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compacted COMMENCEMENT Due to safety concerns, Chico State will limit the number of graduation attendees allowed to enter Nettleton Stadium.

Wills said he is not aware of past medical emergencies being the cause for this new rule. The recommendation for the change came from the Public Safety Committee Christine Lee late in the spring 2013 semester, which was Asst. News Editor too late to change last year’s ceremony, said President Paul Zingg via email. It was then This year, only five guests per one graduating student will be allowed to enter Net- decided the new limitation would take effect this year. tleton Stadium for the Chico Those who don’t have tickets State commencement in May. can watch the commencement Every year, about 10,000 at Laxson Auditorium, Harlen guests fill the stadium each day Adams Theatre or at an outon Saturday and Sunday, said door venue, according to a camChico State spokesperson Joe pus-wide email. Wills. This year, the university “I understand that there’s will be ticketing guests in order safety concerns, but having peoto cut attendance down to about ple watch from a TV outside is 8,000 people. not the same,” said Carla Mo“There are 8,000 seats in the Paul Zingg ran, senior political science stadium — when they fill up, President, Chico major. people will stand or sit outState “When your family actually side where the graduates are sees you walk, you can hear seated,” Wills said. “According them yelling for you,” she said. “The vibe to experts who know about emergency response and safety, not having people and the noise that people make when you’re in those locations will allow us to handle crossing that stage is more special than watching it from a TV screen.” emergencies effectively.” Moran is a first generation college stuAccessibility for the disabled and those dent. Her family is traveling from Las Vewho need special seating face other issues. gas, Pasadena and the Bay Area. Over the years that Chico State has held Because of the new rule, she said she the ceremonies, there have been guests who doesn’t know if most of her family will still needed medical aid at the event. One year, a guest suffered a heat stroke, Wills said. » please see commencement | A4

LaST YEaR: 1,500 – 1,800 gRaduaTES

10,0 00 EaCH guESTS daY

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Crash kills two, one in critical condition Mozes Zarate

News Editor

Two Chico State students are dead and one student is in critical condition following a car crash early Sunday morning. Austin Silver, 20, who was a passenger in the car, was pronounced dead at the scene from severe head trauma, according to California Highway Patrol. Bryant Mata-Adams, 19, the other passenger, died Monday night at Enloe Medical Center. As of 5 p.m. Tuesday, Diego Arriaga-Rodriguez, 18, is in critical condition. At approximately 12:45 a.m. Sunday, Arriaga-Rodriguez was driving westbound on Bidwell Avenue Austin Silver in Chico. The vehi1993-2014 cle, a 1998 BMW, approached a curve on the roadway at an unknown speed. The car was unable to negotiate the curve and flew off the side of the roadway. The car overturned into a creek bed three to five feet from the water, resting on its roof. Arriaga-Rodriguez and Mata-Adams had to be extricated from the car. Both were transported to Enloe Medical Center with major injuries. Mata-Adams was pronounced dead 10 p.m. Monday, acBryant Matacording to the Butte adams County coroner’s of1994-2014 fice. “They and their families all need our prayers,” wrote President Paul Zingg in an email to The Orion. “And that’s what we must do now. Keep them in our thoughts and remind their families of the friendships these young men have developed here.” Arriaga-Rodriguez was found to be under the influence and was arrested. Due to his injuries, he was released to Enloe Medical Center for treatment, along with Mata-Adams. First-year students Arriaga-Rodriguez, a mechanical engineering major,

» please see CRASH | A3

photograph COURTESY OF Chico State

No citations given for transient ‘Sit and Lie’ ordinance Madison Holms

Staff Writer

The Chico Police Department has not given out any citations to those violating the Sit and Lie ordinance since it took effect in December. The ordinance prohibits people from sitting or lying on Chico sidewalks next to commercial property between the hours of 7 a.m. and 11 p.m.Those who are cited under the ordinance would be given a fine that increases with every violation the individual receives. It has been over 30 days since the Sit and Lie ordinance was enacted. It was adopted on Nov. 19 and initiated on Dec. 20. Following its initiation, the department has responded to an average of three calls a day for transient-related incidents, according to Chico Police records. The majority of those calls come from business owners and apartment residents. Surprisingly, the police department has not given a citation to anyone for violating the ordinance. However, that does not mean the ordinance has not had an impact on the city, said Chico Police Capt. Lori MacPhail. Most incidents ended with the subject being told to move along, according to police

records. The long term impact will be revealed within the next few years, said Brad Montgomery, director of the Chico Community Shelter Partnership. As of now, it’s too soon to tell whether the ordinance has had a significant impact on the city and the homeless population. When things happen, they never happen in a vacuum, especially when you’re dealing with human beings,” Montgomery said. “So you can run into false cause and effect situations.” Throughout the past year, the ordinance has sparked controversy over its effectiveness and objectivity. “I really didn’t think it was going to end up having that much of an impact, one way or another,” Montgomery said. “I didn’t think it was the most horrible abridgment of civil rights in history and I didn’t think that it was going to completely eliminate the problems that are real and that downtown businesses are dealing with.” The key to changing the circumstances of the homeless in Chico is building relationships on trust and communication, Montgomery said. “You want to build up trust and frankly, for

Index

The Orion ∤ Photograph by Jamie Stryker

Sit and Lie A homeless man sleeps near his belongings on a grassy area at the City Plaza downtown facing the city council chambers, where many transients and homeless individuals often reside. people who live on the streets, it’s only a matter of time before they have a really horrible day or something happens that’s really bad,” Montgomery said. “If you built up trust, and honest communication with somebody, at that point, the chances that they might

make a different decision that day are much greater.” Madison Holmes can be reached at

newseditor@theorion.com or @theorion_news on Twitter.

Inside

Corrections

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Sports

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Directory

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Police Blotter

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Features

B5

Opinion

A6

Sex Column

B7

TODAY

73 33

Sports

Features

Opinion

Two Chico State alumni have qualified to compete in the U.S. Olympic trials.

Computer science students learn how to start a business through a course that teaches entrepeneurship.

Longing for a football team overshadows current athletic success at Chico State.

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Photo by CHELSEA JEFFERS

Chico State student ensemble The Upstairs Neighbors bring a unique flavor of jazz and funk to the local scene. theorion.com/arts

University Police and the A.S. Bike Cart will substitute tickets for bike lights The Orion ∤ Photograph by Frances Mansour

LIGHT UP Stephanie Kraker, a 20-year-old junior hospitality major, straps a bike light to her frame when riding home from campus on the evening of Jan. 21.

University Police adopt new bike light program

Photo by ANNIE PAIGE

Chico artist Norm Dillinger specializes in pointillism, an art style that involves blending colorful dots. theorion.com/arts

Yessenia Funes

Staff Writer

Starting this week, University Police officers may choose to provide free bike lights instead of citations for unlit cycling. With the loss of Chico State nursing student Kristina Chesterman and Butte College student Janee Nickerson, both from bicycle accidents last semester, bike safety has become a major campus issue, said University Police Chief Robyn Hearne. The students’ deaths urged community members to create the Chico Velo Cycling Club’s Light Up Chico program, which has led to a similar program on campus. Officers from Chico Police Department chose to The Orion ∤ Photograph by Frances Mansour leave tickets behind and give violators bike lights CHANGING GEARS Andy Goldman, 21, a junior legal studies major, right, and Alex Kensil, 23, a senior mechanical instead of tickets. Chico Police began the program engineering major are both avid cyclists. They hope the new bike light program will help keep bicyclists safer. in December, said Janine Rood, the executive diand finance at Chico State, together to expand the about safety.” rector of Chico Velo Cycling Club. Unlike the community program, officers will not club’s bike-light initiative to students. While the cycling club raises funds for their pro“I see it as a valuable program for people who gram through community fundraisers, the campus be handing lights over to students. Hearne said officers will give students vouchers to receive their need lights but can’t afford them,” Mills said. “To program will purchase lights with the Bike Trust lights at the Associated Students Bike Cart or at have lights and not just be legal when they’re rid- Fund, which students fill when they pay the $10 ing their bikes, but to be safer.” local bike shops. bike registration fee on campus. The fund is only About 12 students received citations used for education, equipment for bicycle-mounted “We don’t want to just give them within the last two years for riding officers, bike give-a-ways or enforcement programs away and not have them mounted,” without a bike light at night, excluding like this one. Hearne said. “We want them on the warnings, Hearne said. bikes.” So far, the program has purchased $500 worth The University Police Department of light sets so the front and back of bikes are lit, Curtis Sicheneder, assistant direcplans to track the number of lights it Hearne said. The lights are simple to discourage tor of facilities and recreation, who gives out through the vouchers. The de- thieves from taking the lights off bikes. oversees the A.S. Bike Cart, said he partment and the A.S. Bike Cart will log is pleased with the program because Alex Kensil, a senior engineering student, uses all the voucher information. it helps them achieve their goal of only reflectors because his bike light was stolen The department wants to know who within a week of purchasing it. While he sees providing services to students at robyn uses the lights most, Hearne said. This headlamps as a more versatile option, he said he cheaper rates. Hearne documentation also allows officers to still supports the program. The program also exposes students Chief of police, know if they’ve given an individual to the cart’s many services, such as “I’m for any initiative that increases bike awareUniversity Police a bike light before. The second time ness and biker safety in Chico,” Kensil said. fixing flats and brakes, at student-oriaround, that person may not be so lucky. ented prices, Sicheneder said. “I’m really big on asking for compli- Yessenia Funes can be reached at Russell Mills, a Chico State professor and bike safety advocate, brought Rood and ance before enforcement,” Hearne said. “It’s just a newseditor@orion.com or Lorraine Hoffman, vice president for business better place for us all to be because, ultimately, it’s @theorion_yfunes on Twitter.

photo BY KASEY JUDGE

Zachary Phillips provides a tour of the Wildcat Recreation Center for those who are “unconventionally athetlic.” theorion.com/opinion

File Photo The Orion

Women’s and men’s basketball will face off against the Sonoma State Seawolves 7:30 p.m. Friday in Acker Gym. theorion.com/sports

Community rallies to keep cleanup wanted to be employed, said Bill Such, director of the Jesus Center. “Five more (people) wanted to join, but we couldn’t afford to pay them,” Such said. “The businesses couldn’t afford to pay them so they started a voucher system. A half-dozen of them gave them Christmas presents. R-Town WILLIAM found a good way REICK to connect the busiDowntown ambassador nesses to the homeless people.” The Downtown Chico Business Association is currently in

Jessie Severin

Staff Writer

The Jesus Center and R-Town Downtown Coalition are in the planning stages of making the Cleanup Brigade a permanent solution to keeping downtown Chico clean. In November 2013, four individuals from the Jesus Center were hired to clean the streets of Chico early in the morning. This was in connection to a larger plan by R-Town to make the downtown area safer and seem friendlier, which also included hiring private security. After funding ran out in early January, they are no longer cleaning, but the program has made quite an impact. Up until that point, the homeless had become the enemy to many people in Chico, but the Cleanup Brigade showed that many of them

CORRECTIONS In “Drought hits the university farm,” Francis Mansour was not credited in the first photo underneath the headline. In “Drought hits the university farm,” the pull quote incorrectly attributed Jeff Boles. Chris Putz was the source of the quote. The Orion staff strives for accuracy in all it publishes. We recognize that mistakes will sometimes occur, but we treat every error very seriously. If you feel a correction needs to be made, please email the editor-in-chief at editorinchief@ theorion.com

talks to hire anywhere from four to eight individuals to work as a part of the Cleanup Brigade for the next year. The plans are still very tentative, said William Reick, who is part of the Downtown Ambassadors program and is working with the association to develop the budget for the Cleanup Brigade. “There’s nothing solid yet,” Reick said. “Everyone likes to see the downtown clean, and the people who were cleaning enjoyed what they were doing,” said Alan Tochterman, local businessman and member of the R-Town Coalition. “It could go on continuously. My main function is trying to make it long term.” Jessie Severin can be reached at

newseditor@theorion.com or @jmseverin on Twitter.

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| A3

Zingg promotes local commitments Nicholas Carr

Staff Writer

Building a sense of community beyond the campus that can address evolving social and academic issues is a top priority for Chico State’s leading administrator. At the President’s Spring Convocation held in Harlen Adams Theatre Thursday, President Paul Zingg addressed how the digital revolution, campus identity and community engagement will determine the university’s future. While the digital revolution has lessened the hold that geographic barriers have on education and communication, it has also given people “unprecedented freedom to live alone,� Zingg said, likening the shift to people retreating from cities to suburbs and gated communities. “There is something critically missing when flight and privacy take precedence over community and connection,� he said. Chico’s relationship with the downPaul Zingg town area holds the President, Chico solution to the social State disconnect presented by technology, Zingg said, and is a focal point in the hunt to define the campus’s image. A close physical proximity to the city and a shared devotion to promoting the arts exemplify Chico State’s qualities as a “unique� college town in California, he said. New commitments to the arts both on and off campus involving the Veteran’s Memorial Hall, the Gateway Science Museum and the under-construction arts and humanities building connect the university with the surrounding community,

The Orion ∤ Photograph by Thomas Martinez

LOOKING FORWARD President Paul Zingg speaks to attendees about Chico State’s future. Strengthening the connection between the campus and the surrounding community were common themes throughout the President’s Spring Convocation held in Harlen Adams Theatre Thursday. Zingg said. Along with those efforts, civic engagement was also cited as being crucial to securing a symbiotic relationship. Zingg used the recent debates over the homeless population and public safety as an example of where the university can influence positive change and discussion. Despite claims that the university is not a productive force in addressing local safety issues, programs involving students such as Community Action Volunteers in Education, the Community Legal Information Center and the Blitz Build exemplify the university’s dedication, Zingg said.

Programs like the First Year Experience and the Town Hall Meetings geared at promoting informed public discourse can help bring balance to such discussions that have traditionally created controversy, he said. Promoting positive conversations about the shared future of the city and the university, along with others including future academic planning and how Chico State can be a model of higher education in California, is the challenge facing the campus, Zingg said. Also mentioned at the event:

The university has hired two new deans who will start working this semester. They are Judith Hennessey for the College of Business and Angela Trethewey for the College of Communication and Education. The university’s College of Business has received full accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International. Nicholas Carr can be reached at

ncarr@theorion.com or @nikecarr on Twitter.

Crash: Urgent counseling available to students The Orion ∤ Photograph by Christine lee

Layoffs Milestone, a Chico technology company that hired more than 300 workers last year, laid off a dozen workers last December. At least 315 people are still employed by the local company for phone and chat support. Milestone’s clients include eBay, Google and Facebook.

said if he was laid off, he’d learn to let it go. He was recruited by Milestone during Chico State’s career fair last year. “If I do my job to my best ability, I shouldn’t get laid off,� Sparrey said. “I’m a valuable employee. If I get laid off, it’s out of my control at that point.� He said he’s not volunteering time off like other workers because the department he works in now is a new extension to Milestone. Sparrey used to work in the hardware and management department but he has new responsibilities. The new department gave him a different set of skills, and there was enough work for him, he said. Milestone’s hiring companies are working with their laid-off employees to find jobs, Tallchief said. Milestone is located next to the Chico Municipal Airport. The buildings used to belong to Build, another major employer that laid off several workers around the same time as Milestone.

and Mata-Adams, a microbiology major, started during the fall 2013 semester, said Joe Wills, a Chico State spokesperson. Silver was born Dec. 7, 1993 in Simi Valley, according to a campus-wide email. He began his studies at Chico State in fall 2012. He was a sophomore music industry major. Mata-Adams was born on Sept. 5 1994, in San Diego. Urgent walk-in services are available to students at the Counseling and Wellness Center from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Student Services Building room 430, according to the email. The university flag was lowered Tuesday in Silver’s memory, according to the announcement. The university flag will also be lowered Wednesday in Mata-Adams’ memory, Wills said. A community comes together for many reasons and on many occasions, Zingg wrote. “Grieving is one of them,� Zingg wrote. “So, too, providing hope and encouragement. Their families need to feel that they are not alone in facing loss and being hopeful.� Memorial service information for Silver and Mata-Adams is unavailable as of Tuesday afternoon.

Christine Lee can be reached at

Mozes Zarate can be reached at

clee@theorion.com or leechris017 on Twitter

newseditor@theorion.com or @mzarate139 on Twitter.

Local technology company’s layoffs force workers to compromise,compete

on which day they choose,� she said. A survey was sent out to employees asking Asst. News editor how they want to grow within the company and those whose answers ranked high were Chico’s Milestone technology company recently laid off an unknown number of work- put on a list. Workers are getting more training on client ers in December 2013 due to lack of phone products in order to prove themselves procalls for tech support. ductive, she said. The company measures proThe company recruited several Chico State students during last semester’s career fair. ductiveness by having employees log in codes which correspond with the tasks Milestone wouldn’t reveal how they’re doing throughout the day. many people were laid off, but at Because she’s an exempt emleast 315 people are still employed. ployee, Tallchief can work over“There are about 300 people for time if she wanted to, but regular phone support, 15 people for chat employees are not allowed to, she support and everybody answers said. She wouldn’t disclose her emails,� said Leah Tallchief, psysalary amount but she works 40 to chology graduate student and 60 hours per week. Milestone supervisor for the chat Tallchief said she’s not afraid department. she’ll get laid off because of her Workers answer questions leah current position as supervisor. about tech support, refunds and tallchief “There’s always a possibility the company’s client products. Supervisor at but I’ve tried to make myself as Milestone’s clients are eBay, Milestone indispensable as possible,� she Google and Facebook. said. “I’ve taken a lot of different After the layoff, people started roles.� volunteering time off in order for everybody Brett Sparrey, a Chico State graduate and to get enough work hours, said Tallchief. “People get three-day weekends depending applications support employee at Milestone, Christine Lee

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Police

Blotter

Wednesday, 9:36 a.m.: Suspicious smoke near the elevators in Meriam Library. “Elevator emitting smoke from motor, smells electrical. Called facilities management and services to respond. No one in elevators. Blocked off doors for no access. Alarms sounding in anthropology elevator stairwell, room 190, possibly attributed to elevator issue in Meriam Library.” Thursday, 11:03 a.m.: Bike theft from the Siskiyou Hall bike racks. “Taken within last two hours from bike racks on the north side of Meriam Library. Locked at outer edge of racks with a cable lock. Suspect left the black strap attached to lock. Silver Trek mountain bike, no serial number.” Thursday, 7:07 a.m.: Suspicious subject on Main Street. “Female screaming outside the window. Obscenities. ‘I didn’t do it.’ Possibly with two subjects, possibly with red backpack on Esplanade side.” Friday, 1:06 a.m.: Alcohol violation on the fourth floor of Whitney Hall. “Requesting alcohol assessment. Female is drunk. Female consumed alcohol on an empty stomach and was experiencing nausea. Roommate staying with her for the night.” Sunday, 2:12 a.m.: Welfare check on the third floor of Lassen Hall. “Female vomiting in restroom. Residential advisers requesting alcohol assessment. (Officer) advising (subject is not drunk), female vomiting from upset stomach due to Taco Bell food she consumed.”

Chico Police

The police blotter is a selection of information cited directly from Chico Police Department and University Police Department.

University Police

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NEWS

WedneSday, JAN. 29, 2014

Friday, 8:39 p.m.: Fight off the 600 block of West First Avenue. “Back of the complex, five subjects fighting. Reporting party advising she has also heard ‘shots,’ unknown if they are related. Subjects involved are black male adults, do not live in complex. Husband just told/updated reporting party, advising around 20 people fighting now. Husband did not hear any shots, no weapons seen, no mention.” Friday, 8:41 p.m.: Subject under the influence of drugs on the 200 block of East Avenue. “Subject (possibly under the influence), walking, jumping into roadway. Hitting himself, lying on the ground, walking across El Paso, walking eastbound on East Avenue. Was punching his hand which was possibly bleeding.” Friday, 10:16 p.m.: Drunken escape from Enloe Medical Center on the 1500 block of the Esplanade. “Drunk subject brought in by ambulance, left on foot. Last seen westbound on Arcadian after urinating on a fence. Reporting party calling back advising subject is in the bushes at Fourth Avenue and Arcadian Avenue. Requesting ambulance.” Sunday, 5:18 a.m.: Vandalism on the 400 block of Hazel Street. “Subject broke the window to his house. Threw a trash can through the window. Nine people live in the house, he doesn’t know who the subject is or why he would break the window.”

Sunday, 12:45 a.m.: Bike theft at the Lassen Hall bike racks. “Reporting party observed white male adult wearing a black beanie, with a brown hooded sweatshirt, black pants, large pack steal a dark blue mountain bike with a basket tied on and a turtle horn. Reporting party observed from window.”

Sunday, 8:20 a.m.: Assault/battery on the 800 block of West Second Avenue. “Reporting party was choked out by his roommate. The roommate keeps coming back to the reporting party’s bedroom. No weapons seen other than kitchen knife. Roommate is currently outside the room will not let reporting party leave for work. Subject is threatening additional physical harm when reporting party exits his room. Unknown if the subject will answer the door.”

Sunday, 6:50 p.m.: Suspicious subject outside of Plumas Hall. “Two white male adults with shovels digging in creek area, threw rocks at building, subjects last seen on BMX-type bike northbound on Warner Street towards West Sacramento Ave. Last seen wearing dark hat, beanie cap.”

Sunday, 6:34 p.m.: Disturbance on the 700 block of West Ninth Street. “Two transients are starting fights with customers, one of them has a brown dog. Aggressive panhandling and trying to start fights.” -compiled by Nicholas Carr

COMMENCEMENT: Unused tickets to be redistributed later » continued from A1 be attending although her parents already booked a hotel one year in advance. Local hotels are completely booked within 30 minutes once reservations are open in July, about two months after the previous graduation, said Brook Smith, hotel sales manager at the Courtyard Marriott and Residence Inn in Chico. Smith graduated from Chico State in 2009. “During that time in July, hotels cost about $100 over the regular rate,” she said. There are 90 rooms at the Courtyard Mariott and 78 rooms at the Residence Inn. All the rooms are currently booked for Chico State’s graduation weekend. The new university regulation may or may not affect the hotel business because guests are not allowed to book more than three rooms per person, she said. Those who booked hotels last year have until two weeks prior to graduation weekend to cancel their reservations. “All these people coming in town are a tax revenue,” said Smith. “Limiting the amount of people may be hindering how much money is brought in to Chico.” Typically, about 1,500 graduating students participate on each day — some years, it can be up to 1,800 students, Wills said. The college of agriculture will have their own commencement in Laxson Auditorium to lower the amount of students and visitors in the stadium, according to the email. Students who don’t need the extra tickets can put them into a pool where other students in need will be allowed to take from, Wills said. How these extra tickets will be distributed is still being planned. Johanna Herbert, a senior political science major, said she was expecting eight to nine family members to drive up from Anaheim. Her grandmother was planning to travel from Mexico, she said. “For them to tell us at the last minute when you already made plans with your family isn’t right,” Herbert said. “it doesn’t make sense to limit it to five people because it depends on your family size.” Tickets won’t cost money, according a commencement information website. Regardless, ticket scalping for graduation “has long been a tradition among students,” according to an article from the Wall Street Journal. In 2007, some Princeton University graduates sold their commencement tickets for as much as $250, according to the article. “That would be a poor decision if it was based on trying to make money instead of trying to help others’ families attend the commencement,” Wills said. Children, ages two and under, will not be ticketed if they sit on the parent’s lap. Guests who use wheelchairs, along with those who accompany them will be ticketed and there will be a designated area for accessible seating. Christine Lee can be reached at

klee@theorion.com or @leechriso17 on twitter.


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WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29, 2014

editorial

Graduate gridlock unfair to families Graduation — some students dread it and others can’t wait. However, there are some who are even more excited about it than the soon-to-be graduates: their friends and family. Unfortunately, fewer friends and family members will be able to attend this spring’s commencement. During previous graduations the Nettleton Stadium held 10,000 attendees but only 8,000 will be allowed in this year, to match the number of seats available. The changes are a result of concerns that first responders would not be able to react quickly enough in case of an emergency or other need to evacuate the stadium. Because of these safety concerns, each graduate is restricted to five tickets for commencement. How can students be expected to pick just five guests for one of the most important days of their lives? For those unable to attend the live c e r e m o n y, screens will broadcast the proceedings at various indoor and outdoor locations on campus, but this is a hollow consolation for some who may have traveled hundreds of miles to see their loved ones graduate. Students and parents are angry, especially those with large families who feel unfairly punished by this change. For such an important event, it is concerning that these changes were made without student input. The administration promises to be transparent about decisions like this, but now students are left with a difficult decision they never asked for. Then again, it doesn’t appear that the changes were made with families in mind, but addressed as a logistical issue. If that’s true, perhaps Chico State could take a cue from other universities and break the commencement into even smaller ceremonies, possibly over two weekends. It’s a shame graduation celebrations have to be spoiled by safety concerns but such is life. Graduation comes with many choices for seniors and now Chico State students have one more to face.

How can students be expected to pick just five guests for one of the most important days of their lives?

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Science can still save us Kevin Crittenden

Opinion Columnist

Although science and technology have shaped our society, there is a dangerous lack of understanding of science’s role as a way of thinking and living. The innate curiosity that makes us human, the desire to know why things are the way they are, is beaten out of us by scared teachers or squelched by religion. I was raised Catholic — I know how to obey, to not ask certain questions and that Catholics aren’t cannibals, even if they believe they eat the flesh and drink the blood of Christ. Now I think of gods like superheroes. It would be cool if they were real. Jesus sounds like a great pal and Batman seems like a good dude to know. But I don’t need them to exist to appreciate what they have to offer. I have found that religion conflicts with a critical, rational approach to understanding the human story of existence. More recently, college has pushed the same confined kind of thinking. The prevalence of multiple choice examinations is just one visible example of institutionalized restricted thinking. It’s no secret that people in power have a vested interest in keeping power. Historically, religion has played a major role in this regard. Combine this with an education system that rewards teachers for reinforcing obedience, rather than innovative thinking, and you have a recipe for civilizational failure. “What civilizational failure?” you ask? The kind that makes global warming a de-

batable topic. It’s the same kind that clings to the notion of a vengeful, omnipotent lawmaker waiting in judgment, which many of the Judeo-Christian persuasion believe gifted us the world for our “dominion.” It’s worth noting how the Judeo-Christian domination axiom, later re-dubbed “manifest destiny,” has, with the misuse of science and technology, created the conditions that have made possible the extraordinary abuse of the world’s resources. We’re in this together — no one vein of culture has all the right answers. But we should know enough by now to know that we don’t know enough. The reason science is so unappealing to some is that it always raises new questions, even as it unravels a widening ripple of information and theory. It makes us feel small, inconsequential — not the center of the universe. Put another way, science can be understood as the pursuit of higher-quality ignorance. It’s about acknowledging how much we don’t know. In this sense it’s truly humbling, even if scientists themselves can sometimes be perceived as arrogant. Religion is supposed to make us feel good. It makes sense that we would want to feel relief from the anxiety of living, to know the origins of creation and to have some idea of what’s in store for us when we die. To not wonder about such questions

seems unnatural. It’s so much easier to be told we’re doing it right by prophets and scripture. It feels much nicer to reside in a lifeboat of faith in a world that, at times, seems so hopeless. People want to commit to a story, even if it involves rebirth, reincarnation, eternal bliss in heaven or salvation, to name a few. However, the leap of faith that brings religious communities together leaves less room for the power of interacting with the world through scientific inquiry. There’s too much at stake to worry about stepping on holy toes. The late Carl Sagan, an influential science communicator who spoke frequently about the importance of questioning authority, said “If we’re not able to ask skeptical questions, to interrogate those who tell us something is true, then we’re up for grabs,” by the next manipulator: religious, political or otherwise. We live on the razor’s edge of human history. It’s time for a change in values that place higher priority on ecologically responsible technology, innovation and critical thinking.

The reason science is so unappealing to some is that it always raises new questions, even as it unravels a widening ripple of information and theory.

Kevin Crittenden can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

@theorion_news on Twitter.

Capitalizing on feeling invincible while young Prin Mayowa

Opinion Columnist

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News Editor Mozes Zarate Opinion Editor Zachary Coyl Sports Editor Sharon Martin

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Editor-in-Chief Katrina Cameron Managing Editor Ernesto Rivera Art Director Liz Coffee

@PrinSupreme on Twitter.

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| EDITORIAL BOARD | Spring 2014

Prin Mayowa can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

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With every crazy action, the feeling of invincibility becomes more apparent.

So do something — whether it be volunteering to teach children in developing countries, living in Europe for a few months or road tripping across the U.S. Because after hitting a certain age, I’m pretty sure the invincibility slowly fades. Don’t waste your time sweating the small stuff, but don’t kill yourself thinking of ways to make this time of your life epic either. We can’t all be Superman or Superwoman forever.

Th

Young adulthood sneaks up on the youth of America. They may not know it, but upon entering this new age of independence one steps into a parallel universe bent on living another day to tell a new, more exciting story. That voice in the back of their head goes from sounding like their mother, to sounding more like them. With every crazy action, the feeling of invincibility becomes more apparent. It’s the reason young kids like fast cars, twisting roads, the sun on their face and wind in their hair. This is why they stay out until 2 a.m. on a Sunday night, fully intent on bracing themselves with sunglasses and cappuccinos on Monday morning. Sure, there are the young Donald Trumps who work out, get internships, throw themselves into their work and are considered fully responsible students, friends and well-

rounded people. But with youth, there is barely a difference between the alcoholics and the overworked among us. At this stage in life, selfishness is an undeniable trait. The newfound freedom is almost as amazing as the first day of summer vacation. There is no one to look out for. Life becomes all about spending time thinking about what you want and, if necessary, who you have to take it from. Conquering the world and choosing to make it a little better or worse than how you found it. Young adulthood also makes one aware of a crossroads that force them to realize what in the world is important and whether or not they think they should improve or ignore it all together. By now, I’m sure you young people understand that you are invincible. This is why most fresh-faced adults are not signing up for health care or rushing to the dentist. But there are young people around the world diligently working to make their youth something they can tell stories about.

The unsigned Orion editorial is the collaborative opinion of the editorial board.

Features Editor Risa Johnson Photo Editor Kasey Judge Video Editor Emily Bertolino

Chief Copy Editor John Riggin Public Relations Director Jessica Barber


OPINION

opinions all week @ theorion.com

| A7

THUMBS The Orion ∤ ILLUSTRATION by rachel dugo

Don’t skip classy clothes

WedneSday, JAN. 29, 2014

Thumbs up to possible rain this week. In case you haven’t heard, we’re in a historically long drought.

Thumbs down to food insecurity. Unsure what food insecurity is? Check out the story on B6.

Juliana Eveland

Opinion Columnist

As I walk to classes, maneuvering my way through the flow of people, I glance up and down to take in their appearance. No matter where you go, you are going to be judged by your exterior first. Growing up we learned to not judge a book by its cover, yet we subconsciously make assessments of those we see before getting to know them. Our outward appearance leads us to first impressions. Good or bad, they often have a huge impact on the way a person views you. To begin to grasp the character of a person, I look over their attire first. College is the gateway to our professional lives. Future coworkers and employees will critique every inch of your demeanor before even looking at your resume. That being said, when I see people around campus in grimy looking pajamas, it really grinds my gears. Pajamas to school? That was a big day for us in the sixth grade, but this is college. For those aiming to be successful in life, a big break isn’t going to come from showing up to class looking like you got dressed in the dark — which, considering the pajama issue, must be a ritual for some. Dressing inappropriately doesn’t just hinder your own reputation as a professional, it creates a lack of professionalism in the classroom. Could you imagine if our professors showed up in sweats and a dirty T-shirt? We should give them the same respect they show us by putting in an effort to look laundered and reputable. Plus, you never know who you are going to see or meet on campus. So with that in mind, dress like you might run into that sexy guy in your English class. Wear something clean to impress the girl you volunteer with at CAVE. Find a fresh ensemble to catch the eye of someone new on campus. I’m not saying I don’t have days when sweats and slippers will be the only things getting me through the day, because I do. But I pick and choose these days carefully. If I do decide to go that route, I’ve found I actually have less motivation and energy on those days. There are multiple benefits to dressing well. When I dress well, I feel well. When I receive a compliment on how I look that day it’s a major confidence boost. Nothing compares to finding a piece of clothing that really expresses my personality. Regardless of all these things, taking your outer appearance into consideration each morning is simply something people our age should do. The unfortunate truth that people will judge you based on your appearance should be acknowledged. With that in mind, dress as you want to be perceived. By all means keep wearing pajamas to class, but to most people your look conveys an “I don’t care” attitude. But when you dress with class, at the end of the day, no matter how lousy it might have been, you can remind yourself, “Hey, at least I looked good.”good.”

Fellow coworkers and employees will critique every inch of your demeanor before even looking at your resume.

When I dress well, I feel well. When I receive a compliment on how I look that day it’s a major confidence boost.

Julianna Eveland can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

@theorion_news on Twitter.

The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

Thumbs up to Wildcat alumni Kara Lubieniecki and Alia Gray who will be running in the 2016 Olympic marathon trials. Flip to B1 for more.

Supporting school sports Matt Murphy

Opinion Columnist At some point or another, there is a disease that affects all college students during their time at school. I have unofficially diagnosed it as "school envy," or in some extreme cases, "school jealousy." It's that time when you look at where your friends attend school, see an ad on TV or watch a college football game, and think, "boy, that looks nice." It's inevitable and unavoidable. No matter where you are or what you're doing in life, there will always be someone else who has it better in your eyes. Don’t fret — with a little effort, both of these diseases can be easily cured. I saw a lot of undiagnosed examples of these infections in Chico State students during the recent college football season. Most were people wishing that Chico State still had a football team, no doubt seeing the raucous crowds and the excitement generated by the teams shown on Saturdays on ESPN. It's quite a natural reaction. Who wouldn't want to be a part of those weekly events? The entire school turning out each week, the rivalries, the shared heartbreak and jubilation from wins and losses. Luckily for the sick, there is a simple cure: focus the energy you spend wishing Chico State had a football team on the teams that

Chico State has. Because Chico doesn't have a football team, sports that would ordinarily be overshadowed gain more visibility. Did you know that Chico State is currently ranked fifth in the current Division II Director's Cup Standings, which determine the best athletic program in the country? The men's soccer team finished first in the North Division of the CCAA. The men's cross country team has won 12 straight conference titles, and the women have won 10. The men's track and field team has won 10 straight conference titles and the women's have claimed four in a row. Both men's and women's basketball teams reached the NCAA tournament last year. The men's golf team finished last year ranked 24th in the nation. The baseball team has made it to the conference tournament 14 of the last 15 years. Chico State is not lacking in athletic success. It is, however, lacking the support it deserves. There's no reason that Chico State can't experience the electric atmosphere large football teams enjoy at any of the Wildcats' games, matches or meets. A game is a game no matter where it is played, and you might be surprised how smaller venues like Acker Gym and Nettleton Stadium enhance your experience as a fan. Consider yourself cured and go support your ‘Cats.

Chico State is not lacking in athletic success. It is, however, lacking the support it deserves.

Staff Writer

A new semester calls for a new, heavy workload. Some students have no issue being assigned 50-plus pages to read a night. However, others definitely feel the stress when they are involved in other activities that require a significant amount of their time. They may partake in many different activities such as clubs, work, sports or Greek life. This means that many of them are forced to manage their time wisely in order to balance school and their social lives. It’s no surprise that young adults, particularly college students, have been categorized as the “skimming generation.” Students want to get everything done while figuring out some way to speed up the process. While it is unrealistic to ask professors to reduce the amount of content they are assigning to read, we do have the option to read quicker while still attempting to absorb all the necessary material. Skimming can be an effective method of understanding content, if done correctly. Finding out how long an assignment is and how much time is available could give students insight regarding how of much of their time will be spent on the assignment. Titles, major headings and sub-headings are all placed in the text for a reason, so paying more attention to them before looking any further could give a better idea of what the reading is about. I find it easiest to read the first and last paragraphs of articles to see if there is a significant connection or point that is brought

@matthewcharlesz on Twitter.

up in both the beginning and the end of any article. After I read both paragraphs, I then highlight any words that stand out to me or are being repeated. Taking notes is one of the biggest aids to anyone who likes to skim. I find it nearly impossible for me to remember any of the material I read unless I take notes. The note taking comes in handy when professors assign questions about the reading material. Some students find it useful to look at the assigned or chapter review questions before they read, so that they can highlight any key words that may answer questions while they’re skimming. Skimming can also benefit those who choose to thoroughly read the material. Once a person skims, they are already that much more knowledgeable about the material before actually diving in and reading the “correct” way. Readers may be thinking, “Why waste our time reading when we can skim through everything?” It is important to note that skimming is not a substitution for reading, and it is necessary to read as much as possible for all of your courses. Even if it feels as if the assignment is never-ending, just remember that in the end, all of the extra time reading will be worth the grade. If skimming teaches students how to take better notes, understand the material and look for details in the readings that they never did before, then being a part of the “skimming generation” doesn’t sound so bad.

Skimming can be an effective method of understanding content, if done correctly.

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

TALKING POINTS

Photograph by Frances Mansour Spin, Cycle Andy Goldman, a junior legal studies major, puts the front tire back on a bike at the bike cart.

University Police and the Associated Students Bike Cart have teamed up. Officers may give bicyclists riding without a light a voucher, redeemable at the cart or local bike shops, for a free one instead of a ticket. Hopefully this measure brings awareness to the issue of bike safety. See A2 .

Matt Murphy can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

Skimming simplifies studies Veronica De La Cruz

Thumbs down to a lack of parking spots for students. Why pay for a parking permit if you have to drive around to find a meter?

Veronica De La Cruz can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

Photograph COURTESY OF zennie62 via Flickr Sore Winner Richard Sherman celbrates the Seattle Seahawks’ win over the San Fransico 49ers.

The rant heard ‘round the Twittersphere. Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman’s 20-second post game interview is controversial in more ways than one. It didn’t just start conversations about football, it ignited discussions about race. It’s not okay to call a Stanford graduate a “thug” because he is a black man who was loud and excited after a game saving play. Nicholas Woodard weighs in the sports section. See B2.

STUDY BREAK

Photograph by JHSounds via Wikimedia Play On Music group Daft Punk took home four Grammys at this year’s awards show Sunday in Los Angeles.

Daft Punk, Pharrell Williams and Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were up all night to get lucky in Los Angeles on Jan. 26 at the 56th annual Grammy Awards. Daft Punk took home four Grammys including: Record of the Year, Album of the Year, Best Dance/Electronica Album and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance with Pharell Williams and Nile Rodgers. If Daft Punk fans weren’t already ecstatic about the many wins, the group performed their winning track “Get Lucky” with the legendary Stevie Wonder joining Williams and Rodgers on vocals. Macklemore and Ryan Lewis also took home four Grammys including: Best New Artist, Best Rap Performance, Best Rap Song and Best Rap Album. To top it off, 17-year-old New Zealand native Lorde won two Grammys, Best Pop Solo Performance and Song of the Year, for “Royals.” She’s one to watch out for at next years Grammys.

@theorion_news on Twitter.

• Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

-compiled by Nicole Santos • The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.


A8 |

WedneSday, Jan. 29, 2013

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news all week @ theorion.com


OPINION

opinions all week @ theorion.com

| A7

THUMBS The Orion ∤ ILLUSTRATION by rachel dugo

Don’t skip classy clothes

WedneSday, JAN. 29, 2014

Thumbs up to possible rain this week. In case you haven’t heard, we’re in a historically long drought.

Thumbs down to food insecurity. Unsure what food insecurity is? Check out the story on B6.

Juliana Eveland

Opinion Columnist

As I walk to classes, maneuvering my way through the flow of people, I glance up and down to take in their appearance. No matter where you go, you are going to be judged by your exterior first. Growing up we learned to not judge a book by its cover, yet we subconsciously make assessments of those we see before getting to know them. Our outward appearance leads us to first impressions. Good or bad, they often have a huge impact on the way a person views you. To begin to grasp the character of a person, I look over their attire first. College is the gateway to our professional lives. Future coworkers and employees will critique every inch of your demeanor before even looking at your resume. That being said, when I see people around campus in grimy looking pajamas, it really grinds my gears. Pajamas to school? That was a big day for us in the sixth grade, but this is college. For those aiming to be successful in life, a big break isn’t going to come from showing up to class looking like you got dressed in the dark — which, considering the pajama issue, must be a ritual for some. Dressing inappropriately doesn’t just hinder your own reputation as a professional, it creates a lack of professionalism in the classroom. Could you imagine if our professors showed up in sweats and a dirty T-shirt? We should give them the same respect they show us by putting in an effort to look laundered and reputable. Plus, you never know who you are going to see or meet on campus. So with that in mind, dress like you might run into that sexy guy in your English class. Wear something clean to impress the girl you volunteer with at CAVE. Find a fresh ensemble to catch the eye of someone new on campus. I’m not saying I don’t have days when sweats and slippers will be the only things getting me through the day, because I do. But I pick and choose these days carefully. If I do decide to go that route, I’ve found I actually have less motivation and energy on those days. There are multiple benefits to dressing well. When I dress well, I feel well. When I receive a compliment on how I look that day it’s a major confidence boost. Nothing compares to finding a piece of clothing that really expresses my personality. Regardless of all these things, taking your outer appearance into consideration each morning is simply something people our age should do. The unfortunate truth that people will judge you based on your appearance should be acknowledged. With that in mind, dress as you want to be perceived. By all means keep wearing pajamas to class, but to most people your look conveys an “I don’t care” attitude. But when you dress with class, at the end of the day, no matter how lousy it might have been, you can remind yourself, “Hey, at least I looked good.”good.”

Fellow coworkers and employees will critique every inch of your demeanor before even looking at your resume.

When I dress well, I feel well. When I receive a compliment on how I look that day it’s a major confidence boost.

Julianna Eveland can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

@theorion_news on Twitter.

The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

Thumbs up to Wildcat alumni Kara Lubieniecki and Alia Gray who will be running in the 2016 Olympic marathon trials. Flip to B1 for more.

Supporting school sports Matt Murphy

Opinion Columnist At some point or another, there is a disease that affects all college students during their time at school. I have unofficially diagnosed it as "school envy," or in some extreme cases, "school jealousy." It's that time when you look at where your friends attend school, see an ad on TV or watch a college football game, and think, "boy, that looks nice." It's inevitable and unavoidable. No matter where you are or what you're doing in life, there will always be someone else who has it better in your eyes. Don’t fret — with a little effort, both of these diseases can be easily cured. I saw a lot of undiagnosed examples of these infections in Chico State students during the recent college football season. Most were people wishing that Chico State still had a football team, no doubt seeing the raucous crowds and the excitement generated by the teams shown on Saturdays on ESPN. It's quite a natural reaction. Who wouldn't want to be a part of those weekly events? The entire school turning out each week, the rivalries, the shared heartbreak and jubilation from wins and losses. Luckily for the sick, there is a simple cure: focus the energy you spend wishing Chico State had a football team on the teams that

Chico State has. Because Chico doesn't have a football team, sports that would ordinarily be overshadowed gain more visibility. Did you know that Chico State is currently ranked fifth in the current Division II Director's Cup Standings, which determine the best athletic program in the country? The men's soccer team finished first in the North Division of the CCAA. The men's cross country team has won 12 straight conference titles, and the women have won 10. The men's track and field team has won 10 straight conference titles and the women's have claimed four in a row. Both men's and women's basketball teams reached the NCAA tournament last year. The men's golf team finished last year ranked 24th in the nation. The baseball team has made it to the conference tournament 14 of the last 15 years. Chico State is not lacking in athletic success. It is, however, lacking the support it deserves. There's no reason that Chico State can't experience the electric atmosphere large football teams enjoy at any of the Wildcats' games, matches or meets. A game is a game no matter where it is played, and you might be surprised how smaller venues like Acker Gym and Nettleton Stadium enhance your experience as a fan. Consider yourself cured and go support your ‘Cats.

Chico State is not lacking in athletic success. It is, however, lacking the support it deserves.

Staff Writer

A new semester calls for a new, heavy workload. Some students have no issue being assigned 50-plus pages to read a night. However, others definitely feel the stress when they are involved in other activities that require a significant amount of their time. They may partake in many different activities such as clubs, work, sports or Greek life. This means that many of them are forced to manage their time wisely in order to balance school and their social lives. It’s no surprise that young adults, particularly college students, have been categorized as the “skimming generation.” Students want to get everything done while figuring out some way to speed up the process. While it is unrealistic to ask professors to reduce the amount of content they are assigning to read, we do have the option to read quicker while still attempting to absorb all the necessary material. Skimming can be an effective method of understanding content, if done correctly. Finding out how long an assignment is and how much time is available could give students insight regarding how of much of their time will be spent on the assignment. Titles, major headings and sub-headings are all placed in the text for a reason, so paying more attention to them before looking any further could give a better idea of what the reading is about. I find it easiest to read the first and last paragraphs of articles to see if there is a significant connection or point that is brought

@matthewcharlesz on Twitter.

up in both the beginning and the end of any article. After I read both paragraphs, I then highlight any words that stand out to me or are being repeated. Taking notes is one of the biggest aids to anyone who likes to skim. I find it nearly impossible for me to remember any of the material I read unless I take notes. The note taking comes in handy when professors assign questions about the reading material. Some students find it useful to look at the assigned or chapter review questions before they read, so that they can highlight any key words that may answer questions while they’re skimming. Skimming can also benefit those who choose to thoroughly read the material. Once a person skims, they are already that much more knowledgeable about the material before actually diving in and reading the “correct” way. Readers may be thinking, “Why waste our time reading when we can skim through everything?” It is important to note that skimming is not a substitution for reading, and it is necessary to read as much as possible for all of your courses. Even if it feels as if the assignment is never-ending, just remember that in the end, all of the extra time reading will be worth the grade. If skimming teaches students how to take better notes, understand the material and look for details in the readings that they never did before, then being a part of the “skimming generation” doesn’t sound so bad.

Skimming can be an effective method of understanding content, if done correctly.

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

TALKING POINTS

Photograph by Frances Mansour Spin, Cycle Andy Goldman, a junior legal studies major, puts the front tire back on a bike at the bike cart.

University Police and the Associated Students Bike Cart have teamed up. Officers may give bicyclists riding without a light a voucher, redeemable at the cart or local bike shops, for a free one instead of a ticket. Hopefully this measure brings awareness to the issue of bike safety. See A2 .

Matt Murphy can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

Skimming simplifies studies Veronica De La Cruz

Thumbs down to a lack of parking spots for students. Why pay for a parking permit if you have to drive around to find a meter?

Veronica De La Cruz can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com or

Photograph COURTESY OF zennie62 via Flickr Sore Winner Richard Sherman celbrates the Seattle Seahawks’ win over the San Fransico 49ers.

The rant heard ‘round the Twittersphere. Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman’s 20-second post game interview is controversial in more ways than one. It didn’t just start conversations about football, it ignited discussions about race. It’s not okay to call a Stanford graduate a “thug” because he is a black man who was loud and excited after a game saving play. Nicholas Woodard weighs in the sports section. See B2.

STUDY BREAK

Photograph by JHSounds via Wikimedia Play On Music group Daft Punk took home four Grammys at this year’s awards show Sunday in Los Angeles.

Daft Punk, Pharrell Williams and Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were up all night to get lucky in Los Angeles on Jan. 26 at the 56th annual Grammy Awards. Daft Punk took home four Grammys including: Record of the Year, Album of the Year, Best Dance/Electronica Album and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance with Pharell Williams and Nile Rodgers. If Daft Punk fans weren’t already ecstatic about the many wins, the group performed their winning track “Get Lucky” with the legendary Stevie Wonder joining Williams and Rodgers on vocals. Macklemore and Ryan Lewis also took home four Grammys including: Best New Artist, Best Rap Performance, Best Rap Song and Best Rap Album. To top it off, 17-year-old New Zealand native Lorde won two Grammys, Best Pop Solo Performance and Song of the Year, for “Royals.” She’s one to watch out for at next years Grammys.

@theorion_news on Twitter.

• Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

-compiled by Nicole Santos • The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.


A8 |

WedneSday, Jan. 29, 2013

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Now Leasing for 2014-15

College Living at its Best!

Spacious 3-4 Bedroom Townhomes Fun Resident Events Tours Daily

530-893-2049 1521 NORD AVENUE CHICO, CA

www.NordGardens.com Fun. Community. Friends.

DEVIL’S DUE [R] (1:00) (3:15) (5:30) 7:45 10:10 JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECUIT [PG-13] (11:50) (2:30) (5:10) 7:50 10:25 RIDE ALONG [PG-13] (12:30) (2:55) (5:25) 8:00 10:30 THE NUT JOB 3D [PG] (2:20) 7:05 THE NUT JOB [PG] (12:00) 7:05 LONE SURIVIOR [R] (11:00) (1:50) (4:40) 7:30 10:30 THE LEGEND OF HERCULES 3D [PG-13] (2:40) (5:05) 7:35 THE LEGEND OF HERCULES [PG-13] (12:15) 10:00 AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY [R] (1:15) (4:10) 7:00 9:45 THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (2013) [R] (3:45) 10:20 THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (2013) [R] (1:30) 8:00 ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES [PG-13] (10:45) 5:15 HER [R] (1:20) 4:15 7:15 10:10 AMERICAN HUSTLE [R] (12:45) (4:05) 7:10 10:15 SAVING MR. BANKS [PG-13] (10:45) (1:35) 4:30 7:20 10:20 THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG 3D [PG-13] 6:55 THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG [PG-13] (12:25) FROZEN (2013) [PG] (11:05) (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 9:40 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE [PG-13] (12:20) 7:05 GRAVITY 3D [PG-13] (3:55) 10:25

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Love the ‘cats?

Wildcat of the Week: fast forward

We do too! Can’t make a game? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Follow @theorion_sports on Twitter.

Senior forward McKenzie Dalthorp comes up big for ‘Cats basketball.

see page B2

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WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29, 2014

Chico State’s Independent Student News Source since 1975

The Orion ∤ Photograph by Kasey Judge

Former football players tackle rugby, proving that athleticism works for any sport. Ryan Grady

Staff Writer

F

ootball and rugby are both aggressive, high-energy and intense sports. It’s no surprise former football players seem to make an impression on the rugby field. For three Chico State Wildcats, the transition from football to rugby took some time, but has been successful. Juniors J.W. Davis, an agricultural business major, Brandon Johnson, an exercise physiology major and Ian McLens, a criminal justice major, had successful football careers in high school. Davis was a high school standout, receiving an AllEmpire award as a wide receiver. Johnson was named his league’s defensive MVP. McLens had successful seasons playing as a middle linebacker. Now the three former football players have taken on rugby. Davis plays center, Johnson plays lock and McLens plays flanker on the Chico State rugby team. One aspect of the game that took some adjustment was the passing of the ball. Unlike football, the ball is passed backwards. “I was not used to every pass having to go backwards,” Davis said. “I was finding myself in front of the play a lot of times.” Rugby differs from football, primarily because it is commonly found to be a faster sport. Athletes need to be in top shape to keep up with the quickness of the game. “The pace was a big change for me,” Johnson said. “There are no pauses or breaks in rugby. It takes time to adjust to the fluidity of the game.” While picking up a new sport might pose challenges, certain aspects may come naturally to some. Most athletes maintain traits that help them succeed in multiple sports. “I really loved being introduced to the same physicality that football brings,” Johnson said. “My experience from football really paid off when it came to form tackling.”

While both sports are extremely physical, rugby requires more critical thinking and strategy to take control of the field. “I find myself relaxed on the rugby field,” Davis said. “There are no set plays so you have to just seek the gaps in the defense as they come.” Some pick up a new sport for passion or interest in the game. For Davis, word of mouth led him to playing rugby. “I was just talked into it,” Davis said. “I had older cousins who played for a club team in Colusa tell me that it is a great sport to get into.” For Johnson, it was a different story. Getting involved on campus was one of his goals. “I can remember checking out all kinds of clubs that Chico State had to offer, like Greek life,” Johnson said. “I was very interested until Ian talked me into trying out rugby.” McLens always knew he wanted to play rugby. He said he was attracted to the sport for years because of the physicality. “I love the hitting in rugby,” McLens said. “Physical is my kind of game.” Davis, Johnson and McLens each said they were glad they made the transition from football to rugby. Going into their third season with the club, they have found themselves successful both as individuals and as a team. Last year, the Wildcats rugby team went 12-0 and landed themselves in the top 10 teams in the nation. Besides the skills that these players learned from football, the camaraderie they have developed has been a big part of the team’s success. “I am extremely close with all of the guys on this team,” Davis said. “They quickly turn from your teammates to your brothers.” Ryan Grady can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com or

@RyanGrady23 on Twitter.

Pass Back Juniors Ian McLens, flanker, and Brandon Johnson, lock, work on passes.

Tackling the terms of rugby:

Field that rugby is played on. Pass that is made with high risk of injury to the receiver. Blocking the opposing team from possession after a teammate is tackled.

Chico State alumni dash to Olympics After running in the Chevron Houston Marathon, two Wildcat alumni qualify for the 2016 U.S. Olympic marathon trials

eligibility at the collegiate level. “I was so in love with the sport and felt I was Staff Writer not done,” Gray said. “I had unfinished business Two Wildcat alumni will be heading to the 2016 and wanted to see it through.” Both women give a great amount of credit Olympic marathon trials after they scored top-10 for their success to their time running at Chico finishes at the USA half marathon trials. State under head Alia Gray and Kara coach Gary Towne. Lubieniecki, team“Gary is nothing mates and best friends less than a genius since meeting in 2007 when it comes to runon the Chico State ning and training campus, finished people,” Lubieniecki ninth and 10th respecsaid. “He doesn’t tively, at the Chevron push you too hard Houston Marathon and he knows how to Jan. 19. Both runners build you.” broke the 74 minute Alia Gray “He is a huge part mark on the 13.1 mile Former Chico State cross-country runner in where I am athlettrack. ically today,” Gray “It was a breaksaid. through race for both The long distance Kara and I,” Gray training program implemented by Towne has said. Although they have been teammates since helped Gray and Lubieniecki when competing in 2007, the two have not competed in many races longer races. “We train in the aerobic strength aspect of together. They pushed each other in the race, running for distance,” Towne said. “The workqualifying for the Olympic B standard for the outs we do lend well to the marathon distances.” marathon. Both Lubieniecki and Gray now live and train “It was a special day,” Lubieniecki said. “We raced our own races and helped each other, in Boulder, Colo., running with the Hudson Training Systems elite team, under coach Brad which is really rare.” The former ‘Cats qualified for the U.S. Olympic Hudson. “It’s a great place to train and the community trials in the half marathon, but they will be comis great for post-collegiate athletes trying to peting in the 26.2 mile full marathon. They will be trying to represent the United States in the make a name for themselves,” Lubieniecki said. 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Photographs courtesy of gary towne Gray, a three-time All-American and school Greg Silvia can be reached at fast break Kara Lubieniecki, left, and Alia Gray, right, participate in the 2013 Payton record-holder in the 10K, believes she has unfin- gsilvia@theorion.com or Jordan Invitational 10k, top. Gray and Lubieniecki lead the pack of runners, bottom. ished business with the sport after her years of @gsilvia on Twitter. Greg Silvia

I had unfinished business and wanted to see it through.


B2 |

WILDCAT of the

sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

WedneSday, Jan. 29, 2014

commentary

’Cat Bites: Upholding a reputation in sports media

WEEK

Nick Woodard

Assistant Sports Editor Angry, boastful and disrespectful in more ways than one. No, this isn’t your average thug. This is Seattle Seahawks cornerback and the new lightning rod of sports media, Richard Sherman. By now, most people have seen or at least heard about his antics during the postgame interview from Sunday’s NFC championship game against the San Francisco 49ers. Before you skip the rest of this column, take shelter in the fact that I’m not here to feed you my opinion on how terrible of a person Sherman is. In fact, I think Sherman’s tirade serves as some-

thing positive — a guide on what not to do when confronted by sports media. Athletes, take note. What the Seattle star did is the exact opposite of how you should act around the media. First, let me say that I understand trash-talking. I understand the emotions that come with playing your heart out and I understand getting fired up about the win. But athletes need to have some semblance of composure during the game — irate screaming about nonsense is unacceptable. Take this to heart, Wildcats, because the last thing you want to do is paint a poor picture of yourself with the media. The media’s job is to portray you to the public, and when you act poorly around them, you will undoubtedly develop a bad reputation among the public. There’s a reason no one talks about the picture

Don’t blow up in the middle of an interview.

McKenzie Dalthorp Senior Forward

nwoodard@theorion.com or @nwoodard25 on Twitter.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

WEEKEND PERFORMANCE

WEEKEND PERFORMANCE

The Chico State men’s basketball team went on the road and split a pair of games this past week, beginning with a 67-64 loss at Cal Poly Pomona Thursday and concluding with a 82-70 win over Humboldt State Saturday. In Thursday’s game, Sean Park scored 24 points and had five rebounds, and Rashad Parker added 13 points and seven boards. Jordan Semple also contributed 10 points and six rebounds. In Saturday’s matchup, Parker led the way with 28 points to help the Wildcats snap a twogame losing streak. Semple had 15 points and 10 rebounds, and Park added 15 points of his own. Chico State’s record stands 8-4 in the conference and 12-4 overall. The ’Cats will play the next four at home, starting at 7:30 p.m. Friday against Sonoma State.

The Chico State women’s basketball team had a perfect road trip this past week, first getting past Cal Poly Pomona 85-73 Thursday, then capping off the week with a 69-66 triumph over Humboldt State Saturday. Against Pomona, six players scored in double figures with Jazmine Miller’s 17 points and six assists leading the Wildcats. Against Humboldt, Miller scored 19 points, McKenzie Dalthorp had 16 points and Annie Ward hit the goahead 3-pointer with 26 seconds left to cap a huge comeback for Chico State. The Wildcats, standing 7-5 in the conference and 11-5 overall, will ride a three-game winning streak into the game game against Sonoma State starting at 5:30 p.m. this Friday in Acker Gym.

1-1 2-0

Chico State

mckenzie dalthorp Sport: Basketball Class: Senior Major: Legal studies

The Oregon native played a key role during the Wildcats’ two victories. Dalthorp scored 14 points in the win against Cal Poly Pomona and topped that by scoring 16 points in the triumph against Humboldt State. She will look to dominate again in Friday’s matchup against Sonoma State.

W ildcats The Orion ∤ FILE PHOTO

74

Nick Woodard can be reached at

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

The Orion ∤ file photo

STAT ’CAT

of Sherman hugging Fox News Channel reporter Erin Andrews after the game. It’s because losing his mind with a reporter on live television is the bigger story. Please, don’t let that be you. Also, it should be noted that I personally have never had any issues when conducting interviews with Wildcat athletes. Every ’Cat I’ve had the pleasure of talking to has been just that — a pleasure. Just let this be a reminder of what not to do with the media. Journalists may bug you from time to time, it’s just their job. They may try to get a word in at the wrong times, but stay calm. Leave those emotions on the field. Don’t blow up in the middle of an interview. Don’t earn an ugly reputation with the public. Don’t be Richard Sherman.

DRIVE TO SCORE Senior pointguard Courtney Hamilton drives the ball to the basket during a winning game against Cal State L.A. at Acker Gym.

-Compiled by Nick Woodard

MORE ON THEORION.com/sports Read full coverage of these games and events online.

Standings

(WOMEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY) Chico State alumni Alia Gray and Kara Lubieniecki broke the 74 minute mark during the Chevron Houston Marathon on Jan. 19 to qualify for the 2016 Olympic marathon trials.

30

(WOMEN’S BASKETBALL) Senior forward McKenzie Dalthorp scored a combined 30 points during the Wildcats’ road trip.

28

(MEN’S BASKETBALL) Senior guard Rashad Parker scored a gamehigh 28 points against Humboldt State on Saturday.

11

(WOMEN’S BASKETBALL) The Wildcats scored a season-high 11 3-pointers in Thursday’s victory against Cal Poly Pomona.

Men’s BASKEtBALL

women’s BASKETBALL

CCAA

Overall

1. Cal State San Bernardino

12– 0

15 – 1

1. Cal Poly Pomona

2. Cal Poly Pomona

11 – 1

13 – 3

3. Chico State

8–4

4. Cal State Stanislaus

CCAA

Overall

10 – 2

13 – 3

2. Cal State East Bay

9–3

12 – 7

12 – 4

3. Cal State Dominguez Hills

8–4

12 – 4

7–5

11 – 5

4. UC San Diego

8–4

11 – 5

5. Cal State L.A.

7–5

10 – 6

5. Chico State

7–5

11 – 5

6. San Francisco State

7–5

9–6

6. Cal State L.A.

7–5

10 – 6

7. UC San Diego

5–7

9–7

7. Cal State Stanislaus

7–5

10 – 6

8. Cal State Monterey Bay

4–8

6–9

8. San Francisco State

6–6

10 – 8

9. Cal State East Bay

4–8

7 – 11

9. Humboldt State

5–7

8–8

10. Humboldt State

3–9

8 – 10

10. Cal State San Bernardino

3–9

4 – 11

11. Cal State Dominguez Hills

2 – 10

5 – 14

11. Cal State Monterey Bay

1 – 11

4 – 11

12. Sonoma State

2 – 10

3 – 13

12. Sonoma State

1 – 11

2 – 14

Men’s basketball baseball

Friday, Jan. 31 7:30 p.m.

vs.

WOMen’s basketball men’s golf

Friday, Jan. 31 5:30 p.m.

vs.

Sonoma State

Sonoma State

Chico

Chico

baseball Men’s Track AND Field

Saturday, Feb. 1 11:00 a.m., 1:30 p.m.

vs.

Women’ssoftball Track AND Field

Saturday, Feb. 1 - Sunday, Feb. 2

@

Fresno Pacific

Best of the west tournament

Chico

Turlock


SPORTS

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| B3

WedneSday, Jan. 29, 2014

Australian golfer hits birdies in the city of trees had no idea what I would be experiencing,” Flitcroft said. “Coach Brown defiStaff Writer nitely helped by talking me into getting out here to play for the team.” A cool, calm and collected athlete out Flitcroft has only spent one season of Sydney returns to the Wildcat golf with the Wildcats so far, but he is alteam for the upcoming season. Will Flitcroft, a 23-year-old sopho- ready considered one of the team’s bigmore accounting major, was born and gest returning assets. Needless to say, the first season was raised in Australia. With early aspirations of coming to America, Flitcroft set to be a big challenge for the Australian native. Not only did he have to get was drawn to Chico State to attend used to being in a new country, he had school and play golf. Flitcroft has always been an athlete. to get used to the elements of his new He was required to play a sport as a surroundings when playing . “The courses high school student here are a lot in Sydney, so he rougher so your chose to participate play has to be a in rugby, cricket and lot more techhis favorite pastime nical,” Flitcroft — golf. said. “It isn’t as Flitcroft said he windy here as it is enjoys the challenges Will Flitcroft in Sydney so you and frustration that Sophomore men’s golfer also have to acgolf brings, but is alcount for that and ways striving to betplay differently ter himself. After spending two years at Mac- than you would out there.” As a freshman, Flitcroft had a 73.36 quarie University in Sydney, he decided stroke average which ranked seventh to enroll at Chico State, where he joined the Wildcat golf team. Moving from in the nation among his class. He also had three top-five finishes and five topSydney to Chico was quite a change for him, especially since he had no family 20 finishes in events throughout the season. With numbers like these, it's obor friends here. “I always knew I was going to come vious he knows how to handle pressure. “At the beginning of the year I got off to America at some point and I tried to come here with an open mind since I to a bad start,” Flitcroft said. “Once I Lee Masten

I would like to win at least one event.

The Orion ∤ Photograph by Lee masten

hole-in-one Will Flitcroft, a sophomore accounting major, will return for his second season on the Chico State men’s golf team.

got more comfortable, I was able to settle down and I did a lot better at the end of the season.” Coming into the 2014 season, Flitcroft said he has higher expectations for himself. “I would like to win at least one event,” he said. “I got close a couple times last year but this time I want to get first.” Maybe it’s the laid-back demeanor from Sydney, but Flitcroft does not allow the amount of adversity he has faced bother him. His numbers make him a big asset to the Wildcats and expectations are high coming into the season. “Another big thing I would like to do is get into nationals either as an individual or with the entire team,” he said. “I think we have a good chance to go far this year because of how much talent and experience we have coming back.” Flitcroft has welcomed the change of scenery and enjoys his time at Chico as a student athlete. “I will always remember Chico and be grateful for the time I spent here,” Flitcroft said. “It has been a great experience so far and I have made a lot of friends, not only with my teammates, but with others as well.” Lee Masten can be reached at

sportseditor@theorion.com or @lee23masten on Twitter.

Softball brings veterans back to the playing field Angelo Boscacci

Staff Writer

Last season’s Chico State softball team sported an overall record of 24-24, going 14-6 at home and 8-10 on the road. But that doesn’t tell the whole story. That team lost 11 seniors and added eight freshmen. Most of those freshmen started. “We were very young, but we got one win out of the postseason,” said head coach Angel Shamblin. “It was a great accomplishment for us.” This season, the team will look for a complete turnaround. Only eight new players made the team to fill out its 20-woman roster, making this season’s team more experienced. “We are looking to build on every aspect of the program from last year,” Shamblin said.

Experience will be the key for this year’s team. “Alex Molina was a junior last year, but she was a transfer so it was her first year in our conference,” Shamblin said. “I think having that experience under our belt will help us out a lot.” Molina, a senior starting pitcher, will look to build upon a solid first year in which she went 13-8 with an ERA of 2.54. “Last season I started pretty strong, but toward the end I got into some bad habits,” Molina said. Molina will look to use her experience as a senior to kick those habits. “Personally, I want to get more strikeouts and have a bigger part in our defense,” she said. This year, Shamblin said the Wildcats will rely on how well the team is crafted and balanced.

“We are pretty well-balanced as a team,” Shamblin said. “We have some people that can hit, some people that are fast. Pitchers are throwing really well and our roster is deep.” Shamblin said the key to a successful season is taking a one-day-at-a-time approach. “We are staying in the present moment,” Shamblin said. “We don’t focus on future outcomes. It’s about what we need to do today to get that one percent better than we were yesterday.” The Chico State Wildcats softball team kick off the season Feb. 1 for the Best of the West tournament in Turlock. However, the team will have to wait until Feb. 21 for their first home game. Angelo Boscacci can be reached at The Orion ∤ Photograph by Angelo boscacci

sportseditor@theorion.com or @theorion_sports on Twitter.

throwing heat Senior pitcher Alex Molina will start for the ’Cats when the season starts Feb. 1.

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CAMPUS EVENTS TODAY 2014 Chico Cultural Collaboration Reception

@ Bell Memorial Union 3:30-5 p.m. Network while enjoying food, prizes and entertainment. photograph COURTESY OF Chico state

Saturday

Haus Party EDM Showcase @ Bell Memorial Union 7-11:30 p.m.

Union Label kicks off its spring concert series.

Su n day

The Substance Sequence Tour Feat. A Lot Like Birds, Sianvar

@ 1078 Gallery 7-11 p.m.

Post-hardcore band from Sacramento seamlessly plays from rock to punk.

Thursday

Chico Performances Presents Tommy Emmanuel with Martin Taylor

@ Laxson Auditorium 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Friday

Chico Jazz Collective @ Down Lo 8 p.m.

Enjoy a soulful evening out.

Acoustic finger-picking paired with good humor.

Mon day

Bidwell Mansion Tour @ Bidwell Mansion 12-5 p.m.

Come tour Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park, the three-story Victorian house museum.

T u e sday

Sierra Nevada Brewery Tour

@ Sierra Nevada Brewery 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Learn about the history of the brewing company and get an inside look at Sierra Nevada’s brewhouse, grounds and packaging facilities.


B4 |

WedneSday, jan. 29, 2014

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Light it up This week the Craft Cat shows us how to make a glitzy crystal candle case.

The NEBULA B7 FOOD COLUMN B7 SEX COLUMN B7

theorion.com

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Chico State’s Independent Student News Source since 1975

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29, 2014

The Orion ∤ PHOTOgraphs by Monica Fitch

CHICO’S The Orion ∤ Photograph by Risa Johnson

The Orion ∤ Photograph by Emily teague

All Natural Tree-lined streets draw more residents to town, top left. Bidwell Park reflects the natural beauty of Chico, top right and bottom left. Apples from the Saturday Chico Farmers Market offer fresh flavor to supporters of Butte County’s local agriculture industry, bottom right.

Beauty and brains put Chico on Sunset magazine’s list of best places to live and work in 2014. Dominique Diaz

Staff Writer Chico is listed in Sunset magazine’s “24 Best Places to Live and Work” and is a runner-up in the “Best Place to Reboot Your Life” list for 2014. Chico receives these honors, in part, because of its handsome downtown filled with unique shops and restaurants, the farmers markets and Bidwell Park. “I feel that Bidwell Park helps define Chico because it is very unique in its history and physical features,” said Yajaira Cruz, a sophomore social work major. “If Chico didn’t have Bidwell it would be another small college town.” Josh Stewart, an adjunct political science professor, is from the Bay Area. Living there is more fast-paced and he assumed the entire state of California was like that. However, after visiting Chico, he

was proven wrong. the destinations chosen, according to the “Chico is a small town community, one article. where everyone is welcome, regardless “We’re a piece of an overall puzzle in the of what class or background you’re community,” said Jon Gregory, managing from,” Stewart director for said. “I think I n n o v a t e the farmers North State. market kind of “You don’t illustrates that. have to be in No other place LA or San can you have a Francisco farmers market to start a Josh Stewart like that where company.” Adjunct political science professor everybody S t e w a r t comes out and agrees that supports it.” Chico is among Chico’s willingness to accept new and the top 24 places to live, but he doesn’t upcoming businesses is another reason agree with it being one of the best places the town made Sunset’s list. Support to work. from groups such as Innovate North “Everything that I have been told is that State, a company working to develop local you can only get a job in this town if you businesses, apparently played a role in know someone, and you can only get a job

You can actually walk down the street and people say ‘hi’ to you.

that doesn’t pay very well,” Stewart said. “Most people end up leaving to pursue careers somewhere else but wishing in the back of their head they could still live in Chico.” Although it’s a little college town, Chico has a lot to offer to both students and other residents. Low crime rates, developing businesses and many forms of entertainment are all leading people to choose to live and work here. “You can actually walk down the street and people say ‘hi’ to you,” Stewart said. “You don’t have to worry about leaving your books on the table and having them stolen, which is a thing that you have to worry about in the Bay Area.” Dominique Diaz can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com or

@dominiquelaura on Twitter.


B6 |

WedneSday, jan. 29, 2014

Pantry program feeds students

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FEATURES

food can submit a referral form at Room 110 in Kendall Hall or at the Accessibility ReStaff Writer source Center, which located at Room 170 in The Hungry Wildcats Food Pantry is the Student Services Center. available for students who don’t have seApplicants read and sign a form confirmcure access to food. ing they are enrolled in Chico State this seThe program was in the works for two mester, and swear to only take the food if years before it officially began operating they really need it. at the start of the fall 2013 semester. Chico The program is confidential and based on State is the first school in the California an honor system, so students can provide State University system to create a protheir student ID number in place of their gram that offers free food to students in name when signing it. Students can visit need. the food pantry as many times as they need. Most of the donations come from student The program also promotes health and involvement. Students can donate using wellness, Gilmore said. food bins on campus or at various stu“If they’re also struggling with other dent-run food drives. health issues or something that the coun“So far we haven’t had to buy any food seling center or financial aid or any of the because the community, both staff and facother departments that are under our diviulty, have been so welcoming and generous sion can help with, we’ll see if they need toward this program,” said Kathleen Mo- any other help than just that,” he said. roney, assistant to the associate vice presThose who would like to contribute to ident of student affairs. “Our main goal the program can also make cash donations as an administhat the program tration is that we uses to buy spewant students to cific items. be successful. We “Sometimes really do.” we need proDonated food tein,” Moroney is kept in a pansaid. “Sometry located in the times we need Student Services snack foods. Michelle Rodriguez Center. Students Some students Junior, child development are provided with don’t have time a reusable bag to to cook and need hold donated food. snacks during The program also receives part of its do- the day.” nations through local partnerships with The coordinators carefully monitor the organizations like the Jesus Center. The pantry to ensure that they don’t run out of center often has more food than it can use, a specific type of food. so it gives to the Hungry Wildcats program. “We notice a shortage of a certain need Since last semester, the program has because the pantry is divided by food prodbeen able to help more than 20 students. ucts,” Gilmore said. “So if we’re looking low “They’re grateful and humble,” said Jo- on one shelf, we know to get more of that.” seph Gilmore, a junior anthropology major. Michelle Rodriguez, a junior child devel“It’s nice taking them over there. They’re opment major, believes that students will really happy that they can benefit from the greatly benefit from this program. program.” “Some students do not have enough Some students are hesitant about using money to buy food because they have to pay the resource. for tuition, bills and other things,” Rodri“They’re shy to take too much and they guez said. “I honestly think that having a want to save food for the other students, program like this will make students feel but we say ‘take it, take it, fill the bag,’” Molike the school cares about our health.” roney. “We’ve got great students here.” There are no criteria that students need Dominique Diaz can be reached at to meet in order to qualify for the program. featureseditor@theorion.com or @dominiqueldiaz on Twitter. Students who have a genuine need for the Dominique Diaz

I honestly think that having a program like this will make students feel like the school cares about our health.

The Orion ∤ Photograph by Frances Mansour

Brass from the past In spite of being pulled from the bottom of the sea, the collection of navigation tools on display at the Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology are still in great shape.

Sunken ship showcased studies. “I had the top of an inkwell and paper weights and nested weights. What was Staff Writer interesting to me was that they were selling A new student organized exhibit has 40 sets of weights but the weights were inaclanded at the Valene L. Smith Museum of curate.” Anthropology. Other graduate students worked on the The grand opening of “Into the Blue: Mar- Bob Benner collection. itime Navigation and the Archaeology of “I especially like the incorporation of nauShipwrecks” was held at the museum Thurs- tical equipment in terms of what you’re supday. Artifacts from the Frolic, a ship that posed to use and ideally navigate with, and sunk in 1850, and Bob Benner’s world-class hypothetically if you use it incorrectly you collection of historical navigation instru- would crash,” said Liam Townsend, a firstments are on display. year graduate student in the museum studies The exhibit is the work of a long research program. project by Thomas Layton and Georgia Fox. Benner, a two-time war veteran, is a nautiThe Frolic sank off the coast of Mendocino cal and navigation enthusiast. while transporting tons of cargo from China “I like the craftsmanship of the brass induring the gold rush. struments,” Benner said. “I was going to be Graduate students a weatherman as specializing in mua kid and along seum studies worked came World War II from August through and disrupted that December 2013 to set track so I still have up the exhibit. a lot of weather “The whole expeinstruments like Bob Benner rience of putting barometers and Nautical instruments Collector together an exhibit recording instrufrom the ground up ments, and they’re was really fun, like all brass.” seeing the whole thing come together,” said The exhibit is open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Heather Martin, a first-year graduate stuTuesday through Saturday until July 24. The dent of museum studies. museum is located in the Meriam Library Some students are eager to set up exhibcomplex next to the Janet Turner Print Galits for other museums after getting involved lery and admission is free. with “Into the Blue.” “I mostly focused on everyday stuff like Laura Hass can be reached at writing correspondents,” said Bella Quijano, featureseditor@theorion.com or a first-year graduate student in museum @laurahass1 on Twitter. Laura Hass

I like the craftsmanship of the brass instruments.

New class to groom next generations’ entrepreneurs ber of colleagues who have done similar ment professor and city council member. Peter Straus, director of the Center for things to what Judy and I did.” If students want to see whether or not they Entrepreneurship, applauds both students Staff Writer Sitton is not the only one excited about have the chops for technological startups, and lecturers for being able to get up and With all the praise Chico has his new class. or startups in general, into class at such an early time. gotten for being a great place to Matthew Shouse, a sethey must be willing to “Here in the College of Busilive and work, it’s no surprise nior applied computer wake up before dawn. ness and the Center for Entreprethat the small town is also an graphics major, is unThe class meets at 6 neurship, we are very pleased to ideal environment to start a small sure about what he will a.m. every Tuesday and see the idea of entrepreneurship business. This is a city where learn from the class, but Thursday in the O’Conspread across campus,” Straus you can learn if you have what it knows it will be internell Technology Center. said in a statement addressing takes to start and run a company. esting. With such an early the new class. Gary Sitton, computer science “People are always class time, one might Chico isn’t just one of the best Gary Matthew Peter professor emeritus, was tempted asking questions,” assume it may be hard places to live and work, it’s beSitton Shouse Straus to design a class so students Computer science Shouse said. “It seems to get a group of uncoming somewhere small busiSenior applied Director of would not only learn from him, like a great opportunity computer graphics dergrads and graduate nesses can thrive. professor the Center for major Entrepreneurship but from others who climbed up to meet these people students to be attentive the startup business ladder. Sitand network.” and responsive, but Prin Mayowa can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com or ton and his wife, Judy, started and sold The class will feature insights from busi- Shouse would disagree. @PrinSupreme on Twitter. their own company, Bi-Tech. nesspeople like Ken Grossman, the CEO “It’s worth it,” Shouse said. “Sure I feel MORE ON THEORION.com Watch students “It’s an experiment,” Sitton said. “Over and president of Sierra Nevada Brewing like my mom, going to bed at 9 or 10, but I create a video game in a 48-hour worldthe years I have accumulated quite a numCo. and Sean Morgan, a business manageget so much done now.” wide competition. Prin Mayowa

WORKING WILDCAT: Five tips to stand out to get called back

Ariel Hernandez

Staff Writer The Chico job market is saturated with thousands of college students and only a handful of businesses. If you don’t know why you’re not receiving a callback after submitting dozens of applications, you aren’t alone. It could be from stiff competition, but it might be from common mistakes that many applicants make. Here are five tips to improve the chances of getting a call back:

1. Dress the part One mistake many people make is dressing too casually and making an unprofessional first impression. Whether it’s picking up an application, dropping off a resume or checking up on your application, the way you present yourself matters. You should always dress as if you are about to walk into an interview. Jeans and a nice top are acceptable if they are the only things accessible to you, but dress pants and a button-down shirt are ideal.

2. Job search alone Another common mistake applicants make

is turning job hunting into a group effort. Searching for a job should be something you do alone. Danielle Acosta, co-manager at Bath and Body Works, experiences this frequently with applicants. “You wouldn’t believe how common it is for them to come in with their friends,” Acosta said. “It’s not a good first impression, and it’s not professional.”

3. Make a memorable first impression It’s important to realize that you may only get one chance to set yourself apart from the other job-hungry students with resumes piled high on the manager’s desk. Clifford Kunkel, assistant manager at Trucker, said that the first 30 seconds of meeting someone lets him know if they will be successful there. “When an applicant shakes my hand, introduces themselves and gives me a 15-second run-down, it’s impressive,” Kunkel said. “The biggest mistake an applicant makes is coming in and acting like a robot.”

4. Don’t get hung up on your faults A lot of minimum wage jobs don’t expect applicants to have a lot of experience, so don’t be afraid to apply. Experience isn’t the only thing that matters to an employer. “We look for personable and outgoing peo-

ple,” said Kunkel. “If they have a good attitude and outgoing personality, it makes experience less important.” Confidence is important in a job search. Make sure to highlight your strengths, not your weaknesses.

5. Get your resume in the right hands It’s not always easy to get in touch with a manager, but you should always try. Doing this matches a face to your resume and makes a great first impression. If someone before you talked with the manager in person and you didn’t, they’re already a step

ahead of you. When you go in, ask for the manager, even if you’re just picking up an application. One of the biggest struggles for Chico State students is finding a job, so why not improve your chances? It’s time to dust off your dress pants, work on a firm handshake, show some confidence and go find a job. Ariel Hernandez can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com or

@aj7uriel on Twitter.


FEATURES

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WedneSday, jan.29, 2014

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READERS, DIGEST: Sodium-savvy Super Bowl nachos Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 6 Ingredients: • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts • 1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper • 1 medium onion, diced • 1 medium tomato, diced • 1 bag (11 ounces) tortilla chips • 1 avocado, diced • 1 tablespoon lime juice • 2 cups shredded cheese

Christina Saschin

Food Columnist Super Bowl Sunday is approaching quickly. If you’re throwing a Super Bowl party and don’t know what to make, try this recipe for grilled chicken nachos. These nachos are easy to make and healthier than other snacks like chicken wings. For example, one serving of these grilled chicken nachos contains about 56 milligrams of sodium. If you were to eat the same amount of chicken wings, you would be consuming 511 milligrams of sodium. To put things in perspective, the Recommended Dietary Allowance for sodium is no more than 2,300 milligrams per day for healthy adults, making this a smart choice for a snack. The Orion ∤ Photograph by Christina Saschin

winning plate These simple nachos are sure to satisfy hungry football fans, whether they’re prepared as a celebratory snack or comfort food after a tough loss.

Christina Saschin can be reached at

featureseditor@theorion.com or @Stina127 on Twitter.

Steps: 1. In a medium-sized frying pan, cook the chicken in olive oil and season with lemon pepper. 2. When cool, shred the chicken into smaller pieces. 3. Next, dice the onion, tomato and avocado. 4. In a medium-sized frying pan, sautee the onions until they are golden brown, then add the diced tomatoes. 5. Arrange chips onto a platter and top with the sauteed onion and tomato, shredded chicken, diced avocado, lime juice and shredded cheese.

THE O-FACE: Argument for erotica

Michael Karp

Sex Columnist Gonzo, BDSM, anal, amateur and voyeur. These are categories of pornography, and I’m going to explain why men, even those who are in relationships like me, watch it. Sometimes the reasons men are drawn to porn perplexes even us. However, we don’t masturbate solely to porn, as our imaginations can be equally useful. In 2006, the porn industry raked in nearly $13 billion. WebMD states that 26 percent of male Internet users visit adult websites, while only 3 percent of women go to these sites. I used to be an excessive porn user, watching it two to three times a day. My friends may

have even called me a connoisseur. I have since given up the habit, but my overwhelming sex drive during puberty could not have been satiated any other way. However, even writing about it makes me want to whip out the old YouPorn again. Wondering why some people seem to spend so much time with porn? Here are some likely reasons:

sure is the greatest thing ever.

To learn some new moves in the bedroom Porn is the only reason I had any idea of what to do between the sheets my first time. One could call it studying.

I used to be an excessive porn user, watching it two to three times a day. My friends may have even called me a connoisseur.

To blow off steam, pun intended After a hard day’s work, a stressful test or an exhausting trip, some scented candles, a couple pornos and a session of selfish plea-

Haven’t gotten laid in a while

Everyone has been there. After hitting a dry spell, some decide to give themselves a little momentary satisfaction. In these cases, a 20-minute date with Palmela Handerson may be in order.

While relatively harmless, there is a darker side of porn use and the implications it can have on these users. Excessive porn use can lead to sexual anxiety or addiction, inability to perform and distorted mental images of what sex and beauty really are. With a large amount of porn in someone’s life, standards for sex rise to unreasonable levels. Many of us are naturally drawn to porn and there is such thing as a healthy level of porn usage. It starts to have negative effects on our sex lives when the fantasies get too farfetched and the amount of masturbation with porn gets out of hand. Michael Karp can reached at

sexcolumnist@theorion.com or @_MichaelKarp on Twitter.

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ANSWERS FOR THE CROSSWORD AND SUDOKU ARE AVAILABLE ON THEORION.COM


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The Orion Vol. 72, Issue 2