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THE

PAN AMERICAN

T h e S t u d e n t N e w s p a p e r o f T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f Te x a s - P a n A m e r i c a n

February 15, 2007

UTPA prepares for visit from SACS committee By LUKE KOONG The Pan American As the time for re-accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools approaches, institutions tend to get nervous. However, such is not the case at The University of Texas-Pan American. A team of eight peer reviewers and Linwood Rose, president of James

Texas top ten percent rule under review

Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., will visit UTPA April 16-19 to determine whether the university will be allowed to keep its accreditation, a distinction that ensures the university’s federal funding among other things. “We will achieve it,” said William Turk, SACS coordinator and liaison. He is also co-chair for the leadership committee, one of three involved in the accreditation process at the university,

alongside President Blandina Cardenas. The process, which takes place every 10 years, is a daunting one, according to Turk, who compared waiting for the review team and accreditation to writing a term paper. “We’re positive we’re doing a good job but we haven’t received a final grade yet,” he said. When the SACS visitation team arrives on campus, it will be discussing

important to students as well. “It tells anybody that looks at your degree that it’s meaningful and wasn’t bought over the Internet,” Turk said. “If that program is not accredited by some institution that says this is a worthwhile academic piece of paper, it’s meaningless. You spent a whole bunch of money on nothing.” Receiving accreditation also

See SACS page 11

news anchor Rather familiar face: Former speaks to students By SANDRA GONZALEZ The Pan American A familiar voice could be heard throughout the Fine Arts Auditorium Tuesday night. However, Dan Rather’s faultless diction and broadcast-ready tone were not coming through the speakers of a television because on this particular evening, he was reporting live. Rather made the journey to The University of Texas-Pan American from Afghanistan, where he had been filming a report just 48 hours before for his HDNet show “Dan Rather Reporting.” While it was not his first trip to the Valley, this time the former longtime CBS Evening News anchor was visiting the university as part of the

By VERONICA GONZALEZ The Pan American In 1997, the Texas Legislature decided all graduating high school students in the top ten percent of their class would be granted automatic admission into any Texas public university. The ruling was designed to improve and maintain campus diversity. Now, nearly 10 years later, some lawmakers say the rule is vulnerable to being changed. The Texas Legislature meets every other year beginning on the second Tuesday in January to address governmental issues and decide on pressing senate bills. This session, Dennis McMillan, The University of Texas-Pan American’s associate vice president for enrollment and student services, said there are multiple bills out there trying to reduce the top ten percent law. “Reducing the top ten percent law to five percent is only one way of lawmakers dealing with the issue,” McMillan said. “There are other bills that suggest only allowing a certain percentage of the incoming freshman class to be admitted based on the top percent rule.”

See PERCENT page 11

the Quality Enhancement Plan and taking a detailed look at campus facilities. Turk said that understanding the magnitude of being accredited has always been important. The alternative to winning is not good. “If we’re not accredited, your degree means nothing and we get no federal aid,” Turk said. “Basically, we’re out of business.” He added that accreditation is very

Distinguished Speakers Series. While an audience of over 700 is a smaller one than the Texas-born Rather is used to, he nonetheless took advantage of the opportunity to speak about the world and journalism as it is now and will become. HERE, NOW Expectedly, the CBS veteran made it a point to talk at length about the status of the vocation he called his life’s work. He stressed that in the present day, reporters are constantly faced with the dilemma of deciding what is news. “A good definition of news: news is something you, the public needs,

See RATHER page 11

Sidney Meadows/The Pan American

News

A&E

Sports

Various new measures to help ease students’ financial burden

Find out what band came out first at 2007’s Battle of the Bands

Thai golfer High Wongchindawest brings strong work ethic

See Page 3

See Page 7

See Page 15


PAGE 2

R EADER FORUM

Februar y 15, 2007 THE

PAN AMERICAN

Letters to the editor

1201 West University, CAS 170 Edinburg, Texas 78539 (956) 381-2541 Fax: (956) 316-7122 http://www.panam.edu/dept/panamerican 56th Year – No. 19 Editor Claudette Gonzalez ThePanAmerican@gmail.com News Editor

A&E Editor

Sports Editor

Sandra Gonzalez

Frank Calvillo

Luke Koong

sandra_ panamerican@ yahoo.com

hennero@ msn.com

lkoong2004 @yahoo.com

Photo Editor

Design Editor

Sidney Meadows

Roy Bazan

outintherain@ aol.com

crazy_restless@ yahoo.com

Designers Gregorio Garza

Rick Gamez

the_nataku@ yahoo.com

rikgamez@ gmail.com

Reporters and Photographers Leslie Estrada Jeanette Perez Onydia Garza

Rafael Roux

Patrick Kennedy

Angela Salazar

Kristyna Mancias Erick Quintero Savannah Martinez Adviser Dr. Greg Selber Secretary Anita Casares Ad Manager Lillian Villarreal

Asst. Ad Manager Samantha Quintana

To the editor: I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence for hosting a seminar with Mr. Benjamin Romero of LockheedMartin Jan. 20. Mr. Romero shared the story of his own pathway from being the oldest of 9 children growing up in rural New Mexico with little financial resources to attending college and later achieving a 28-year career as a high ranking officer in the Air Force, and now in industry. His story was inspirational to

“I salute the Center for Academic Excellence for providing an opportunity to UTPA students to learn about a career path that has appeal to some, but certain-

To the editor: In the article, “SGA president faces group of upset senators” (Feb. 1), it was disappointing to read that Student Government Association President Argelia Barerra’s negligence is being dismissed with diverting phrases such as, “The student government should be focusing on the business of the university…” and “…overcoming miscommunications.” Are the miscommunications about meeting times? When elected student representatives use an established democratic

process in light of legitimate grievances without personal vendettas, their efforts should be applauded. This is where we as students can learn first-hand what that nifty little phrase “checks and balances” is all about. It is unacceptable that the College of Arts and Humanities has no representatives and that attendance to mandatory meetings is not taken seriously. Because there can be no accountability or accessibility if there are excessive absences, is it comical to state that the students are

To the editor: Sorry, this isn't the nude photos of the actor you love. But you can still read this opinion of one insignificant reader of this newspaper. This is in reference to the article dated Feb. 8 “Student government continues debate over leader’s faults.” I was in Army JROTC in high school. In my senior year, I was second in command of the staff (which is the equivalent of the SGA senate). Whenever our leader didn't show up, we knew that if she had a chance

Q

Q

ly not all.” - Bruce Reed Interim Dean College of Health Sciences & Human Services many of the students in attendance.

Mr. Romero shared his experiences and views of working in intelligence gathering. When asked some challenging (and in my opinion, valid) questions about past activities of the CIA, such as illegal intrusions into other countries, he responded with grace, pointing out that he had never worked for the CIA nor agreed with all government decisions such as the wars in Vietnam and Iraq. I salute the Center for Academic Excellence for providing an opportunity to UTPA students to learn about a career path that has appeal to some

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“Even at the unviversity level, holding an office is not merely about ceremonial debuts and mixers, but hard work.” - Samantha Garcia senior biology major being represented to the fullest capacity. Many of our student leaders have the potential to have polished

but certainly not all. I feel that as an institution of higher education, presenting options and possibilities to our students, who then decide for themselves if they are a “fit,” is the right way to go. I look forward to attending more of the seminars hosted by the Center. Sincerely, Bruce Reed Interim Dean College of Health Sciences & Human Services political careers in our communities and if social participation is not understood now, then how can we trust them later? This is the most elemental premise in understanding democracy. Even at the university level, holding an office is not merely about ceremonial debuts and mixers, but hard work. Again, hats off to our vigilant representatives – you make us proud! Samantha Garcia senior biology major

Advertising information spubs@panam.edu Delivery Thursday at Noon

The Pan American gladly accepts letters from students, staff and faculty regarding newspaper content or current issues. The Pan American reserves the right to edit submissions for grammar and length. Please limit submission length to 300 words. The Pan American cannot publish anonymous letters, or submissions containing hate speech or gratuitous personal attacks. Letters are printed at the discretion of the editor and must include the writer’s name, classification/title and phone number.

The Pan American is the official student newspaper of The University of Texas-Pan American. Views presented are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the university.

“Why anyone would waste time talking about impeaching a leader, unless for a serios offense (i.e.: drugs, suspension, etc.) is beyond my thinking.” - Andrew Dominguez freshman biology major to go to the meetings, she would. This thing about the senators being mad at the president is childish. When my leader didn't show, I, AS A

LEADER, took charge do the work and show it to my leader afterwards when I saw her. Why anyone would waste time talking about impeaching a leader, unless for a serious offense (i.e.: drugs, suspension, etc.), is beyond my thinking. These three senators have an agenda, too much time on their hands and need get over whatever personal grudge they have with her. I, as a freshman, am not familiar with the SGA. But even I know that the SGA president has to worry about senior classes, personal life (like fam-

ily and friends) and the responsibility of SGA. Obviously, she has lot on her plate aside from the student government. The students elected an SGA president because she was someone with a lot extraciurricular activites, and not someone who has a lot free time to do things like a write a long letter (my brain hurts) to a student newspaper. Hope you enjoyed. Sexy forever, Andrew Dominguez freshman biology major

IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF

THE PAN AMERICAN

Available Feb. 22

Injection issue

Colorful characters

- Find out more about Gov. Perry’s decision regarding an HPV-preventing vaccine

- Find out why a comic book following translates into box-office gold for movies


N EWS

News in brief: The controversial film “Hand of God,” which addresses sexual abuse by Catholic priests, will be shown at Cine El Rey Feb. 18 at 4:30 p.m.

Troxel Hall to be home to student organizations in fall By ANNA FLORES The Pan American The word is out: beginning fall 2007, tenants of Troxel Hall dormitory will have something in common besides living under the same roof. When the new semester begins, so will “organization housing,” a proposal that offers students at The University of

Texas-Pan American a chance to live with others from their same campus club, fraternity, sorority, religious group or any other university organization. “No other college has done this. Theme and MARTIN

Greek housing has been done, but not organization housing,” said Chad Martin, director of residence life at The University of Texas-Pan American. “Our main focus is to create a better campus environment.” Troxel Hall, which is located on Sugar Road and was built over 30 years ago, has four towers and three floors, making a total of 12 spaces. Also known

as “pods,” each space could accommodate 11 to 14 students, and groups applying for organization housing will get to live in the pod of their choice, depending on availability. “I think it’ll be a great opportunity for students and organizations to come together and get to know each other,” said Tania Chavez, a Student Government Association member and

senior finance major. “I’ve been living on campus for almost three years and it was hard to get to know people when I first moved in.” The cost of living in Troxel Hall will remain the same, with double occupancy rooms priced at $1,500 per person and singles at $2,100 per year. “It’s going to be run 100 percent

See HOUSING page 12

Possible Legislation to give students financial relief scheduling Minimum wage to increase Loan rates to see decline changes in the works By KRISTEN VILLEGAS The Pan American

By BRENDA RODRIGUEZ The Pan American The Task Force on Academic Scheduling has revised the present academic schedule of Monday-WednesdayFriday and Tuesday-Thursday classes in hopes of benefiting faculty and students at The University of Texas-Pan American. Instead of a MWF and TR schedule, the team is proposing a MW, TR, and Friday schedule, with the possibility of Saturday classes. Classes on MW and TR will be an hour and 15 minutes with a 90-minute activity period. Friday classes will run two hours and 30 minutes with an activity period of 1:15. Dennis McMillan, associate vice president for enrollment and student services, served on the task force and said the new schedule could have great benefits. “It will impact the ability of us being able to offer classes at the times that the students want them the most. It’ll stretch the schedules into the late afternoon,” he said. The task force was formed a little over a year ago when UTPA President Blandina Cardenas asked for proposals for a new schedule. In order to come up with the new schedule, the group consulted with faculty, administrators and staff involved in the scheduling development process to come up with a new plan. In addition to the new structure, another proposed change would allow a

See SCHEDULE page 12

At around 8 a.m. Samantha Koch will be getting ready to head off to school. After a day of classes and having to go to work in between each class at The University of Texas-Pan American Admissions and New Student Services office where she is an orientation leader, all she wants to do is go home and relax. However, instead she worries about making it to her second job at Joe’s Crab Shack on time, where she earns $3.20 an hour plus tip share as a hostess. “At first it was a little difficult being able to manage everything,” said Koch, a freshman at UTPA. “But after a little work at it, I am able to deal with classes, study time and two jobs allowing downtime for myself not to mention time for home and projects.” However, changes might be made to benefit an estimated 5.6 million workers in the United States just like Koch, as the U.S. Senate has passed a bill to increase the minimum wage 40 percent to $7.25 over a two-year period. Like many minimum-wage workers Koch, a journalism major, depends on minimum wage paying jobs in order to pay bills and get by. “I wake up, go to class, go to my orientations until we are done, go to Joe’s change there and don’t get home until around 11 p.m.,” said Koch. However, not everyone is happy with the idea of the increase. Small-business owners have traditionally worried that raising the wage will force them to cut employees and/or benefits. But the Senate bill would institute tax credits from the government to compensate for wage increases. The planned tax advantages are worth $8.3 billion over a 10-

year period. The wage increase, the first in a decade, would boost the average annual salary for a minimum-wage worker to $15,000 from $11,000. The tax break appears to even things out in terms of the employer. But there are other complications and possible unintended consequences. Jose Pagan, a professor of economics, said while many workers would benefit from the increase, others could be pushed into unemployment as a result. “Increasing the minimum wage will force employers to think twice about hiring new workers,” he said. “Employers will also be less likely to

See MINIMUM page 12

By SARAH JESKE The Pan American

Interest rates – two words most students dislike more than the loans they are attached to. However, this may not be the case for long because of state House Resolution 5 passed Jan. 17. According to Valley Congressman Ruben Hinojosa, the bill aims to cut loan interest rates in half over the next five years. “This is the first step in dealing with access and affordability of higher education,” said Hinojosa. The reduction will begin July 1, 2007 and continue to decrease annually until 2011. It will affect new, subsidized

loans that are taken out after the start date. “The problem is interest rates adding thousands of dollars to the debt [students] already owe,” said Hinojosa. According to Fastweb.com, which posted a sample loan scenario to better explain the process, someone paying off a $10,000 loan will, over 10 years, pay $4,718.49 in interest. This is the type of situation Hinojosa and the members of the 110th Congress are trying to eliminate. In Texas, 64 percent of undergraduate students take out loans - 89.9 percent of which are federal, such as Stafford loans - according to the

See LOAN page 12

Rafael Roux/The Pan American BARE MINIMUM - Vanessa Jasso, an architecture major, makes a sandwich at Subway where she earns minim wage.


Page 4

NEWS

February 15, 2007

Evening Tutoring at Unity Hall! The Learning Assistance Center Will start evening tutoring services In Mathematics and Writing At Unity Hall 1/29/07 Monday-Thursday From 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Internet Tutoring is now available Call 381-2585 for details Successful Semesters Begin Here! For information call the Learning Assistance Center (LAC) Location: LAC building except for Writing (Library Suite 101) 381-2585 or go by LEAC 100.


NEWS

February 15, 2007

Page 5

Group hopes to increase female political activity By KRISTEN VILLEGAS The Pan American According to statistics from a recent study by The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, voter turnouts from 2004 showed only 51 percent of women ages 18-24 and 68 percent of women ages 25 and above voted. Disappointed with voter turnouts, local Democratic women from Hidalgo County have come together to form a chapter of Texas Democratic Women. Dori Contreras Garza, judge in the 13th Court of Appeals, said female participation in the political process is a big concern. “The purpose of the organization is to promote increased political activity and influence of Democratic women in Texas politics,” said Contreras Garza. She also assisted in the formation of the Coastal Bend Chapter of TDW, which was organized by northern Texas counties in 1987. While TDW is made up of women of various professions and backgrounds, this is not only a women’s organization; men may join as well. “The focus is women. We want to participate not compete against men,” said Dolly Elizondo, the first president

elect of the local TDW. Some activities TDW will be taking part in will be voter registration, supporting local activities of the Democratic parties, discussing community issues, and educating the public on how to become involved in the political process.

Q “This is a fantastic way for women to get involved and take leadership roles in the future.” - Marisela Deleon president Young Democrats Society “As a group we can all make a difference and help promote our party and help improve the voter turnout,” said Contreras Garza. “We would also like to encourage women to run for office and get involved politically.” In addition, TDW highly encourages students, who are often apathetic about politics, to join. TDW hopes to get involved with student Democrat organizations to help get the vote out. “It is important to network and start networking at a young age,” said Contreras Garza. “Students have only to

gain from the experience of getting involved in this organization, not only to become more informed but to meet people than can help you along the way.” Marisela Deleon, president of the Young Democrat Society at UTPA, encouraged her members to participate, attend meetings and become involved with TDW. She said working with the organization would not only increase support for the Democratic Party but also provide equal opportunities for everyone. “This is a fantastic way for women to get involved and take leadership roles in the future,” said Deleon, a senior finance major. “It’s also a good way for women to participate, as opposed to men being the leaders.” As part of an organization that promotes voting and involvement for women, TDW members hope to make a difference in the community by combining the two and getting people aware of the fact that voting can make a difference. One of their main goals is to educate young women on how to get involved. “I would like to have a hand in motivating young students to vote,” Elizondo said. As president of TDW, she wants to keep up with laws being passed that

affect female Democrats and said she has always been interested in getting the vote out; that’s why she joined the organization. “I now belong to an organization that promotes voting,” Elizondo said.

TDW will have its next meeting some time in March at The University of Texas Pan-American, to raise awareness among students. For more information e-mail Contreras Garza at dori_garza@msn.com.

Sidney Meadows/The Pan American VOTER - Dolly Elizondo, president of the local Texas Democratic Women chapter, hopes the new organization will increase female political involvement.


EN ESPAÑOL

Noticias en breve: El filme controversial “Hand of God,” que habla sobre el abuso sexual cometido por sacerdotes Católicos, será mostrado en Cine El Rey el día18 de Febrero a las 4:30 p.m.

Legislatura intenta bajar intereses en prestamos Por SARAH JESKE Traducido Por JAIME NAVARRO The Pan American “Taza de interés” son probablemente las tres palabras que la mayoría de los estudiantes detestan, incluso mas que los prestamos a los que están sujetos. Sin embargo es posible que esta situación cambie, gracias a las resoluciones aprobadas por el congreso el 17 de Enero. De acuerdo al congresista Rubén Hinojosa, la ultima ley aprobada clama el reducir la taza de interés a la mitad en los próximos 5 años. “Este es nuestro primer paso para lograr que la educación superior sea accesible”. La reducción comenzara el primero de julio de 2007 y continuara en decremento hasta el 2011. Este decremento también afectara a los prestamos que hallan sido adquiridos antes de que entre en efecto esta ley. El sitio “Fastweb.com” ha creado

un escenario virtual que explica el funcionamiento de los intereses con las tazas de ahora. Alguien que solicita un préstamo de $10,000 dólares con 10 años a pagar, tendrá un interés total de $4,718.49 dólares. Este tipo de situaciones son las que el congresista Hinojosa intenta eliminar.

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“Este es nuestro primer paso para lograr que la educación superior sea accesible”. - Rubén Hinojosa Congresista Legislatura de Texas

Según el Centro Nacional de Estadísticas para la Educación, en Texas un 64% de los estudiantes universitarios solicitan prestamos bancarios, 89% se solicitan al gobierno federal, un ejemplo de estos prestamos es “Stafford Loans”.

Laura Salas, estudiante de postgrado en la facultad de negocios de la Universidad de Texas-Pan American, recibió un préstamo para pagar su educación mientras asistía a la Universidad Our Lady of the Lake. “Yo no medite lo suficiente acerca de los costos, cuando los requerí en la universidad, sin embargo no fue así cuando los busque para mi postgrado”. Cuando Salas se graduó de la OLLU ella habia accumulado cerca de $40,000 dólares en prestamos. “Se que seré capaz de pagar mi deuda, pero esto me tomara de 10 a 15 años”, dice Salas. Hinojosa, ex alumno de UTPA, dice que el no tuvo que tomar un préstamo para poder completar su educación superior, pero reconoce que esto ha cambiado. “Tengo que admitirlo, yo no tuve que pedir prestamos para pagar mis estudios universitarios, pero era mucho mas barato cuando yo estudiaba. En ese entonces $3,000 podían mantenerte por

un año, ahora es casi cuatro veces eso”. Hinojosa reconoce las necesidades de los estudiantes para poder costear su carrera universitaria y asegura que esta medida es un gran paso para lograr que los estudiantes terminen sus carreras, tanto en el ámbito académico como en el financiero. William Morley quien es director de Servicios Financieros, quiere asegurarse que todos los estudiantes y futuros estudiantes comprendan este cambio en las regulación. En un esfuerzo para lograr esto y con motivo del mes de la ayuda financiera (febrero), asistirá a escuelas publicas a lo largo del Valle para informar a todos los estudiantes. El equipo de Servicios Financieros planea también visitar escuelas de educación elemental y media superior explicando la importancia de una educación universitaria. “Nuestro propósito es educar sobre el mundo de los prestamos para la educación. Queremos enfatizar que el cole-

gio sí es una posibilidad sin importar cual es el ingreso familiar”, dice Morley Además, Hinojosa dice que una de sus prioridad es asegurar que nadie se quede fuera del presupuesto cuando este sea finalizado.

Q “Queremos enfatizar que el colegio sí es una posibilidad sin importar cual es el ingreso familiar”. - William Morley Director, Servicios Financieros Mientras otras alternativas para pagar la educación superior son preferidas, Hinojosa dice que si los prestamos son la única opción, las personas deben utilizarlos sin remordimientos por intereses. “Quizás tomen años para pagarlos, pero los beneficios de una educación universitaria los valen”, dice Hinojosa.


RTS A EN T& E RTA I N M E N T

Editor’s Pick: Must-Read Book Best-selling author Brian Selznick’s new novel, “The Invention of Hugo Cabret,” tells the magical story of an orphan in Paris

Battle of the Bands rocks on through second year By JEANETTE PEREZ The Pan American Usually Monday is one of those days you wish would never come. It gives a sense of dread because you know it means going back to school or work, or sometimes both. Last Monday was different. The University Program Board has hosted a variety of campus activities for students at The University of Texas-Pan American, but what happened Feb. 5 stood out from the rest. For the second year in a row, UPB held its long-awaited Battle of the Bands. With a lineup of local talents and a special guest performance by the Detroit-based band PBM, the night was more than promising. The reward: the local team coming in first place would be given its own UTPA-sponsored show April 3. According to UPB advisor Maricela Gonzalez, the show represented more than just entertainment value. “It’s proven that students who interact in their community have better grades so I think it’s really important for them to get involved,” she said. The event kicked off at 6 p.m. in the Student Union Theater, with the bands ready to hit the stage.

Joey Cortez/The Pan American BAND WARS - One of the highlights of last week’s Homecoming festivities was the Battle of the Bands held Feb. 5 in the Student Union. Edinburg ska-reggae-punk group Vital Brass Tones (above) mixed up the evening’s selections.

Opening up the night were the outof-towners PBM, who appeared on NBC’s “America’s Got Talent” show. The punk rock/ska quintet wasted no time busting out tunes with its unique style. In addition to songs like “Super Hero” and “Retail King,” the five guys surprised the audience and belted out their own versions of popular television show songs, including “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” and an all-time kid favorite,

“The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” before ending their set with another surprising song written out of popular Nintendo codes. After 45 minutes of ska-rock inspired tunes, it was time for the locals. First up was the Weslaco alternative Christian rock band Last Place. Playing only two songs for a set, the four guys walked off with a round of applause. Five minutes later, the ska-reggae-

punk Vital Brass Tones from Edinburg mixed it up with some audience participation to their highly up-tempo songs. Edinburg’s own goth-inspired Driving the Nails hit the stage with their black clothing, headbanging and long hair. Loud blasting drums, synched guitars and the soft melodies of the keys fused together created the perfect ambience for a rock show. Mellowing things out a bit were the

Decadent Suits with their indie/bluesinspired songs, dressy apparel and their crowd-pleasing “Shake, Shake.” Following that act were the alternative rock and punk sounds of the female-fronted Violet Avenue, hailing from McAllen, of course, with their happy beats “Haven” and “Slow” and the like. Last but not least, representing the Valley rock scene was yet another Edinburg band, Stillborne. With the singer revving up the crowd and inspiring their supporters to take a stand in the front, this local band rocked the night away. At the end of the night, Driving the Nails came in third, Vital Brass Tones took second, and Decadent Suits nabbed top honors. Driving the Nails guitarist, Frank Salinas, a graphic design major, stressed the importance of the night’s event. “A lot people don’t realize that we have so many talented acts in the Valley,” said the 21-year-old Edinburg native. “It’s very important and it’s time that the Valley realized what they’re missing.” With more than 250 people in attendance, the night was definitely a success. “I would definitely come back to future battles,” smiled 19-year-old freshman computer information systems major Jonathan Ovalle.

Mexican film company to produce debut feature By LESLIE ESTRADA The Pan American After some delays and postponements, everything is finally ready to start shooting this summer for Mexica Films’ latest production, the independent Mexican film, “El Gato Chido” (The Cool Cat). The film by Arni Rodriguez, a University of Texas-Pan American graduate student, is a teen comedy about a girl who gets dumped by her boyfriend and then finds true love. The story revolves around Valentine’s Day and shows how everyone looks to find their perfect match. “In the film, everybody is looking for their gato chido,” said executive producer Rodriguez. “The phrase is used as a metaphor. It is the protagonist’s way of saying that she is looking for her Prince Charming.” This promising film contains a number of Mexican actors including Sherlyn, who will be the protagonist. Other actors

include Omar Chaparro, a comedian, model and actress Roxana Martinez and journalist Pepillo Orijel. Award-winning Mexican actress Sylvia Pinal is also in negations to star in the film. “I’m flying to Mexico City next week to meet Sylvia Pinal,” Rodriguez said. “I am very nervous since she has not come out in films for a while. I really hope she accepts the proposal I have for her. I would love for Mrs. Pinal to be in my film.” Local talent will be showcased in this movie, which will give them as much exposure as possible. “We have local talent like actress Alejandra Barrera and myself,” said Brenda Bautista, assistant producer. “We have a lot of fresh faces who are very talented and are willing to really focus their attention on the project.” The movie, which should wrap filming by the end of the summer, will be released throughout Mexico and the

United States within the next year. “We have two distributors interested in the movie,” said Rodriguez. “Videocine and Warner Brothers Mexico are anxious to distribute the film; I guess it’s whoever makes the best offer gets it.” Rodriguez stated that he wants to portray Hispanics in a positive light, and highlight the strength of the Latino community. “I want to show the world that we can do things,” Rodriguez said. “I want to show them that we are beautiful and talented.” Salvador Gutierrez, a junior television/film major at The University of Texas-Pan American, thinks that what is being done by Mexica Films is very important and gives other students hope to realize their dreams. “Knowing that a graduate student is already making one of his dreams come true really encourages me to keep on doing the best on everything that I do,” Gutierrez said. “It is really an inspiration;

it shows us that our dreams can also come true if we work hard enough to achieve them.” Rodriguez said that the best advice he can give to students is to do what they want. “Everybody has dreams. If you wish for something to happen, do it. It will be

hard and require time but you can do it,” he said. “People say they want to do things but never get them done. If you want to achieve something you have to work hard to get it.” For more information about “El Gato Chido” and other productions visit www.mexenter.com.


Page 8

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

February 15, 2007

February 15, 2007 veryone knows the story of Clark Kent, the mildmannered reporter whose secret life was being the one and only Superman. In a way, being Superman was Kent’s hobby or hidden talent in his life. Half the time he would be at his job writing and reporting the news, but a secret life allowed him to bring out a different side of himself. The University of Texas-Pan American is filled with Clark Kents by day and Supermen by night. Maybe saving the planet isn’t on everyone’s list of talents or hobbies, but some are just as fun and interesting.

E

THE WEDDING SINGER Susana Chapa began her career with UTPA in 1998 as an “English as a second language” instructor for the English Language Institute. She is now assistant director for Career Placement Services. “My present position has many responsibilities and lends to the overall operation of the department,” said Chapa. “Consistently working with students, faculty, administration and employers is my commitment to providing high quality services for our students to develop, explore and establish their mission while a university student and upon graduation.” During the week, Chapa and the rest of the staff at CPS help students find jobs and internships that will benefit them in the future. However, an interest from her youth still keeps her busy on the side. “My interest with music and actually singing began when I was a junior high student,” Chapa said. “I was a band member and a fellow band member shared that he would play and sing at weddings.” Because of her own passion for singing, she asked her friend to let her know if he ever needed a singing partner. After being invited to one of her friend’s rehearsals, she began singing with the band as a part-time job throughout her junior high and high school years. During her years in high school, Chapa decided to fine tune her voice by joining choir, musical productions and talent shows. “I would enter as a soloist until a few of my classmates and I formed a trio and we began to sing at local talent shows,” she said. “One year I decided to enter the talent show at the Mercedes Live Stock Show back in the ‘70s

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT when they had that event and I actually won.” Trying to figure out a way to prove herself to the music community was difficult at first, but after a certain performance, she finally let it become her part-time job as an adult. “I proved myself through when I sang at my chief’s - I was then employed as an Adult Probation Officer - daughter’s wedding and from then on it became a part-time job for me,” she said. Now 30 years later, Chapa continues to perform and maintain her passion for singing and music. Her most recent performance was at a wedding in St. Joseph’s Downtown Cathedral in San Antonio. Chapa considered it an honor to sing at such a spiritual and historic cathedral. Chapa says her favorite moment is in 1977 when she sang on KGBT radio, and calls that “being at the right place at the right time.” MARSHALLING ARTS Some talents require a more physical impact on the body. Martial arts are becoming one of the most popular sports around. To become a master takes a lot of discipline and study. Cory Wimberly, an assistant professor who teaches social political philosophy and feminism classes, is a Sensei in Ju Jitsu. “Jujitsu is what I do now,” Wimberly said. “I started when I was younger with Tae Kwon Do. I began to do Jujitsu in 1994.” There are some differences between Jujitsu and Tae Kwon Do and other martial arts. “Tae Kwon Do, Karate and Kung Fu are the most popular,” he said. “They focus mainly on striking, punching. Tae Kwon Do focuses 70 percent on kicking. Jujitsu, there’s different kinds, but the one I tend to do most often focuses pretty equally on striking, throws and takedowns.” This type of Jujitsu also centers on self-defense and what to do if someone fights you to the ground. Since Wimberly also teaches feminism courses, he can use his knowledge of martial arts. “I’ve taught women’s self defense as an option for my feminism courses,” Wimberly said. “That has worked really well especially when you get students out of class, they bond together and the discussion in the class is much improved.”

Page 9 Most people idolize or want to become like those they see on television or in the movies. This is how it all started for Wimberly. “I was like 11 or 12. It was like a childhood fantasy kind of thing. I wanted to be like the guys in the movies, be a ninja and an expert and learn all the secrets of martial arts,” he said. Although Wimberly says many people get into martial arts for fun reasons, their reasons for sticking with it are more important. One of his biggest influences in the sport has been Frank Shamrock, a fighter for the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Wimberly is a new member of the faculty at UTPA. He moved here from Southern California and began teaching here in August 2006. Because of the similarities he sees between the two places, he is starting to feel right at home in the Valley. THE BREWER Christopher Little has a unique hobby that began back in his graduate school days. “Benjamin Franklin once said that ‘Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy!’” Little said. His interest expanded and soon he became fascinated, wanting to taste every beer possible - sort of like a “collection,” as he puts it. Not only is he enthralled by the taste, but also the history behind beer. “I have probably tried 150 different beers from around the world and from various microbreweries and large breweries,” he said “Additionally, I have an interest in the history of brewing and in the yeast organisms themselves.” It was this interest that led him to brew his own beer; doing so remains one of his favorite things to do with his father. He brews three batches per semester. Since he teaches plant pathology and mycology, brewing is right up his alley. “My students know I do this,” Little said. “Since this process utilizes yeast, I have suggested that it might be a fun activity for the mycology (fungal biology) students.” Although this suggestion has yet to be carried out, it would make for an interesting class. And just as an FYI; none of his homemade beverage has ever been sold. So for all the Clark Kents out there, it is alright to allow the Superman in you out to share talents and hobbies with others.


Page 8

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

February 15, 2007

February 15, 2007 veryone knows the story of Clark Kent, the mildmannered reporter whose secret life was being the one and only Superman. In a way, being Superman was Kent’s hobby or hidden talent in his life. Half the time he would be at his job writing and reporting the news, but a secret life allowed him to bring out a different side of himself. The University of Texas-Pan American is filled with Clark Kents by day and Supermen by night. Maybe saving the planet isn’t on everyone’s list of talents or hobbies, but some are just as fun and interesting.

E

THE WEDDING SINGER Susana Chapa began her career with UTPA in 1998 as an “English as a second language” instructor for the English Language Institute. She is now assistant director for Career Placement Services. “My present position has many responsibilities and lends to the overall operation of the department,” said Chapa. “Consistently working with students, faculty, administration and employers is my commitment to providing high quality services for our students to develop, explore and establish their mission while a university student and upon graduation.” During the week, Chapa and the rest of the staff at CPS help students find jobs and internships that will benefit them in the future. However, an interest from her youth still keeps her busy on the side. “My interest with music and actually singing began when I was a junior high student,” Chapa said. “I was a band member and a fellow band member shared that he would play and sing at weddings.” Because of her own passion for singing, she asked her friend to let her know if he ever needed a singing partner. After being invited to one of her friend’s rehearsals, she began singing with the band as a part-time job throughout her junior high and high school years. During her years in high school, Chapa decided to fine tune her voice by joining choir, musical productions and talent shows. “I would enter as a soloist until a few of my classmates and I formed a trio and we began to sing at local talent shows,” she said. “One year I decided to enter the talent show at the Mercedes Live Stock Show back in the ‘70s

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT when they had that event and I actually won.” Trying to figure out a way to prove herself to the music community was difficult at first, but after a certain performance, she finally let it become her part-time job as an adult. “I proved myself through when I sang at my chief’s - I was then employed as an Adult Probation Officer - daughter’s wedding and from then on it became a part-time job for me,” she said. Now 30 years later, Chapa continues to perform and maintain her passion for singing and music. Her most recent performance was at a wedding in St. Joseph’s Downtown Cathedral in San Antonio. Chapa considered it an honor to sing at such a spiritual and historic cathedral. Chapa says her favorite moment is in 1977 when she sang on KGBT radio, and calls that “being at the right place at the right time.” MARSHALLING ARTS Some talents require a more physical impact on the body. Martial arts are becoming one of the most popular sports around. To become a master takes a lot of discipline and study. Cory Wimberly, an assistant professor who teaches social political philosophy and feminism classes, is a Sensei in Ju Jitsu. “Jujitsu is what I do now,” Wimberly said. “I started when I was younger with Tae Kwon Do. I began to do Jujitsu in 1994.” There are some differences between Jujitsu and Tae Kwon Do and other martial arts. “Tae Kwon Do, Karate and Kung Fu are the most popular,” he said. “They focus mainly on striking, punching. Tae Kwon Do focuses 70 percent on kicking. Jujitsu, there’s different kinds, but the one I tend to do most often focuses pretty equally on striking, throws and takedowns.” This type of Jujitsu also centers on self-defense and what to do if someone fights you to the ground. Since Wimberly also teaches feminism courses, he can use his knowledge of martial arts. “I’ve taught women’s self defense as an option for my feminism courses,” Wimberly said. “That has worked really well especially when you get students out of class, they bond together and the discussion in the class is much improved.”

Page 9 Most people idolize or want to become like those they see on television or in the movies. This is how it all started for Wimberly. “I was like 11 or 12. It was like a childhood fantasy kind of thing. I wanted to be like the guys in the movies, be a ninja and an expert and learn all the secrets of martial arts,” he said. Although Wimberly says many people get into martial arts for fun reasons, their reasons for sticking with it are more important. One of his biggest influences in the sport has been Frank Shamrock, a fighter for the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Wimberly is a new member of the faculty at UTPA. He moved here from Southern California and began teaching here in August 2006. Because of the similarities he sees between the two places, he is starting to feel right at home in the Valley. THE BREWER Christopher Little has a unique hobby that began back in his graduate school days. “Benjamin Franklin once said that ‘Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy!’” Little said. His interest expanded and soon he became fascinated, wanting to taste every beer possible - sort of like a “collection,” as he puts it. Not only is he enthralled by the taste, but also the history behind beer. “I have probably tried 150 different beers from around the world and from various microbreweries and large breweries,” he said “Additionally, I have an interest in the history of brewing and in the yeast organisms themselves.” It was this interest that led him to brew his own beer; doing so remains one of his favorite things to do with his father. He brews three batches per semester. Since he teaches plant pathology and mycology, brewing is right up his alley. “My students know I do this,” Little said. “Since this process utilizes yeast, I have suggested that it might be a fun activity for the mycology (fungal biology) students.” Although this suggestion has yet to be carried out, it would make for an interesting class. And just as an FYI; none of his homemade beverage has ever been sold. So for all the Clark Kents out there, it is alright to allow the Superman in you out to share talents and hobbies with others.


A&E

Page 10

February 15, 2007

Films that Oscar forgot By FRANK CALVILLO The Pan American Every February for the past 79 years, Hollywood has chosen to honor the year’s best in films with the Academy Awards. The much-anticipated ceremony praises those who took part in creating the most memorable and noteworthy motion pictures throughout the past year. Outstanding films such as “The Departed,” “Babel” and “Little Miss Sunshine” scored with critics and moviegoers and were deservedly recognized with nominations for this year’s Oscars. However while nearly all of the films nominated for this year’s statuettes were Oscar-worthy (albeit on different levels), it’s difficult to ignore the absence of some of the year’s cinematic gems.

Elizabeth Kennedy/The Pan American SHOP WHILE YOU EAT - Pricetags hang from the paintings featured throughout Masterpiece Café, a McAllen eatery where dining and art go hand in hand.

Café shows patrons art of having lunch By FRANK CALVILLO

The Pan American You know the setting. Avant-garde music coming from the speakers, decorative pieces of art hanging from the brightly-colored walls and plush, red velvet chairs for you to sit in. No it isn’t an upscale restaurant in New York City’s Soho district. It’s a McAllen restaurant called Masterpiece Café. Masterpiece Café is one of those restaurants that strives to be different from the average eatery through its unique surroundings. Although primarily a lunch café, open only between the hours of 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, Masterpiece Café’s menu reads like one from an elegant four-star restaurant. Choices at the place - located in the Uptown Plaza on North 10th include quiche, sandwiches served on Greek bread, deserts such as tuxedotruffle mousse and an assortment of beverages from fine wines to espressos and milkshakes. But beyond the conventions of any other restaurant, the element that makes Masterpiece Café a one-of-a-kind origi-

nal is the art on its walls. Upon entering the restaurant, the first thing to be noticed is the eyecatching pieces of art on display throughout. Made of steel, tile and wire, the pieces reflect the contemporary feel of today’s art world and serve to enhance the experience of the café’s patrons. Masterpiece Café is actually the little sister of Artline America, an art shop that opened in 1991 specializing in custom framing; it is located in the same building. According to owner Roy Robinson, it was his appreciation for art that led to the creation of Masterpiece Café in 2000. “We thought that the two of them would go hand in hand,” he said. “We wanted people to have a chance to enjoy good art while having some lunch.” Robinson says that if a person likes a piece of art that much, they are welcome to leave with it for the right price. “All the pieces in the café are for sale,” Robinson said, “although the prices do tend to vary.” Just as the price of the artwork varies, so does the clientele who comes

in to look at it. “We have different types, from young folks that enjoy art to Winter Texans. Most are professionals that just want a fast bite to eat in a relaxed atmosphere,” Robinson said. “I see something different every time I come here,” said Rhonda Flores, a McAllen resident. Flores, who often frequents Masterpiece Café, feels it is ideal for lunchtime cravings. “I always get the chicken salad for me and my boss,” she said. “It’s her favorite.” Sarah Rios, another McAllen resident, feels that the quiet atmosphere is what has her coming back for more. “So many places are really busy and loud during lunch time and this one isn’t,” she said. “You can just relax and enjoy your lunch peacefully.” It is this collective atmosphere that Robinson believes contributes to the café’s success. “The majority of our customers are repeat customers who end up coming back to us multiple times, not only for the food, which is healthy and also made from scratch, but also to look at the art,” he said.

“RUNNING WITH SCISSORS” It’s hard to imagine why, with so many of the elements Academy voters love, this true-life story was passed over for any nominations. Based on the bestselling memoir by Augusten Burroughs, the dark, comedic film tells the story of a 16-year-old boy who is given up for adoption by his erratic mother, to her eccentric psychiatrist and his offbeat family. Aside from a strong cast of actors that includes Alec Baldwin, Annette Benning and Gwyneth Paltrow, the film contains a type of humor unseen in many of today’s comedies. Take for example the scene in which combating spouses Baldwin and Benning are at a restaurant where Baldwin proclaims: “I haven’t had a drink in four years,” to which his estranged wife says to a nearby waitress: “Excuse me, could you get him a medal?” How a film like this was ever overlooked will forever remain a mystery. “INFAMOUS” Many say that nothing original comes out of Hollywood anymore. However the rule should not apply to “Infamous,” the re-telling of the making of Truman Capote’s non-fiction classic “In Cold Blood.” Released a year after 2005’s similarly-themed, Oscar-winning “Capote,” “Infamous” was instantly dismissed as a mere copy of the previous film and received no accolades or acknowledgment. Had academy voters given the film a chance, surely they would have noted the energetic performances (particularly from an outstanding Sandra Bullock), the sharp dialogue and, more importantly, the contrast between the author’s plush New York world and the solemn Midwestern farmland he visits. Where “Capote” went out of its way to be overly dark, “Infamous” focused on

the humanity of the story while at the same time managing to remain compelling throughout. “A GOOD YEAR” Perhaps one of the most overlooked films of 2006, “A Good Year” is the film adaptation of the best-selling novel of the same name by Peter Mayle. The film tells the story of a successful businessman who inherits a vineyard in France after his uncle dies. Upon returning to his late uncle’s large estate, he recounts his days as a young boy there and in-turn begins to re-evaluate his life. With performances from Russell Crowe, Albert Finney and Freddie Highmore, the most obvious question here is why weren’t any acting nominations bestowed among these three talented and versatile a c t o r s ? Furthermore, the film’s countryside setting in the south of France is so vivid and lively that it almost becomes a character itself, not to mention a would-be shoein for best cinematography. In the past, films

like “A Good Year” have often been embraced by the Academy. Its absence is yet another sign that today’s voters prefer smaller-scaled films dealing with social issues. It is unclear how a film is chosen to receive the highest honor in Tinsel Town. Some believe it is through endless campaigning, while others insist it is pure taste that can lead to taking home a “golden guy.” However defining a good movie has nothing to do with how many nominations it receives for any award. While some of the year’s best films will be honored at the ceremony on Feb. 25, the real winners will be the movie audiences who find pleasure and joy in a film simply because they thought it was good.


NEWS

February 15, 2007

Page 11

SACS continued from page 1 proves that the institution has continued to improve. During the off-campus review, UTPA met 66 out of 76 criteria set forth for accreditation. Of the 10 criteria not met, three dealt with the university’s financial report. Another two dealt with the Starr County campus. Additional documentation was requested for institutional outcome assessment, how technology enhanced student learning, how the institution measured students’ progress in the core curriculum, information about independent graduate learning and supplemental data for 50 faculty members teaching classes for credit. A QUALITY PLAN Karen Watt, professor in educational leadership, has been serving as project director for the QEP, a document outlining how the university plans to improve student learning. In particular, it targets three freshman-level math courses that have been found to have

high failure rates. Both Turk and Watt said it was important students were familiar with the QEP because it is the main issue the accreditation team will be looking at during their visit. “The QEP is something that we need to make sure that students are affected by because everyone has to take those gatekeeper (core) courses,” Watt said. The process to create the QEP originally began in fall ‘05, with preliminary studies and surveys of university needs. Project members were asked to identify an area affecting the quality of learning that could show improvement within five to 10 years. The project team looked at the top 10 courses with high failure rates. “Since the three math courses were at the top, we thought we needed to really look into this and see how we can make teaching and learning better,” Watt said. Especially alarming was the number of first-generation Hispanic students failing core math courses. Failure rates

as high as 78 percent were noted for first-generation students. Overall, the rates were as high as 62 percent for those freshman-level courses. The student learning objectives, part of the QEP, are those statements commonly found on syllabi that say what a student should get out of a certain course. The QEP doesn’t focus on the content of the math courses; it shows the process whereby the university will implement initiatives to improve student learning. Watt has been the leader of an interdisciplinary team with a representative from each college selected to give their input for the QEP. “The largest challenge has been coordinating all of the ideas and all of the input from everyone to create the document (the QEP), get it ready and send to the SACS external review team,” she said. PILOT PLANNING Chad Richardson, a sociology pro-

Joey Cortez/The Pan American MOB SCENE - UTPA police hold back audience members who swarmed Dan Rather’s car after his speech Tuesday.

only attitude you can take is to ‘keep on keeping on,’ while always keeping in mind no one does it perfectly,” he said. “And, certainly, I have not.” However, he said reporting, though flawed, is necessary. “This country’s founders put freedom of the press in the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights not because they loved reporters,” he said. “They put freedom of the press right after freedom of religion because they understood that without it, the democratic experience... didn’t have a chance.” YEAR TO WATCH In his nearly 24 years at CBS News, Rather reported on several wars, both political and literal. During his recent visit to Afghanistan, Rather said he came across what he calls “a forgotten war.” “Afghanistan is not Iraq. It has a different history, a different culture and different people,” he explained. Rather added that this year will be

retake the modules he or she did not pass, rather than retaking the entire class. Other interventions include four hours of classroom instruction, three hours of interaction with the professor and use of co-operative teaching. WAITING GAME The final version of the QEP will be sent to print within the next few days. Between now and April, the campus SACS committees will be spreading the word about the QEP to the rest of the university. “All of us are hoping that the initiatives we put in place will actually improve student performance,” Watt said. “We’ve been talking about it for a couple of years. Now seeing the plan in place will be interesting.” UTPA should receive feedback about the status of receiving accreditation but will not have an official response until December. Individuals interested in learning more can visit http://sacs.utpa.edu/QEP.

PERCENT continued from page 1

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something that is important for the public to need…in which, someone, somewhere, often in a power position, doesn’t want you to know,” he said. Rather added that the importance of reporting real news is immeasurable, and no one understands that better than those who are trying to keep it away from the public. “Unfortunately, the small minority of people who have something to lose often understand this better than the great majority of people who stand to gain from the truth being told,” he said. “That’s why they have and will continue to go to great lengths to manipulate the news.” During the 2004 presidential campaign, Rather’s own ability to report the news was put into question after his program ran a false report about President George Bush’s military record. He said when a reporter comes under fire for how they report, there is one thing they can do. “If you’re going to be a reporter of integrity and independence, I think the

fessor, has been helping to write up the pilot project dealing with the gatekeeper math courses, as part of the SACS accreditation process. In particular, Richardson has used his specialty in sociology to help identify the needs of first-generation Hispanic students and a description of the local community. “It was intended mainly for firstgeneration students because we found that their passing rates in those college math courses were much lower than the rest of the student population,” Richardson said. “A lot of them who don’t pass drop out of the university. It’s retaining students by helping them get past the math courses.” Starting in the fall, only eight sections of the first math course will be offered. Beginning in 2008, all three math courses will be offered and the project will be in full swing. Richardson said one of the most significant changes would be to divide the courses into modules so that students who failed a math course would only need to

defining for the United States. “If I’m correct in my judgment, and I may not be since I’m often wrong, 2007 will be a particularly bloody and expensive year in Afghanistan,” he said. “However, I believe there is always cause for optimism… especially in this country, the history of which is filled with examples of adversity and obstacles overcome.” Rather added that the future of the country will depend on not just the upcoming presidential election, but what Americans choose to hear during it. “So as these great issues of America and the world are debated, I ask you to remember to consider your news sources while asking yourself who stands to gain from any particular view point and why,” he said. “Don’t become, as many of us journalists have, too afraid to ask the tough questions.” The final speaker of the series, Scott Ritter, former U.N. weapons inspector, is scheduled for April 5.

Among the problems bringing this issue to the foreground is the fact that because of the rule, Texas flagship schools such as Texas A&M University and The University of Texas-Austin have a progressively smaller percentage of slots available for students who were not in the top ten percent of a Texas high school class. In the last four years, top 10 percent admittances to UT have gone from 30 percent of the incoming class to 70 percent. These statistics have some worried that should the trend continue, there would be a time when the entire incoming class would be composed of these students. Under the current law, those within the top ten percent are admitted by high school grade-point average, despite SAT/ACT scores. This means that grades are the determining factor, though it has long been suggested that the top 10 percent at an academically excellent school is a bit different than the top 10 percent at other schools with lower performance. As for The University of Texas-Pan American, McMillan said the number of students admitted based on the top ten percent law has never been a problem. Last semester, 508 out of the 2,845 entering freshman were in the top ten percent of their high school class. “I’m not overly concerned from UTPA’s standpoint,” McMillan said. “I wish we did have the problem of the top ten percent taking our slots.” However, McMillan said should legislation pass that eliminates the law, UTPA could see advantages, particularly regarding the traditional “brain drain” of top area kids heading upstate.

“We might reap the benefit of students that could have gone on to other public institutions, but because they didn’t get in, they may decide to stay here,” he said. “It could result in UTPA getting top-notch students we may have never gotten before, like those in the seventh or eight percentile.” Yet, some high school students currently in the top ten percent of their class fail to see the possible benefits. “I think it’s not fair. Those graduating from one high school may have it easier to be in the top ten percent of the class than the other, depending on class size and the academic strength of the school,” said Laura Gonzalez, a senior in the top ten percent at Valley Christian High School in Brownsville. McMillan added that UTPA wants to focus on continuing to meet the growing demand for better higher education with more opportunities for incoming students. “When legislature mandates a ruling, we have to react to it. Multiple bills passed based on class rank will probably change our admissions policy,” he said. “Right now a committee is reviewing it. We want to focus on raising the bar, by continuing to raise our ACT score requirements.” State Rep. Aaron Pena said the current law has served its purpose and any decision to overturn it should be approached with careful consideration and be well thought out. “I think the plan has done a pretty good job of addressing some historic under representation of minority students in higher education without resorting to the use of quotas,” Pena said.


NEWS

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MINIMUM continued from page 3 offer on-the-job training to workers so the increase could have a negative impact.” Koch’s only worry is that if minimum wage were to go up she thinks that companies would find a way to raise prices in their products and that the economy would experience a downfall. James Eugene Garverick, a UTPA professor of accounting, agreed, saying he thinks most people already make over minimum wage due to supply and demand in the marketplace, adding that he believes the only effect this bill would have would be “inflationary.” “I think the biggest ramifications will be to make politicians look good, more than economic ramifications,” said Garverick. However, John Bokina, a professor in the political science department, says that based on past minimum wage increases, the effect on inflation will be minimal. “Would it possibly have an increase in the cost of goods and services? Yeah, a little, but nothing dramatic,” Bokina said. “It’s compensated by the fact that people will have enhanced buying power

and they can purchase more goods and services.” Bokina believes there will be benefits to both workers and businesses, saying that when workers have more buying power, the buy more from the businesses. In addition, Garverick said he doesn’t think the increase in minimum wage will be a total benefit to society, saying it might have an adverse effect on health care and company benefits. However, Pagan said whatever the effect; it should be felt full-force locally.

Q

“Increasing the minimum wage will force employers to think twice about hiring new workers.” - Jose Pagan professor of economics “The Valley has one of the lowest average wage rates in the country so, if there is going to be an impact, we should feel it here more than almost anywhere else in the United States,” Pagan said.

SCHEDULE continued from page 3 15-minute break in between classes and an activity period every day. Yazmin Gonzalez, a junior English major from McAllen, said she would welcome the changes. “I love the idea of not having to come to school the whole week,” Gonzalez said. “And I like the 15-minute break because it gives me extra minutes to smoke a cigarette.” John Emery, dean of the College of Business Administration and chair of the task force, said many professors feel this schedule is the route to take. “Most instructors, not all, feel that a 75-minute class format is more efficient. You only have to take roll and get everyone settled in and once you get into the material, it works a lot better,” he said. “There are some exceptions. Professors that teach mathematics feel that shorter classes but more frequent classes work a little better.” In addition, Emery said the new schedule could help alleviate parking headaches around campus for the university’s 16,253 students as some students would prefer a MW schedule, while oth-

ers would want a TR. Emery added that at certain times, the university only uses a little over 50 percent of its available classroom space. Better spacing out of classes time-wise would make use more efficient. “When we ask the Legislature to support us for a new facility they’re going to say, ‘Well, how much are you using?’ so the more you use them the stronger your case is to get a new building and things like that,” said Emery. However, the new schedule would not be without its drawbacks. According to McMillan, students who prefer to sign up for early morning classes to end their day early may find themselves in a bind, as this new system has more afternoon than morning classes. “We know that it’s not always possible for students to get all their classes between eight and noon Monday through Friday,” he said. “There’s going to be times where afternoon classes are going to be required, but we can do some things to try to help in that regard.”

McMillan added that the new schedule could hurt student involvement, one of the university’s biggest goals. “Concerns that we have would be for instance the students in the residence halls. If they were through with their classes on Thursday the residence hall would just be vacant on the weekends,” said McMillan. “We’re trying to encourage student engagement and student activities within the residence halls but if all the students leave every weekend that would work against us in trying to encourage that sort of student engagement.” The Student Government Association is in charge of communicating the students’ feelings on the proposal. E-mail reader opinions to members at SGA@utpa.edu. The academic deans are already surveying their people and weighing options; they will report back to the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Sale. If the schedule is approved, changes may take place as early as fall 2008.

HOUSING continued from page 3

LOAN continued from page 3 Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics. Laura Salas, a graduate student in the business program at The University of Texas-Pan American, took out loans to pay for her bachelor’s degree at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio. “I didn’t think about the cost as much as I should have,” Salas said, “but it definitely made a difference when I was looking into graduate school.” Salas graduated from OLLU with a degree in social work and about $40,000 in student loans. “I know I will be able to pay off my debt, but it is still going to take 10 to 15 years before I am done,” she said. Hinojosa, a graduate of UTPA, said while he never had to take loans to achieve his business degree, things have changed.

February 15, 2007

“I will admit, I did not have to take out any loans to pay for college, but it was much cheaper when I was in school,” said Hinojosa. “[Back then] $3,000 could get you through the year. Now it is four times that.” Hinojosa recognizes the need for more help in affordability and said the new measure is a big step in helping students solve the “affordability puzzle,” which includes academic preparation and financial aid options. William Morley, assistant director of student financial services, wants to make certain all current and prospective students become aware of the changes. In an effort to do so, he will be sharing the information with students in public schools across the Valley throughout the month of February, which is Financial Aid Awareness Month.

Fast Eddie’s Billiards Is now hiring for Waitstaff, bartender, and hostess at the McAllen and Edinburg Location 400 Nolana St. G, McAllen 815 N. Closner, Edinburg

During the month, staff members from Student Financial Services plan to visit elementary, middle and high schools explaining the importance of higher education. “Our purpose is to help get the world out about financial aid,” Morley said. “We want to emphasize that college is a possibility, no matter what your family’s income status.” In addition, Hinojosa said one of his main priorities is making sure education is not left behind when the national budget is finalized. While alternative funding options are always preferred, Hinojosa said if loans are the only option to pay for education, they should be taken advantage of. “It may take years [to pay them off], but the benefits are worth the wait,” he said.

different from anything else on campus,” Martin said. “It will be a self-governed residence hall.” Troxel Hall residents will be able to have their pods painted in the color of their choice and have the option of replacing existing furniture with their personal selections, both features not offered at other residence halls. “It sounds like a cool idea, but there would have to be certain rules so that there wouldn’t be any type of chaos even though it’s going to be self-governed,” said Hector De Leon, a junior biology major. Martin assured that each pod will be able to apply their own rules within the dorm community, though state and federal regulations would still have to be met. Each organization will also have their own office and rooms will be available on each floor where groups can

invite speakers or hold meetings. Another appealing features according to Martin are 24-hour visitation and the option of residence during holidays. “For anyone that is planning to live on campus, this is the perfect opportunity to be more engaged with university life,” Chavez said. “I totally encourage students to apply for organization housing. If it would’ve been available when I first came to Pan Am, I definitely would’ve been part of it.” Students interested in being part of this new project can apply starting March 1 at the Residence Life office, located in UC 315. “With organization housing we hope to see positive changes in regards to life on campus, and possibly create a better college experience for UTPA students,” said Martin.


SPORTS

February 15, 2007

Page 13

ENLIGHTENED BY LUCAS

Baseball

I’m a dirty cheater I was unable to go to the basketball game this weekend, and much to my dismay, our boys in green and orange were edged By LUKE KOONG out 81-76. The Pan American The loss ended their 10-game dominance of home court. Now, had this game been played on my game console, the outcome most certainly would have been different. Anyone familiar with the College Hoops franchise for the Sony PlayStation 2 will know that in the game options, there are sliders that help determine the difficulty level of the game. Now, most days, I’ll leave the settings as they are and lose graciously. But there are just some games that you can’t lose. Especially if you’re trying to win a bid for the Big Dance in March. So, let’s say I’m losing by, oh, I don’t know, 19 points with 5:23 left to go. See that slider that controls 3-point accuracy? Normally it sits at the mid-point of the bar.

Feb. 11 Not when I’m down by that much with so little time to go. 3-point accuracy bar, meet 100 percent! Now, watch as Colin Lien hits a trifecta from way behind the arc. Watch Brian Burrell knock down threes while fading away from two defenders. Watch as that 19-point deficit fades away and becomes a 30-point blowout. Take that, Texas A&M! Bow down to my might, Florida. You readers might say I have no honor. But at least the Broncs are still undefeated in my book. Yet, when all is said and done and UTPA has won five straight national titles, reality sets back in. No matter how much I humiliate powerhouse teams in the game, the truth remains that we lost our first home game. Of course, the season is far from over. The team will be finishing the season on the road. If the prior results of the season are any indication, the teams we are going to face will be easily handled with no problems. So here Utah Valley State, we give you this one win on our court. Because we’re coming to dominate on yours. Please send all comments, questions and cheat codes to lkoong2004@yahoo.com.

McNeese at Texas-Pan American (Edinburg) Texas-Pan American 9, McNeese 7 R H Texas-Pan American 101 160 00X 9 9 McNeese 102 300 001 7 11 Conrad, Ropp (4), Frantz (7), Smith (9) and Hulett; Cisper, Smolen (3), Silva (7), Davilla (9) and Flores. W-Smolen (0-1); S-Davila (2). 2B: McNeese-Becker; Texas-Pan American-Gonzalez, Flores, Brooks, Bourn. HR-Kingrey. Texas-Pan American 4-3, McNeese 0-3

Feb. 10 Cal State Northridge at Texas-Pan American (Edinburg) Cal State Northridge 5, Texas-Pan American 3 R H E Cal State Northridge 030 000 011 5 11 3 Texas-Pan American 001 200 000 3 7 1 Jolicoeur, Haderlein (9) and Parham; Linder, Guajardo (5), Mancini (8), Davila (8) and Flores. W-Jolicoeur (2-0); L-Davila (0-1); SHaderlein (1). 2B: Cal State Northridge-Traynum, Kasarjian, Parham; Texas-Pan American-Brooks. 3B: Cal State Northridge-Reed. Cal State Northridge 6-2, Texas-Pan American 3-3

Feb. 9 Illinois-Chicago at Texas-Pan American (Edinburg) Texas-Pan American 2, Illinois-Chicago 1 R H E Texas-Pan American 000 001 001 2 8 0 Illinois-Chicago 000 000 001 1 6 0 Peterson, Davis (8) and Whinery; Wymer, Silva (9), Davila (9) and Flores. W-Wymer (2-0); L-Peterson (0-1); S-Davila (2). 2B: IllinoisChicago-Flores. 3B: Illinois-Chicago-Gempp Jr. Texas-Pan American 3-2, Illinois-Chicago 0-1

Men’s Tennis

Women’s Tennis

Feb. 10

Feb. 10

Texas-Pan American 5 Hardin-Simmons 2

Texas State 4 Texas-Pan American 3

Singles Ivan Avila, UTPA, def. Ryan Waters, Simmons, 7-5, 7-6 Gary Bianco, UTPA, def. Wade Morgan, Simmons, 6-2, 6-0 David Lopez-Heredia, UTPA, def. Justin Lockbay, Simmons, 7-5, 7-6 Shashank Vij, UTPA, def. Samuel Miers, Simmons, 6-3, 6-0 Doubles Ivan Avila and Nirvick Mohinta, UTPA, def. Doug Eckstein and Wade Morgan, Simmons, 8-1 Shashank Vij and Gary Bianco, UTPA, def. Samuel Miers and Wes Kidd, Simmons, 8-6 Texas-Pan American 5 Abilene Christian 1 Lamar 4 Texas-Pan American 0

Track and field teams continue to improve Broncs preparing for outdoor season On Friday, 23 members of the men and women’s track teams posted personal records at the University of Houston/RunSport All-Comers Track Meet. Liliana Cavazos took first place with a leap of 39-3 1/4 in the triple jump, also earning third place in the school record books. Carolina Izaguirre took first in the 3,000 meters, finishing with a time of 10:45.64. Omar Doria, of Edinburg North, was first in the mile with a time of 4:24.87. Claudia Lopez hit a 37-11 and tied for second in the triple jump. Edinburg native Rose Escovedo finished fourth in the 3,000-meter. Sara Rodriguez of Pharr finished two spots behind her. Vanessa Brown took home second and third in the 200- and 400-meter races, respectively. Ashlon Martin was fifth and seventh in the 400-meter and 200-meter, respectively. Amanda Ferris took third place accolades in the weight throw, while the distance medley team of Sonya Rivera, Shardae Bey and Lizet Garcia notched a third-place finish. Gilroy Martinez finished third in the one-mile race, senior Will Littleton was second in the high jump and Sal Gonzalez was third in the pole vault. Scott Miller was sixth in the weight throw, Luis Nava was third in the 3,000-meter race and Angel Ramirez finished ninth in the same event. Wally Gonzalez finished fourth in the 800-meter run. He was also part of the distance medley team with Doria and Ruben Cantu, helping it take second place. The outdoor season begins March 3 in Laredo. The Pan American

E 2 4 (1-0); L-Conrad

Singles Julia Cirne-Lima, UTPA, def. Andrea Giraldo, State, 5-7, 6-2, 6-0 Megan Bedeau, UTPA, def. Sumarie Muller, State, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4 Silke Buksik, UTPA, def. Ali Gulida, Texas State, 6-1, 0-6, 6-3 Ashley Ellis, State, def. Giana Oliveira, UTPA, 6-1, 6-1 Lainy Chafitz, State, def. Stephanie Willerding, UTPA, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2 Mackenzie Farmer, State, def. Nicole Garcia, UTPA, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3 Doubles Megan Bedeau and Silke Buksik, UTPA, def. Ashley Ellis and Mackenzie Farmer, State, 8-6 Lainy Chafitz and Andrea Giraldo,State, def. Giana Oliveira and Julia Cirne-Lima, UTPA, 8-4 Sumarie Muller and Ali Gulida, State, def. Stephanie Willerding and Nicole Garcia, UTPA, 8-5

Men’s Basketball Feb. 10 Utah Valley State at Texas-Pan American (Edinburg) Utah Valley State 81, Texas-Pan American 76 Utah Valley State (17-7) Peterson 1-2 1-2 3, Bailey 3-5 5-7 12, Heck 7-11 4-6 23, Brady 1-3 1-2 3, Brown 2-3 1-2 5, Olsen 0-1 0-0 0, Toolson 6-11 3-3 17, Troyer 3-6 0-2 6, Walker 5-7 2-4 12, Ravenberg 0-0 0-1 0. Totals 28-49 17-29 81. Texas-Pan American (12-11) Stoll 7-10 4-7 23, Burrell 6-11 2-2 17, Shankle 2-3 1-2 6, Trader 2-4 4-5 8, Allgood 3-5 0-0 0, Puente 0-0 0-0 0, Edwards 0-0 0-2 0, Chatman 0-2 0-0 0, Robinson 0-0 0-0 0, Lien 4-5 7-10 16. Totals 24-40 19-29 76. Halftime-Utah Valley State 34-32. 3-Point Goals- Utah Valley State 8-20 (Peterson 0-1, Bailey 1-3, Heck 5-7, Olsen 0-1, Toolson 2-5, Troyer 0-3) Texas-Pan American 9-20 (Stoll 4-7, Burrell 3-8, Shankle 1-2, Chatman 0-2, Lien 1-1). Fouled Out-Olsen. Rebounds-Utah Valley State 26 (Heck 7) Texas-Pan American 24 (Burrell 9). Assists-Utah Valley State 12 (Olsen 3) Texas-Pan American 12 (Stoll 3). Total FoulsUtah Valley State 25, Texas-Pan American 23. A-1,450.

Women’s Basketball Feb. 10 Texas-Pan American at Utah Valley State (Shurian Family AC in Orem, Utah) Utah Valley State 75, Texas-Pan American 54 Texas-Pan American (10-15) Gray 3-8 2-2 8, Daniel 1-4 3-7 5, Vaughn 1-4 0-0 2, Garrett 0-2 1-2 1, Grigsby 3-13 2-5 8, Wilson 4-4 0-0 11, Jones 1-5 0-0 2, Freeman 1-1 0-0 3, Kostacky 0-1 0-0 0, Winfrey 0-4 0-0 0, Jean 4-8 2-2 10, Schneider 0-0 2-2 2, Ramirez 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 19-55 12-20 54. Utah Valley State (12-11) Marvin 6-15 8-11 24, Fairbanks 9-16 8-9 27, Grimm 3-9 2-2 8, Peterson 0-7 0-0 0, Beaman 1-2 0-0 2, McMurray 3-5 1-1 9, Ahlstrom 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 1-2 1-2 3, Nakayama 0-3 0-0 0, Schott 0-0 0-0 0, Cornejo 1-2 0-0 2, Reynolds 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 24-63 20-25 75. Halftime-Utah Valley State 38-30. 3-Point Goals-Texas-Pan American 4-11 (Gray 0-1, Vaughn 0-1, Grigsby 0-2, Wilson 3-3, Freeman 1-1, Winfrey 0-2, Jean 0-1) Utah Valley State 7-20 (Marvin 4-7, Fairbanks 1-3, Peterson 0-5, McMurray 2-3, Nakayama 0-2). ReboundsTexas-Pan American 38 (Daniel, Grigsby 6) Utah Valley State 41 (McMurray 8). Assists-Texas-Pan American 10 (Gray, Grigsby, Jones, Winfrey 2) Utah Valley State 19 (Marvin 5). Total Fouls-Texas-Pan American 16, Utah Valley State 19. A-301.


SPORTS SPORTS

February 15, 2007 Page 14

Page 15 February 15, 2007

Baseball players earn honors for performance By LUKE KOONG The Pan American The University of Texas-Pan American produced more than two wins in three days during the weekend in the Citrus Tournament held at Edinburg Baseball Stadium. Four

Broncs earned spots on the AllTournament team. Catcher Osiel Flores made the team with a .385 batting average, compiling five hits in 13 at-bats. The senior produced a double against McNeese State, which brought in two teammates and a 9-7 victory.

Abraham Garcia had five hits during the tournament, producing a .556 batting average. The sophomore scored a run against McNeese State and produced four hits in six trips to the plate in the games against IllinoisChicago and Cal State Northridge. Junior outfielder Roly Gonzalez

scored five runs for the Broncs. In the game against McNeese State, he scored three times and had three RBIs. Bronc hurler Josh Wymer was also honored. The freshman accumulated eight innings without a run and notched a win for his efforts. He allowed a .167 batting average in help-

ing the Broncs attain a 2-1 record. In addition, Wymer was also selected as the Division I Independent Pitcher of the Week. On a down note, the Broncs got flattened, 19-0, Tuesday to even their record at 4-4 heading into a threegames series at Texas A&M this week.

Onydia Garza/The Pan American BIG WEEKEND - The University of Texas-Pan American collected a 2-1 record in the Citrus Tournament. (Clockwise from left) First baseman Dominic Tognietti (23) makes a play on the ball. Ray Silva (45) hurls a pitch toward his opponent. Outfielder Leighton Autrey returns a pitch. The team gathers to celebrate their 2-1 victory against Illinois-Chicago. Nick Bourn (4) tags the bag at first base.

Tennis squads face stiff competition in ranked opponents By PATRICK KENNEDY The Pan American The climb toward success for The University of Texas-Pan American men and women’s tennis teams has been a rocky one, but one they hope will ultimately succeed. Since the time he decided to take the reigns of the UTPA tennis program, head coach Ron Hubbard’s dream was to take the program back to its glory days of the 1960s and ‘70s. To accomplish his goals, he planned to beef up recruiting efforts, and step up the level of competition. Both teams have opened up against some very strong opponents this season, leading to close losses and hard-fought victories.

“The teams are evolving. They’ve started with highly ranked teams, and it has certainly helped us some,” said Hubbard, once a Bronc standout in the sport, back in the ‘70s. After starting the spring season with losses to 19th-ranked Texas A&M, 57th-ranked Oklahoma and 46th-ranked TCU, the men’s team took down HardinSimmons and Abilene Christian University in a 2-1 win last week. After beating opponents McMurry University in a 7-0 blowout and Texas A&M Corpus Christi 4-2, the Lady Bronc tennis team suffered a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to Texas State University and a 6-1 loss to UTSA last week in San Marcos. Combined, both the men and

women’s teams are playing eight nationally ranked FILA teams this season. The men have already played three of them and still have to take on 39th-ranked SMU and 53rd-ranked Texas A&MCorpus Christi. On the other side of the net, the women have played against 29th-ranked Texas A&M and will play 40th ranked SMU and 69th-ranked Rice. The lessons learned over the past few weeks will be taken to heart as the men’s team enters into Southland Conference play this weekend, and as the women continue to work toward a new standard of excellence for the program. On Saturday, the men travel to Corpus Christi to take on the Islanders, a

school which Hubbard has dubbed a “cohort school.” “We see the schools in the Southland Conference as our cohorts, and we gauge ourselves by them,” he said. The Islanders will prove to be a staunch opponent for the Broncs, as they are coming off a 5-2 victory against TCU, led by 40th-ranked doubles pair Andrey Kumanstov and Mikhail Pavlov. The women’s team will also be traveling to Corpus to take on the Lady Islanders. To get ready for the upcoming matches, Hubbard says that he and his coaching staff will be working with the teams in order to, “get everyone a little more consistent in their playing.”

FILA NCAA Division I National Tennis Rankings Men No. 19 Texas A&M Result: L, 0-7 No. 39 SMU No. 46 TCU Result: L, 0-7 No. 53 Texas A&M-CC No. 57 Univ. of Okla. Result: L, 0-6

Feb.3 April 4 Jan. 24 Feb. 17 Jan. 23

Women No. 29 Texas A&M Result: L, 0-7 No. 40 SMU No. 69 Rice

Jan. 20 April 3 Mar. 30


SPORTS

February 15, 2007

Page 15

Wongchindawest brings new attitude to golf team By SAVANNAH MARTINEZ The Pan American

Sidney Meadows/The Pan American ON THE GREEN - Freshman High Wongchindawest has been a good team player and hard worker in his short tenure with the men’s golf team.

A talented young golfer emerged from Bangkok, Thailand, three years ago. His name was Pornlapat Wongchindawest, commonly known as High among friends and teammates, and he traveled to the United States after his sophomore year in high school. Now, the 5-foot-7-inch freshman plays for The University of Texas-Pan American men’s golf team. Wongchindawest, an international business major, competed as a member of the Bangkok National Team in 2003 and 2004. He took part in the Thailand National Team Stage One Qualifier in 2003 and in the Thailand National Team Championship in 2004. He said his tenure on both squads has helped shape his playing style and philosophy on the game. “Being on the Bangkok National Team in 2003 and 2004 was a fine experience because I was one of the youngest members ever to be on it,” Wongchindawest said. “I was playing with the older, more experienced players and we won Nationals, which was great and was quite an experience.” The pressure of a large-scale competition like the Stage One Qualifier was an honor as well as nerve-wracking.

However, Wongchindawest pulled through and shot the lowest round during the first day of competition. “Our team was the number-one seed,” he recalled. “We won the first stage qualifier by 22 shots.” He faced more experienced competition that day, but it did not faze him. Some of that he attributes to his teammates who took him under their wings. “There were a lot of really good teams out there but we won the first stage by so much we were pretty confident. The team was obviously older and experienced and guided me along,” Wongchindawest said. In the end, High’s efforts helped his team earn the title after winning a fourman playoff. “It was down to the wire,” he noted. As a new addition to the Bronc golf team, Wongchindawest continues to play with passion, something many of his teammates enjoy about him. “I really like High as a friend. He is an excellent player, always has a smile on his face and he is a good guy to be around,” said Jeff Hensley, a junior business management major. With Wongchindawest, the Broncs now have another asset to employ. “He has talent and a nice work ethic. I think he’ll be able to help our team out,” said sophomore business

marketing major Shane Pierce. “He brings a lot of effort and hard work to the team.” Men’s golf coach Andrew Tredway agrees with his players and described Wongchindawest’s work ethic and personality as having had a major impact so far. “High is a great guy and hard worker. His game and the effort he puts out on the golf course really transcends to everything else he does,” Tredway said. “He tries as hard as he can in everything, whether it is in school or workouts. He is always giving it 100 percent, which is something that the team and I really appreciate.” Wongchindawest and the Bronc golf team will be competing against 12 other teams Saturday at the Rice Intercollegiate Tournament, kicking off the spring season. Their last major competition was Nov. 7, 2006 at the Battle on the Bend in Toledo Bend, La. Tredway said his troops are ready for action. “Everybody is really motivated. The guys who have been here in the past are playing against their former coach, Drew Scott, who is now the coach at Rice,” Tredway said. “I really do not have to say anything to them for this tournament. They are all motivated enough to go out there and do well.”

Lady Broncs look to end five-game roadtrip with conference wins By KRISTYNA MANCIAS The Pan American It is a time of judgment for The University of Texas-Pan American Lady Broncs as they complete their five-game road trip with stops at North Dakota and South Dakota State University today and Saturday, respectively. UTPA sits at 10-15 on the season and is coming off a 75-54 setback against Utah Valley State University. The loss put the lady netters at 3-3 in league play. With the season coming to a close the Lady Broncs are in contention to finish in first place if they win these final games. “At this point every game is important, as far as league goes. We want to win the rest of our games and end on a good note,” said lone senior MaHogany Daniel. UTPA’s first stop will be in Billings, S.D., tonight where they will face the Jackrabbits of South Dakota State University at 8 p.m. SDSU (18-5) currently leads in the league standings and is riding on a seven-game winning streak. Back on Jan. 27, UTPA suffered a defeat 64-52 at the hands of SDSU at the Field House.

“We definitely want to get South Dakota and beat them on their home court because they beat us at home,” Daniel said. On Saturday, the ladies will make their way to Fargo, N.D., for a rematch against North Dakota State University at 7 p.m. UTPA picked up a dramatic 5957 win with 2.2 seconds left in regulation back on Jan. 25 at the Field House. NDSU is coming off an 81-49 home victory against New Jersey Institute of Technology on Feb. 10. The Bison are 10-10 overall and 3-2 in league play. The Lady Broncs will be back at the Field House Feb. 24 to as their final three games of the season unfold. Two of the three games will be against United League Basketball opponents, while the other is an exhibition game against Monterrey Tech Feb. 27. Daniel, one of the program’s best career rebounders and shot blockers, can feel her career coming to a close. “Right now all I want to do is play hard and step up my game,” Daniel said. “It’s crunch time and as March 3 nears, it will be my last game of my four-year career.” Daniel currently leads the team in block shots (45) and offensive (62) and defensive rebounds (100) this season.

Onydia Garza/The Pan American DRIVE TO SUCCEED - MaHogany Daniel (13) gets past North Dakota State defender Ali Sonstelie (44). The Lady Broncs won a thriller at home against the Bison 59-57 on Jan. 25.


SPORTS By ERICK QUINTERO The Pan American It is often said your best defense is a good offense. When The University of Texas-Pan American men’s head basketball coach Tom Schuberth arrived on campus during the summer of 2006 he was told he was inheriting a bad shooting team. Bad barely scratched the surface. The Broncs had just compiled a dismal 7-24 campaign. What Schuberth did inherit was 6foot-11-inch senior pivot man Colin Lien, the key to this year’s three-point oriented offense, and some solid ball handlers. With the addition of junior college transfers point guard Paul Stoll and shooting guard Brian Burrell, all the pieces were in place for his fast paced 3out, 2-in high-low motion offense, which leads all NCAA Division I in

3-point field goal percentage. The Green and Orange as a team average 37.6 percent from downtown, good for 174 treys on the year. In the low block, Lien draws most of the attention from opposing teams and with Stoll leading the break, Burrell does the most damage from outside, with 61 threes on the season. Schuberth said he chose this style because it suits his personnel, and added his team looks for good shots only, always wanting to make opponents work. “I like to play fast. I think kids like to play fast and fans like to see you play fast,” Schuberth said. “That to me is when we are at our best. We take the opportunity to run our fast break and if it’s not there we back it out and run our offense.” BRONCS IN ACTION Utah Valley State witnessed firsthand the Green

and Orange attack, surviving a late second half rally to escape with an 81-76 victory. The loss broke UTPA’s unbeaten home streak. The Broncs are now 12-11 overall. David Heck scored 23 points, Ryan Toolson tallied 17 points and Chris Bailey and Joe Walker chipped in 12 points a piece for the Wolverines. It was a close game throughout but UTPA failed to swing momentum their way in front of the 1,450 in attendance as Heck and Toolson were clutch in crucial moments. Every time the Green and Orange mounted a come back, Heck or Toolson would find the bottom of the net to maintain UVS’s lead. Stoll led one final push for the Green and Orange with 0:57 left. The Broncs used a full court press and fouls to try a n d

McGrady

pull off the victory. After Matt Peterson connected on one of two free throws, Stoll took the ball the length of the court, driving untouched to the hoop and pulled UTPA within seven, 7770. Bailey followed with a pair of free throws, to put State back up by nine, b u t Burrell

Editor’s Pick: Game to Watch NBA All-Star Game When: Sunday Time: 7 p.m. Where: Las Vegas, Nev.

he finally missed both attempts. The Broncs rebounded and Stoll pushed again as he drilled his fourth trifecta of the night to pull UTPA within three points, 79-76. With 11 seconds left the Broncs sent Heck to the line again, where he iced the game by making two. Burrell scored 17 points to go along with nine rebounds as Lien added another 1 6

answered with a nothing-butnet corner 3pointer w i t h 2 7 . 1 seconds left. The Broncs would then send Heck to the line where

Wade

points and four rebounds. The game could have gone either way, as both squads posted similar percentages. UTPA shot 60 percent from the field and UVS shot 57.1 percent. The key stat for the game could be the woeful second half effort from the free throw line. The men shot 50 percent from the charity stripe, but Schuberth blamed poor preparation instead. “We lost in our preparation a week prior. For a mediocre team, they might have been good practices. For a team that wants to be good and talk about championships, they were not good,” Schuberth said. “I hold them to have high expectations if we’re going to turn this program around.” The men will take to the hardwood again on Thursday against South Dakota State, tip off at 7 p.m.

BURRELL

STOLL

LIEN

Designed By: Roy Bazan Onydia Garza/The Pan American


February 15, 2007