Page 1

Creation of student Intramural Committee on horizon, See page 14

September 18, 2008

SINCE 1943

Volume 65, No. 4

T FACULTY

Political science chair goes back to true roots

By Brian Silva THE PAN AMERICAN The raging ‘60s were an uncertain time in America, as war and social revolution dominated the American landscape. Right in the middle of it was Jerry Polinard. The former activist, and now former political sci-

ence department chair, is returning to focus on his first love: teaching. In the 1960s Polinard participated in the anti-war and civil rights movements. As an activist he remembers being a part of boycotts, sit-ins, and protests. “I’m a product of the 1960s,” he said. “The whole issue of civil liber-

ties was very important to me.” That passion for civil rights and liberties led him to focus on the constitutional law portion of the political science field. Soon after his activist years, he joined what was then called Pan American University as a political science instructor in 1972. However at the time he joined there

was no Department of Political Science. That changed the following year and he was selected as the new department’s first chair. He served for 12 years, stepped down, but then became the leader again in 1996. The long-time UTPA professor seems to have reached the end of his chair duties, after being succeeded by Dr.

James P. Wenzel this year. Originally from Corpus Christi, Polinard received his bachelors and masters degrees in government in the early 1960s from what was then Texas A&I University Kingsville. He’s also taught at eight different universities in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.

SEE CHAIR || PAGE 11

T CAMPUS

UTPA unveils long-awaited Sue the T.Rex By Brian Silva THE PAN AMERICAN Poised in an intimidating running position with her razor-sharp rows of teeth gaping open, Sue’s still frame appears ready for attack. However, the 67-million-year-old T. Rex will remain in that position in The University of Texas-Pan American Visitor’s Center until Jan. 4, 2009. The cast of Sue’s more than 250 bones was assembled last week by Physical Plant workers and members of the Chicago Field Museum, which owns the structure. Her 12-foot tall cast will be on display to the public starting Monday. This is an educational exhibit, surrounded by a room full of facts and interactive features, like a device that allows students to see how far Sue can move her arms. Another exhibit, provided by H-E-B and called “Dino Prophecy” will also be available for students to view in the planetarium on

SEE SUE || PAGE 11

Ben Briones/THE PAN AMERICAN

DINOBITE! - UTPA President Blandina Cardenas introduces the A T. Rex Named Sue exhibition Friday at the university Visitors Center. The exhibition will run from Sept. 22 to Jan. 4.

T POLITICS

Debate focuses on ‘08 presidential campaigns By J.R. Ortega THE PAN AMERICAN The Student Union was the site Monday for the first Great Election Debate, an event that highlighted the 2008 presidential election from both conservative and liberal viewpoints, and whose final assessment was

INDEX

something that many out there already assumed: that the media can form a bias toward a certain political affiliation. Sponsored by the Student Union, Office of Student Development and the Office of Student Life and Transitions, the debate is part of Wolfman Productions, which offers

OPINIONS

PG. 2

rotating debates on many of today’s controversial issues like pornography, science, religion and politics. Conveying the conservative view was Cliff Kincaid, editor of Accuracy in Media, the conservative media watchdog. Kincaid also co-hosted CNN’s Crossfire and has had recent appearances on PBS, CNN and Fox News.

NEWS

PG. 3

Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting director and activism director Peter Hart shed light on the liberal side of the coin. Hart, author of The Oh Really? Factor: Unspinning Fox News Channel’s Bill O’Reilly, also writes for FAIR’s magazine Extra and is a producer and co-host of FAIR’s radio show CounterSpin.

A&E

PG. 7

Despite the civil exchange of viable ideas from both Kincaid and Hart, one thing was evident, both the Democratic and Republican campaigns have received their fair share of smears in the media so far. From Barack Obama’s association with the Rev. Jeremiah Wright to John

SEE DEBATE || PAGE 11

SPORTS

PG. 13


UTPA Generations: The Series Watch for Bronc history lessons intermittently throughout the semester Aug. 25 - Introduction Sept. 4 - ‘20s & ‘30s Sept. 25 - ‘40s & ‘50s Oct. 16 - ‘60s & ‘70s Nov. 6 - ‘80s & ‘90s Dec. 3 - 2000 & Beyond

Page 2

September 18, 2008

THE PAN AMERICAN

T OPINION

Fed bailouts hurt American taxpayer By Brian Silva REPORTER This week has been one for the history books for the U.S. stock market. The collapse of giant Wall Street financial companies is sending shivers down the spine of the American economy as parallels are drawn to the beginnings of the Great Depression. We learned, though, from our mistakes during that financial crisis, or so we thought. Regulation was the key word. Make sure the monolithic companies earn money, but not to the point to where they endanger Americans. Deregulation of the banking and lending industry is blamed for the current financial crisis. They used dangerous lending practices to make money, and now it’s costing the American taxpayers tens of billions of dollars in bailouts for the collapsing

banks. We as Americans are put in a bind. We have to bail them out or they’ll take down the economy. But at the same time we’re using billions of the people’s money to give to private businesses. The vast majority of Americans with bank accounts have a safety net, though. It is very important to remember that the Federal Depository Insurance Company (FDIC) insures almost all banks accounts up to $100,000 if the bank belonging to the FDIC fails. The fix to this financial crisis, and it’s a bigger crisis than we can fathom, is simply strong regulation, and prevention of banks and financial institutions from using abusive and dangerous lending practices.

Sept. 18, 2008

V 65, No. 4

1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 Phone: (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 www.utpa.edu/dept/panamerican EDITOR IN CHIEF J.R. Ortega / ortega.e.jr@gmail.com NEWS EDITOR Abigail Muniz / abby.muniz@yahoo.com A&E EDITOR Laura Garcia / laurad500@hotmail.com SPORTS EDITORS Ramiro Paez / ramiropaez@aol.com Gregorio Garza / the_nataku@yahoo.com PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Roxy Solis / roxysolis34@yahoo.com DESIGN EDITOR Roy Bazan / rbazanzz@yahoo.com COPY EDITOR Adriana Acosta / acostaa@hotmail.com REPORTERS, DESIGNERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS Alvaro Balderas Russen Vela Isaac Garcia Andrielle Figueroa Onydia Garza Ben Briones Rick Gamez Ana Villaurrutia Pedro Perez IV ADVISER

Dr. Greg Selber --- selberg@utpa.edu SECRETARY

Anita Reyes --- areyes18@utpa.edu ADVERTISING MANAGER Samantha Quintana --- spubs@utpa.edu

**Delivery** Thursday at noon The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the paper or university.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Pan American accepts letters of 300 words or less from students, staff and faculty regarding recent newspaper content, campus concerns or current events. The Pan American reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. The Pan American cannot publish anonymous letters or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Please send all story ideas to thepanamerican@gmail.com. Individuals with disabilities wishing to acquire this publication in an alternative format or needing assistance to attend any event listed can contact The Pan American for more details.

T OPINION

Courtesy - www.cksinfo.com

Debate highlights impasse By J.R. Ortega EDITOR IN CHIEF

The recent Great Election Debate hosted in the Student Union really got the political ball in my head rolling. First off, I thought it was going to be more of a debate but instead it was more two sides, liberal and conservative, presenting their arguments. Cliff Kincaid, a right-wing conservative, developed his argument by saying something along the lines of, this is why Obama is going to lose the election. I think that was a very conservative move to make. Peter Hart, the liberal debater, said he would not assume who would win the election; a very liberal type of move.

To be honest I’m not sure which side I’m really on. By all means, this is not an opinion of The Pan American’s, but my own. Both talked about how the media “smeared” this candidate and that candidate, but what they failed to mention or bring to question was the fact that they each had evidence of media smearing both Republican and Democratic candidates. Thus it is true, the media does form a bias (not intentionally) toward a candidate. Kincaid mentioned how Sarah Palin has recently been in the media spotlight and that they have been highlighting her weak points. Hart argued the same about the Obama/ Rev. Jeremiah

Wright spectacle. Though beforehand they both mentioned that it wasn’t going to be an uncivilized crossfire, I expected more of an event. For years both sides of the political coin have been arguing about media coverage and who is right and who is wrong. So my question is this: Do events like this Great Election Debate serve a purpose? Do they enlighten the student body? By all means they do inform the student body, but I’m not sure if they really solve any problems. Despite all opinions, the event was very eye-opening, but face the facts: many students there were there for extra credit.

T LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Art students lack necessary equipment It is impossible not to feel demoralized as an art student in University of Texas Pan American when the studios in the Art Department lack resources that enable students to learn. As I heard that the Art Department was going to remodel studios, I was satisfied at last the department was getting interested in the student’s needs. I was shocked last summer when I entered my junior advance drawing course and saw it empty. I could have thought like students who belong to other departments that I got the wrong room number and this room was going to be remolded. But, I knew better. I entered the room and dropped my s

tuff on the floor, got something to sit on and waited for the professor to come in while I wondered on what we were going to draw on. For this class, my peers and I had to build up from scratch high tech tables that had been placed outside the classrooms and gotten wet from the recent rains. Students claim they had seen them outside in the mist of humidity, sun and rain for over a year. For being outside without protection, only three glass tables survived. We spent the first class day building tables instead of learning. When we finished, we realized we still did not have enough tables for everyone.

It is outraging to have to explain that art students in the University of Texas Pan-American need good chairs to sit on, enough tables to draw on already build and ready to be used on the first day of class. The situation art students suffer needs to be known. Art students need to get together and post up the problems in the doorways, email, call and step into the Art Department office demanding what they paid for. Sincerely, Beatriz Guzman Velasquez


Dates to Know:

September 18, 2008

HESTEC WEEK

Last day to drop with grade of “DR” or “W”

Monday through Friday Around campus

Tuesday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Page 3

THE PAN AMERICAN

T CAMPUS

University takes on campus-wide green initiative By Ana Villaurrutia THE PAN AMERICAN Sue, The University of Texas-PanAmerican’s new dinosaur fossil replica, weighs seven tons. On the other hand, Roxie the Recyclesaurus Rex, is slowly growing as it ingests bins full of the university’s recyclables. Recyclesaurus Rex, a recycling program provided by the Edinburg Recycling Center, is just one of many environmental projects being pushed

forward on campus this year. Ironically it meshes well with the university’s big fall exhibit opening next week. It is just one more step in the university’s steady progress toward becoming more environmentally conscious. If UTPA is able to do it, the feat would stand in contrast to traditionally weak Valley city efforts to this regard. The national average of waste

recycled in a city is 32 percent, while Texas cities like San Antonio and Houston recycling below 5 percent, according to The New York Times. The Environmental Protection Agency estimated that 75 percent of waste is recyclable. STUDENTS CONSERVE Part of the UTPA push is giving students on campus more accessible ways to dispose of their trash.

“We (the university) started with just three bins and now we’re anywhere between 18 and 20 bins,” said Fidel Castro, Global Awareness Project (GAP) chair. Heritage Hall was first to initiate the recycling program last year. When GAP saw the programs’ success, members decided to get the other dorms involved as well. ”Basically we’re trying to improve the environment and make it a

lifestyle,” he added. Troxel, Heritage and Unity Halls and Bronc Village have 15 recycling bins all together, and each resident was given recycling boxes for their rooms this semester. Castro said GAP is now considering the addition of a recycling trailer between Unity Hall and Bronc Village, which holds six bins. “We have bins overflowing with

SEE GREEN || PAGE 12

T STUDY

UTPA community reacts to recent smoking-study findings By J.R. Ortega THE PAN AMERICAN The University of Texas-Pan American is no exception to a study released last week by the American Lung Association which found smoking among college students has decreased since its peak in 1999. The study looked at how many people had smoked in the past 30 days, and found that 19.2 percent (roughly 1 in 5) of college students smoked in 2006; much lower than the 30.6 reported in 1999. Despite the significant decrease in college smokers, the number still does not surpass the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services target threshold of 12 percent by 2010. Despite the findings, anecdotal evidence still points to a perceived prevalence of lighting up

around UTPA. Mayra Lopez, a 19-year-old nursing major from EdcouchElsa, said she still sees a large number of students smoking around campus all the time. “It does bother me because even though we are in an open environment, it can affect my health,” she said. “It’s your right to do what you want, but it’s going to affect me.” Using the example of Truth, an anti-smoking campaign targeted toward young adults, Lopez said that vast coverage of smoking in general could add to pressures to smoke rather than reduce them. “I think some of these campaigns try and make them (commercials) funny and catchy when they should focus more on the facts,” she said in earnest. More than half of college

SEE STUDY || PAGE 12

T SCIENCE

HESTEC enters seventh year, large turnout expected By Kristen Cabrera THE PAN AMERICAN The University of Texas-Pan American’s Hispanic Engineering Science and Technology (HESTEC) event promises to be bigger and better for its seventh anniversary. With last year’s HESTEC turnout at roughly 80,000 people, the expectations is that this year’s numbers are expected to be the same or even higher, according to Gilbert Maldonado, the associate executive director for COSERVE, the outreach program that

works closely with HESTEC, said the event would have many exhibits that are new and different. “The exhibit that most students will be looking forward to is NASA’s Mars Science Lab Rover, Because this is its third public appearance in the United States and its first in Texas,” Maldonado said. Young students interested in the NASA exhibit will get to meet the scientists that worked on the rover, and be able to watch a demonstration on Community Day of what it will be doing on Mars once it is launched in

fall 2009 and in lands in 2010. UTPA students will be able to see the rover before the general public does, on Sept. 25 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the Health and Physical Education II complex located on the east side of campus. It is a highlight for HESTEC as it continues to become a major happening in Valley education. “HESTEC is the largest outreach program in South Texas,” said Maldonado, “Students will benefit from the entire event. There is something for every age group and for

every member of the family.” Some of the new additions include the grand re-opening of the H-E-B planetarium and the unveiling of the exhibit, A T.Rex Named Sue. This year, the entire campus will be utilized for HESTEC unlike last year, when only the east side was used. There will also be two big stages, the main stage which will be in The Quad, located in front of the Student Union, and the community stage which will be by the Science Building north of the sundial.

On Thursday, Sept. 25, the UTPA Office of Career Services will host the Student/Employer Networking Social. Lourdes Servantes, the OCS assistant director, said “It is a great opportunity for students who are not able to go to the Career Expo to meet with employers and still network with them.” The social will be an event where students can get a chance to meet future employers in a more casual environment. On Friday, these same students

SEE HESTEC || PAGE 12


Page 4

ADVERTISEMENTS

September 18, 2008


September 18, 2008

ADVERTISEMENTS

Page 5


Page 6

ADVERTISEMENTS

September 18, 2008


Dates to Know:

September 18, 2008

The Apple in the Tree

Schwayze

Sept. 23 7 p.m. the Student Union

Sept. 25 7 p.m. Cine El Rey $20 advance Page 7

THE PAN AMERICAN

T CULTURE

Knowledge from across the globe By Andrielle Figueroa THE PAN AMERICAN Over the summer, select University of Texas-Pan American students were able to enjoy a stay in Rabat, Morocco. The trip was part of a Cultural and Language Immersion program designed to expand the students knowledge of another culture. A group of 12 students and two teaching assistants were taken on the trip which was funded by the university’s Integrated Global Knowledge and Understanding Collaboration (IGkNU). The difference between a study abroad program and a Cultural and Language Immersion one is that in the former students usually get credit for attending classes with professors from the home university; but in the immersion alternative, they take classes about the country (its history, culture, law, language, organization, traditions and economics) from professors in the host country, at the local university. “Our goals are to help educate a new generation of leaders and to make sure our students become successful and to increase the workforces in the U.S.,” said Nick Weimer, IGkNU manager.

Students who meet required academic criteria and are eligible for the new experience are able to go on these collaborations with all expenses paid by IGkNU. One of the 12 students who went to Morocco in June was 20-year-old English major Lynnette Aguilar. Every day the routine began at 8 a.m. when they studied Arabic for four hours and then went on to culture classes. A large part of the trip was spent trying to learn and understand the language and use it as a part of the student’s everyday situations. As they would soon find out, language is what connects us to people. “It was hard for us to communicate at first, we are all very social and it’s hard to not have that human connection. We were later able to build a relationship and appreciate it even more,” said the La Joya native. Aside from certain differences Aguilar said she noticed more similarities between the Moroccan and Latino culture. “They were very family-oriented like the Latino culture, they like to stay as close to their family as possible.” One of the main differences between the United States and Morocco was that

Omar Doria

FOREIGN LAND - Omar Doria (right) enjoys downtime while sightseeing in Morocco. The trip was made possible by the IGkNU program.

most of the population in the latter country is Muslim. “It was a mild culture shock, but it helped us all learn about and respect another culture. The people there were amazing and very hospitable,” added Omar Doria, a 20-year-old biology major from Edinburg. The students stayed in guest rooms at Mohammed V University. Students were able to study the surrounding city. Doria said the supermarkets were awesome, but at first they had no understanding of the Arabic language. “We could hear the vendors saying the prices of items but we all thought, ‘What are they saying?’ I thought I would be able to use my French but when we could not communicate, I thought, ‘Man my French must be bad,’” Doria joked. An avid runner, Doria is on the track team at UTPA, and he explained the love the city has for athletics. Ironically, while he was visiting Hilton Park in Rabat, he noticed runners and decided to join them in their daily jaunt. Little did he know he would be meeting and running with an Olympic champion by accident, which was monumental for the athlete. “I thought, ‘Man, these guys run fast,’

so I figured I would try and run with them. We ran and afterward we were cooling down. We started talking, I could not understand him because he spoke Arabic, but his friend was actually translating our conversation,” Doria said. “His friend tells me, Joauad Gharib two-time world champion. I just looked at him and said, ‘Are you serious?’” Doria had been running with a man who received the silver medal in the 2008 Beijing Olympics Marathon. When asked if he would ever return to Morocco, Doria was eager to say yes. Almost every day he has memories of the trip. It was something he never expected to do and was thankful to be in on the collaboration. “Sure there is traveling, but you wouldn’t get the same privileges we did, we were able to meet the parliament and political figures,” Doria said. In the end the UTPA student-athlete received a much better gift than souvenirs. “I know this experience changed my life and made a difference in my perception of the world. I understand now that a respect for all the world religions, world cultures is not an option, but a necessity. Shukran (‘Thank you’ in Arabic).”


Page 8

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

September 18, 2008

September 18, 2008

Page 9

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Film festival broadening its scope By Marco Carbajal THE PAN AMERICAN

Every February, film buffs brave the bitter cold and descend on Park City, Utah, for the latest in independent film at the Sundance Film Festival. Every September, however, the Rio Grande Valley has its own indie event and luckily under much milder weather conditions. The 15th annual CineSol Film Festival officially kicked off Friday with a reception at the Cine El Rey, at 311 S. 17th St. in McAllen. The annual two week event will run this year from Sept. 12 through Sept 27. The festival began in 1993 as a platform for Latino-inspired films, that related to the Latino people and culture. In recent years though, CineSol has broadened its scope to include films from many different regions and ethnic backgrounds and even begins with a special competition called the 36-hour film race. In the race, groups draw a film genre from a hat and have 36 hours to write, shoot, and edit a 4-to-10-minute film. This year’s winner, Finding Cochino, which roughly tanslates to “finding nasty,” from Orange Media is a “mockumentary” that follows the rise and fall of a famous porn star. The Orange Media team is made up of a group of co-workers from Entravision Communications who enjoy dabbling in extracurricular film projects outside of work. Like most filmmakers in the area, the Orange Media group believes that the RGV film scene is defintiely catching on. In just one year, the 36-hour Film Race grew from 13 to 23 teams. “I think the film scene here is definitely growing with events like CineSol,” said Finding Cochino director Edward Cordero, 34, a production

Design by Rick Gamez

photographer and editor with Entravision Communications. Area filmmakers like Cordero are sure to reap the benefits from the growing support of their art through events like CineSol. “We focus on great films and filmmakers, whether it be local, Latino, or otherwise,” said Henry Serrato, a 1997 University of Texas-Pan American graduate and CineSol board member from Harlingen. “We are in support of independent filmmaking in general.” AROUND THE GLOBE The growth of CineSol is further illustrated by a range of submissions from 12 different countries. Of 150 possible films, 44 were chosen for the festival and will be screened at venues like Cine El Rey, UTPA and UTBrownsville in the span of the two week event. “We have documentaries, horror, drama, shorts, animation, and local films, and we will be showing films from Spain, Thailand, Mexico, Chile and Australia,” Serrato added. Director Lav Bodnaruk was one such international entry. Hailing from Brisbane, Australia, he entered his comedy, The Pain of the Macho, after a friend told him about the CineSol opportunity. The Pain of the Macho follows a Latin Lothario, or lover, who tells the story of how after years of meaningless sex, he meets and loses the girl of his dreams in one night. The film short was inspired by the play of the same name by Latino playwright Rick Najera. “I’ve been making my own independent films for 10 years,” says Bodnaruk, a 2002 graduate of Queensland College of Art in Australia. “Festivals like CineSol are a great way to get your work noticed. My only hope as a filmmaker is to get it out

there and entertain people.” Much close to home, the short film Mark’d was also featured at the festival, and included a short Q&A with the cast and crew afterward. Mark’d, from 21-year-old director Ali Naqvi of Mission, is the story of four assassins who all claim to have made the same hit, on the same day, at the same place and same time. Naqvi, a 2008 UTPA theater/TV/film graduate, co-wrote the piece with fellow alum Bull Sanchez, and admits their story came about organically. “Bull and I wrote the story, then when we were casting, it evolved into something different,” said Naqvi. “Then when we shot it, it became something different again. It has come so far from what we thought it was going to look like. But that’s the evolution of filmmaking.” Naqvi, like a growing number of local artists, chose to remain in the Valley and help change the industry from within. “I had the opportunity to move to Los Angeles or Austin,” he said. “But I decided I was going to stay down here for awhile and help the film scene grow. With passion for filmmaking and festivals like CineSol, it’s possible to have success anywhere.” Serrato added that in addition to entertainment, CineSol is a wonderful networking opportunity for anyone interested in filmmaking, whether they be lighting technicians, writers, makeup artists, or actors. Another local director who was on hand for Q&A was Charles Brenner, a 26-year-old from San Juan whose film, Mason Dixon, is generating an impressive amount of buzz. Mason Dixon invites viewers to a small town where the real mafia lives. The Mason family is on a quest for revenge against the corrupted political

Dixon family. When a feud ignites, it brings the past associations of both families into question. “It’s a look at corruption in a small town,” explained Brenner. “It deals with brotherhood, good over evil, and nature versus nurture.” Brenner, a 2008 graduate of UTPA, used the Valley as inspiration for a realistic approach to the classic mob drama. “On The Sopranos and stuff like that, it’s exaggerated and blown up,” he noted. “But here or anywhere, the people who really do this stuff are not necessarily glorified or rich. They’re almost normal.” Brenner’s film has also been screened at the Big Bang Film Festival in Philadelphia and the Southern Winds Festival in Oklahoma, garnering the attention of some film executives from Los Angeles with whom he has a meeting later this month. He’s the perfect example of how growing film festivals like CineSol no doubt have a big hand in helping bring films to larger audiences and, as Serrato also pointed out, provide a chance to see up-and-coming talent viewers won’t see featured elsewhere. “You are not going to see these movies at Cinemark or Carmike,” Serrato says. “CineSol is the only venue to see these films.” This year’s CineSol wasn’t without a few glitches, however. Hurricane Dolly extensively damaged venues such as the South Padre Island Convention Center and the Harlingen Municipal Auditorium, leaving board members scrambling to secure the new location at Cine El Rey. Both opening and closing weekends have a cover charge of $30, and admission to the festival ranges anywhere from free screenings to $20 for an allday ticket depending on the film, loca-


Page 8

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

September 18, 2008

September 18, 2008

Page 9

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Film festival broadening its scope By Marco Carbajal THE PAN AMERICAN

Every February, film buffs brave the bitter cold and descend on Park City, Utah, for the latest in independent film at the Sundance Film Festival. Every September, however, the Rio Grande Valley has its own indie event and luckily under much milder weather conditions. The 15th annual CineSol Film Festival officially kicked off Friday with a reception at the Cine El Rey, at 311 S. 17th St. in McAllen. The annual two week event will run this year from Sept. 12 through Sept 27. The festival began in 1993 as a platform for Latino-inspired films, that related to the Latino people and culture. In recent years though, CineSol has broadened its scope to include films from many different regions and ethnic backgrounds and even begins with a special competition called the 36-hour film race. In the race, groups draw a film genre from a hat and have 36 hours to write, shoot, and edit a 4-to-10-minute film. This year’s winner, Finding Cochino, which roughly tanslates to “finding nasty,” from Orange Media is a “mockumentary” that follows the rise and fall of a famous porn star. The Orange Media team is made up of a group of co-workers from Entravision Communications who enjoy dabbling in extracurricular film projects outside of work. Like most filmmakers in the area, the Orange Media group believes that the RGV film scene is defintiely catching on. In just one year, the 36-hour Film Race grew from 13 to 23 teams. “I think the film scene here is definitely growing with events like CineSol,” said Finding Cochino director Edward Cordero, 34, a production

Design by Rick Gamez

photographer and editor with Entravision Communications. Area filmmakers like Cordero are sure to reap the benefits from the growing support of their art through events like CineSol. “We focus on great films and filmmakers, whether it be local, Latino, or otherwise,” said Henry Serrato, a 1997 University of Texas-Pan American graduate and CineSol board member from Harlingen. “We are in support of independent filmmaking in general.” AROUND THE GLOBE The growth of CineSol is further illustrated by a range of submissions from 12 different countries. Of 150 possible films, 44 were chosen for the festival and will be screened at venues like Cine El Rey, UTPA and UTBrownsville in the span of the two week event. “We have documentaries, horror, drama, shorts, animation, and local films, and we will be showing films from Spain, Thailand, Mexico, Chile and Australia,” Serrato added. Director Lav Bodnaruk was one such international entry. Hailing from Brisbane, Australia, he entered his comedy, The Pain of the Macho, after a friend told him about the CineSol opportunity. The Pain of the Macho follows a Latin Lothario, or lover, who tells the story of how after years of meaningless sex, he meets and loses the girl of his dreams in one night. The film short was inspired by the play of the same name by Latino playwright Rick Najera. “I’ve been making my own independent films for 10 years,” says Bodnaruk, a 2002 graduate of Queensland College of Art in Australia. “Festivals like CineSol are a great way to get your work noticed. My only hope as a filmmaker is to get it out

there and entertain people.” Much close to home, the short film Mark’d was also featured at the festival, and included a short Q&A with the cast and crew afterward. Mark’d, from 21-year-old director Ali Naqvi of Mission, is the story of four assassins who all claim to have made the same hit, on the same day, at the same place and same time. Naqvi, a 2008 UTPA theater/TV/film graduate, co-wrote the piece with fellow alum Bull Sanchez, and admits their story came about organically. “Bull and I wrote the story, then when we were casting, it evolved into something different,” said Naqvi. “Then when we shot it, it became something different again. It has come so far from what we thought it was going to look like. But that’s the evolution of filmmaking.” Naqvi, like a growing number of local artists, chose to remain in the Valley and help change the industry from within. “I had the opportunity to move to Los Angeles or Austin,” he said. “But I decided I was going to stay down here for awhile and help the film scene grow. With passion for filmmaking and festivals like CineSol, it’s possible to have success anywhere.” Serrato added that in addition to entertainment, CineSol is a wonderful networking opportunity for anyone interested in filmmaking, whether they be lighting technicians, writers, makeup artists, or actors. Another local director who was on hand for Q&A was Charles Brenner, a 26-year-old from San Juan whose film, Mason Dixon, is generating an impressive amount of buzz. Mason Dixon invites viewers to a small town where the real mafia lives. The Mason family is on a quest for revenge against the corrupted political

Dixon family. When a feud ignites, it brings the past associations of both families into question. “It’s a look at corruption in a small town,” explained Brenner. “It deals with brotherhood, good over evil, and nature versus nurture.” Brenner, a 2008 graduate of UTPA, used the Valley as inspiration for a realistic approach to the classic mob drama. “On The Sopranos and stuff like that, it’s exaggerated and blown up,” he noted. “But here or anywhere, the people who really do this stuff are not necessarily glorified or rich. They’re almost normal.” Brenner’s film has also been screened at the Big Bang Film Festival in Philadelphia and the Southern Winds Festival in Oklahoma, garnering the attention of some film executives from Los Angeles with whom he has a meeting later this month. He’s the perfect example of how growing film festivals like CineSol no doubt have a big hand in helping bring films to larger audiences and, as Serrato also pointed out, provide a chance to see up-and-coming talent viewers won’t see featured elsewhere. “You are not going to see these movies at Cinemark or Carmike,” Serrato says. “CineSol is the only venue to see these films.” This year’s CineSol wasn’t without a few glitches, however. Hurricane Dolly extensively damaged venues such as the South Padre Island Convention Center and the Harlingen Municipal Auditorium, leaving board members scrambling to secure the new location at Cine El Rey. Both opening and closing weekends have a cover charge of $30, and admission to the festival ranges anywhere from free screenings to $20 for an allday ticket depending on the film, loca-


September 18, 2008

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Page 10

T ALTERNATIVE STYLE

DIY movement offering alternatives

By Isaac Garcia THE PAN AMERICAN In an era where buying clothing, shoes and jewelry is only a mouseclick away, and the process of its manufacturing involves conveyer belts and assembly lines, both an event and an organization, Craftivism is seeking to educate people in the do-it-yourself movement. Craft plus activism equals Craftivism, an activist movement that has increasingly become a social and political ideology acting out against large-scale manufacturing in a nonviolent manner, promoting alternatives to large-scale manufactured products. It was created by a trio of University of Texas-Pan American students: Crissy Cruz, a 24-year-old senior TV/film major from San Isidro, 30-year-old Javier Gonzales, a fashion major from San Francisco, and 22year-old Edinburg native Daniel Martinez, a marketing major. Craftivism will be held on Sept. 20 at the Manic Haus Art Gallery located in McAllen’s Art District at 1301-B N. Main St. Doors open at noon and

close at midnight. M a r t i n e z d e s c r i b e d Craftivism as an event that will teach people the ways of do-it-your-self culture by questioning the supposed uniqueness of the m a n u f a c t u r e ’s skills and promotes the ability of the average person to learn to do more than he or she thought was possible. “DIY culture refers to the ethic of being self-reliant and the capability of creating things on your own,” Martinez said. Organizers of Craftivism are keen to not single out any large-scale manufacturing companies or people. Instead they want to inform people of the impact that these manufacturing companies have on the environment and society. Some successful large-scale manufacturing companies receiving scrutiny in recent years for labor exploitation in developing countries

include Gap, Nike and Levi’s. “I don’t think we can blame any one particular company or person,” said Martinez. There are different ways to engage people in the DIY movement. Cruz and Gonzales, who run an online boutique that sells strictly handmade products from around the world, wanted to host a live event that gibed with the purpose of the boutique. In their first event as Craftivism organizers, they are hoping to attract all people who share an interest in DIY. “We want to stay true to the handmade aspect of DIY and we selected our vendors in hopes of offering a very diverse selection of handmade products. We have vendors who make zines, accessories, clothing and paintings,” Cruz explained. A zine is a small circulation and noncommercial publication of original or

appropriated texts and images online. Martinez will also be part of the vending community. He will be offering clothing and streetwear that he has designed and created. “I’ve planned to sell T-shirts, skirts, pants, vests, hoodies and cardigans. It’s a great opportunity to network with others that are equally as interested in handmade products and making money is always nice,” said Martinez. In addition to vendor sales, Craftivism will host DIY tutorials from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Manic Haus. “There will be a total of four tutorials, each starting at the beginning of every hour,” Martinez said. “We have a stencil artist that will be teaching how to create stencils out of paper and transferring prints onto different mediums. There will also be tutorials in hand-sewing and small alterations on clothing.” Organizers are aware that Craftivism may not matter to everyone, but they are there for those who show even the slightest interest. “The truth is that a lot of people don’t mind large-scale manufactured products,” Gonzalez added. “And let’s

face it, there are going to be a lot of things that you won’t be able to find at Craftivism that you’ll have to run out to Wal-Mart for.” Still, students are taking notice. Patty Moreno, a 23-year-old junior theater major at UTPA, heard about Craftivism when she saw a flier on campus. “I look forward to going and learning how to sew and making alterations on clothing,” the Pharr native said. “Plus it’s a way of helping out local artists and designers by purchasing their products.” Organizers of Craftivism are optimistic that the event will draw enough people and enthusiasm, they have already began talks of hosting another Craftivism event in October. Martinez explained that DIY may be time-consuming but Craftivism can help make it easier. “Craftivism offers the community a firsthand look at the DIY culture and offers the community and students the opportunity to learn, experience, and purchase something that has an individual flare that you won’t find elsewhere,” he said.

T REEL REVIEW

Knightley charms audiences in period film By Russen Vela THE PAN AMERICAN An excellent and sumptuous new film The Duchess, by director Saul Dibbs (Bullet Boy, The Line of Beauty) is based on Amanda Foreman’s best-selling 1998 biography of Georgiana Spencer, the fifth Duchess of Devonshire. The former is the best period drama in some time. Before anyone gets their knickers in a twist as to why they should go see yet another period film starring the young and talented Keira Knightley (Pride and Prejudice, Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy) it is because this is truly her finest and most incredible performance to date. The Duchess is filled with infamy, scandal and illegitimacy. But at its heart this is a tragic story of the oppression of a leading light of English high society in the 18th century. There was a special sneak preview at the AMC Theater in San Antonio before the film opens nationwide on Sept. 19. This reviewer was in attendance. Knightley plays Georgiana Spencer, a young, innocent 17-yearold aristocrat who is thrust into an arranged marriage by her mother Lady Spencer, played superbly by Charlotte Rampling (Swimming Pool, The Wings of the Dove) to the much older Duke of Devonshire, done by Ralph Fiennes (The Constant Gardner, Schindler’s List). Thinking the duke is marrying her for love, Georgiana enters into the hierarchy of

the aristocratic world of London with her new husband and becomes an instant celebrity. There she becomes the “Empress of Fashion” due to her excessive clothes encrusted with gems and ornaments, and wigs adorned with ostrich feathers. She also becomes an avid supporter of the popular Whig Party, and gains a reputation as a notorious gambler and friend to the common people. But with the sweet comes the sour. Georgiana cannot conceive a son the duke so desperately wants, so he turns his eye to her best friend Lady Elizabeth “Bess” Foster, played by newcomer Hayley Atwell (Brideshead Revisited, Cassandra’s Dream). Thus, Georgiana is forced by the duke, his family and her family to accept the arrangement of her best friend being his mistress and settle down to the task at hand and provide him with a male heir in order to secure her position. During her tormented journey she comes across a Whig politician and future prime minister of England, Earl Charles Grey, played by Dominic Cooper of this summer’s Mamma Mia. She embarks on a love affair with him, only to have her fantasy and her dreams crushed by her duty as wife and mother. Knightley has recieved a lot of negative press for only playing period heroines, but she really does shine in this film. Her transformation from innocent teen bride to wronged wife to mature woman is truly remarkable. Yes, some may complain that they

have seen her in this sort of picture before, but they haven’t seen her like this. She literally changes with the years that pass in the film and viewers can see her growth as an actress. Her scenes with Fiennes, who also shines in his role as the cold, unloving duke, will have the audience holding on to their seats and taking deep breaths to calm themselves. To be honest, the scenes between the duke and duchess are possibly the best special effect of the film, due to the intensity of the pair’s acting; both will probably be frontrunners for this year’s Oscar for Best Actress and Best Actor.

The production values are also a pleasure to watch. The film was shot on location in London, Bath, and Chatsworth House, where the real duke and duchess lived in the 18th century. The country shots are beyond beautiful and the costumes by Michael O’Connor deserve the Oscar for Achievement in Costume Design. A fun fact revealed when the biography was released 10 years back was that Georgiana was the great-greatgreat-great-aunt of the late Princess Diana of Wales. Diana did not get to read the biography of her infamous ancestress as she had died a year

before it was released. What made the book an instant national bestseller was how close the lives of Georgiana and Diana paralleled. Both were trapped in loveless marriages became celebrities with the common people and won their love, even though the love they wanted from their husbands never came. The film is rated PG-13 for brief sexual content, adult language and brief nudity. The Duchess sashayed its namesake’s pannier dress and eightfoot bejeweled ostrich feather adorned wig into selected theaters Sept. 12; the film opens nationwide Sept. 19.

PARAMOUNT PICTURES

WHIG PARTY - Ralph Fiennes, Keira Knightley and Hayley Atwell star in Saul Dibbs’ film about a young girl promised to the Duke of Devonshire in the 18th century who refuses to leave her childish ways behind.


Page 11

NEWS

September 18, 2008

SUE continued from Page 1 the east side of campus by he science building. “It’s a free exhibit for everyone,” said Fred Del Barrio, president of the McDonald’s Rio Grande Valley Coop. “Students are able to come from throughout the Valley, and throughout South Texas. We just want to give all students the opportunity to come and see her.” The Chicago Field Museum also provided the university with a replica of Sue’s head, which rotates amid a dark hue of red light just down the hall from the Visitors Center. “For children, it opens up their minds, it opens them up to learning through out their lives,” he said. “The

more kids you expose to these types of things… it just gets their imagination going and encourages them to learn about these things.” There are two traveling casts of Sue, funded by the McDonald’s Corporation. However, the Sue exhibit in the Visitors Center was mostly paid for by McDonald’s Rio Grande Valley Co-op. The owners and operators of the Co-op donated $75,000 to the exhibit. UTPA President Blandina Cardenas expressed her deep appreciation for the efforts by university staff that brought together the exhibit as well as the donors. “I’m very proud of the collabora-

CHAIR continued from Page 1 During his much iteration as the enjoy teaching constitutional law and leader of the department, he brought political film.” his familiar activist approach to acaPolinard pointed out with the pasdemia. sage of time, his popular Political “We set out to deliberately to be a Film class has evolved. very student-oriented department,” He traditionally showed movies Polinard said, speaking of his first about a subject he knows well, the years as chair. “One of the first things Vietnam War, but notes that as that we did was to develop the Student Bill conflict has become somewhat dated, of Rights.” “I might as well show a film about the The Student Bill of Rights was Civil War now.” adopted by the department, and shortly He added that he teaches with thereafter became a campus-wide inno- movies that look at politics and differvation. Since then, its tenets have been ent sorts of discrimination, like race, integrated into the Handbook of gender, disability and sexual orientaOperating Procedures under tion. “Classroom Responsibilities.” Though, Polinard does conclude Polinard maintains, though, that the course with Casablanca, claiming, accomplishments that occurred during “You can’t consider yourself civilized his terms were not his alone, but rather if you haven’t seen that movie.” the collective work of the department. Polinard has worked as a political Jeanette Broshears, interim dean of analyst for many years on KRGV students and former student of Channel 5, according to Broshears. Polinard, took his Civil Liberties class She also said he has held and moderback in 1986 when ated Constitution she was a psycholo“One of the first things we Day events and gy major at UTPA. debates. Broshears She remembered did was to develop the remembered last that he taught with Student Bill of Rights.” year when humor and said it Polinard showed was easy to tell that up dressed as Jerry Polinard he was passionate A l e x a n d e r Former political science chair about the class. Hamilton wearing “He’s more real an American flag and genuine,” Broshears said. “People style top hat. truly enjoy getting to learn from him.” “He has done an outstanding job,” Polinard said a year ago he sent a Broshears said. “He will be there for letter to President Cardenas saying he anyone who needs him.” would not be seeking another term as Broshears said Polinard actively chair. helps students in the college and in the “I thought it was time for the community, like helping students predepartment to have a chair that wasn’t pare for the LSAT, a law school eligible for senior discounts,” he said, entrance exam, and high school stujoking about his reason for stepping dents in government organizations. down. She also said he mentors freshmen As of the beginning of the semes- and often brings in people from law ter he was replaced by Wenzel, about schools from all around the nation to whom Polinard says: “He was a speak to students. unanimous choice by the depart“His desire and passion is to give ment… and I’m very happy he was our students the same opportunities, chosen as chair.” skills and abilities as any other student Polinard humbly admitted that he in the nation, trying to open the door only wanted to serve for one six-year for them,” Broshears said. term back in 1996, but when his was Polinard said it has been a privilege up, the department was going through being a part of the political science some transitions, like bringing in new department, a group he says does a faculty. great job catering to students. “As some of those new faculty “I’ve enjoyed being a part of the became tenured I wanted to go back to department and watching it grow over teaching,” Polinard said. “I really the years,” he concluded.

tion of this project, foremost with our partners at McDonald’s partners right here in the Rio Grande Valley,” Cardenas said. “We brought a worldclass museum exhibit to this part of Texas… from the Chicago Field Museum, one of the best museum organizations in the world, and that has value unto itself.” Cardenas anticipates 40,000 or more young people, from the Valley to Corpus Christi and Laredo, visit the exhibit. “I’m looking forward to having them come and be excited about being on a university campus, and be excited about learning on a university campus,” she commented. The president added that she wants

students who come and visit the exhibit from the region’s schools to be able to identify themselves as someone who is comfortable with being at a university, and expects to be at the university in the future. She said that all the Region I school districts have been contacted about the exhibit, but that she’ll make sure the invitation goes beyond Region I. “We’re planting that seed in the minds of young people that this place belongs to them,” Cardenas explained. “We have a mission, and the responsibility to expand the horizon for all of this region.” Cardenas explained that the exhibit is one of the ways the university is try-

ing to get a young person’s vision of the future to expand. “You got to get people excited about learning,” she said. To keep the excitement high, other exhibits could also make their way here. “There are so many distractions for young people,” Cardenas said, referring to television and new media. However, Cardenas also said the Valley’s socio-economic status presents a challenge as well. “Many families may think the university isn’t for them… they want it, but they think they can’t afford it,” she said. “It is possible. There are ways, it is for them.

DEBATE continued from Page 1 McCain’s seven houses, each has been hammered at various times by a 24-7 communication onslaught. Kincaid, who majored in journalism from Toledo University, said he learned the ins and outs of the bias in the field quickly. “You may be taught even now that journalism is who, what, when, where, why and how; but I quickly learned it’s who, what, when, where, why, how and so what?” he said. “A journalist’s bias impact the stories. Not only the content of the stories, but what stories are told.” Kincaid hit his points strongly by using the recent media spotlight Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin has received. He added that what he perceives as negative attention toward her and her party from the media is why he knows Obama will lose the election. “The Sarah Palin phenomenon, and we have to admit it has become that, is in part a response to the excesses of the liberal media,” said Kincaid. Calling the media “cheerleaders,” Kincaid said a lot of the focus has been on Palin’s pro-life and pro-tradition viewpoints. He added that the media spotlight on her Down syn-

drome son Trig, plus her 17-year-old unmarried daughter’s pregnancy have focused on insubstantial reasons for judging her ability to help run the country. “These are the kinds of vicious, hateful, mean-spirited attacks that I guess the people putting them out think is going to help their cause. But in the long run, it’s going to elect Sarah Palin vice president of the United States,” he said. While Kincaid offered evidence on why Obama would lose, Hart took a different approach, offering a liberal viewpoint with no answer as to who would win the November election. He detected a double standard on the part of conservatives. “The nomination (of Palin) has produced a peculiar kind of flip-flop for conservative pundits. For the last year they’ve been saying, ‘We can’t elect Barack Obama president, he has no experience. Where did this guy come from, how can we trust him?’” he said. “Sarah Palin comes right out of the clear blue sky and that experience argument is out the window. She’s the right person for job right now. These people (conservatives) can’t even bother to take the time to be

consistent.” Hart said media focus on McCain’s status as a POW in Vietnam suggests that he cannot be questioned at all. He continued by saying the storylines the media latch onto, like Obama being Muslim or Sarah Palin being pro-tradition, really affect how one votes and what media source they tune into. “Obama is going to raise your taxes, he wants to teach sex education to kindergartners…Barack Obama called Sarah Palin a pig; all of these things are lies,” he said. “Now how does a journalist, whose duty is to report the truth, deal with lies?” He added that some members of the media have strong feelings for Obama, just as others do McCain. “Folks spend a lot of time arguing over which candidate media is favoring in this election and that election and it’s an interesting thing,” Hart said. “At FAIR, we’ve been saying you should flip the question around. Don’t ask whether the media are fair to this candidate or that candidate; ask whether the media are fair to you the voter. Did you learn the information you needed to learn to make an informed decision for the election?”

Ben Briones/THE PAN AMERICAN

DEBATE - Michael Escamilla (right foreground), a senior finance major, poses a question at the “Great Election Debate” in the Student Union on Monday.


September 18, 2008

NEWS

Page 12

SMOKING continued from Page 3 smokers do so socially, rather than habitually, according to the ALA. Also, former high school smokers are more likely to smoke than those who began later. Joseph Perez, a 24-year-old TV/film major has been smoking for three years, and said his manner of tobacco use is more social than habitual. Though Perez is a smoker, he surprisingly supports anti-smoking campaigns like Truth. “I think that smoking is bad, but I still smoke,” said Perez, who uses any brand that produces “lights,” cigarettes that are smoother on the throat and contain less nicotine. “If I tried to quit, I would, but I’m at a stage where it helps me.” Perez smokes two to three cigarettes a day but said the number increases during stressful events like mid-terms and finals; then, he goes through a pack per day. “I like smoking because it relieves stress,” he explained. “It gives you a slight relief.” Miguel Lopez, a UTPA substance abuse coordinator, said that Bacchus and Gamma - an organization that stresses health and wellness issues and Student Life and Transition Services host the local version of the national Great American Smokeout once a year to promote students to quit smoking. Lopez, who has worked with UTPA for five years, added that the booming

Hispanic population has created a new market for tobacco companies. “They (tobacco companies) are waiting on new people to continue the business,” he said. “It is aimed toward younger generations and Hispanics.” In 1997, the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. paid California communities $10 million for targeting young children with advertisements of the cartoon figure, Joe Camel. Lawsuits like these sparked an increase in anti-smoking campaigns. Anti-smoking campaigns target tobacco companies because of the increased incidence of lung/heart cancer and disease. A summary conducted released in 2005 by the California Environmental Protection agency that nearly 3,400 lung cancer deaths and between 22,700 and 69,600 heart disease deaths in the United States deaths are a result of second-hand smoke. As a way to combat these health issues, the ALA has created a Smokefree Air Challenge by 2010, which intends to convince colleges and universities across the country ban smoking on-campus. However Lopez said the challenge has not been brought to the university’s attention. On Tuesday, 14 of Pennsylvania’s state-owned universities banned smoking on campus, including in courtyards and well-ventilated open areas. The sudden ban is apart of the ALA’s challenge, according to

Texas Smoke-free Schools Colleges and universities entirely smoke-free (indoors and outdoors) Colleges and universities smoke-free with minor exemptions in remote out door areas

Colleges and universities smoke-free in residential housing

Chancellor John Cavanaugh of the Pennsylvania State System. Already the ban has led to a student outcry against it. But at UTPA, the university is way behind the curve. In spite of the university’s purported health-conscious mindset, only one study has been conducted, by the UTPA Border Health Office and Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness in 2004. That research focused on smoking among faculty and staff and found that six percent of respondents smoked. Of the six percent, 74 percent smoke every day, 32 percent smoke five to 10 cigarettes a day, 29 percent smoke 11 to 20 per day, and seven percent went

through more than 20 a day. The offices have yet to compile a smoking study pertaining to the student body. UTPA President Blandina Cardenas said that UTPA student health and well-being are top priorities. “If I could communicate one thing it would be young people have an extraordinary opportunity to plan for a long, healthy life,” she said. Cardenas shared the fact that she is a former smoker whose experience taught her to be more conscientious about health. “It is crucial we, as UTPA, promote health,” added the president, who had major heart surgery last year.

Institutional Research and Effectiveness. Jose Delgado, a 22-year-old senior economics major, said HESTEC should really open the eyes of Valley residents. “It is motivation for people in the Valley who only see service industry, retail and government jobs, to realize that there are more than those Valley opportunities,” he explained. The H-E-B planetarium will be encouraging young student interest in the sciences by giving away iPods, laptops and many other prizes every 15 minutes between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Community Day. Some big entertainment names coming to the main stage are Pesado, a Norteño group, as well as Baby Boy, a Latin hip-hop artist.

SHADOWED - Juan Vasquez of Region I GEAR UP works at one of the events at HESTEC 2007.

The University Bookstore, owned by Follett Higher Education Group, the Sodexho group in the cafeteria, and Physical Plant have all contributed to going green this semester. The bookstore reduced the amount of coupons and free samples with purchases this semester. Follett also recycled 70,000 pounds in its 800 bookstores in 2007. Future construction at UTPA will also become environmentally friendly. Over the summer, Physical Plant’s construction and special project coordinator Marianella Franklin became accredited by Leadership in Energy and

Environmental Design. LEED is the national benchmark for certification on construction of green buildings. “Right now the entire UTPA community and the city are trying to make a difference, it’s a time in which we are able to joint venture,” Franklin said. Future projects include ensuring the UTPA Starr County satellite campus is built under LEED guidelines, and equipping the future Academic Performing Arts Center with a water feature that Franklin said would provide visual appeal and water conservation.

STATE AND LOCAL LEVEL The state of Texas has weaker smoking restrictions than many states, according to the ALA. States like California, Massachusetts and Illinois get an “A” in smoke-free air on the ALA’s 2007 State of Tobacco Control report card, while Texas, North Carolina and South Carolina have received an “F.” In late 2007, the City of McAllen established a smoking ban in public places like restaurants, bowling alleys and the airport. Bars were not included in the ban, as they are in some areas, particularly larger cities like New York and San Francisco.

HESTEC continued from Page 3 will have an opportunity to give alums, HESTEC reps would like to employers their resume and talk to show families and students what jobs them more about a future career, at the have been created and filled because UTPA Career Expo, which will be of UTPA. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in two loca“There are the essential elements tions; The Field House, where the for the formula,” Maldonado focus will be on science, technology, explained. “There’s a family unit supengineering and mathematic employ- porting the students’ career choice.” This is a formula which ers, plus the Wellness Center, which will showcase busiMaldonado says is ness, liberal arts,  TIDBIT partly responsible for an enrollment and health employincrease in science ment opportunities. and engineering Alumni from At HESTEC 2007 departments from UTPA will represent their compa- 80,000 people attended 2,907 in the fall nies at the Career 2003 to 3,502 in the weeklong event. fall 2007, numbers Expo Sept. 26 and Community Day that were gleaned from the UTPA Sept. 27. Through these Office of

THE PAN AMERICAN FILE PHOTO

GREEN continued from Page 3 stacks and stacks of cardboard,” he explained. “We are still trying to figure out where (the trailer) will be because of parking issues,” said Castro, who also plans to have a trailer placed at HESTEC. The Environmental Awareness Club and the Student Government Association also put bins in the University Center, Wellness and Recreational Center and the Student Union a year ago. EAC now wants the university to take more responsibility in recycling by making sure the bins are not overflowing and to see where more bins

could be placed across campus. “They just don’t see it as a priority right now” said EAC co-president Stephanie Jimenez. “It’s hard to get each individual building to agree.” Although the EAC has had some resistance, some students still see the recycling bins as a success. “It’s easier, if you don’t see recycling bins you’re just going to throw it in the trash,” said Claudia Rios, a Rio Grande City English major. OTHER PROGRAMS The students are not the only ones to jump on the eco-bandwagon.

Physical Plant has also helped write a grant that will fund Rapid Response Advanced Manufacturing Research Center’s transformation into a green building with a lab that will teach sustainability, a concept that teaches the use of natural resources without compromising future use. Franklin said it is impossible for the university to be 100 percent green, and that at the moment they do not have LEED-level buildings. But the university is on its way. “We are changing our standards so our future projects…can be LEEDcertified,” she added.


September 18, 2008

ADVERTISEMENTS

Page 13


September 18, 2008

SPORTS

Page 14

T WELLNESS CENTER

Cabrera looks to create student intramural committee By Ramiro Paez THE PAN AMERICAN Art Cabrera, intramural assistant director for the Wellness Recreation Sports Complex, is looking to expand the intramural sports department at The University of Texas-Pan American with an advisory council that will assess the recreational needs of students. Cabrera says the committee, which could be employed by the spring semester, will augment the intramural sector, providing students with greater opportunities. “This is to give us a new direction to go in,” he said. “It will give us ideas of where the students would like to go. We’ve been here for a while and (our unit) is traditional stuff. I would like to try to find out what other activities students would like to see.” With student participation steadily increasing, Cabrera knows the time is right to inform the university of a possible council implementation. The council, which will be comprised of seven or eight students, will meet twice a month to discuss happenings within the department, policies and procedures, and eligibility requirements, along with providing suggestions for news events or activities. In addition, the council will serve as

a judiciary committee for any problems that occur during play (i.e. ejection). Students would be able to appeal decisions made by Cabrera and present their case to the committee. “In turn, the committee would either agree with my findings or provide an alternate solution,” Cabrera explained. Kevin Quintero, a senior kinesiology major and member of the Top Guns flag football team, says the committee would be significant for intramurals because it will allow students to defend any situations they felt were unjust. “It gives the students a voice to be heard,” he said. “It’s good for the Rec because it would show they are trying to accommodate everything for the students. I’ve always felt good about rules.” The committee is open to any student on campus, including intramural participants and members of fraternities and student government, but they must have at least sophomore status. Non-intramural students are also highly recommended to join, to balance possible bias. Students who serve on the board and play intramurals are expected to be model players to uphold the reputation of the department. The idea for such a committee is already a reality at other state schools. At The University of North Texas, intramural assistant director Britton Sherry

says having an advisory board is a good idea but requires good management. “I do think that the committee is important and I think that if a university has the resources to implement one, they should,” he said. “That being said, it does take a little bit of work. Any time you have students that are volunteering for something, it is often not their priority. You have to really stay on top of things to make sure they are aware of the meetings and that they have a reason for showing up.” Sherry also added that his student advisory committee has been a successful establishment for the Mean Green intramural department. “We have seen success with our committee,” he continued. “They have suggested new successful programs (dodge ball, Texas Hold ’em, ultimate Frisbee) and they have also suggested ways to improve the program (better advertising, scoreboards at the fields and a more efficient way to communicate with captains).” Back at UTPA, Cabrera says the committee is still in its planning stages but the sooner students respond, the closer it will be to becoming a reality. “It’s just been something that we’ve wanted to do so I’m trying to get the word out if any interested people want to join or help out with this,” he said.

Onydia Garza/THE PAN AMERICAN

AN INTRAMURAL FIRST - Art Cabrera is trying to involve students in a potential committee that will benefit them in the intramural department.

T CAMPUS ACTIVITIES

Student Union hosts a variety of tournaments for students By Adriana Acosta THE PAN AMERICAN

Onydia Garza/THE PAN AMERICAN

POOL TIME - Antonio Rodriguez, a senior biology major, enjoys a day of pool at the Student Union, hosts of numerous upcoming activities.

Freshman Stephen Ozuna spends a few days a week playing pool in the Student Union before and after class. His focus on the game has allowed him to become a better player, and he’ll use that experience to help him compete in pool tournaments currently being hosted at the Student Union. The University of Texas-Pan American union will host over 40 events this year, tourneys ranging from ping-pong to billiards to Wii. Students wanting to get involved with campus activities can enjoy an afternoon of friendly competition and entertainment, all free of charge. Other tournaments involve popular video games Guitar Hero, FIFA Soccer and Halo 3, as the Union continues a semester of innovations designed to stimulate interest. “We are trying to get the word out, that we are having events,” said Cindy Mata, assistant director of the Union. Actually, the tournaments have been a staple since the Union eight years ago. Putting up signs advertising them helps raise awareness. “It gives the students an opportunity to become involved in student life, win great prizes and enjoy their college experience,” Mata said. Mata says she believes the increase of student traffic at the Student Union

has been in part to the recent events being hosted. Compared to last year, she says the number of people has almost quadrupled. “There has been about a 25-percent increase on a daily basis of student traffic,” she said. “Students want to get more involved.” Alamo resident Reyes Sepulveda is excited about the competitions being held each week and hopes to be a part of an upcoming tournament that will take place on Sept. 24 from 3 p.m.to 6 p.m. in the first floor of the Student Union. The health education major said having events like these gives students something to do between classes. “I think events like these will keep us off the streets,” he said. The game room will host a pingpong tournament Sept. 18 and a billiards event Sept. 24. Mata says a high volume of students is expected to attend. Last week, 50 students participated in a poker tournament that lasted over three hours each. Bronc bucks were awarded to the top three winners in each category. Bronc Bucks can be used on campus to purchase school supplies or food. Awards for each place are $50 for first place, $40 for second and $30 for third place. The Student Union will give additional prices in the future, like T-shirts, mugs, and gift certificates. “It is pretty cool to have them,”

said freshmen computer engineering student Tony Arriaga. “It gives me things to do between classes and not be bored.” Students wanting more information on upcoming events should visit www.utpa.edu/studentunion or www.myspace.com/utpastudentunion for additional tournament dates and activities.

Student Union Fall 2008 Tournaments Game Room Sept. 24 Oct. 3 Oct. 8 Oct. 14 Oct. 27 Nov. 5 Nov. 6 Nov. 12 Nov. 18 Nov. 24

Billiards 3 p.m. Air Hockey 4 p.m. Ping Pong 3 p.m. Poker 3:30 p.m. Billiards 3 p.m. Wii 2 p.m. Ping Pong 3 p.m. Poker 3:30 p.m. Air Hockey 4 p.m. Billiards 3 p.m.

Gaming Lounge (tentative) Sept. 23 Oct. 16 Oct. 30 Nov. 13 Nov. 20

Guitar Hero FIFA Soccer Madden ‘09 Halo 3 Call of Duty

3.p.m. 3 p.m. 3 p.m. 3 p.m. 3 p.m.


September 18, 2008

Page 15

SPORTS

T SOCCER CLUB

Roadrunners drop Broncs in season opener

By Pedro Perez IV THE PAN AMERICAN South Texas natives know what the brutal sun can bring during its finest afternoon hour. And on Saturday, The University of Texas-Pan American men’s soccer club kicked off its 2008 Texas Collegiate Soccer League campaign under the scorching heat with a 1-0 loss against The University of Texas-San Antonio at the UTPA intramural practice field. “I thought that with the talent that we have and the skill that we have we could do a lot better but in our first game, we did OK but we appeared to be confused at times,” said third-year head coach Marcelo Schmidt. The Bronc matchup against Sam Houston State the following day was canceled due to Hurricane Ike but action will resume Saturday, Sept. 27 when UTPA travels to St. Edward’s University for a 3 p.m. tilt. As temperatures climbed over 100 degrees Saturday, both teams embarked on what some would consider a classic chess match. The

Broncs (0-1) and Roadrunners attacked the net on numerous occasions but it was Ron Barnes’ score in the 18th minute that lifted the visitors to victory. The score was set up by Michael Karpeinski’s corner kick. “It was a tough game,” said Roadrunner coach Eric Ashley. “This is always a tough place to play and I think our guys did a great job.” UTPA, coming off a 9-2 season a year ago, struggled to get the momentum going as fatigue played a major factor in Saturday’s loss. At one point during the game, newcomer Jacobo Zuniga was carried off the field by captain Victor Gutierrez, and Schmidt. “The heat had quite a bit of an effect on the players,” Schmidt said. “I would have truly thought it would be advantage to us because we live in the heat 365 days a year. But I think maybe this was a wakeup call in terms of our conditioning.” In the second half, the Broncs failed to capitalize on three free-kick attempts and on Adrian Flores’ break away play, as UTSA’s goal keeper came up with game-saving scores.

“The goal keeper was great,” said Ashley. “He made big saves when we needed him and he kept us in the game all game long.” As a team, Gutierrez said he thought they moved the ball well on some new formations. But he was unhappy with some of the officials’ calls, including what termed “unfair” profanity calls. In the first half, Bronc halfback Francisco Guerrero was handed a yellow card for using profanity even though several Roadrunners were swearing blatantly throughout the match without any consequence, according to team members. “We had our chances but we missed,” Gutierrez said. “It was aggressive with these guys as our rivalry. Every year we come out and play extra hard.” The men were not the only ones reeling from the effects of Hurricane Ike, as both of the Lady Broncs’ weekend contests against Texas A&M and SHS were canceled. The women will open up their season at home Saturday against Texas State at 3 p.m. followed by UTSA.on Sunday.

File photo

HOME STRUGGLE - The Broncs look to regain their swagger next weekend when they travel to the capital for a date with Stephen F. Austin.

T Q&A

Hernandez speaks about mental, physical preparation By Alvaro Balderas PAN AMERICAN STAFF

throughout the season, the concrete takes a toll on our legs. It’s just bad. PA: How do you prepare yourself Fans see them run long distances to go through the season physically with stamina and drive, and perhaps and mentally knowing it’s going to assume that it comes easy. But any be so strenuous? Hernandez: Mentally, I think athlete involved in cross country will tell you that in order to keep the about improving my preparation and pace, a ton of work and preparation, improving my time so I can do well both physically and mentally, is done in my next meet. Physically, I do a before the race day arrives. UTPA lot of core exercises before the seasenior J.J. Hernandez, a San Juan son to prepare, such as abs or native who’s been one of the pro- pushups. Also, I play some pick-up basketball or gram’s best runners flag football to for years, sat down get my breathing to talk about his going before the experiences on the season. We stay Bronc squad. off running for The Pan the first month American: How and just concendo you prepare trate on our core yourself before the strength. season starts? PA: What is it Hernandez: like waking up Well for me, it every morning to starts with dedicago run? tion in the morning Hernandez: I when I get up for a J.J. HERNANDEZ like to run. run. I just do not have to prepare myself physically Every morning I may wake up with a but also in the way I live my life for not-so-good mood but it is a given the amount of time the season is. I that I have to run. My body is so used sacrifice a lot of things throughout to it now that even on my off days I still wake up at six without trying. the season. PA: What kind of exertion/toll Most of us have been running for goes thorough a cross country ath- half our lives and I guess our bodies lete’s body throughout a full season? have gotten used to it. PA: How much do you train Hernandez: It is horrible. Sometimes I wonder why God made me a run- weeks before a meet? Do you have to ner. Edinburg has nowhere to run so be careful not to overwork your body when we‘re running every day and get tired before a competition?

Hernandez: It all depends on my mileage. Sometimes I am running close to 95 miles a week but usually I have my routine. We are not concerned much about getting tired before the day of the race because we know the first half of the season we are all going to feel like that. The day before the meet we usually run an easy 12miler or just an easy workout. PA: The week before the race, what’s the first thing you do? Talk about the process you take when preparing for competition. Hernandez: Usually I do my 15mile long run on Sundays and Wednesdays. Every other day it is 11 miles except the day of the race. Runs of this sort I usually do in about an hour and five minutes. PA: What about strethcing? Hernandez: Most people think strethcing before runs is important but it does one a disservice. It may loosen your muscles too much so it is ideal to stretch after one runs PA: What’s your diet like? Hernandez: Runners have a stereotype of drinking water and eating sal-

ads. We just don’t eat salad and drink water. Whenever I am hungry I eat whatever. I like to go to Whataburger. Of course I have to Whata-size my order. The way I look at it, I’ll burn the calories the next day. I also found spinach to be very helpful with its energyenriched protein. PA: Is there any free time the week of your race? Hernandez: Any week we have off, we get together and hang out, but on weeks of meets we pretty much lay low, because we’re all busy with either school or work. PA: What do you like most about preparing for a meet? Hernandez: The positives that I expect from myself. Sometimes I tell

myself, “What if today was race day? How would I feel?” I feel that if I prepare myself I’m going to get the results I want. PA: What do dislike most about preparation/training? Hernandez: Definitely the heavy mileage. There come times when you feel bad but you still have to go out there and run. Either I’ve had long nights or there’s bad weather. It gets hard sometimes. PA: Are there usually game plans you develop going into different meets? Hernandez: The only time we ever change our routine is when we know there are big schools competing. We usually increase our mileage. Our goal is to step up for big meets.


Dates to Know: Women’s Volleyball Lamar University Tournament Sept. 19 - Sept. 20 September 18, 2008

THE PAN AMERICAN

Page 16

T FEATURE

By Sara Hernandez THE PAN AMERICAN The University of Texas-Pan American women’s golf team began its 2008-2009 season this week, placing fifth at the UC Invitational in Cincinnati. The two-day competition was highlighted by the outstanding performance of freshman Maria Jose Camey, sister of Mariale Camey; the former broke the all-time single season round record with a 69 score. The record was previously held by Nancy Verastegui in 1995 and Daniela Cortes in 2005. “This speaks a lot about her character and who she is. The whole team is proud of her stepping up, being a freshman,” said men’s and women’s coach Ofelia Lopez. Mariale Camey finished tied for 10th with a three-round score of 226. Her sister followed suit with a score of 233, tying for 20th with sophomore Haley Hocott. Based on the per-

QuotesFrom TheStands formance, Lopez says she foresees a successful future for the team after a steady takeoff in the season opener. “I think this is a great starting point,” she said. “Last year, we were never able to finish a round. This good performance makes them hungry for the nest tournament.” The Lady Broncs will resume play Oct. 5 in Tulsa at the ORU Shootout. PREVIEW After coming up short in several tournaments last season, the women returned to the green with a determined mindset, which has Lopez confident that there’s a new attitude. “They are looking good, pushing each other, and believing in themselves. The girls are committed in playing well as a whole team; they came back refocused,” said the second-year head coach. “We have set high standards. I’m very excited to lead the team, so they can show what the team is about.” The Lady Broncs will be led by senior Mariale Camey, who returns after posting a 79.9 stroke average in 16 rounds last season.

“She’s playing great. She’s ready to start off where she left up and is ready for her and her team to play well,” Lopez said. Ale, as her teammates call her, assures that being the top performer last year does not put a special pressure on her, although she is focused on driving her team to have a better season. “I’m feeling great,” she said. “I really like the team. We are playing for the team and care about each other.” Mariale Camey will be accompanied by the experienced Sandberg. The Canada native obtained a 73.2 strokes average in 14 rounds last season. “She practiced hard during the

summer,” said Lopez, who added Sandberg’s team skills will be crucial for the Lady Bronc success. Junior Rebecca de Leon, team captain from Mission, will look to motivate her fellow teammates by example. “She will be leading and organizing her team,” said Lopez. “She’s doing what a captain needs to do, setting an example in the classroom and outside of it.” The effort will also be bolstered by returning sophomores Sara Garcia and Valley native Melinda Uriegas, as well as the two freshmen in Sarah Kothny of Kingwood, and the elder Camey. After placing second in the National Minority Golf Championship in May, the girls have their eyes fixed on another accomplishment: winning the Big West Conference; the pending entrance into the conference will not happen until 2010, but it fills the women with enthusiasm. Belonging to a conference will allow the team to become more competitive which motivates the girls to play hard. “I’ve always dreamed to play in a conference,” said the younger Camey. “I’m very excited about it.”

“ If you look at it, only two NFC teams have won in the last eight years. The other six have been from the AFC , now it looks like the NFC are coming back.” Joey Cortez Junior TV and Film major

On past Super Bowl winners

“If I was the coach, I would have benched him for at least one game. Even though he has two consecutive 100-yard games and people are making a big deal out of him, I still would’ve benched him for the next game. Its just embarassing.” Rene Trevino Senior English major

On DeSean Jackson’s fumble

Editor’s Picks  HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

C.C. Calallen @ Los Fresnos Widcats Falcons Friday 7:30 p.m.

 COLLEGE FOOTBALL

LSU Tigers

@

Auburn Tigers

Saturday 6:45 p.m. (ESPN)

 NFL SWING AWAY - Senior Mariale Camey led the Lady Broncs with a 79.9-stroke average last spring and looks to continue her success this year.

File Photo

Dallas Cowboys

@ Green Bay Packers

Sunday 7:15 p.m. (NBC)

September 18, 2008  

T FACULTY T POLITICS SEE DEBATE || PAGE 11 By Brian Silva THE PAN AMERICAN By Brian Silva THE PAN AMERICAN By J.R. Ortega THE PAN AMERICAN B...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you