute. Just before the half, they doubled game where we still had to make adjustthe lead on a breakaway-through pass, ments and movements.” “People played well when we leaving the Lady Broncs bewildered. “I could not make the right formation changed formations on the dime. We modified our starting formation to a 4- throughout the game for us, and the lack

of practice left our girls lost,” Zuniga said. “I think we tried to give our best effort and I am glad for that. They played with heart and that is good. That is one thing I like about my team.” In the second half, the Lady Broncs came out rejuvenated and in the 15th minute, freshman forward Marcela Polanco scored their first goal. What seemed to start a rally, set off the Bear offense as they countered in the 31st and 36th minute, which left the Broncs without an answer. “We were expecting a good game and it was that. We had heard good things about the Pan American team and we were worried about our girls being a little bit dead leg from the eight hour drive from Waco,” Baylor coach Rick Whitley said. “They had some awesome players. The goalie had some wonderful saves. She is not very tall but there were two where she just saved them with her great leaping ability.” And that goalie was Edinburg native Yoli Pena, who had a nice outing against Baylor’s offense but could not contain all the scoring attacks the visitors threw at her. “I stopped what I could but there was a couple I should have been able to stop,” Pena said. “We started off slow the first half. It seemed like we were asleep. In the second, we got better but we were not focused enough in our defense. We tried to play the offside too much and because of that we were always left with a one-on-one situation.”

Roxy Solis/THE PAN AMERICAN

BITTERSWEET WEEKEND - Sophomore kinesiology major Arnela Torres (above, right) plays defense during the Lady Broncs’ 4-1 loss against Baylor Saturday afternoon. Meanwhile, the Broncs improved to a game over .500 after Saturday’s 4-2 win against Texas State with the help of doctoral business major Arne Baruka (left).

Onydia Garza/THE PAN AMERICAN


October 9, 2008

Page 15

SPORTS

T VOLLEYBALL

Lady Broncs fall to UTSA, continue home stretch By Sara Hernandez THE PAN AMERICAN

offering stiff defense. The third set gave UTPA fans a sense of comeback. The women stayed After a difficult road trip, The on top of the game and were able to University of Texas-Pan American’s record the 25-21 victory against the volleyball team was glad to return Lady Roadrunners. UTPA recorded 33 home to begin a four-game home stand. kills and only committed 11 errors But that home feeling quickly turned compared to UTSA’s 21 miscues. After an encouraging third set, the sour as the Lady Broncs dug themselves an early two-set deficit against Lady Roadrunners spoiled the potenThe University of Texas-San Antonio, tial comeback. The teams found themwhich they could never recover from, selves in a 20-20 deadlock, but after a losing 17-25, 20-25, 25-21, 20-25 series of errors by the Lady Broncs, Saturday afternoon at the Field House. UTSA took home the victory with a The first set started tied with the 25-20 fourth-set win. “I think we could have played a two teams scoring points after the other but after a 5-5 tie, the Lady little bit better, but I have to give hats Broncs were unable to remain on pace off to UTPA, they played great defense,” Lady Roadrunner coach with the Lady Roadrunners. Even though UTSA committed more Laura Groff said. Still, senior outside hitter Kellie errors (5-2) in the first set, the visitors also recorded more kills than UTPA Phillips noted she was frustrated with the way her (18-10), averaging a Volleyball Schedule team performed .419 hitting percentagainst UTSA. age against .276 by Remaining Home Games “We are so much the Lady Broncs, preventing them Oct. 10 Utah Valley State 7 p.m. better than this, but 7 p.m. it’s not showing the from scoring the Oct. 17 Chicago State 2 p.m. performance that we points necessary to Oct. 19 Houston Baptist 3 p.m. are capable of,” said give competition in Oct. 31 Texas Southern Phillips, who had a the opening set. A very similar story was presented .238 hitting percentage with 14 kills, in the second set. UTPA, now 3-10 on four errors, and 42 attacks in the game. Senior middle blocker Deanna the season, started with a two-point advantage and a 3-1 score when Schneyer, who returned to the lineup Danielle Reed and Marci Logan after an injury, recorded four kills on blocked an attack from Kelsey 10 attempts with two errors. Junior Schwirtlich. However, after UTSA Noelle Mayor of Missouri City, had caught up on a 6-6 tie, the visitors nine kills, one error and 25 attacks, made it impossible for the Lady while sophomore outside hitter Logan Broncs to even the score again by totaled 10 kills on 28 attempts.

UTPA coach Angela Hubbard stressed disappointment for not having taken advantage of UTSA’s mistakes. “UTSA definitely was not playing to their potential and I felt that we should have capitalized and we didn’t,” she said. “We didn’t really push pack as we should have, but we’ll go in practice, work hard and try to make changes for us to come out and do better against Utah Valley.” With only nine games remaining before the National Independent Tournament, the Lady Broncs will host four more home games at the Field House, including three straight beginning Friday against Utah Valley State. UTAH VALLEY STATE On Friday, the Lady Broncs will host the “Digs for the Cure” event at the Field House against Utah Valley State at 7 p.m., in an effort to promote a good cause. The beneficence game will consist of people pledging a voluntary amount of money per dig. The money raised will be donated to the Susan G. Komen Foundation for the fight against breast cancer. “It’s going to be awesome,” Schneyer said. “Everybody is going to be wearing pink.” Phillips also expressed her excitement for the cause and hopes they will be able to regain their swagger. “Everybody should come support that,” she said. “We are playing Utah Valley and they’re actually a very good team so we’re gonna have to step up our performance if we are planning on winning.”

Roxy Solis/THE PAN AMERICAN

BEEP BEEP! - Junior outside hitter Noelle Mayor (center) attacks the net during the Lady Broncs’ loss to UTSA Saturday.

T WOMEN’S GOLF

Lady Broncs struggle in Oklahoma By Pedro Perez IV THE PAN AMERICAN Cold weather, rain and wind sounds like the setting for a classic gridiron match in autumn, but unfortunately for the Lady Broncs golf team it was like that for the Oral Roberts University Shootout at the Meadowbrook Country Club in Tulsa. On Tuesday after three rounds on a flooded golf course, the Lady Broncs finished in 14th place dropping one spot from Monday’s 36-hole performance. “I have to say they did grind and they did fight for everything that was out there,” said second year director of men’s and women’s golf Ofelia Lopez. “It was raining and it was windy and cold but they (Lady Broncs) played.”

Roxy Solis/THE PAN AMERICAN

EYEING THE PUTT - Sophomore San Antonio native Haley Hocott shot a three-round score of 247, tying for 58th.

DAY ONE According to Lopez there was a 90percent chance of rain on Monday but fortunately for the Lady Broncs it was nothing they couldn’t handle. In front of the pack for the Lady Broncs in 30th place with a 15-overpar 159 was freshman Maria Jose Camey (77-82). One stroke behind

Camey and tied in 38th place senior Bronwyn Sandberg (79-81) finished the day with a 16-over-par 160. Sophomore Haley Hocott (82-82) finished her two rounds in a four-way tie in 57th place shooting 20-over-par 164. Valley native and junior Rebecca De Leon (83-83) shot 166 while freshman newcomer Sarah Kothny (82-87) ended her 36-hole run in 77th place with 169. DAY TWO On Tuesday the Lady Broncs were on the links again with standing water nearly flooding the course. Camey (81) shot a three-round score of 240 finishing in a four-way tie. Sandberg (82) ended her run tied in 43rd place with a three-round score of 242. The San Antonio native Hocott (83) finished tied for 58th place, shooting 247 over the 54 holes played. Kothny (81) finished her day tied in 69th place with an overall score of 250 and De Leon (89) ended up in a tie in 81st place after firing 255 over the two days. At the end of the three-round tournament Lopez felt the team had lost its

way in several key areas. “I have to say that we lost the confidence and trusting in ourselves,” she explained. “That’s what we’re going to be working on right now for the next tournament. We need to learn how to stay confident no matter who we play.” The Lady Broncs hit the links again Nov. 3 when they will participate in the University of Alabama Birmingham’s UAB Fall Beach Blast in Gulf Shores, Al. The Alabama trip could be the catalyst the team needs, as Lopez explained that in order to perform well as a team, the girls need a good performance at the tournament to rebuild some belief in themselves. Before they get there, however, a nearly month-long break between tournaments should help the effort as well. “We just need to go back to the basics,” Lopez concluded. “That means we need to go back to our mental game and stay confident, we need to start trusting in ourselves. We’re a great team and we know we can do it, we just actually need to go out and perform.”


Page 16

October 9, 2008

THE PAN AMERICAN

T FEATURE

By Ramiro Paez THE PAN AMERICAN Many people receive their 15 minutes of fame, but for University of Texas-Pan American junior Carlos Castaneda, 60 seconds will do just fine. Castaneda, a 21-year-old aspiring bodybuilder, had the opportunity to compete in the elusive 2008 NPC Gold’s Gym Classic Saturday at the McAllen Civic Center. Although he did not place in the top three of the men’s novice lightweight division, the experience was something he says was truly a “blessing.” “I’m very happy being that I’m young,” Castaneda said of his opportunity. “More than anything, it’s being able to start early to be able to progress in the future and expect better outcomes from myself.” Standing backstage at a bodybuilding competition was an intimidating environment, especially since Castaneda was a rookie and other bulky, fit physiques almost made him reconsider what he was about to do. Nonetheless, the time was now and there was no turning back. “The feeling, the nerves and the anxiety actually started the night before,” he said. “You train for months and months at a time and you never get to see who you’re competing against until you hit that day. Even though you try not to, some people can be pretty intimidating. Some people have backed out at that point because they see other people that look better than them. “I was one of those who did get intimidated, I’m not going to lie, but this was my first show and I just did it for experience.” But once the nerves settled, everything was smooth sailing. The minute-long flexing routine to “Welcome Home,” a Coheed and Cambria track, seemed to come naturally to Castaneda, almost like it does to 2006 Mr. Olympia Jay Cutler, who made a special guest appearance at the event. He didn’t quite feel like a movie star, but with the stage’s bright lights shining on him, it did make him feel superior. Before he knew it, the song was cut and his dream of one day performing in a live competition became a reality.

QuotesFrom TheStands

“It’s just a great feeling that you know you’re in the best shape of your life and you went out there and did it,” he said. In their second showcase in two years, approximately 45 contestants participated in the event. The divisions ranged from men’s and women’s teen to the men’s master division, where the top three places were awarded trophies. THE ROAD TO SUCCESS If someone had told Castaneda, who graduated from Edinburg High School in June 2005, that three years later he would be showing off his physique to judges and a large audience, it probably would have left him baffled. That’s because bodybuilding was not in his plans at the time. Eight months after graduating from high school, Castaneda was working at GNC, where he started to learn about physical fitness and nutrition. He saw well-built customers walk in the store and that immediately sparked the interest. He started to watch his diet and heavy workouts began. After GNC, he decided to move on to Gold’s Gym in January 2007 for a job in sales and as a front-desk employee. There, his exercise regimen steadily started to increase and during that same month he received personal-trainer certification from the National Association of Sports Medicine. From that point, Castaneda knew he wanted to follow the bodybuilding path. And he did. The workouts intensified as he ballooned to 200 pounds, after having weighed 135 pounds in high school. Castaneda’s workouts consisted of four sets of eight reps with heavyweights for specific muscle groups. But with dedication to sport came the mental and physical toughness to endure. “The mentality you need to have has to be in a strong state,” said the dietetics major. “Your body undergoes through a lot of pressure and pain. You have to find it within you to keep on going. It’s just a matter of will.” One person who was there to help and motivate him was Rodolfo Lopez, a sophomore international business major. While Castaneda was preparing for the competition, Lopez, who was there simply for moral support, would wake up at 4:30 a.m. every day to assist him with workouts as the meet neared.

“I know it’s hard when you go by yourself. He’s a good friend of mine and he was very into this competition so I wanted to support him,” Lopez said. “Even though I didn’t have to, I knew it would help him if I went.” There, Lopez saw how serious Castaneda was about pursuing his goal. “He was very dedicated,” said Lopez, an Edinburg native. “I tried to help him in every aspect. More towards the end, the more he gave all he had.” Though an ill-timed bout with the flu had prevented Castaneda from competing in the inaugural Gold’s Gym Classic last October, the experience was incentive enough to make him rebuild his stamina and remain hopeful of future competition. He learned that there would be a second Gold’s Gym Classic so he consistently trained for 10 months. In the final two months before the event, his workouts became wearying as he had to shed 30 pounds in order to compete in the men’s novice lightweight division. He began exercising three times a day along with maintain-

ing a disciplined diet, while going to school full-time. But there was no other way to do it, so he endured the demanding task, which paid off in the end. “I just did it for myself,” Castaneda said. “I wanted to prove to myself that I could do it and that I had the disciplined more than anything. You have to really focus on what you want and sacrifices do come with this sport.” Though he will not compete again until next year, Castaneda plans to remain in good physical condition to have a leg up when the next event rolls around. The Gold Gym’s Classic, above all else, served as an experience-builder, the only thing that mattered to him. And with the support of his family and friends, he was able to bear through the challenge that bodybuilding presented. “If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t have done the show,” he said. “Yes I do love the sport but you need a strong, solid foundation and that happens to be my family and friends. It’s a solid foundation like them that motivated me all the way through.”

“I expect Texas to upset Oklahoma, even though everybody in their right mind thinks that Oklahoma is gonna win. I think their quarterback Colt McCoy is gonna come through in the game. Even though the defense is young, they are still gonna win it.” Rolando Ramirez Sophomore Criminal justice major

On Texas vs. Oklahoma

“I’m glad that they won, but they should of blown them out though. I was expecting them to be more on offense.” Raul Ramos Junior Comm. disorders major

On Cowboys’ recent win

Editor’s Picks  HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Raymondville @ Bearkats

Hidalgo Pirates

Friday 7:30 p.m.

 COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Texas Longhorns

vs. Oklahoma Sooners

Saturday 11 a.m. (ABC)

 NFL

Roxy Solis/THE PAN AMERICAN

Carolina Panthers

@ Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Sunday Noon (Fox)


October 9, 2008