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New coach is getting girls on the ball

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Relay photos

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see page B4

Relay for Life brings in the money Residents of Othello took to the track July 27 and 28, raising more than $80,000 through the annual Heart of the Basin Relay for Life at Huskie Track. Participants walked the track for 15 hours, selling food, drink and other goodies and putting on various fundraisers.

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Holy rollers hit the town

Story on B1

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

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When a single participant brings in more than $1,000 for their team, they become a Grand Club member. Last year, there was one person who made it to Grand Club. This year, 13 people made the cut, including David Hines, Kate Brueske, Diana Longoria, Greg Brandenburg, ManPHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA dy Moore, Melissa Martinez, Paul Snyder, Darla Booth- The youngest Miss-ter Relay shows SEE RELAY | A5  off at the event July 27.

had $1,308, the Restless and Rowdy Rotarians brought in $4,321, Stars of Hope raised $442.16, Sterling Stars donated $1,638.42, The Extinguishers donated $2,429.56, the Royal Flushers donated $3,760.84, Under Construction donated $5,750.97 and the Upbeat Baptists brought in $397. Everyone strove to bring in money for their team, but some went above and beyond.

Other teams worked hard, too. Adams County Wheezers and Geezers brought in $6,007, Blue Hawaii had $1,289.23 to donate, Bosom Buddies gave $5,412.99, Care Bears had $4,635.67, Hearts of Hope donated $3,294, Homer Castillo family brought in $3,870.05, J.R. Simplot donated $7,942, The Lep-Re-Kon Lucky Charms donated $1,000.52, McCain

The 17 active teams raised a total of $80,838, more than the goal of $77,000 chairperson Jenn Stevenson set earlier this year. This is enough to almost completely fund three cancer researchers for one year each. Team CBHA broke their own record, becoming the first team in local Relay history to break $15,000 on their own, bringing in a total of $15,374.22.

Commissioners face off at forum BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

The five candidates for the Adams County board of commissioners gathered July 25 at a special candidate forum hosted by The Othello Tea Party. The Othello Tea Party is all about education, chair Michael Helman said. To make a good decision, each voter should know who and what they are voting for, he said. Change is important at the local, state and national level. For this change, people need to be aware and informed, he said. That’s why they hosted the event, so people could better get to know the people behind the names on the ballots, he said. SEE ELECTION | A5 

PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Gregoire praises broadband Internet access in eastern Washington at the Kennewick library July 26.

NoaNet brings rural internet

PHOTOS BY BRIANA ALZOLA

A full barbecue dinner was served at a picnic honoring the late Tommie Tindell in Pioneer Park July 29.

A patriotic feast

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

By Briana Alzola Staff writer

KENNEWICK — Spreading technology to the far reaches of the state is essential in making all local cities and towns the best they can be, Gov. Chris Gregoire said at an event July 26. The governor was at the Kennewick branch of Mid-Columbia Libraries to celebrate the expansion of broadband Internet access to more rural areas of the state. NoaNet oversaw the expansion, which was funded by federal American Reinvestment SEE BROADBAND | A4 

When it comes to choosing someone who defines community service, Tommie Tindell is on the top of the list, Jim Shade, the master of the Paul Revere Lodge No. 205, said. Othello’s Masonic Lodge held their annual barbecue July 29, but things were a little different this year. For

more than 20 years, Tindell hosted the annual meal at his home. He died July 4 and the lodge wanted to honor him. So, the barbecue was moved to Pioneer Park, under the Air Force plane he was so instrumental in bringing to Othello, and renamed. The Tommie Tindell Memorial All-Masonic Barbecue, which will beSEE BARBECUE | A6 

Friendship, food and fun focus of Fiesta BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

It’s time for cultures to come together once again, as the entire community is invited to celebrate friendship across language lines, SEE FIESTA | A6 

Even some desserts at the event were patriotically themed.

Bunch celebrates 50 years in Othello Bunch arrived in Othello in August 1962, having completed medical school in Oregon and then an internship in Spokane. He worked at the Main Street Clinic with Dr. Ken Pershall for many years before moving to the 14th Avenue clinic. Then, in 2004, the 14th Avenue clinic became part of CBHA. Bunch first came to Othello because he always felt drawn to rural medicine, he said. He had a few relatives in the area and already knew Pershall so it seemed like a logical next step. SEE BUNCH | A4 

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER Fifty years ago, Richard Bunch was just arriving in Othello, doctor bag in hand, ready to make his way in the medical world. Now, half a century later, he’s ready to celebrate this milestone in his career with the help of the people he’s served. The Columbia Basin Health Association (CBHA) will host a 50th anniversary party for him from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3 on the lawns of the 14th Avenue Medical Clinic.

Dr. Richard Bunch

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Benton City Daze parade seeking participants Benton City Daze, the community’s annual festival sponsored by the Benton City Chamber of Commerce, will be held Sept. 8 and 9. One of the highlights of Saturday’s activities is the grand parade. The Chamber is inviting businesses, organizations, royalty and community representatives from throughout the region to participate in observance of this year’s theme, “Celebrating 100 Years on the Yellowstone Trail.” This commemorates the centennial of the historic Yellowstone Trail, which was one of the first named motor routes and was recognized from 1912 to 1930. The Yellowstone Trail was advertised as “A good road from Plymouth Rock to Puget Sound.” Besides help-

ing to ease travel between neighboring communities along the route, the road facilitated transcontinental automobile travel and brought many tourists to Yellowstone Park. The route was initiated in 1912 and was promoted until 1930 when funding dried up in the Great Depression and numbered routes were being instituted. The Yellowstone Trail route initially crossed the Idaho Panhandle, then in Washington state, came through Spokane and dropped down to Dayton, then through Walla Walla, Wallula, Pasco and Kennewick, Benton City, Prosser and up the Yakima Valley to cross Snoqualmie Pass to Seattle (in 1925, through efforts of the Wenatchee Chamber of Com-

merce, the route was shifted northward to go from Spokane west to Wenatchee and then on to Snoqualmie). Historically, the Yellowstone Trail route was marked by yellow paint on boulders, fence posts or buildings, with black arrows pointing toward Yellowstone Park. Benton City has recreated trail markings through town following the original route; Benton City Daze visitors will see a lot of yellow and black along the main street. Other Benton City Daze activities Saturday include a pancake breakfast, the Little Miss Benton City pageant, variety show, bingo and vendors in the park. The Merchants Association will also be sponsoring bed races and various

eating contests throughout the day. Saturday’s festivities will conclude with a street dance from 6 to 10 p.m. Sunday, the Benton County Jr. Fair and Rodeo grounds will host a Cowboy Church service at 9 a.m. followed by Family Fun Day, including mounted games, as well as activities not requiring a horse. Parade participants are requested to be in place by 9 a.m. Sept. 8 for judging. The parade will begin at 10 a.m. Parade entry forms are available at the Chamber office, 513 Ninth Street, Benton City, or on the Chamber website, www.bentoncitychamber. org. For more information, phone (509) 588-4984 or (509) 948-3733.

Barbecue | ‘I am proud to call him my friend’ From page A1 come an annual event, brought in Masons from all over the state who wanted to honor him. The park was decked out in red, white and blue in honor of the event and the man who wore his patriotism, literally, on his sleeve. “He is a fine man and example to all of us as a Mason and as an individual,” Grandmaster of the Masons of Washington Dean Heinemann said. “I am proud to call him my friend. I

hope we take those lessons he was always teaching and continue to make ourselves and our community better. That’ll be Tommie’s legacy.” Heinemann has known Tindell for about 30 years. Tindell touched the hearts of many, Heinemann said. He was dedicated to helping others and always had kind words for people. His conversations were wide-ranging and thought pro-

voking and he was an extraordinary storyteller. His service is what brought so many people in from around the state, Shade said. He was a mason for almost 60 years and served as secretary for more than 30. He was also involved with several other community organizations. “He was involved in everything,” Shade said. The goal of Masons is to make good men better, Shade

said. The fraternal organization helps out around town through scholarships and other community donations. They promote education and good behavior among the members and the community. The Masons promote lessons of morality, Heinemann said. The first lodges were found in England in 1717 and have provided inspiration for the thousands of lodges that have come since.

PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Several people from around the state came together July 29 to celebrate the life of Tommie Tindell.

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Please join us in celebration of Dr. Richard Bunch’s 50th year practicing medicine.

Harvil graduates basic training Air Force Airman First Class Brandon J. Harvill graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Harvill is a 2003 graduate of Othello High School. Othello High School alum receives Eastern Washington University scholarship Horacio Valdez,18, of Othello, has been awarded a presidential scholarship for $2,500 for the 2012-13 academic year at Eastern Washington University. Valdez recently graduated from Othello High School as part of the class of 2012. Before graduating, he was involved in Running Start, college bound, honor society, baseball, basketball, Huskie Olympics and senior class fundraising, along with being titled Super Student Fall 2008, Student of the Trimester Fall 2008, OHS Honor Rolls, Columbia Basin College Honor Roll President’s List twice, Dean’s List and OHS “Class Brain.” Valdez will be majoring in accounting at EWU. He is the son of Zobeida and Horacio Valdez Jr., of Othello.

Fiesta | Event starts Aug. 10 at 5 p.m. From page A1

Emil Martinez said. Martinez is the lead planner of the 14th annual Fiesta Amistad music festival, taking place Friday and Saturday, Aug. 10 and 11, in Lions Park. The two-day event will feature musical performances, kids games, food and vendors. This year, the event board is branching out when it comes to the types of things available, Martinez said. In addition to tacos, food vendors will be selling hamburgers, hot dogs, elephant ears, sopes, tostadas and more. The event will also have a clown and other children’s entertainment take the main stage for portions of the event, Martinez said. Usually, the entertainment for the younger attendants is relegated to the edges of the celebration, but this year, everyone is going to be involved in a bigger way, he said. The event should be plenty of fun, he said, with musical

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groups from throughout the region. Some acts sing in English and some in Spanish, he said. Several come from Othello, including returners Grupo Expresión, the band from the Cimmaron, and the Andy Sulzman Band. Other musical groups are making their Fiesta debut this year. The event runs Aug. 10 from 5 to 10 p.m. and Aug. 11 from 2:15 to 10 p.m. It is a completely family-oriented event, Martinez said, and drugs and alcohol are strictly prohibited. For a full schedule of bands, turn to page B8. For more information on these musical groups, check out next week’s Outlook. The event should offer a nice weekend break between harvest seasons, Martinez said. It is a time for families to come, enjoy a nice meal and hear some great music, he said.

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Ruiz to compete in Indianapolis Othello graduate Natilee Ruiz will compete at the 2012 U.S. Open Swimming Championships Aug. 7 to 11, in Indianapolis, Ind. The meet will serve as a selection event for the 2013 World University Games. Ruiz will swim in four events — the 100- and 200-meter backstroke, the 200-meter IM and the 200-meter freestyle.

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Outlook The Othello

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Weaver Field hosts model plane fly-in

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What Are You Doing for the 4th? T H U R S DAY, J U N E 2 8 , 2 012 Thursday

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Science center sends youth to space

PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

See full story on page A4

A freak storm of ran and hail the afternoon of June 23 quickly flooded Othello’s streets, like Broadway Avenue, seen here.

Ruiz swims in Olympic trials

Festivities on tap for Fourth

A full day of festivities is planned in Lions Park July 4 to help Othello celebrate Independence Day in style. The Greater Othello Chamber of Commerce will host their annual Fourth of July celebration, which will feature this year sport contests, professional entertainment, games and more. The chamber has really stepped up their game, president Shawn Logan said at a city council meeting July 25. They have added new events to make sure there is fun for the whole family. The master of ceremonies for the event will be Mikayla Parris, who will be a senior

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER This week, Othello’s own Natilee Ruiz is in Omaha, Neb., making waves at the 2012 Olympic team trials for swimming. The teen will compete in the 200-meter individual medley and the 200-meter backstroke. To qualify for the trials, a swimmer has four years to make a set time for their chosen events, Ruiz said. About 1,500 swimmers will be making the trip to Nebraska this year. A couple hundred will be at each event. From those swimmers, 16 will move to the

See Fourth, page A5 

See Ruiz, page A5 

GED classes see successful graduates

PHOTOS BY BRIANA ALZOLA

The hail comes down July 23 as Old Hotel centennial celebration attendees try to prevent damage.

Centennial celebration takes turn for rainy

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

With multiple locations and more than two dozen students enrolled, the GED class through Washington’s Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) program in Othello is taking a break for the summer, but not before seeing seven of its students graduate. Othello’s graduates include Roberto Acevedo, Sandra Barriga, William Benitez, Fatima Cardenas, Yadira Melendez, Magdalena Saldana and Mariana Villanueva.

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

FILE PHOTO

Natilee Ruiz

Pay raises set BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER Raises for the council members and mayor have been set, Leonard Lyons, an officer of an independent salary committee, reported at the city council meeting June 25. The council selected a committee earlier this year, which included Timo Montemayor, Larry McCourtie, Socrates Hernandez, Bob Luhn and Lyons, to review the base compensation of council members and the mayor. This monthly rate of pay has not been changed since 1995. Committee members were chosen to represent individuals from different backgrounds and lines of work, to represent the community as a whole.

It started as a beautiful day for The Old Hotel to celebrate its 100th birthday June 23. The sun shone down on the gathered artists outside, children danced on a stage and people gathered to feast from local food vendors. Then, everything changed. In an instant, dark clouds had gathered and rain was pouring down. People lowered their overhead tents to keep the wind from blowing them away and to try to protect their wares and themselves from the weather. Chelsea Dasso, of Kennewick, hurried to get her electronic keyboard and microphone out of the falling water. The late June day just got stranger, however, as hail began to fall, beating the ground and those still huddled outside. Volunteers and guests ran through the weather, trying to save expensive audio equipment and paintings worth several hundred dollars. Thunder and lightning filled the air. Suddenly, as quickly as it had come, the weather shifted again. The rain stopped, the clouds continued on their path and the blue skies once again dominated the day. “I think it’s a memorable blessing,” Brittany Stromberg, who helped plan the event, said. “All the people were troopers.” It was like the universe was really testing out The Old Hotel, she said. They have lasted 100 years, so this is a centennial event to remember.

See GED, page A5 

Chelsea Dasso performs outside The Old Hotel for their centennial celebration June 23.

Despite everything, it turned out quite well, she said. For a nonprofit, it was a great turnout. The artists weren’t as pleasant. Several had paintings affected greatly by the downpour. Some, like those painted in acrylics, were maintained on the surface, but for their wooden frames, the water could mean warping and a change in shape. After the sun made a reappearance, the See Centennial, page A8 

PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Students practice CPR skills during a special class put on by the OIC GED class June 21.

See City Council, page A7 

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The Othello Outlook – Thursday, June 28, 2012

www.OthelloOutlook.com

Lady Vikings sponsor summer basketball camps Big Bend Community College is hosting a girls basketball camp this summer. Lady Vikings Basketball Camp will be held July 16 to 20. Girls in grades 3 to 9 will get instruction from college coaches and players from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the first four days and 9 a.m. to noon on the final day of camp. Players are divided into

groups according to age and skill level. Basketball fundamentals are taught and drilled each day. Players participate in multiple games and contests daily, Preston Wilks, Lady Vikings head coach and camp director, said. Wilks said there are still openings. For registration information, call 793-2227

How to save on vacations PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Some bright acryllic paintings dry a little in the sun after being caught in a sudden downpour during the centennial celebration.

Centennial | Local musicians from around the area performed From page A1 celebration picked back up. Slowly and surely, the groups started to reassemble their wares, Dasso took her place back on the stage and the Klingeman family restarted their preparations for dinner. Besides the weather, the day went very well, Old Hotel manager Sally Laufer said. In addition to the artists showcasing their work, locals sold food and there were games for the kids, in addition to local musicians showing their talent on stage. One artist showing her work was 12-year-old Gabriela Hall, from Moses Lake. This was her very first art show. She was happy to be chosen to show her work, she said. She only received her first art set this last Christmas and taught herself to paint, along with help from mentor Rebecca Littlefield. She painted almost all the work she showed off at the centennial in one night, she said. She loves to paint because she loves the feel of the paintbrush in her hand. A lot of the food being served, including a special railroad-themed fundraising dinner, was prepared by the Klingeman family. Their pork business will also be represented at the Othello

Farmers Market beginning in July, Laura Klingeman Smith said. They have a free-range farm and do not use hormones or growth stimulants, she said, meaning their pork is flavorful and delicious. At the market, they will have frozen products, including three flavors of bacon, ground pork, sausage, tenderloin and more. Musicians included the Dance Time girls and local bands and singers. Dasso came in from Kennewick. Her performance had an unplanned intermission when the weather started acting up. She was excited to have had it happen, she said. “I’ve never had that experience,” she said. Her CD is available online. She has been singing since she was 6 and she just loves the way music can help perfectly portray emotions and feelings, she said. Attendee Natalie Silva had a good time, too, she said. She grew up in Othello and moved back last fall. She had a great time at the centennial, she said. “It was awesome,” she said. She loves that The Old Hotel is

around to give people something to do in Othello, she said. The whole event was well planned. “Brittany did an amazing job,” she said.

Gabriela Hall, Moses Lake, shows off her painting at The Old Hotel June 23.

Families are always looking for ways to enjoy vacations that maximize fun while minimizing the budget. With focus on gas prices, a recent AAA report indicated that families are opting to take shorter road trips, or “nearcations,” as they make their travel plans. Family travel expert and mother of three, Suzanne Rowan Kelleher, of WeJustGotBack.com, knows the challenges of planning a great lower-cost vacation. To help your family reduce costs on summer travel, Kelleher offers the following tips: Plan ahead. While spontaneous getaways sound fun, the best way to save is by planning ahead. Most resorts offer the greatest variety of room options, package amenities and overall savings when stays are booked further out in advance. Be flexible. The highest rates are typically on weekends. Plan a mid-week getaway or start your vacation on a Sunday to take advantage of off-peak prices. Book online. Websites allow vacation planners to view best available rates, compare alternate dates, room styles and package plans. If you have

a destination in mind, sign up to receive the location’s newsletter, which often includes discounts and special promotion codes. Bundle and save. Research package options that include meals and other amenities. Limited time promotions, such as “Kids Eat Free,” can help when budgeting for meals. Resort amenities and entertainment offerings are also often bundled for extra savings. Not sure what can be bundled with your stay? Just ask. Find the cheapest gas. Save on gas with your smart phone. The free app GasBuddy can estimate how much you’ll spend and direct you to the cheapest gas stations. Fuel Finder, another gas saving app, shows gas prices throughout the U.S. and Canada. Visit www.GasBuddy.com and www.bottlerocketapps.com/ apps/fuelfinder to learn more. Prepare the car. Purchases from a grocery store are cheaper than convenience stores and fast food restaurants, so save time and money by pre-buying snacks and drinks. Take advantage of the time together by talking, singing and laughing. Make the journey as fun as the final destination.

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Relay For Life of Heart of the Basin Othello High School track July 27-28, 2012 6:30 p.m. to 9 a.m.

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Join the fight to find a cure for a disease that will be diagnosed in more than 35,000 men, women and youngsters in Washington this year. Contact your friends, family members, co-workers or classmates and form a team to participate in this year’s American Cancer Society Relay For Life of Heart of the Basin.

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To form a team, contact: Jenn Stevenson, chair, 488-5982; or Darla Boothman, team development chair, 488-5567. Or visit relayforlife.org/heartofthebasinwa


Outlook The Othello

PUBLISHED SINCE 1947 • HOME OF THE OTHELLO HUSKIES • WWW .OTHELLOOUTLOOK. COM • VOL. 76 NO. 49 • $1

Lady Huskies end winless streak

Santa  Claus IS COMING TO TOWN! Photos, Food, Fun & much more!

DEC. 13 • 4 –7 p.m. @ THE FACTORY, 103 S. FIRST

T H U R S DAY, D E C E M B E R 6, 2 012 Thursday

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Crane fest Bazaar leaves many with poster warm fuzzies design decided Page A5

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Holocaust survivor inspires OHS BY BRIANA ALZOLA EDITOR@OTHELLOOUTLOOK.COM

PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Director Bob Reichert leads the annual Othello Choral Society Christmas cantata at McFarland Middle School Dec. 3.

Cantata makes joyful noise BY BRIANA ALZOLA EDITOR@OTHELLOOUTLOOK.COM The Othello Choral Society helped kick off the Christmas season this weekend, as they presented their annual Christmas Cantata. The show features choirs of both adults

and children and follows the story of the first Christmas. This year’s cantata was called “Hope of the Broken World,” created, arranged and orchestrated by Dave Clarke and David T. Clydesdale. The cantata was just written this year, director Bob Reichert said.

Reichert has been directing for several years and he always chooses a new production, he said. This year, he listened to about 10 different cantatas before settling on “Hope of the Broken World.” One thing he liked about the show was SEE CANTATA | A6 

When he was 2 years old, the camp was liberated by the Russians. The people within the camp fled, but Loth’s mother, having been experimented on herself, could not escape with both herself and her young son. At a train station in Poland, she gave the baby to a Polish woman and asked her to care for him, promising to one day return for the little one. This woman, Matka, raised him for the next 14 years in a town called Torun, Poland. They weren’t pleasant years, though. As a boy with papers declaring him a GerSEE HOLOCAUST | A5 

Even out of the most tragic of times, hope, peace and forgiveness can prevail. No one knows this better than Peter Loth, one of the youngest Holocaust survivors still alive today. Loth shared his inspirational message at Othello High School Dec. 3. From being born in a death camp to brushes with the KKK, the first portion of Loth’s life was filled with pain and suffering. He was born in 1943 at a camp called Stuttof, one of the 1,600 death camps around during the Holocaust. The only reason he and his mother remained alive is the soldiers holding them captive used them for human experimentation and torture, he said. The pain and suffering to be had by all, from the starvation to brutal murder, was all around. It is unlike anything a person can even begin to think of, he said. “You don’t even imagine Peter Loth what suffering is,” he said.

Princess wanted

Winning kind of grows on you …

The Othello Theatre Guild is inviting people to put on their glass slippers and step up to the microphone. Auditions are this weekend for their upcoming produc-

Local law enforcement officials put down the razors and picked up donations last month, as they engaged in a race to the end of the hairy road. Participants from the Adams County Sheriffs Office, the Othello Police Department, the Ritzville Police Department and the Washington State Patrol participated in a local mustache-growing contest during the month of November. The contest was part of Movember, a national movement to bring more attention to men’s health issues. Each participant shaved at the beginning of the month and then were judged on their mustaches Nov. 30. They were awarded between 1 and 10 points in each category, which included fullness, conformity

BY BRIANA ALZOLA EDITOR@OTHELLOOUTLOOK.COM

tion of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella.” The guild is looking for people of all ages, from younger kids to teenagers and adults. Each person interested in auditioning should bring something to sing. SEE CINDERELLA | A6 

Beautification committee seeks to light up our lives BY BRIANA ALZOLA EDITOR@OTHELLOOUTLOOK.COM Grant funding could help the Othello Beatification and the city move forward with a significant amount of the lighting half of their Main Street Project. Last year, the committee and the city teamed together to hire an architect to create Opinion A2

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a plan for Main Street. The plan included lights, both pedestrian and arterial, trees and planters. A special energy grant through the Washington state Department of Commerce will refocus their attention to just the pedestrian lighting for now. Originally, the plan was to SEE BEAUTIFICATION | A4 

Community A3-A7 REDUCED • REDUCED • REDUCED 4 bEDROOM HOME iN WARDEN

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Local law enforcement officials show off their facial hair after a month-long mustache-growing competition.

All the funds, $414 in total, to face, “wow factor” and how Each participant also got a natural looking the facial hair bonus point, up to 10, for each will be donated to the Ameriwas. $20 they raised. SEE MOUSTACHE | A4 

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C OM MU NIT Y

www.OthelloOutlook.com

The Othello Outlook – Thursday, December 6, 2012

A5

HOLOCAUST | ‘I couldn’t stay silent anymore’ From page A1

man Jew, he did not do well in Poland. He was repeatedly taken from Matka, moved from orphanage to orphanage and even spent time in prison. Now, all his teeth are false, after being struck in the mouth with the butt of a gun. At one point, he was put in front of a wall to be killed, execution style. Matka offered up herself instead and was raped by the man who had his gun in Loth’s mouth, but Loth escaped with his life. In 1958, he received word from his mother and made his way to the United States-occupied Germany to be reunited with her. She had escaped the death camp and Poland and married an American soldier. While in Germany, he had to deal with bullies because he was greatly underweight and did not speak the language. Loth, his mother, stepfather and two stepsisters moved to the United States the next year, where they were sent to Georgia. Things did not go well there, though, when the Ku Klux Klan abused the members of the family. Then, the family moved again, this time to Kansas. After while, Loth’s stepfather became abusive and Loth ran away from home, settling in Missouri. He was rescued from the street and introduced to new ideas, religions and cul-

ture. He was 18 at this time, and learned about art, things he could do and how to dance to rock and roll music, he said. Then, he went into military service. He was married and divorced a couple times before marrying his current wife. Combined, they have eight children. They live in Florida but travel often for speaking engagements. For many years, he did not share with his children what had happened to him in his youth. He didn’t want them to know he was raped, beaten and tortured, he said. Then, when reconnecting with his long lost family, he discovered his mother had died. Her last wish was that her ashes be brought to the death camp, so she could be with the other thousands of women who lost their lives. Loth and his family visited the camp, one of the most difficult things he’s ever done. In fact, he suffered a massive heart attack upon returning to the United States, as the stress and trauma of the camp was just too much to handle. As he said goodbye to his mother, he realized something. “I couldn’t stay silent anymore,” he said. In 200, he started publicly speaking about what he’s gone through and the forgiveness he’s managed to learn. Forgiveness is not easy and

for a long time, Loth held a lot of hate in his heart, he said. However, keeping bitterness around helps no one and it is important to let go of the hate. “It will set you free,” he said. He has since spoken in more than 50 countries, at schools, military bases and more. Education is exceptionally important, he said. The only way to make sure history does not repeat itself is to make sure people know what happened and what they can do to keep it from happening again. “I got myself educated, you can do the same,” he said. Learning about the death camps of the Holocaust can be tragic, for example, but it’s important to know that it happened so nothing like this ever happens again, he said. “We have to be careful what we do to each other,” Loth said. Loth has been speaking for many years and can see a direct impact on people, he said. He receives hundreds of letters from people thanking him for speaking and sharing with them his message. In one particular case, a young women came up to him after a show at a high school. The young woman was incredibly unhappy. She confessed she had been raped and was without love in her home, causing her to turn to gangs to provide a sense of family. He looked at her and told her

to give up the anger and the hate, to go to school and focus on the good she can do in her life. Then, a few years later, he spoke at a university. Someone approached him after the talk. Soon, he discovered it was the same young woman. She had given up the path her life was on and focused instead on education. It is stories like that that keep Loth speaking, he said. He is happy with his life now, he said. He gets to help people and just enjoy life. He has learned to do things like fly planes and build a house with his own hands, he said. Education has certainly made his life better. Loth will be joined by other inspirational speakers and a hip hop worship group during a special free event Dec. 7. The event will begin at 7 p.m. at the Wallenstein Theater at Big Bend Community College, 7662 Chanute St., Moses Lake. One of the speakers includes Bradley Stewart, who was born in South Africa. Born with cerebral palsy, he was an object of ridicule for many years. He harbored hate in his heart until he had to deal with his father’s brutal murder, he said, which helped him learn about forgiveness and letting go. For more information on Loth, or to purchase copies of his book “Peace by Piece,” visit peterloth.com.

PHOTO BY DARLA HUSSEY

A little boy awaits Santa’s reaction to the request whispered to the big man at the annual Delta Upsilon bazaar Saturday, Dec. 1.

Bazaar brings holiday joy to Othello BY BRIANA ALZOLA EDITOR@OTHELLOOUTLOOK.COM From Christmas wreaths to scarves, wooden toys to yummy treats, the annual Delta Upsilon annual Christmas bazaar at Othello High School Dec. 1 had a little something for everyone. The bazaar has been going on for several decades, Joey Gardner, with Delta Upsilon, said. This year was definitely a success. There was a great turnout of both shoppers and vendors this year, Gardner said. In fact, the vendors signed up in advance this year. Every spot was full and there was a waiting list for a full three weeks before the bazaar happened. Each person paid for their space.

The money goes into two scholarship funds. The first goes along with other Beta groups and is given to a graduating high school senior. Then, the Delta Upsilon group has also started a special scholarship for students between kindergarten and sixth grade. The funds go to help with extracurricular activities the student would not normally be able to afford, anything from music or art classes to paying the registration fee for a sport. They chose to help younger kids because those students can’t go out and get jobs of their own, Gardner said. Overall, the event was a success, she said. “Thanks everyone who came, we had a great turnout,” Gardner said.

Villarreal new BBCC Trustee

Dr. Miguel “Mike” Villarreal, of Othello, has been appointed to the Big Bend Community College Board of Trustees by Gov. Christine Gregoire. Villarreal’s term was effective Nov. 16, 2012, and continues until Sept. 30, 2017. Villarreal is the assistant superintendent of Othello School District. He was Warden’s middle school principal from 1999 to 2008 and was an elementary school teacher in Warden from 1995 to 1999. Villarreal earned his Doc-

PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Peter Loth greets some of the attendees of his speech at Othello High School Dec. 3.

torate in Educational Leadership from Washington State University in 2011. He is a 1988 graduate of Othello High School. Villarreal replaces Mike Wren, of Ephrata, who served as a Trustee since 2008. The five-member Board of Trustees is appointed by the Governor from candidates living within BBCC’s 4,600-square-mile service district — which includes all of Grant and Adams counties and the Odessa School District in Lincoln County.

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Outlook The Othello

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Enjoy the fair in Moses Lake this weekend! T H U R S D AY, A U G U S T 1 6 , 2 0 12 Thursday

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The Fiesta Dawgs take on Yakima Amistad School rocks starts Lions Aug. 23 Park

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Miller earns judge’s seat BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER The race for Adams County Superior Court judge has come to a close as Brian Miller won his brother’s title.

and closing it is the hardest part of the election. The office will be closed officially Dec. 31. “I have established close and SCREEN SHOT FROM ADAMS COUNTY ELECTION SITE long term relationships with SEE ELECTION | A4  Miller will take over the judge seat in January.

tor Randy Flyckt, 1,494 votes to 1,179. He earned just less than 56 percent of the vote. He will take his seat in January after ending his private practice. He has had the practice for 37 years, he said,

“I appreciate the support I received from the voters and those individuals who worked so hard on my behalf in this campaign,” he said. He beat his competitor, current Adams County prosecu-

City looks at rule change

Lions Club to host yard sale

From shoes to furniture to picture frames, items of all kinds will be available for purchase at a community yard sale in Pioneer Park this weekend. The yard sale is hosted by the Lions Club and is in its second year. It will run from 8 a.m. to noon. Several vendors have already signed up, but there are plenty of spots left available to be reserved, organizer Donna Ruttan said. Call her at 488-2727 to reserve a spot. SEE YARD SALE | A5 

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER In June of 1985, the city council passed an ordinance that stated a one-half percent sales tax would be put in place by the city and the SEE COUNCIL | A5 

PHOTOS BY BRIANA ALZOLA

The Andy Sulzman Band donned costumes during their turn on stage at the Fiesta Amistad in Lions Park Aug. 11.

Heat can’t stop the beat BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER Locals took to Lions Park, and to the stage, this weekend as Othello played host to the 14th annual American Fiesta Amistad music festival Aug. 10 and 11. The event featured three musical acts Friday and six more Saturday, plus one comedy clown act for kids Saturday.

PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Finance Director Mike Bailey talks to the council during a proposed ordinance change Aug. 13.

Hoping to get lucky BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

Even the young attendees showed their dance moves at the event.

The Mobile Community Services Office from the Department of Social and Health Services will be visiting Othello Tuesday, Aug. 21. The mobile unit will be at the SkillSource Office, 165 N. First Ave., from noon to 6 p.m. At the event, visitors can apply for cash assistance, basic food assistance, medical assistant, drug and alcohol treatment services, child care services and for a replacement EBT card. They can also drop off paperwork, complete an eligibility review, mid-certification review or make changes to an existing case. For more information, visit www.dshs. wa.gov/mobileoffice.

Fire season lights up Basin

Following a successful event in Yakima, BY BRIANA ALZOLA Adams County Pet Rescue is looking to con- STAFF WRITER tinue their luck at finding forever homes for SEE ADOPTATHON | A5  With temperatures heating up the Columbia Basin, fires are becoming more prevalent. Flames sprouted up near Cle Elum this week, burning through several thousand acres and more than 60 homes. The wildfire, which started Monday afternoon and led to the evacuation for hundreds of people, is believed to have been started by a construction crew working east of COURTESY PHOTO Cle Elum. State mobilization crews Charlie will be one of the dogs available for adoption at the Pet Rescue event at Del’s Aug. 18. were called in to help with Opinion A2

Several of the performers were from the area, including Grupo Expresion, Jesus Barragan, the Andy Sulzman Band and Jeremiah Rundquist. The others were from other nearby areas in the Columbia Basin. The event went very well, organizer Emiliano Martinez said. Local talent helped get SEE FIESTA | A4 

Mobile CSO coming to Othello Aug. 21

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the blaze. As of Tuesday morning, no Adams County volunteers had been called in to help with this fire. There have also been smaller brush fires throughout the rest of the Columbia Basin as summer temperatures remain high. The heat is expected to last at least through the month, with several days next week expected to be near 100 degrees. The National Weather Service declared a hazardous weather outlook for the CoSEE FIRES | A6 

Neighbors A7

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PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

A controlled burn filled skies with smoke off Cunningham Road Aug. 10.

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C om mu nit y

A4  The Othello Outlook – Thursday, August 16, 2012

www.OthelloOutlook.com

DUI cause of car crash An Othello man was injured Aug. 8, when he crossed the center line while driving under the influence. Felipe Calletanoscazares, 36, was driving a Geo Metro eastbound Highway 26 at 9:19 p.m. when he crossed the center line and struck a Freightliner tractor and trailer going westbound.

The tractor was being driving by Behrooz Behmanesh, 57, Orangeville, Calif. Calletanascazares was taken to Othello Community Hospital, but Behmanesh was not injured. The car was totaled. Calletanoscazares will be charged with driving under the influence.

Election | Plager, Marshall move on From page A1 many of my clients,” he said. Miller is ready, though, to move on to the next part of his life. “I look forward to the new challenges I will face as the next Adams County Superior Court judge,” he said. Flyckt will continue as a prosecutor in the county. This position is up for election again in two years. In the Adams County commissioner race, two people from each district advanced to the general election in November. In commission district No. 2, there were only two candidates in the primary. Incumbent Roger Hartwig brought in 68 percent of the vote and newcomer Oscar Garza earned 32 percent. They will face off again Nov. 6. In district No. 1, three candidates were narrowed to two. Advancing are incumbent Rudy Plager, who earned 57 percent of the vote, and John Marshall, who earned 32 percent. Don Gentry earned 11 percent of the vote and did not move on. There are 6,239 registered voters in Adams County. Of those, 2,782 voted, a voter turnout of almost 45 percent. Statewide, 1,342,380 of 3,731,658 registered voters turned in a ballot, for a voter turnout of just less than 36 percent. Adams County races will be certified Aug. 21. In the legislative race, Mark Schoesler, Susan Fagan and Joe Schmick all ran unopposed. For U.S. Senator, Michael Baumgartner and Maria Cantwell will move to the general election. Statewide, Baumgartner earned 30 percent of the vote and Cantwell earned 56 percent. Things were a little different on Adams County bal-

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lots. In the county, Baumgartner earned 42 percent and Cantwell earned 37 percent of the vote. For governor, Rob McKenna and Jay Inslee will face off in November. Across the state, McKenna earned 42.93 percent of the vote and Inslee earned 47 percent. In the county, McKenna received 67 percent of the vote and Inslee earned 23 percent. Brad Owen (49 percent of the vote) will head to the Lt. Governor race in November with Bill Finkbeiner (26 percent). Kim Wyman and Kathleen Drew are the top vote earners if the Secretary of State contest, earning a combined 61 percent of the vote. Jim McIntire ran uncontested for the position of state treasurer. James Watkins and Troy Kelley will move on as State Auditor candidates and the November Attorney General position will be competed over by Bob Ferguson and Reagan Dunn. Peter Goldmark and Clint Didier earned a combined 93 percent of the vote in the Commissioner of Public Lands race and will compete in November. Randy Dorn will defend his current Superintendent of Public Instruction title against Ron Higgins later this year. Mike Kreidler earned 55 percent of the vote in the Insurance Commissioner race and will be joined in the general election by John Adams, who earned 22 percent of the vote. In Congressional District No. 4, Doc Hastings will defend his current position in November against newcomer Mary Baechler. Hastings earned 59 percent of the vote and Baechler earned 27.

From page A1

the audience really involved with their acts, making everything fun for attendees, Martinez said. The same goes for Cepillin, the Spanish-speaking clown who delighted the younger audiences, he said. Cepillin brought in a crowd of kids in front of the stage and shared with them jokes and a ventriloquism act. The youngest attendees weren’t left out the rest of the time. Earlier in the day, Andy Sulzman performed with them some percussion numbers, including drumming on pots, pans, a garbage can and cow bells.

Spanish-speaking groups brought out the crowds, too. In addition to Grupo Exprecion, Fiesta had performances from Pasion Azteca, Corazon de Tierra Caliente, Los Relampagos de Guerrero and Grupo Talizman. Cheyenne brought a Southern Rock vibe to the annual event. They all combined to really make the goal of Fiesta come true this year, Martinez said, they brought together people of different cultures. The whole goal is to celebrate amistad, a Spanish word meaning friendship, Martinez said.

Photo by briana alzola

A member of Grupo Exprecion takes the stage Aug. 10.

The weather was nice and the turnout was pretty good, he said. It’s hard to compete with farming and other family obligations so it’s always good to see so many people in the park, he said. Next year, he hopes to work more with the Fourth of July festival. Because the two fall only a month apart, sponsorships and volunteers could be shared instead of competing with each other, he siad. Next year, with more new blood and new ideas involved, the event could be better than ever, Martinez said. The volunteers that are already involved did a great job. “Thanks to everyone,” he said. In addition to music, there were vendors selling everything from tacos to elephant ears and from jewelry to toys and trinkets. The Columbia Basin Health Association teamed up with Coordinated Care to provide health screening and information to the public. Healthcare Howie, their mascot, was also there to make some new friends. Marlena Garza, Othello, came to the park with her family. While the food is her favorite part of the event, she loves the people and music, she said. It’s good to get out and have something fun to do in the park, she said. “We are just always looking for something different to do,” she said. Eloy Yarrito was in town as part of Cheyenne, one of the

musical acts. The band also included Paul Hunter, Robert Patron, Randy Metherd and Scott Okerlund. The group has been performing with each other for about six years, but this is their first time to Fiesta as a group, Yarrito said. A few have performed in Othello with other bands. The band members have known each other for years through a variety of ways and just like to get together and play, Yarrito said. Lions Park is a great place to play because the audience is always receptive. “It’s a good time,” Yaritto said. He has been interested in music all his life and loves performing, he said. It’s great to get up there and play off the audience and your fellow musicians. Felicity Ortiz came to the park, too, so she could hang out with friends and have some fun, she said. She liked the Andy Sulzman Band best. It’s a good event, she said. Giselle Moreno agreed. More people should come next year, she said. Alejandra Cerna, Jaqui Cerna and Analina Chavez all agreed the event was fun to attend. “It’s a party,” Adrian Simental said. Visiting all the booths and stands is the best part of the event, attendee Elizabeth Sanchez said. “It’s fun to hang out with friends,” she said.

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Former Othello High School graduates gather together to enjoy barbecue and old friends Aug. 11.

WED. & THUR. (AUG. 15 & 16): 6:45 & 9:20 p.m. (Ends 8/16)

MAGIC MIKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (R) WED. & THUR. (AUG. 15 & 16): 6:50 & 9:15 p.m. (Ends 8/16) WED. & THUR. (AUG. 15 & 16): 7:00 & 9:10 p.m. FRI. (AUG. 17): 7:02 & 9:15 p.m. SAT. & SUN. (AUG. 18 & 19): 4:02, 7:02 & 9:15 p.m. MON. – THURS. (AUG. 20 – 23): 7:02 p.m. (Ends 8/23)

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The Othello VFW is looking for new members to carry on the programs started by the veterans of World War II and the Korean conflict. We are down to just a few members who can help on some of the programs. VFW members take part in parades, honor guards, memorial services, Buddy Poppy sales and teaching flag etiquette to civic groups, Scouts and schools. Please plan to attend this important meeting. For more information, call Eric Morgan at (509) 346-3823

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8889 Membership and Information meeting 7 p.m. Wednesday, August 22 @ Sterling Savings Bank


Outlook The Othello

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T H U R S DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 012 Thursday

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Small town, big laughs BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER Rick Pulido lurched across stage, throwing himself into the act of running from police without knowing why, the reason older people walk hunched over and the difference between cowboys in Texas and those in Montana. The man, from California, was the featured headlining comedian at Reichert Showhouse’s second comedy night June 7. He was joined by Troy Davis, of Indiana. Pulido grew up in El Paso, Texas. He used his Mexican heritage and growing up in a house full of women as part of the experiences for his routine. Instead of sitting down and writing one-liners or witty jokes, he just talks about the funny things that happen to him, he said. Throughout his life, people always told him he was funny, he said. They encouraged him to make people laugh on a more professional lev-

BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Museum vice chair Fay Coats showcases a piece of history during the big season opening June 9.

Museum goes to head of class

See Comedy, page A4 

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER The local education system is one of the core components of the town’s history and the Othello Community Museum celebrated it during their season opening June 9. “We are honoring teachers, who were so important to the settlement of our community,” museum vice chair Fay Coats said. The museum will be open Saturdays from 1 to 5 p.m. for the remainder of the summer. It is located at the corner of Third Avenue and

PHOTOS BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Edgar Alvarado receives an Eeyore toy, a joke about his disposition, from Amy Parris during the ceremony June 5.

ALPS celebrates grads BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER The tears and smiles were plentiful June 5 as the seniors of the Alternative Learning Placement Site (ALPS) celebrated their successes at their graduation. The 13 members of the class of 2012 were each honored for their hard work and perseverance. Principal Leonard Lusk awarded three scholarships to deserving students. To earn the money, the students wrote essays about the things they’ve gone through. Jose Campollo earned $500 for his future. He wrote about living in California. He lived in a rough area and had daily interaction with gang members and violence. He

BY BRIANA ALZOLA

Jokester Rick Pulido scans the crowd during his comedy performance at Reichert’s Showhouse June 7.

Celebrating a century BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER One hundred years after opening, The Old Hotel is ready to celebrate its centennial in a big way. The hotel, which has been an art gallery for the past 37 years, will hold a day-long celebration June 23. In addition to live music, arts and crafts booths, vendors and games and activities, the gallery’s caboose will be on display, as will Milwaukee railroad speeder cars. The event will run from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. The gallery is located at 33 E. Larch St. Brittany Stromberg will be painting a community mural on the side of the children’s art building. She will paint a tree stretching

BY BRIANA ALZOLA

COURTESY PHOTO

Mark is one of the pets being featured at the Adams County Pet Rescue Adopt-a-Thon June 16.

Community A3-A6

lost several people close to him, including his best friend, to gun and knife injuries. He and his parents decided to keep him See ALPS, page A8 

BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER

The Interpretive Caboose at The Old Hotel Art Gallery will be open during their centennial celebration June 23.

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The graduates snacked on themed cake.

Adopt-a-Thon offers canine information

See Old Hotel, page A4 

Opinion A2

See Museum, page A6 

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Neighbors A7

rEduCEd pErfECt startEr homE doN’t fEar thE BiG Bad Wolf

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Schools A8, B2-B5

NEW CoNstruCtioN

Dogs and information will be available to be picked up in Othello June 16, as Adams County Pet Rescue hosts their second annual Adopt-a-Thon. The adopt-a-thon will run from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. There will be a variety of featured speakers talking about everything from canine nurtrition to signs of canine parvovirus. The speeches will start up at 9 a.m. with a lesson on nurtrition. Then, at 10 a.m., Ernie Summers will talk about signs of parvo; at 11 a.m. Mikki Kison will talk about acupressure for dogs; at noon, Summers will talk about the ACPR building project, then he will talk at 1 p.m. about emergency medical tips. At 2 p.m., Broadway Animal Hospital will talk about pet overpopulation prevention. Nutrition and pet acupressure will repeat again at 3 and 4 p.m. and then at 5 p.m., ACPR will present awards and recognition.

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Sports B1

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One student shows off for the crowd as he makes his way to the promotion ceremony June 8.

Mustangs move on to Huskies BY BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER Colder weather didn’t cool down spirits at McFarland Middle School’s annual promotion ceremony at Huskie Field June 8. The class of 2016 moved on from the eighth grade during the ceremony, ending their time at McFarland and preparing for their move to Othello High School. Class president Jasmine Lopez stood in

See ACPR, page A4 

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BY BRIANA ALZOLA

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See McFarland, page A5 

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The Othello Outlook – Thursday, June 14, 2012

www.OthelloOutlook.com

Scootney and Seventh to become four-way stop BRIANA ALZOLA STAFF WRITER The Othello city council approved June 11 to create a four-way stop at the intersection of Scootney Street and Seventh Avenue, just south of Kiwanis Park and Lutacaga Elementary School. Currently, traffic running east and west on Scootney does not have a stop sign. During school days, traffic waiting to turn and those cars on Seventh Avenue with a stop sign can get backed up for several blocks, Othello Police Chief Steve Dunnagan said. The stop signs will allow for easier traffic flow and make it safer for both vehicles and pedestrians, he said. They are PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA

A student at Hiawatha shows his skills during a talent show June 6.

Othello grads earn UW degrees Three students from Othello will graduate from the University of Washington this June. They include Gabriel Cantu, who earned a bachelor of science degree in physiology,

Melinda Sue Lopez, who will receive a bachelor of science degree in materials science and engineering and Olivia Guadalupe Lopez, who earned a bachelor of arts in sociology.

Old Hotel | Dinner is $20 in advance From page A1

across the building. Members of the community will be able to stop by and paint one leaf each onto the tree. The street in front of the gallery, Larch Street, will be closed for the day, too. Attendees will be invited to dance in the street as part of the celebration. There will be demonstrations, like how to use a pottery wheel. Tents will provide shelter from the sun. The gallery is inviting anyone with history at The Old Hotel or stories to share to do

REICHERT’S SHOWHOUSE 3 130 N. Broadway, Othello 488-0345

Web Site – showhouse.qwestoffice.net

June 13th – 21st MONDAY IS BARGAIN NIGHT: ADMISSION & POPCORN HALF-PRICE

MEN IN BLACK 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) WED. (JUNE 13): 9:15 p.m. THUR. (JUNE 14): 6:50 p.m. (Ends 6/14)

SNOW WHITE & THE HUNTSMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) WED. (JUNE 13): 6:45 p.m. THUR. (JUNE 14): 9:15 p.m. (Ends 6/14)

MADAGASCAR 3 (3D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG) WED. & THUR. (JUNE 13 & 14): 7:00 & 9:10 p.m. FRI. (JUNE 15): 7:00 & 9:15 p.m. SAT. & SUN. (JUNE 16 & 17): 4:05, 7:00 & 9:15 p.m. MON. – THUR. (JUNE 18 – 21): 7:00 & 9:15 p.m.

so during their event. Food will include Diana’s Homemade Pies, ice cream, homemade tamales and more. A special dinner that night will serve as a fundraiser for the gallery. The railroader dinner will feature an old-style pulled pork sandwich, hobo beans, potato salad, choice of drink and dessert, bacon cheesecake. Dinner is $20 if tickets are purchased in advance, $25 at the door.

This is when the water table is the lowest and construction is the easiest. Columbia will become a one-way street, running east to west. This street will have one main lane, with two large shoulders and parking lanes on the side. Wahluke will become a oneway, running west to east. Signs will also be installed informing drivers of the changes and direction of travel. The council members also asked about other changes they would like made along the roads while they are under construction. Things outside the scope of the original safety project, which was started because there have been so many

and furthered his career. His progression has changed him, he said. When he started, if he could make just one person in the audience laugh, he considered his show successful. Now, if one person is not laughing, it bothers him. He believes everyone should laugh as much as possible. “If laughter is the best medicine, let’s play doctor,” Pulido said. It isn’t just about laughing once or twice, though, his goal is to make people happy. Comedy fits his personality, he said. He gets to talk in front of people all the time. It’s PHOTO BY BRIANA ALZOLA like any other talent, though, Troy Davis jokes about his multiple he said, it takes practice. You have to work on your skill to divorces during the comedy show.

keep it going well. The hardest part of being a comedian isn’t the performing, he said. Actually writing and performing only takes up 20 percent of the time. The other 80 percent of the job is the business side — arranging gigs, discussing fees, keeping up with receipts, dealing with taxes and other daily workings. He thought his show in Othello went well, he said. He is used to performing in bigger cities so Othello wasn’t his normal venue. Still, after two minutes or so, he felt right at home. The energy of the audience made him feel comfortable. “People are so wonderful here,” Pulido said.

ROCK OF AGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (PG-13) FRI. (JUNE 15): 6:50 & 9:25 p.m. SAT. & SUN. (JUNE 16 & 17): 4:02, 6:50 & 9:25 p.m. MON. – THUR. (JUNE 18 – 21): 6:50 & 9:25 p.m. 3D SURCHARGE REMINDER GENERAL: $2.50 JUNIORS: $1.50

From page A1 The event will be at Del’s Farm Supply, 210 E. Columbia St., who are really great supporters of pet rescue, Jamie Krueger, with ACPR, said. The location is in town this year because Pet Rescue thought it might be easier to stop by and check out everything there was to see, she said. Del’s will be serving hot dogs and other refreshments from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be some animals at the fair who have been with Pet Rescue for more than a year. These animals will be offered with a 25 percent discount on the adoption fees.

Del’s will also offer a discount to those who adopt. In addition to the discount, all dogs are up-to-date on shots and have been spayed and neutered. Interested people can check out animals on the Adams County Pet Rescue website and start the adoption process ahead of time, Krueger said. That way, the adoption can go smoother on the day of the adopt-a-thon for both staff and attendees. Attendees will get the chance to learn something new. “It’s an introduction to Pet Rescue and what we’re about,” Krueger said. Tilly is another pet to be featured at the Adopt-a-Thon.

Indoor garage sale 65 1/2 Columbia St. (Behind Steve’s Body Shop) Furniture. Home decor. Lots of girl’s & women’s clothes. Unused Pampered Chef items.

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Saturday, June 16 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

THE SCREENING ROOMS TUESDAY, JUNE 19 – Free Admission 4:00 P.M. – “The Yankles” (PG-13) 4:02 P.M. – “Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds” (PG-13) 4:05 P.M. – “Big Miracle” (PG)

Davis’ comedy focused on his life, as well. He talked about his experience with multiple divorces and raising kids. The comedy show was fun, Othello resident Bill Berk said. It’s something different to do in town, he said. He came to the first show, too, and will attend others in the future. Rosa and Fili Vera both enjoyed the show, too. “It was fabulous,” F. Vera said, playing off a joke Pulido made during his set about words men never use. Fabulous was accompanied by precious and moist. R. Vera said she loved the show and was disappointed not to see more people in the audience.

ACPR | A discount at Del’s will be given to those who adopt

PROMETHEUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (R) WED. & THUR. (JUNE 13 & 14): 6:45 & 9:20 p.m. FRI. (JUNE 15): 6:45 & 9:20 p.m. SAT. & SUN. (JUNE 16 & 17): 4:00, 6:45 & 9:20 p.m. MON. – THUR. (JUNE 18 – 21): 6:45 & 9:20 p.m.

collisions at the intersection of First Avenue and Highway 26, would be considered enhancements. These enhancements could happen at the same time as construction but would not be funded by DOT dollars. The city is more than able to pursue other grant funding, he said. The city also approved their six-year street plan at the meeting. The plan will be in place from now until 2018. The city can update and change it as needed and the listed projects are not in priority order, they are simply there as a necesity to applying for state and other funding, Terry Clements, with Othello Public Works, said.

Comedy | ‘If laughter is the best medicine, let’s play doctor’

From page A1 el. He entered a competition, thinking it would be all amateurs. He got there and found himself competing against 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Summer feeding for lunch professionals. Still, he did prettime will also be from June ty well, he said, and decided to 13 to July 19 at Taggares Park continue with comedy. He performed at open mics and Lions Park. Lunch at Taggares will be 11 to 11:30 a.m. and lunch at Lions will be from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Free lunch does exist Othello children 18 years and younger can eat breakfast and lunch for free. Scootney Springs will be open June 13 to July 12 and McFarland will be open June 13 to July 19. Both schools will be closed July 4. Breakfast is from 7:45 to 8:15 a.m. and lunch is from

installing the signs in the summer so people will get used to them before school starts up again in the fall. The new signage and installation will cost the city about $275, Dunnagan said. Also at the meeting, the council gave approval to Bob Romine, with the Washington state Department of Transportation, on the First Avenue project. The project has been heavily debated over the past several months, but the parties involved have come to an agreement. The project, which will involve new striping and lane use on the intersection of Highway 26, Columbia Street and Wahluke Street will likely begin at the end of the year.

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Alzola Feature Writer of the Year  

Submission WNPA 2013

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