Page 1

Chico State’s Independen t S t u de n t Ne w spa pe r , since 1975

Construction plans for Chico State to start as soon as next year >> A5

Wednesday December 15, 2010 Volume 65 Issue 16 1 free copy per person additional copies 50¢

CONSUMER ALERT>>

Louder than words Cameras in Q&A WITH A.S. PRESIDENT AMRO JAYOUSI >> A4

SPORTS >> B2, B4

Around the horn

bars under investigation by police Jeb Draper VIDEO EDITOR

Wildcat baseball, softball prepare for next season

ENTERTAINMENT >> C2

Moonlighting musicians Newcomers Steve French use members from La Fin du Monde and The Shimmies

THE ORION • JEB DRAPER

POLITICAL ART Journalism major and former Orion editor Kevin Hagedorn [left] and A.S. President Amro Jayousi [right] protest the Afghanistan war by recreating “The Saigon Execution” Thursday at Trinity Commons.

Course fees system confusing Walter Ford

FEATURES >> D D11

The reaso Th reasons for s the season Learn the Le custom customs and tradit traditions of three winter ho holidays

STAFF WRITER

The seven colleges on campus are preparing proposals to claim their share of $200,000 available to aid classroom learning, but confusion surrounding the process has some at a disadvantage. Students pay additional fees of $26 and $20 to cover the cost of the newly implemented consolidated course fee and student learning fee since the beginning of this semester.

The $26 fee went to cover miscellaneous course fees from all of the colleges, said Michael Ward, dean of the College of Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Management. That money has already been distributed to the seven colleges based on average course fees from the past three years. The $20 fee goes into the student learning fee that is available for anything related to classroom learning, he said. This is where it gets a little confusing.

“This could be for a projector, special lab materials, field trips, things that enhance student learning, but it can’t be used to pay faculty or staff,” Ward said. It can also be used for new hardware and software available to students and to fund student assistants, according to a Campus Fee Advisory Committee memorandum. Proposals for the money are due to the provost by Friday, said Joel Zimbelman, dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts,

ONLINE >> theorion.com

Toxicology report released Chico State student Jesse Kohen died Oct. 19 in a car accident. He had been driving under the influence.

INDEX >>

THE ORION • ELI MAY

Weather

A2

Police Blotter

A6

The Webz

A4

Opinion

A8

Sports

B1

Quieter streets in January

Entertainment

C1

Calendar

C7

Heidi Parodi

Classifieds / Games

B5

Features

D1

DON’T TURN DOWN THE MUSIC Michael “Mike G” Griffith [left] expresses disapproval on the pedicab music ordinance, which he said will negatively affect his business.

High 53 Low 33° a.m. showers

STAFF WRITER

The beats of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” grew louder and louder as a sound-amplified pedicab moved closer to a group of Chico State students on 10th and Chestnut streets. People started dancing and screaming as the music got louder. “I love the music — it keeps the crowds coming by,” said Dwayne Edwards, president of the Tau Gamma Theta fraternity. But starting Jan. 6, music levels will be turned down. The Chico City Council voted 4-3 Dec. 7 on an ordinance that requires all pedicab drivers to lower music levels as a way to

adhere to California Vehicle Code 27007. The code states vehicles must not have music loud enough to be heard beyond a 50-foot radius, according to the California Department of Motor Vehicles’ website. “We’re not trying to remove the music, we’re not trying to end it, and we’re not trying to stop the pedicabs,” said Chico Police Chief Mike Maloney. “We’re just trying to bring a reasonable degree of control to the volume of the music by setting a standard that is consistent with the vehicle code.” The vehicle code wasn’t applied to bicycles before, he said. “It will be the end of

G-Ride,” Mike Griffith said, owner of his own pedicab dubbed G-Ride. Griffith is known for blasting different kinds of music while riding around town. “Music is the majority of my business,” he said. “I won’t be able to support myself without that.” Some Chico State students enjoy the music Griffith plays, such as Felicia Axtell, a senior communications major. “I love him,” she said. “I think the music makes it really fun.” Police noted bicycles were not given citations after Griffith refused to pay tickets he had received, Maloney said. There was no ordinance

in a phone interview. There will be about 25 proposals asking for a total of $100,000 coming from his college, Zimbelman said. The expectation is an allotment of about $30,000. “We don’t really know how this works,” he said. “It’s new to everyone.” The system needs more clarity and tightening, said Terry Curtis, associate dean of the College of Communication and Education. “For whatever reason it >> please see FEES | A6 against playing loud music then. “There are a number of bicycles and pedicabs that have music that can be heard audibly from the bicycle,” he said. Griffith wasn’t the only one noticeably affected by the ordinance, even though he is the only pedicab rider with a sound system. Dmitri Jeziorski, a fan of Chico’s annual summer Bicycle Musical Festival, did not want the ordinance passed. “I heard the ordinance and I said, ‘Hey, let’s not ruin the festival,’” Jeziorski said. The festival allows people to ride different kinds of bicycles and play music from special sound systems very loudly, he said. Now the music cannot be shown off. A few downtown restaurants appreciate the music played by Griffith. “He helps me out with business,” said Taylor McCarthy, owner of the Beach Hut Deli on West Second Street. Aurora Granskog, coowner of Aca Taco on West Second Street, is also appreciative of the music. “I love the music and so does my husband, and he’s 65,” she said. Griffith plans on talking to his attorney and doing something about the ordinance. Heidi Parodi can be reached at hparodi@theorion.com

A security camera hidden in a hollow smoke detector was removed from a bathroom at a popular student bar. Chico Police responded to Panama Bar and Cafe on East Second Street after a customer said he had witnessed an employee viewing a screen showing live video of the interior of a restroom Dec. 4, said Chico Police Sgt. Rob Merrifield in a press release. A search by officers confirmed there was one camera located in Panama’s patio bathroom. Another camera was also found in the men’s restroom of The University Bar, Merrifield said. The camera is mounted behind a mirror over the sink area and views patrons entering and leaving, said Robert Mowry, owner of both bars. This camera does not view into the restroom and points to a place that is openly accessible to the public. Both cameras were installed for security reasons and to reduce vandalism, Mowry said. Mowry thinks The University Bar’s camera has been effective and he does not plan on taking it down unless he is asked to do so, he said. Panama’s camera was strategically positioned toward a mirror in such a way to show the least amount of the toilet and urinal area as possible. However, a partial view was unavoidable, he said. The camera’s position was not considered to be offensive, said Josh Coker, a manager at Panama’s. “You couldn’t actually see anyone peeing,” he said. The employee who the witness claimed was viewing the video was in an area not open to the public, Coker said. While the system does have a monitor, live video feed is temporarily stored onto a hard drive within a password-protected server, Mowry said. The footage, which records over itself every 24 hours, can only be accessed by Mowry and selected employees. The bathroom footage would only be reviewed if vandalism were discovered, he said. Regardless of who could view the video, recording activities inside a restroom is an invasion of privacy and should not be tolerated, said Dan Browne, a senior construction management major. “It’s disgusting and gross,” Browne said. “There are certain areas that are meant to be private.” The only video from the Panama camera that currently exists is about two hours of footage that police requested, Mowry said. After viewing a clip, officers determined that people using the facilities could be seen in compromising way, said Merrifield >> please see BAR | A7


A2 |

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

Campus Clips

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Weather >>

always online >> theorion.com

Forecast features highs/lows in degrees Fahrenheit source: weather.com

Today

Thurs

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tues

53/33° partly tl cloudy

552/39° mostly tl sunny

448/45° rain

448/45° showers h

51/45° showers h

51/42° rain

54/45° showers h

World News >>

World News compiled by The Orion’s Esmeralda F. Ramirez

London, England — WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange turned himself in to London policemen in

Memberships for Gateway Museum now available >> Museum membership packages are now available for the Gateway Science Museum for the holiday season. Memberships to the museum include unlimited free general admission, discounts on special programs, invitations to members-only events and more. Hours of operation are noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For more information, please visit gatewayscience.org or call 530-898-4121.

response to allegations that he forcefully had sexual relations on three occasions with two women. Michoacan,

Assange has not

Mexico —

been charged with any

Nazario “El Chayo”

crimes.

Moreno Gonzalez, also

Source: cnn.com

known as “El Doctor,” was shot and killed after a two-day shootout between Mexican officials. Alexandria, Egypt —

Moreno Gonzalez was a top

Strong storms destroyed

leader in the “La Familia Michoa-

buildings in Egypt, causing

cana” drug cartel. The cartel formed in 2000 and has terrorized

roofs to collapse. Six people were

Michoacan communities through

pulled out of a fallen factory by

murder, kidnapping and drug traf-

rescue workers, even though some

ficking.

people remain missing.

Xian, China — A 2,400-year-old pot of soup was unearthed near Xian by Chinese archaeologists. The pot

Source: bbc.co.uk

Source: cnn.com

was found during an excavation for an airport extension. The pot contained liquid and bones. Source: bbc.co.uk

Source: Student Announcements

Motivational speaker to lift spirits in workforce e >> Motivational speaker and comedian Steve Rizzo zo will be at Chico State at 9 a.m. today at the Bell Memorial Union. Rizzo will be speaking to staff, faculty ulty and student employees to help them enjoy the workplace. Rizzo’s workshop shop helps those involved to be happier in the workplace e and in life through comedy. dy. He is known as the “attitude adjuster” for the he work he does in making those he speaks to be happier and more involved ed in their occupations. Thiss event is being put on by the University Staff Development Program and is free for faculty, staff and student employees. To register, go to the University Staff Development website.

THE ORION • JEB DRAPER

PETS FOR CHRISTMAS Annabelle Ann [center, right], an 11-year-old rat terrier, is adopted by Heiley Medrano, a 16-year-old Chico High School student, and her family Saturday at the Butte Humane Society. The shelter’s goal is to have at least 125 pets adopted by Dec. 31.

Shelter gives animals ‘home for holidays’

Source: University Staff Development

Julia Vazquez STAFF WRITER

S

adoption process to make sure both the new home and the animal are compatible, Wells said. “We are looking for a forever home for our animals, so we make sure to counsel adopters during the process and make sure they are able to take care of the animal for the next 10 to 15 years as well as provide for their needs,” she said. People’s perception of shelter animals is that they are undesirable, which is incorrect, said Tiffany Mathews, a senior at Chico State

and a volunteer for Butte Humane Society. “A lot of the animals at the shelter are there because people move and can’t bring their pets, not because they are not wanted,” she said. Most of the time the dogs and cats at the shelter have already been socialized and make very good companions for people, Mathews said. “It would be nice for the animals to have a warm home for the holidays,” she said. Julia Vazquez can be reached at jvazquez@theorion.com

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The Orion staff strives for accuracy in all it publishes. We recognize that mistakes will sometimes occur, but we treat every error very seriously. If you feel a correction needs to be made, please e-mail the managing editor at managingeditor@theorion.com

adopters the flexibility to name a price that fits their specific budget.” The main goal is to get animals adopted so more can come in, he said. On average, 194 animals are brought into the shelter every month, said Lori Wells, communication and outreach associate for Butte Humane Society. Adopters also get a free veterinarian visit, one month of health insurance and contact with staff as people make the transition with their new pet, she said. There is also an

ONLINE

[Corrections]

Editor In Chief

DESIGN

Source: aschico.com/wrec

Depending on the type of animal, Butte Humane Society can accommodate about 200 to 300 animals, Alexander said. “We get a fair amount of pure breeds and our mixed breeds are just as important,” he said. The adoption fee for a cat is $45, the fee for a dog is $75 and puppies are $150, Alexander said. All adopted pets come spayed or neutered, microchipped and vaccinated. “Right now we are doing a cat adoption special called ‘Name your price,’” Wells said. “We want to give

C h i c o S tat e’s I n d e p e n d e n t S t u d e n t N e w s pa p e r , s i n c e 1975 EDITORIAL

>> Students staying in Chico during the winter break will have the opportunity to go to the Wildcat Recreation Center and exercise. Group exercise sessions will be available, but the schedule is yet to be determined. The following is a glimpse at winter hours: Dec. 20 to 23: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Dec. 24 to 25 will be closed; Dec. 26: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Dec. 27 to 30: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Dec. 31 to Jan. 1 will be closed.

EDITORIAL

WREC will remain open during holiday break

tudents are not the only ones going home this holiday season. Animals will too, with the help of people looking to adopt. Butte Humane Society, located at 2579 Fair St., is hosting its annual “Take us home for the holidays” campaign, which began Dec. 1 and will run through Dec. 31. The goal is to have 125 animals adopted by the end of the month, said Dustin Alexander, data and development

coordinator for Butte Humane Society. Since the campaign started, 46 animals have been adopted. “It’s going pretty good so far,” he said. “But to give you an idea, during the summer, 33 adoptions is actually one day’s worth on a Saturday.” The shelter will try to adopt out any animal that was in the shelter before December, Alexander said. There is a big push during the winter and the holiday season because adoption numbers tend to decrease, he said.

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Jane Dempsey Asst. Business Manager

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Ad Sales Representatives

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Keaton Bass Simon Bunker

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A4 |

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

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>> The Webz _

National News

Previews to this week's blogs.

tuesday

CZECH TO CHICO

Disclosure bill reassessed after Palin speech at CSU >> The California College Disclosure Bill is being reintroduced for consideration by Jerry Brown in response to disputes concerning the concealment of what Cal State Stanislaus paid Sarah Palin to speak at a fundraising event. The bill was created when students demanded to know how much the university was spending on Palinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract. Under public pressure, a judge ordered the CSU Stanislaus Foundation to disclose the full amount paid to Palin. Source: The Sacramento Bee

California News BP to pay those aďŹ&#x20AC;ected by spill if agreed not to sue >> British Petroleum created a $20 billion fund in the wake of the Gulf Coast spill to compensate the many people and businesses adversely aďŹ&#x20AC;ected by the spill. Kenneth Feinberg, the administrator of the fund, is oďŹ&#x20AC;ering people and companies who had their applications accepted for emergency payments a signing bonus of $5,000 to $25,000 in exchange for not suing the company. This second phase of the ďŹ nal payment is set up for people who intend to settle out of court for a determined amount. By settling for this lump sum, those aďŹ&#x20AC;ected give up their right to sue BP at any point in the future. This is contrary to what Feinberg said in the past where victims could apply for emergency quarterly payments with no restrictions on whether they could sue BP later. Source: The New York Times

By Thomas Lawrence

Q&A with Amro Jayousi THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ JEB DRAPER

RECREATING AN IMAGE Kevin Hagedorn and Amro Jayousi are â&#x20AC;&#x153;elements in a picture,â&#x20AC;? allowing passers-by to make what they want of it.

Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note Amro Jayousi, A.S. president, and Kevin Hagedorn, former video editor for The Orion, participated in a silent protest from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday in Trinity Commons. As students, we all have

to wear different hats at different times. But members of The Orion cannot afford to be involved in a political spectacle. It compromises the ability to cover an event objectively, thereby making staff members unable to report the news.

Esmeralda F. Ramirez NEWS EDITOR

Q: Can you tell me about Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s silent protest at Trinity Commons? A: Well, ďŹ rst of all, I just want to make clear before we move on that this protest was independent from my activities as student oďŹ&#x192;cer. It has nothing to do with me being A.S. president. We see the protest more of a political display or political theater. And what we wanted to convey is a statement about the Afghanistan war. We wanted to convey that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wrong, that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unethical and that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bad war. The phrase that we used was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s war is a crimeâ&#x20AC;? for a few reasons. Obama has that charisma, that ability, to not appear as George W. Bush. You just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make that connection. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting at. Q: What were studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; responses as they passed by? A: We got mixed responses. A lot of students yelled, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just shoot him already.â&#x20AC;? That was a common response. Some were mad that the sign said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s war is a crimeâ&#x20AC;? rather than â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Afghanistan war.â&#x20AC;? Some students walked up and oďŹ&#x20AC;ered support. Some students asked if we wanted food or drinks and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We appreciate you doing this.â&#x20AC;? Q: Do you think you went too far with the gun-pointing eďŹ&#x20AC;ect? A: This is not a setup we came up with. We were recreating â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Saigon Executionâ&#x20AC;? image during the Vietnam War. Maybe only a handful made that connection.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve talked with Hagedorn, the man with the gun in the photo, and he is aware The Orion has to separate itself from political activism. However, we all have to do what we think is right, and political awareness is

Do we think we went too far? No. We knew this was right at the borderline, but it ďŹ ts in with the style of guerrilla political art that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to do. Q: What did it physically feel like to be out there for 3.5 hours? It was pretty cold. A: It felt nothing as bad as the people in Afghanistan feel. Q: Because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re A.S. president, what you do on campus represents students. What do you have to say about that? A: Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much more to me than just a student oďŹ&#x192;cer. I mean, I struggle with that constantly. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a human being who has political views and political convictions that I want to express. I hope people recognize the distinction between myself as A.S. president and my role in this oďŹ&#x192;ce. I try to be fair to each student in whatever issue that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re bringing independent from my political convictions. Q: Does the A.S. have any rules or regulations against your responsibilities as president and your personal opinions? A: The closest to that would probably be conďŹ&#x201A;ict of interest, which prevents you from acting on anything inside the A.S. that would beneďŹ t your interests outside the A.S. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing, though, that limits this kind of activity. In fact, a lot of A.S. presidents in the past have been active on issues. Q: What do you have to say to those students that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree with your political views, but still feel you represent them as A.S. president? A: I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne. Me and Kevin always struggle on how much information to put

important to him. Hagedorn and The Orion have decided to part ways on good terms. See A8 for the opinions of the editorial board on this issue.

By Christina Rafael

out there. I mean, we ended up putting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s war is a crimeâ&#x20AC;? but we struggled. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to let people make of the image what they want to make, rather than really telling them a message. We never put any fact sheets or maps or statistics. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just elements in a picture and we want the viewer to do the work, to make what they want of it. For the people that disagree with it, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne. Depending on what kind of disagreement, we can argue on political grounds. Q: How did Kevin get involved? A: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve known Kevin for a long time. We were part of the Palestine Solidarity Committee and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done a lot of activities together. We share a lot in common when it comes to the style of political activism, the aesthetic look and the thought behind it. Q: How does it feel to be a political activist, student and student oďŹ&#x192;cer at the same time? A: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tough position. In fact, when I was going back and forth on whether I should run for A.S. president or not, I had to reconcile with my political activities on campus and my role as A.S. president. And only if I answered, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How am I going to be able to reconcile these two things?â&#x20AC;? was I able to run for president. That was the biggest obstacle. Often times I think about this being my last year in college, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really going to regret not using this time to express myself. And most of the activism really comes from an urge to be active. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really resist it, to be honest.

newseditor@theorion.com

wednesday

WEEKLY JUICE

Matt Shilts can be reached at editorinchief@theorion.com

Esmeralda F. Ramirez can be reached at

â&#x2013;  Few things are more gratifying than slinging a few things in the car, or in my case, into a backpack, and going on a trip. Whether it be a day hike or a multi-week international trip, the element of spontaneity is rich and exciting. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned the pitfalls of traveling more loosely, both financially and otherwise. I have some tips that only a trip to Europe could teach me. czechtochico.wordpress.com

â&#x2013;  Sometimes I feel like a man. I was recently engulfed in a new book, and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but relate to the antagonists. One woman was confused because her ex-boyfriend would randomly call her and ask how things were going for her. Guilty. Maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a result of a new generation of women today, but I feel I encompass the stereotypical â&#x20AC;&#x153;man roleâ&#x20AC;? in the majority of my relationships. weeklyjuice.wordpress.com

thursday

CHARMS OF CHICO By Rebecca Hucker

â&#x2013;  Powellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sweet Shoppe lets students find their favorite candies without having to drive across town. Students can finally get that perfect Christmas gift for friends or family and also satisfy their own sweet tooth. The store is famous for its gelato ice cream, which comes in a variety of flavors that appeal to people who want to try something new or prefer sticking to old favorites. charmsofchico.wordpress.com

friday

GOOD EATS By Nick Pike

â&#x2013;  So to wrap up the semester for finding the best spots to eat in Chico, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to end it with my most revered cuisine of all â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sushi. Since my mother introduced the Japanese phenomenon to me at the age of 8 I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been able to get enough of it. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always said if I had to choose one food to eat the rest of my life, sushi would be it. chicocollegedining.wordpress.com

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A5

Construction plans to improve Chico State Stephanie Consiglio STAFF WRITER

New additions and renovations are coming to the Chico State campus in the upcoming years. Plans are being made to put in an art and humanities building along with a new parking structure, said Joe Wills, director of public affairs and publications. Some of the funding for the building project comes from bonds voters approved in the past state election, Wills said. The $2.8 million came from the state budget signed in October and will be used for the design aspect of the building. A future bond measure will

be needed to fund the rest of the construction phase, Wills said. “No one knows when another bond measure will happen for higher education,” he said. “There could be a bond measure next year, but it’s hard to say.” This could be because there is a lot of uncertainty with the state government, such as having a new governor and dealing with budget cuts, Wills said. Students will have better opportunities to check out performing arts majors thanks to the building, said senior kinesiology major Bradley Martinez. The building will enhance the performing arts department and give students in those majors more to utilize.

“I’ve been in Taylor Hall a few times and it seems old and outdated,” he said. “The new building will offer more for students.” A new parking structure is another factor to the importance of the arts and humanities building for two reasons, Wills said. It will allow for more parking for visitors who come to campus events and as well as relocate the University Police Department to a better area. “The logical and best choice is in the proposed new parking structure,” said Lori Hoffman, vice president for business and finance in an e-mail interview. “It would be more central, visible and effective for providing

security and service.” The current trailers will be removed with planned renovations to West First Street, she said. The new parking structure will include offices and 320 parking spots, increasing the total spaces on campus to 2,076, Wills said. “This number is still a very low number given the 18,000 people on campus,” he said. “That ratio is the lowest in the CSU system.” The parking structure is a good idea because parking is a big issue in the downtown area, Martinez said. “The traffic close to campus is terrible right now, so this will

make traffic better and make it easier to find more parking spots,” he said. Seventy-five percent of the money will come from state lease revenue bonds that will be repaid through parking revenue, such as parking meters and parking permits, Wills said. The rest of the funding will come from leftover money from the building project, money for energy saving projects and existing money in the business and finance department, he said. When the building, currently known as “Taylor II,” is closer to being built the university will make special arrangements during

construction to move students, faculty and staff to a new location, Wills said. There are no specific locations chosen at this time, however. Plans to renovate West First Street and Trinity Commons are in the preliminary stages, Hoff man said. Funding comes from a partnership with Associated Students and non-state campus funds, she said. Chico State will also continue to add bike racks, lockers for bikes, safe pedestrian walkways and free public transit, she said. Stephanie Consiglio can be reached at sconsiglio@theorion.com

West First Street “Taylor II”

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• Cost — $54.4 million • Location — Replacing Taylor Hall • Features — New classrooms, offices, art studios, a 200-seat multi-use theater and a new recording studio. • Dates — Starting as early as 2013, construction could last two years and four months

• Cost — $2 million (part of the Trinity Commons fund) • Location — West First Street • Features — Bike lanes and walkway • Dates — Summer 2011

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Kendall Hall Taylor Hall

Trinity Commons

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• Cost — $2 million • Location — Trinity Commons • Features — Renovation of area • Dates — Fall 2011

Parking Structure • Cost — $14 million • Location — Corner of Normal Avenue and West Second Street. • Features — University Police offices, 10 solar panel units for electric cars, 320 more parking spots • Dates — Starting construction in January 2012 and will be completed in December 2012

PAC

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MAP COURESY OF GOOGLE MAPS • DESIGN BY LIAM TURNER


A6 |

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

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always online >> theorion.com

Consolidation of fees breakdown School years All accused of violating the law are innocent until proven guilty | Information cited directly from Chico Police Department Thursday, 9:47 a.m.: Drunk in public reported at 700 block of East Fifth Avenue. “Subject on Arbutus between Fifth and Seventh going through garbage cans, yelling at passers-by.”

When reporting party drove by subject hit his head with the sword.” Friday, 12:22 a.m.: Suspicious subject reported at 5000 block of West Sixth Street. “Male subject found laying in roommate’s bed. Subject unknown to the residents. Reporting party now saying that he was covered in blankets and they couldn’t actually tell who he was but nobody had permission to be there.” Friday, 2:50 a.m.: Suspicious subject reporting at 1000 block of Mulberry Street. “Subject going from window to window knocking, for past three hours.”

Thursday, 2:07 p.m.: Indecent exposure reported at Wildwood Avenue. “Male subject running around the kids’ playground area, with no pants on.” Thursday, 4:32 p.m.: Subject disturbing the peace reported at 300 block of Main Street. “Male subject throwing rocks at vehicles.” Thursday, 6:24 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported at Taco Bell on 2000 block of Esplanade. “Black male adult in the lot trying to sell at least $3,000 in gold for $300. Subject caught reporting party as he was entering the Taco Bell.”

Saturday, 12:12 a.m.: Drunk in public reported at 900 block of East Seventh Street. “Intoxicated female in reporting party’s yard. Female is on the phone yelling, laying on the sidewalk.” Saturday. 5:12 p.m.: Drunk in public reported at 1000 block of Esplanade. “Male subject out in front of business office, drinking quart of beer and yelling at passing people and vehicles.” Sunday, 3:38 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported at 300 block of West Eighth Street. “Subject is intoxicated. Subject was grabbing himself and cursing.” - Police Blotter compiled by Rudro Roy

Thursday, 8:09 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported at 100 block of West Lassen Avenue. “Male subject in long trench coat, appears to be juvenile 15 to 16 years old. Carrying a samurai sword.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHELSEA ROSS

Course fee Student learning Total fees/ year (fixed) fee (increases)

2010/2011

$26.00

$20.00

$46.00

2011/2012

$26.00

$28.00

$54.00

2012/2013

$26.00

$36.00

$62.00

2013/2014

$26.00

$44.00

$70.00

2014/2015

$26.00

$52.00

$78.00

2015/2016

$26.00

$60.00

$86.00

2016/2017

$26.00

$68.00

$94.00

2017/2018

$26.00

$76.00

$102.00

2018/2019

$26.00

$84.00

$110.00

2019/2020

$26.00

$92.00

$118.00

INFORMATION FROM PROPOSED CONSOLIDATED COURSE FEES

FEES: Colleges ask for funding continued from A1

was rolled out very rapidly,” he said. There is no precedence for these proposals, he said. Some have asked for outrageous amounts. The College of Communication and Education will be submitting nine proposals asking for $90,000 in funds, Curtis said. This is the first time student course fees are being joined together at Chico State and the process is still working out some of the kinks, Ward said. Each college has a primarily student-based committee that ranks the proposals and submits the rankings to the dean of that college for approval, he said. Then the dean sends the rankings to the provost for consideration.

Because the timeline for making this happen was so short, the ranking process was difficult, Interim Dean of the College of Natural Sciences Margaret Owens said in a phone interview. “How do you rank apples from oranges?” she said. “I’m sure things will be smoother next year.” The College of Natural Sciences will be submitting 15 proposals asking for $101,000. There is a committee on campus copmosed of the Associated Students government members, students, faculty and staff, Ward said. Campus Fee Advisory Committee, of which Ward is a member, sets the guidelines for what the student learning fee can be used for and also consults with the provost

when choosing the proposals that will receive funding, he said. The College of Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Management will be submitting 28 proposals that ask for a total of $296,000. With all the confusion that surrounds the process A.S. President and CFAC member Amro Jayousi wants to improve how the committee is structured in the future, he said. “This is a significant change on campus, and getting familiar with the process will take some time,” he said. “Unfortunately, right now only those who do understand the procedure are benefiting from it.” Walter Ford can be reached at wford@theorion.com

THE ORION • JEB DRAPER

BIKE SAFETY Library staff member Adele Conroy passes through the library’s breezeway, where the bike lockers are proposed to be at. [right] A fallen bicycle outside Plumas Hall.

Pilot program will determine bicycle locker necessity Lindsay Woychick STAFF WRITER

New bike lockers will be installed near Meriam Library’s entrance for students, faculty and staff to rent in spring 2011. The 12 enclosed lockers will be part of a pilot project to encourage alternative modes of transportation, said Lori Hoffman, vice president for business and finance in an e-mail interview. Each locker will cost $30 to rent for the semester, with an initial $50 key deposit. Each pre-constructed locker, made of partially recycled

material, was paid for by the parking revenue fund and will cost $1,200 each, Hoffman said. The parking revenue fund generates money from fines and forfeitures to be used for alternative transportation projects, according to a Chico State Fund Definitions document. Pedaling toward bike housing The plan was developed from a Transportation Demand Management Plan of Chico State in May 2009, University Police Lt. Robyn Hearne said. The study included recommendations

on how to provide alternative parking and more secure places for bikes on campus. Feedback and other surveys on feasibility and what students wanted were also collected, she said. “You have different people who have different needs and so the bike lockers are another aspect of bike parking that provide for a little more security,” Hearne said. Currently high-end bike owners may choose not to ride bikes because they aren’t insured on bike safety on campus, she said.

“This provides them with secure parking that would be better than having to bring bikes inside,” Hearne said. Giving your bike a safe home Installation of the bike lockers will begin in early January, said Suzy Littrell, cashiering supervisor for student financial services, in an e-mail interview. Students, faculty and staff will be able to rent the lockers for a semester at a time, she said. “Offering covered, secure bike parking is one more

program we are implementing to encourage as many of our campus community to ride to work and school,” she said. The success of the project will determine if future lockers are added, Hearne said. If all the lockers are rented, a waiting list will be created for possible expansion of the program. Ensuring bike safety at night would be a reason to use the bike lockers, said Chico State student Sarah Denton, a sophomore liberal studies major. “I think it’s a good idea for late night at the library so you don’t have to worry about

walking because you think your bike is going to be stolen,” she said. Other New Options New test bike racks will also be added on campus for the spring semester, Hearne said. They will serve as test racks and be located off West First Street. A.S. Sustainability will help coordinate the efforts, she said. Continuation of the differently styled racks will be based on usage and funding. Lindsay Woychick can be reached at lwoychick@theorion.com


Buy-back book prices

$10

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 |

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$20

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$40

$50

$60

$70

A7

$80

$42.90

$28.70

$34.97 $5.40 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Critical Thinkingâ&#x20AC;? Moore, 9th ed.

$5.00 $68.50

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ JEB DRAPER

$26.64

PANAMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Alumnus Todd Brown walks past Panama Bar and Cafe on West Second Street Monday. Chico State students make up about 80 percent of the barâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clientele, said owner Robert Mowry.

$28.50 $10

$20

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BAR: Investigation pending continued from A1

$49.20

NOT AVAILABLE

$49.00 $36.00 $53.95 $30.14 $45.00

â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Mixed Companyâ&#x20AC;? Rothwell, 7th ed. INFOGRAPH BY LAUREN STORNETTA

Used books ďŹ nd value in resales Rudro Roy STAFF WRITER

The end of the semester will bring one last ďŹ&#x201A;urry of students to the A.S. Bookstore before many depart for the winter. Even though buy-back for books began last week, the bookstore has been preparing well in advance. The A.S. Bookstore receives orders from professors on which books are being used the following semester, said Linda Riggins, textbook manager for the A.S. Bookstore. Riggins starts sending out e-mails to professors requesting book orders in October or November.

From this list, it is decided which books the store is going to buy back. A third-party company, Missouri Textbook Exchange, Inc., handles the buying of the books for the A.S. Bookstore, Riggins said. The bookstore gives the company a buying quota for certain books, and once that quote is ďŹ lled, the company buys the remaining books for itself at a much lower price. Senior Yosuke Maki, a business major with an emphasis in marketing, was not aware of another company buying books back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sometimes used to go there wondering why I get less than

$25 for a book I paid more than $100 for at the beginning of the semester,â&#x20AC;? Maki said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I mostly try to buy and sell my books online now.â&#x20AC;? One of the ďŹ rst considerations when choosing a new book for a class is the price, said Bruce Grelle, professor of religious studies. He tries to keep the total price of the books for his class under $100. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But they cost what they cost,â&#x20AC;? Grelle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really see anyone getting rich oďŹ&#x20AC; it. I think print publishing is really struggling for its own survival.â&#x20AC;? A more popular book is one for philosophy students called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Critical Thinking,â&#x20AC;? by Brook

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Noel Moore, Riggins said. The bookstore is buying a used copy of this book back for about $42.50, which is half the original price. Another popular book is â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Mixed Company,â&#x20AC;? by J. Dan is bought back at about $45, while the new copy will go for $59.95. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes editions may change and we may not use them anymore,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice that at least these books donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to waste and students get at least some money for them.â&#x20AC;? Rudro Roy can be reached at rroy@theorion.com

in a phone interview. Operating a hidden camera in a private restroom is a misdemeanor in California. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was pretty clear that people were unaware of the cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location,â&#x20AC;? MerriďŹ eld said. Mowry has used the cameras periodically in the past ďŹ ve years in attempt to reduce the activity of vandals, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have to protect my business,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153; I have to protect my customers.â&#x20AC;? Mirrors occasionally needed replacement two or three times a week, Mowry said. He began looking for alternative solutions to the problem, he said. Each mirror costs about $150 with installation . The constant struggle to keep restrooms free of damage is frustrating and has led to an error of judgment, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do see it is a problem,â&#x20AC;? Mowry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will never go back in.â&#x20AC;? Prior to the incident, a notice posted near the front entrance of Panama stated that there may be video surveillance throughout all areas of the business, both public and private, he said. The notice has since been removed. The surveillance systems are in place to provide safety,

Mowry said. Cesilia Fernandez, a senior international relations and Spanish major, thinks most bars are victims to vandalism but the action of the owner is not justiďŹ ed, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think what everyone is kinda thinking right now is that they just totally violated everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re watching them in the bathroom,â&#x20AC;? she said. Fernandez has gone to Panamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the past but is waiting on the results of the investigation to decide if she will return, she said. Whether or not the incident will have an eďŹ&#x20AC;ect on business is still unclear, Mowry said. Coker admits the initial thought of having a camera in a bathroom might be bad and thinks there will undoubtedly be some degree of impact, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything will aďŹ&#x20AC;ect your business, word of mouth more than anything else,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. After the Detective Bureau concludes their investigation, the case will be handed over to the Butte County District Attorney to decide if the case should go further in the judicial system, MerriďŹ eld said. Jeb Draper can be reached at videoeditor@theorion.com


always online >> theorion.com | WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

A8 |

[ Editorials ]

Message lost in spectacle news organization. You can find the reasoning behind the A.S. president’s decision in a question and answer interview between Jayousi and News Editor Esmeralda Ramirez on A4. Jayousi plainly stated that his participation here is distinct from his duties as an A.S. officer. That is perfectly fine. He even goes as far as to make it explicit that this was not his idea but something he went along with — stating that he was going to do something anyway. Jayousi may very well thinks that he did his best to separate his identities before marching into this public exhibition but what Jayousi doesn’t seem to understand is that this is something he has no control over. As the leader of the student body, Jayousi’s actions are a direct reflection of Chico State. An elected official represents his constituency. It doesn’t get simpler than that. For our A.S. president to participate in self-described “guerilla political art” to purposefully provoke his fellow students is objectionable at best. Jayousi’s involvement on campus has been something of a key component for Chico State’s political atmosphere for some time now. Now that he has reached the highest student office, it’s time for his Shakespearein-the-park politics to take on a face that is more reflective of the student body instead of deciding for us which issues are worthy of discussion. If Jayousi did this last semester or a year ago or even the day before the votes were tallied, we would be fine with it. Now that he’s our A.S. president, he must realize that he is the students’ leader and voice.

A.S. president and resident political pot stirrer Amro Jayousi stood silently with a green toy gun to his head Thursday and represented the entire student body. His political outcries and sensational activism have come to characterize Jayousi’s residency here at Chico State and probably helped win him the election. However, now that he is in charge of perhaps the most public office our university has to offer, it is not unreasonable for those he represents to expect a little separation of politics and personal beliefs. For those not in attendance for the public display of dissension, the protest we are referencing included Jayousi and a former Orion editorial board member standing on chairs surrounded by yellow tape. Jayousi was dressed mimicking an Afghan citizen. Former Video Editor for The Orion Kevin Hagedorn stood, wearing a U.S. military uniform, holding a toy gun to the A.S. officer’s head while standing in front of a sign reading “Obama’s War is a Crime.” Subject matter aside, the very idea of these two Chico State gatekeepers being not only involved but the executors of this demonstration has us tuning out the message. Events such as these, especially when put on by our A.S. president, interfere with the immediate and important reason for having them in the first place, just as having a member of The Orion involved automatically compromises our ability to cover it. The Orion does not support journalists creating news or putting ourselves in the center of important issues because this threatens the credibility of our coverage and our voice as a

Unspoken appreciation for the students. Chico Dance Theater offers an entertainment aspect to campus that allows students participate as well. This student group has not only helped entertain the Chico community but has broadened the Theater Arts department by providing a musical theater dance minor. It is always important to highlight the work that student ethnic organizations do on and for the campus. By exposing Chico State to an educational and often entertaining glimpse into Hmong culture, the Hmong Student Association is an asset to the student body. There are countless organizations we would like to support in this editorial but we just don’t have the space to do so. To every organization that supports the students as they toil in the name of education, we say thank you and we hope to work with you more in the coming semesters.

Sometimes there just isn’t enough room for everyone. Now that the end of the semester has come, it is time to recognize those organizations whose names weren’t always so present in our coverage. The Campus Wellness Center provides an important but often over-looked service to the student body — stress relief — especially around finals time. Their work isn’t limited to the last two weeks in the semester, however. All year long, it provides students with self-help resources, creative programs and special events to help fight off the biting stress of university life. A.S. LIVE! helps take minds off class or work by loading each semester with both free and paid events specifically chosen with Chico State students in mind. From speed dating to afternoon concerts, the low cost events that come through this organization are working

Editorial Board Sports Editor

Video Editor

Managing Editor

Entertainment Editor

Online Editor

News Editor

Features Editor

Chief Copy Editor

Almendra Carpizo Esmeralda Ramirez Opinion Editor

Joanna Hass

Thomas Lawrence Earl Parsons

Ally Dukkers Photo Editor

Samantha Youngman

Jeb Draper Gerardo Rocha Anthony Siino Art Director

Liam Turner

The opinion editor can be reached at

opinioneditor@theorion.com

Biracial heritage brings completion, awareness Serena Cervantes OPINION COLUMNIST

At 23, I am more conscious of myself as more than one -dimensional. Perhaps being biracial is a prism of sorts that is multidimensional and colorful. Although it may look crystal clear to some as to what race or language or class you belong in, more insight serves as a light that shines through someone, exposing the richness of his or her magnitude. The only way to fully grasp your own cultural dimensions is to learn about all cultures you find yourself within. Perhaps cultures are overlapping your sense of self and crisscrossing thresholds create new cultures of their own — like the way in which red and blue make purple or how yellow and blue make green and so on. Going off to college is a culture of itself. Education pulls you away from the environment of your home which is also a culture of privacy, safety and intimacy. It is through the institution of education that

our public sense of self begins to form. Now we must question how our private selves of home culture will be significant in the public culture of the university. When my brother Adam went off to attend Chico State before me, he would come back to visit and he was a different person. He was more Americanized because of education and somehow this made his identity as a cultural minority more pronounced. When I finally came to join him in Chico I saw how set apart he was within the whole institution of college life. Culturally, he was distinguished like my father’s accented English was distinguishable among bland American English. In the way that a Spanish tongue turns English to have a rather twangy pronouncement of words, Adam’s self-evidence of Americanization was only a tracing of his dominant inner core where ethnicity remained at a stasis. Now that I am at the university, I feel the difference of myself as I walk into classrooms filled with students who have European last names. I feel the distinction of my name as it is

cut into a harsh “s” when the professor calls on me to take attendance, “Sir-eena Sir-vanteese?” Hearing my name being called in its Americanized form creates a longing in me to search further for my ethnicity. I long to know more about the history behind the severe, Arabic-looking Mexican who is my father. I long to know more about the European ancestry of my blue-eyed, pious mother. I ask myself if there is a politically correct way of embracing being biracial — should I have learned Spanish like my brother, do I deserve to be a scholarship student because of my ethnicity, am I white enough, did I not “claim” my Mexican heritage enough? Somehow, I think my brother always knew that education was the key to self-identity in spite of an environment that questioned everything about him. Theoretically, the institution asks, “Who are you?” Chico State would roll out a statistical report of Adam: male, between 21 and 25, Hispanic, from a family who makes less than $12,000 annually, nursing

major. What education serves to produce is a heightened awareness of one’s self because of the clashing of cultures people come from. My brother was not only a statistical readout when he received his education, but he had other elements added to his sense of self that created his rather unique composition. What the institution doesn’t read is that he is also gay, white-looking and speaks fluent Spanish. Adam would stand proud amidst the towering of institutions, amidst a culture of whiteness, amidst the very American Dream itself and say, “Who am I really? Maybe you can’t handle who I am. I am a person, humble and prideful. And I am never one -dimensional.” The institutions of the world are not what give you your dimensions but it is the education you’re willing to receive in order to find your sense of self that brings to life the brilliance of multiple facets. Serena Cervantes can be reached at scervantes@theorion.com

Realistic goals by doomsday deadline Nick Pike OPINION COLUMNIST

Start making your bucket lists everyone, it looks as though Y2K is making a comeback tour in 2012 and this time it’s serious. It’s taking a different approach altogether this time around — instead of the technological meltdown, we’re basing the Earth’s demise on the predictions of a Mayan culture from thousands of years ago. From painfully bad movies starring John Cusack to History Channel specials, the seed has been planted in America’s brain that our big spinning blueberry will be squashed in almost two years exactly. So being that this decade’s Armageddon hype is coming up pretty quickly we don’t have a huge amount of time to plan an extravagant bucket list and go hiking in the Himalayas or tour the pyramids with Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson. This got me to thinking about what could be a realistic bucket list for a Chico State students. I figure a good portion of us will still be in school or fresh out when meteors or aliens or adverse weather destroys our planet, so I wanted to keep this doable. A few things crossed my mind as possible for Chico students. • Start a massive food fight in the marketplace or throw a rager on campus with every single student and faculty member. • Maybe you can’t hike Everest or Kilimanjaro, but there’s always Shasta or Lassen right in our backyard. • Streaking through campus or holding a massive naked float down the river would be

pretty epic to do before you die. • You could find the most attractive person on campus and max out a credit card taking them on the most lavish date possible. • There’s always being in the library at sunset reading a random book for 15 minutes at a time until the sun comes up — you would have to lock yourself in being that the library closes at midnight. • You could pursue your sexual fantasies with multiple partners or in random places on campus — a tree, a professors’ desk or the library. The multitasker would make it a professor’s desk in their office, but I don’t think that’s too uncommon for some these days. • Learn a random European or Latin language and walk around in a thong all day trying to drum up conversations with people you don’t know. • Learn some form of exotic dance and use it at a packed bar while everyone is doing the typical “grinding.” • Go to Madison Bear Garden and eat every single burger on the menu in one day. The list goes on and the only thing hindering it is the imagination. But what if this apocalypse wasn’t really a load of crap? What if there is some validity to it? The big factor is the Mayan calendar that everyone is worried about. Mayans were able to develop the measure of time and were

Letters Editor

to the

Editor in Chief

Matt Shilts

Thumbs Up to the not-so-frigid cold this winter. It’s about time someone took Jack Frost down a few pegs.

Thumbs Down to the new Yogi Bear movie … and just Yogi Bear in general.

Thumbs Upto relieving your stress during finals week. Go pet a puppy and see if you still feel the need to have a mental breakdown.

The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER NEUMANN

proficient in astrology. Their calendar has predicted major events in the world accurately centuries before they occurred, such as wars and significant weather events. Come Dec. 21, 2012 the Mayan calendar ends, leading many to believe the world ends. However, many who have studied the Mayans say it is

just a beginning of a new period or awakening for our civilization which could be interpreted various ways. The only thing really happening is the solar system aligning itself with the Milky Way during the winter solstice which has happened seven times during the existence of man. So maybe something weird will happen and Chico will become a tropical oasis or be obliterated completely. Or maybe nothing will happen at all. Regardless, make yourself a bucket list for the remainder of your Chico days and act on it whether or not the world is ending — you won’t regret it. Nick Pike can be reached at npike@theorion.com

Read the guidelines below for information on how to submit your own Letters to the Editor • Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

• The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.


Thumbs Down to cumulative finals. We learned this stuff in September and forgot in October. You’re a little late.

Thumbs Up to selling back your books on your own. Don’t let someone else reap the benefits of blood, sweat and tears.

Thumbs Down to being too poor to celebrate the holidays. This year you’re getting the gift of my friendship.

Thumbs Up to the end of the semester. Insert your own reason here.

Thumbs Down to inconsistency in the NFL. You guys are killing my fantasy league and I can’t let my roommate win again.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 | always online >> theorion.com

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GUEST COMMENTARY >>

Leaks possibly neglected Bill Adams FORMER CHICO STATE PLUMBER

WikiLeaks provides free information Alexa Alexander Seymour O OPINION COLUMNIST

WikiLeaks may have introduced an ugly lump of coal into the world of diplomatic relations, but this coal can be used to energize a new trend, a trend that can free people from the leash that political and media corespondents lead people around. We trust our pundits to frame information for us. As entertainers, they don’t always do that job so well. Now, people everywhere are presented an opportunity that would normally require a security clearance. These 250,000 cables bring a chance for the general public to gain a better understanding of world events for themselves. Take the situation in North Korea for example — The RVbourn FamilyRadio evangelists going around campus aren’t the only ones who may think that the nuclear-armed “Hermit Kingdom’s” seemingly senseless and violent behavior may herald the end times. Political commentators from the major media sources such as Fox

News regularly refer to North Korean leader Kim Jong-il as unpredictable, crazy and overall one of the most dangerous people in the world. With the cable leaks, we get a rational explanation for North Korea’s behavior that doesn’t so easily lend to fear mongering. According to senior Chinese diplomat Wu Jianghao and communications between Chinese and American officials, the dying Kim Jong-il is creating a favorable atmosphere for his son to succeed him as ruler. “The rapid pace of provocative actions in North Korea was due to Kim Jong-il’s declining health and might be part of a gambit under which Kim Jong-il would escalate tensions with the United States so that his successor, presumably Kim Jong-un, could then step in and ease those tensions,” Jianghao wrote in a cable. No one in Southeast Asia wants a war, and Kim Jongun’s de-escalation would be met with cheers and a sigh of relief at home and abroad, solidifying his place as North Korea’s leader. He will need this support. The young Kim has shown ineptitude in the past, having a hand in the country’s catastrophic

currency devaluation. The cables suggest there are senior military officials and other family members scheming to take leadership after the elder Kim’s death. This doesn’t make Kim Jong-il’s corruption and cruelty toward his people any more tolerable, but at least it’s comforting to know he isn’t a psycho with his finger hovering above the nuclear button. The leaks break another pundit talking point – that China sustains North Korea out of an urge to support a fellow communist state. Rather, China sustains the Hermit Kingdom’s corrupt, erratic regime more for material gain – as the only country willing to engage it, China gets the North Korean economic market all to itself. The cables offer more nuance, and according to South Korean officials, China is content with sustaining the corrupt North Korean regime because its collapse would let loose a flood of North Korean refugees across the Chinese border. South Korea and its U.S. ally would then walk into the North to pick up the pieces, depriving China of its buffer zone that was supposed

to separate its border from U.S. and South Korean forces. But as the North becomes more belligerent, China’s gains from using the Hermit Kingdom as a buffer, distraction or economic market diminish in the face of the potential consequences of war. A war between North Korea, South Korea and its western allies could involve nuclear weapons, and at the very least would put U.S. troops on China’s border. This explains China’s recent support, stated in a cable communication, of dissolving the North Korean regime and unifying the two countries under a South Korean banner. While China gains much from status quo in the North when war becomes the product, Korean unification becomes attractive. So go forth and read these cables, but remember that they don’t represent the undeniable truth, just an informed diplomat’s opinion. Next time you hear a political pundit spout a one liner about North Korea and its nut-job leader, you will know the world is more complex than many bother to consider. Alexander Seymour can be reached at aseymour@theorion.com

There is a sign in the campus plumbing shop that simply says: “The plumber protects the health of the nation.” I took it as an honor when in 1991 I was chosen from more than 100 applicants to be your plumber. I was told by the administrators to work to the highest standards, use the best materials; time was not an issue. “Protect the students’ health and safety,” that was my directive. Unfortunately for me, I thought this applied to administrators as well. So what happened? It was discovered in 2002 that 28 2-inch diameter Pyrex glass vent pipes were broken off under the flat roof structure of the Physical Sciences Building, venting toxic air 6 feet over students’ heads. This would be bad enough if the vents only vented the sewage part of the building. It becomes extraordinarily dangerous when you realize the 28 vents were designed primarily to vent the hundreds of lab sinks and fume hood sinks. In 2002, the administrator’s arguments for not repairing included: Friable asbestos above the ceiling from sprayed on fireproofing. No funds to abate asbestos. This is curious because in the recent Orion article, administrators are quoted using the same excuses. After many vicious arguments with those in positions over me — supervisors and administrators — I phoned Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA sent an inspector on January 14, 2003 to inspect the broken pipes. He never even looked at the broken pipes! He reported no violation. Now I’m arguing with Cal/ OSHA. They refuse to return for another inspection. Is this because they are both state agencies? Fearing exposure, the administrators got nervous. What to do? Their demand to the plumbers was, “Fix the pipes! However, you can only access them through the roof flashings.” This meant standing on the roof.

The method used was to blindly poke 1.5-inch diameter pipes through flashings and try to insert them into the 2-inch shattered glass. At best, this would only direct some of the toxic air and gases out of the building. This so-called repair is a bubble-gum-and-duct-tape -type approach meant for the short term. Anyone authorizing or taking part in this repair is guilty of a misdemeanor, according to the Uniform Plumbing Code, and violating 10 separate subsections. I demanded this illegal repair must be immediately followed by abatement and proper, legal repairs. When it became apparent to me that this would not be the case, I refused to be any part of it. Another excuse used in 2002 was the building is a positive pressure building. That’s exactly what Marvin Pratt and Neil Nunn stated in The Orion’s article. I’m so tired of explaining this that I’m going to let the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials say it for me. Simply dial 1-800-201-0335 and talk to Matt who handles code questions. Explain the situation, and then ask: Does the Uniform Plumbing Code give any exemptions for personal issues, like lack of funds or asbestos? Does the Uniform Plumbing Code give any exemption for a positive pressure building? Is the purpose of the Uniform Plumbing Code to protect the health and safety of the public? Why in the forward of the Uniform Plumbing Code does it say these are the minimum regulations? I suppose you shouldn’t be too alarmed. After all, as Pratt said, “Our chief engineers and chief designers have looked at it and so have other professionals. Some pretty specialized and educated people looked at this and no one saw a problem except Bill.” What I am asking of the faculty, staff and especially students is to demand an investigation of this matter. A proper inspection must be performed. Bill Adams

Identity crisis comes with white dress Joanna Hass OPINION EDITOR

We can all pretend women gently lay their names to rest and carry on the lineage of their hubby’s family, but how much more obvious does it have to be for people to see that we place our own identities on the slab and give them up as a sacrifice to the happily-ever-after gods — or God, if you’re reading this in a red state. But it’s not our fault, you see. Women get born into this crazy game of Cabbage Patch Doll roulette where we are assigned two randomly selected, sometimes un-complementary, names and are expected to go on unquestioning. As we slowly start to admit the system is flawed and more and more women hyphenate

their way out the situation, there are some statistics that might have you dropping your jaw rather than your name. Women who have changed their name after marriage are generally older and less educated, according to a study from the Tilburg Institute for Behavioral Economics Research. It also showed that women are not only divided this way in reality but in our minds as well. In this study, hypothetical women were described in the same way except for their decision to change their name after marriage. It was discovered that women who changed their name were viewed as less intelligent, competent and ambitious than the women who kept their last name. Not only will going through the name change alter the way women are judged but the way they are compensated as well.

According to the same article women who changed their last names were less likely to be hired into a hypothetical job and more likely to be paid less. Tina Turner once said that all she wanted was to keep her married name after an even more famously bad marriage. Looking back now, she might have been the only woman to make more money by doing so. Of course, the decision isn’t all about the green. There are some pretty strong emotional and situational taboos that go along with it. For instance, I’m sure some women adopt their sweetie’s surname as a way to make things easier for the kids or whatever. Can’t a woman ever make a decision strictly for herself? Being a child with a semiobscene last name wasn’t fun but being an adult with one isn’t really any better. My world has been one

full of mispronunciations and explanations of spelling. So ever since as I was old enough to understand that my marital status could stop stick and stones of bullying, I have been psyched to one day, essentially, change. Actually, having the opportunity to change your name is probably both the weirdest and the coolest tradition that hasn’t died already. It’s the kind of familial thing that gets guilted upon us and then ultimately used against us. But, then again, since when is that new for women? And while I was always pretty much set upon kissing my Hass goodbye and moving on to the next, hopefully phonetically spelled, last name, the whole situation is enough to make me want to pull a Cher and just be me. Joanna Hass can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com

PIECE OF MIND >> What would you do if the world was going to end in 2012?

Robert Stevens

Graduate Student | anthropology

Dominic Mutto junior | recreation

“I’d do whatever I could to stop the world from ending.”

“I’d live my life to the fullest and cherish my friends as much as I could.”

“I’d sit on my porch with a bottle of Jack Daniels and say sayonara.”

“I’d preserve the human soul in digital format so it could be launched into space and preserved for others to find someday. ”

Jordan Jones

sophomore | sociology

Tara Reese

freshman | psychology


A10 |

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

N EWS

always online >> theorion.com


Women’s basketball loses key player, guard Natasha Smith >> B2 always online >> theorion.com

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B

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

Thomas Lawrence Sports Editor

Let’s play two

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

DRIVING CAT Sean Parks P [above, right] drives to the hoop Wednesday night against a Cal State Stanislaus defender. Sophomore Sophom Damario Sims [left] racked up 11 points, a steal and two rebounds the same night.

’Cats get defensive, start season 7-1 Blake Mehigan STAFF WRITER

Wildcats on the Chico State Men’s basketball team have attributed their strong start to players buying into a defensive -orientated attack and team continuity on the offensive. And it was evident as the team jumped off to a 7-1 start this past week. This is the ’Cats’ strongest start since 1942, and head coach Greg Clink’s recruitment has been a large reason for it. “We are trying to build a culture of improvement,” Clink said. “We’ve been finding players that are passionate about improvement.” One of Clink’s goals is to find players who are effective in very short periods of time, he said. One player perfectly exemplified this idea during Wednesday night’s 61-59 victory over Cal State Stanislaus — guard Spencer Moyer, who had two big 3-point baskets in five minutes of play to go along with another crucial point from the free throw line. “I don’t think we win that game if he doesn’t come in and give us the spark off the bench,”

Clink said. The reasons for Clink’s bold statement are numerous and Clink is not shy in his excitement for how Moyer performed

GAME 1 Chico State

61

Cal State Stanislaus

59

in that game. “The shots he hit ignited us — he gave us a momentum,” Clink said. “He was huge.” The ’Cats had a very solid defensive effort in the first half of the game, holding the Warriors to only 15 points f on just 17.2 percent shooting. The second half was quite a different story though, as the Warriors went on a tear, shooting 56 percent from the field and 92.9 percent from the line. The defensive effort in the second half was not at the level it could have been and the team struggled to execute later in the game, Clink said. The Wildcats did have a solid contribution from forward Terence Pellum, who had consecutive possessions with big baskets down the stretch.

“Coach drew up a couple of plays for me, and I got a chance to score and made the big buckets for us tonight,” Pellum said. Pellum had three blocks and two steals to accompany his team-high 13 points in 24 minutes against Cal State Stanislaus. He is currently fi rst on the team in blocks and ranks second only behind junior guard Jay Flores in steals this season. Forward Roderick “Rod” Hawkins finished with 9 points and seven rebounds, but had five turnovers for the game. “We wanted to cut down on our turnovers,” Hawkins said. “But our main focus was to continue to guard them and keep them off the offensive glass.” The senior thought the Wildcats’ effort was there, but the defense was not quite in stride during the second half. Flores finished with 8 points, a team high eight rebounds and three assists. Sophomore Damario Sims notched 11 points to go along with a steal and two rebounds. The ’Cats game against Pacific Union was a different

story. Chico State jumped out to a 13-2 lead to start the game and never looked back. They led by more than 30 points at times and won by a 29-point margin, 69-40. The ’Cats bench also outscored the starters 38-31 for the first time this season.

GAME 2 Chico State

69

Pacific Union

40

“It was a game where we could play a lot of guys and everybody I put in responded well,” Clink said. Center Jason Conrad played the most minutes with 22 off the bench, while guard Rashad Parker scored the most with 13 points off the bench. Parker also had a team-high three steals. “In the second half every time down we ran a certain play, our main goal was to execute for 40 minutes,” Parker said. Running plays consistently in the second half is already the main focus of the team and an area it is looking to

build upon, Clink said. Clink is confident that his team has been improving, he said. “I feel our motion offense and off-ball screens have been pretty good,” Clink said. “It wasn’t perfect but we did a better job of that in the second half.” Coming into the game against Pacific Union, Clink looked to limit his players’ minutes and give some players more chances on the court, he said. He wants to develop a quicker rotation as the Wildcats’ previous games saw a few players on the court for extended periods of time. “I was hoping it would be an opportunity to play a lot of players who hadn’t had a real opportunity to play yet, and we accomplished that,” Clink said. All 13 players played, 11 of them scored and eight contributed 6 points or more. Chico State’s next home game will be at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 7 against UC San Diego. Blake Mehigan can be reached at bmehigan@theorion.com THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

HOLIDAY CHEERS The Wildcat bench erupts after a thunderous throwdown by forward Roderick Hawkins in the second half of Wednesday’s 61-59 victory over Cal State Stanislaus. The Warriors were held to just 15 first-half points before making it interesting for the ’Cats in the second half.

Seasons change for Wildcats With a miracle win and a West Regional title, the men’s soccer team forecasted a storybook spring for Chico State sports. The Greg Clink era is in full swing for men’s basketball after his second campaign last year, in which the Wildcats clawed their way to a postseason berth and lost in a heartbreaker against Humboldt State in the California Collegiate Athletic Association semifinals. Stressing defense in the gym and no-holds-barred recruiting outside of it, Clink has rebuilt a program that got stale under beloved coach Prescott “Puck” Smith. The second-place ’Cats are being led by the two-headed, dreadlocked beast that is sophomore guard Damario Sims and senior forward Terence Pellum. On the women’s side, head coach Brian Fogel, now without the “interim” tag in his title, has the team at 6-0, with a No. 17 in the national ranking. The Wildcats could be primed for another playoff run — even without the dazzling Natasha Smith in the backcourt. Out on the diamonds, at Nettleton Stadium and the University Softball Field, spring 2010 was a tale of success and fresh rosters for both baseball and softball. Behind the bats of new talents like Jackson Evans and Adrian Bringas, the Chico State baseball team slugged their way to the West Regionals before losing to Hawaii Pacific. Bringas, Johnny Hay and pitcher Kevin Brahney along with several other stars of ’10 will be back in the dirt next semester, where they belong. The 2010 softball team was under new management from Angel Shamblin after a miserable campaign under head coach Jamie Brown in 2009. Second baseman Charlotte Honciano and company were true grinders, and surged to the NCAA Super Regional to take on Hawaii Pacific. They won the first game and were one win away from the College World Series before the Sea Warriors swept the remaining two. Meanwhile, track and field will be strong as ever, as the recruiting machine of Kirk Freitas and Oliver Hanf have brought in another smorgasbord of versatile athletes to win ribbon after ribbon. They’ll kick off their spring season with the Wildcat Relays in Chico on Feb. 26. Men’s golf is heading into spring scorching after a Division II Championship Preview win at the Shoals Fighting Joe Golf Course, in Florence, Ala., Oct. 19. Kyle Souza and the rest of the sweet swinging, chipping and putting ’Cats are at the Coyote Classic in San Bernardino starting Feb. 28. While women’s golf was under the radar in the fall, LPGA member Kathy Dais and her squad remained competitive consistently. From the hardwood to the ballpark, to the track and the putting green, the 2011 springtime Wildcats are a force to be reckoned with. Thomas Lawrence can be reached at

of the week

sportseditor@theorion.com

’catfights

Men and Women’s Basketball will pick up games starting Dec. 30 against Cal State L.A. The next home game will be Jan. 7 v. UC San Diego The women will play at 5:30 p.m. and the men will play at 7:30 p.m.

sports

TO DAY I N

Dec. 15, 1891 James Naismith invents basketball in Canada.

[ jock talk ] If you meet the Buddha in the lane, feed him the ball.” -Phil Jackson National Basketball Association Coach


B2 |

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

S P O RT S

always online >> theorion.com

Sports Shorts College sports around the nation

Humboldt State forward named player of the week >> Humboldt State forward Bree Halsey was named the California Collegiate Athletic Association’s women’s basketball Player of the Week for Dec. 5 to 12. Halsey was named the tournament’s Most Valuable Player after leading the Lumberjacks to a 2-0 record at the CCAA/ PacWest Challenge over the weekend. She averaged a double-double, contributing 15 points and 15 rebounds a contest. source: goccaa.org

FILE PHOTO • JEB DRAPER

WATCHING FROM SIDELINES Senior All-CCAA guard Natasha Smith has played sensational ball for the Wildcats her whole career, but now has to watch her team from the sidelines after she suffered a season-ending knee injury Dec.3 against Humboldt State. The ’Cats have gone 2-1 in her absence. Humboldt State forward given player of week honors >> Humboldt State forward Randy Hunter was named the California Collegiate Athletic Association’s men’s basketball Player of the Week for Dec. 6 to Dec. 12. Hunter sparked the Lumberjacks to a key 96-82 victory over Sonoma State Saturday. He scored a career-high 26 points, collected seven rebounds, had an assist and a block. He finished the game shooting 11-of-13 from the field and 4-of-4 from the foul line. source: goccaa.org

Cal State Stanislaus bell rings for Salvation Army >> Members of the Cal State Stanislaus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee took time out from their final exam preparations and served as bell ringers for the Salvation Army this holiday season. The Salavation Army kettle drive is well known around the world, particularly during the holiday season for volunteer bell ringers greeting patrons in front of local grocery stores and shopping centers. source: goccaa.org

Wildcat of the Week

All-CCAA guard’s injury tough situation for ’Cats Kevin Augustine STAFF WRITER

The Chico State women’s basketball team is taking its fast break start to the season, making tough roster transitions on the fly and tipping off the California Collegiate Athletic Association that the Wildcats are on a shooter’s roll. The Wildcats are currently ranked first in the CCAA standings, but their success came at a cost. The Wildcats lost senior guard Natasha Smith to a season-ending torn ACL in her left knee against Humboldt State on Dec. 3 at Acker Gym. Smith, who averaged 14.6 points, five assists and five rebounds a game on the season, managed two CCAA Player of the Week honors before the injury. “I am proud of how the team has progressed,” Smith said in a phone interview. She is very proud of how the

Sophia Horn STAFF WRITER

Women’s softball is about to begin the season after winter break and the players have the utmost confidence in the team that has been developing. During the spring season, the team will be able to utilize all the players because the new recruits add depth to the team, sophomore Kacie McCarthy said.

Softball 2010 Record • 33 wins–21 losses overall

• 2010 NCAA Super Regional Berth

Taylor Lydon

The senior forward helped the Wildcats to a 7-1 record over the weekend as she posted 27 points, nine rebounds and two dimes. Her efforts proved to be key in a 65-62 overtime victory over No. 14 Western Washington Friday night, before they dropped a tough last-second loss at the talons of Seattle Pacific on Saturday night, 57-56.

Many of McCarthy’s teammates agree that the influx of talent could be a big help this season. The new recruits fit in well and seem to be contributing to the team, said returning senior Sarah Marcia. Many of the new players already have their own set of accomplishments, such as Diana Payan who transferred after two years at Fullerton College. Payan accomplished a .414 batting average at Fullerton College with three home runs and 22 RBIs. She has also earned of

Wildcat

Line Bottom

Wildcat of the Week is a regular feature meant to acknowledge the contributions made by individuals to the team. Winners are chosen by The Orion sports staff from nominations taken from all sports. To nominate: sportseditor@theorion.com

“It’s going to be a number of players who fill in for Smith’s productivity,” Fogel said. “Katie Girten, Molly Collins, Taylor Lydon and Courtney Harrison, for instance.” There will be extended time for some players, but Fogel made it clear that everybody’s roles will remain the same. “Play-wise we aren’t going to change a lot of things,” Fogel said. “We have to play to our strengths and continue to get better. We’re going to use this to bond together.” This is a time for experience to lead the way for the Wildcats, said junior guard Molly Collins, who scored a career-high 17 points and nine rebounds in the win against Western Washington. “Natasha was a leader and a role model in practice and in the games,” Collins said. “The upperclassmen need to step up and this is a motivator for us.” Senior guard Katie Girten, who knocked down four

3-pointers and a career-high 12 points in the first loss of the season for the Wildcats, thinks losing Smith will demand more from her teammates, she said. “Losing Natasha changes the complexion of the team,” Girten said. “Everyone is going to have to play bigger than we’re used to.” The team will miss her presence on the court from here on out, she said. “We love ’Tash and wish she could play with us,” Girten said. “She is an inspiration to us and we aim to work as hard as she did.” The Wildcat’s success on the court has set them up for a great start to the season, but the conference games will continue to get tougher as the schedule moves forward, Fogel said. The team received a 17th -place ranking in the Division II National Bulletin Preseason Top 25 Women’s Basketball Poll and second in the 2010-2011 CCAA Women’s Basketball Preseason Coaches’ Poll before the season

began, expectations were as hairy as Willie the Wildcat. But the Wildcats have responded diligently, going undefeated into CCAA/GNAC Tournament for the first time in seven years, beating 14th ranked Western Washington in overtime, and were one shot away from recording another win against Seattle Pacific in last season’s NCAA West Region final at the Wolves’ Den in Sonoma State. “We’ve really positioned ourselves well within the conference,” Fogel said. “We’ve done everything we possibly can up until this point and we’ll worry about Cal State L.A. when that time comes.” After a near three-week break, the Wildcats face a tough road trip at the end of December against Cal State L.A. Dec. 30 and Cal State Dominguez Hills Dec. 31. Kevin Augustine can be reached at kaugustine@theorion.com

Wildcats look to build on last year’s success

• 21 CCAA wins–14 losses

women’s basketball

seniors have stepped up their game and of how the freshman are improving, she said. Smith clawed her way into career top-10s in scoring, assists, steals, 3-pointers and free throws while at Chico State. “Before I came to Chico, I looked at the record books and knew I was going to be a part of a winning program,” Smith said. “I wanted to be among greats like Amber Simmons, who dominated on all ends of the court and records. As a freshman, that was a big motivator for me.” Head coach Brian Fogel acknowledged the loss as well as the need for determination in the face of adversity. “We’re going to have to change some things,” Fogel said. “We’re really sad for Natasha, but at the same time we can’t feel sorry for ourselves and we need to move forward.” Replacing Smith’s productivity on the court will not take any one particular person, Fogel said.

California Collegiate Athletic Association All-SoCal First Team honors last season. Jackie Munoz, who is also a transfer student from Fullerton College, batted .328 last season at Fullerton and led the team with six home runs and 30 RBIs. She also had 16 extra base hits and nine stolen bases in the past season. The last top newcomer is Britt Wright, who hit .440 with two home runs and 22 RBIs last season. Wright led the Pacific Coast Athletic Conference with 10 triples and 25 stolen bases, as well as receiving the All-PCAC First Team honors. “I want to play and grow as a team,” McCarthy said. “I also want to play as well as we did last year.” Last season, the Wildcats advanced to the National Collegiate Athletic Association West Super Regional and finished with a record of 33-21. The ’Cats also received the accomplishment of being the top-ranked CCAA school in the Top 25 poll for the 2010 season, claiming the 17th spot on the list. The team lost some valuable players, such as graduates Christine Johnson, Rebecca Johnson and Charlotte Honciano, but junior first baseman Rachel Failla is confident the team can still win in their absence, she

Men’s Basketball The Wildcats beat Cal State Stanislaus on Wednesday, 61-59, before beating Pacific Union on Saturday, 69-40. This is the teams fi rst 7-1 start since 1942.

PHOTO COURTESY OF • CHICO STATE SPORTS INFORMATION

SEA OF HEADS The Wildcats circle up before a game last season. Their first home game will be Feb. 18. said. Honciano had an impressive season leading the Wildcats with a batting average of .375, 33

We are able to play with a competitive vibe because we have made a name for ourselves.”

Sarah Marcia

senior right-handed pitcher

runs, 69 hits, two triples and a slugging percentage of .511. The team does have a handful of returners to help during the season such as junior Sam Quadt, who hit .293 with a teamhigh 12 doubles last season and tied Failla with a team-high 25

Women’s Basketball Wildcats defeated Western Washington 65-62 (OT) in their first game of the CCAA/ GNCA Challenge tournament over the weekend. The second game would yield a loss to Seattle Pacific, 57-56.

runs driven in. Due to the impressive record that the Wildcats gained last season, there may be a difference in the way the team will play during the upcoming season, Marcia said. “There are high expectations for us now,” Marcia said. “We are able to play with a competitive vibe because we have made a name for ourselves.” The team has managed to practice during the year to make sure they are prepared for the upcoming season. “We have fall ball,” Failla said. “It’s a certain amount of time during the fall that we practice and have tournaments against Division I schools.” During fall ball, the ’Cats played against University of Phoenix, Sacramento State and San Jose State.

Stat of the week Freshman Rashad Parker had a career-high of 13 points, three steals, three rebounds and two assists in 20 minutes of action during the 69-40 victory over Pacific Union Saturday.

McCarthy thinks the team is confident about how it played during fall ball, she said. It is a preview for how the team will do during the actual season. “I wish we could’ve played more just so we could get accustomed to each other,” McCarthy said. “But, from what I saw, we could definitely build.” With a team that accomplished an abundance of impressive records, the upcoming season is expected to be a competitive one. The Wildcats will be taking on their first game of the season Feb. 4 at Mizuno Best of the West Invitational in Turlock. The team will play their first home game Feb. 18 against Cal State East Bay. Sophia Horn can be reached at shorn@theorion.com


S C H E D U L E

always online >> theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 |

B3

Fall 2010 >> it might get rowdy MEN’S BASKETBALL

MEN’S SOCCER | CONT.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL | CONT.

| 7-1-0

CROSS COUNTRY

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills 12:30 p.m.

Sept. 17

Cal Poly Pomona

L 44-59

Jan. 7

UC San Diego

12:30 p.m.

Sept. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

@Cal State Stanislaus

W 64-59

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 24

Bethany University

W 63-44

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 26

Nov. 26

Northwest Christian

W 85-72

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 27

Dominican

W 71-54

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

Dec. 3

Humboldt State

L 84-81

Jan. 22

Dec. 4

Sonoma State

W 69-65

Dec. 8

Cal State Stanislaus

W 61-59

Dec. 11

Pacific Union

Dec. 30

@Cal State L.A.

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

Jan. 7

W 3-0

|

Sept. 25

@Stanford Invitational

6th/9th

L 2-1

Oct. 2

@Williamette Invitational

2nd/3rd

Humboldt State

W 1-0

Oct. 16

@Santa Clara Invitational

2nd/4th

Sonoma State

W 2-0

Nov. 6

@CCAA Championships

Oct. 1

Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Nov. 6

@Doc Adams Invitational

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 3

Cal State L.A.

CSU Monterey Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 8

@Sonoma State

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 10

@Humboldt State

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 15

@UC San Diego

W 69-40

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 17

@Cal State East Bay

W 3-1

7 p.m.

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 22

San Francisco State

W 1-0

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 10

@Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 25

CSU Monterey Bay

W 3-1

Sept. 3

@Dominican

W 3-1

UC San Diego

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 12

@UC San Diego

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 27

Cal State Stanislaus

W 2-1

Sept. 3

@BYU- Hawaii

W 3-1

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 30

@Cal State Stanislaus

L 1-0

Sept. 4

@Grand Canyon

W 3-1

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 5-7

CCAA Championship

L 3-0

Sept. 4

@Seattle Pacific

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 12-14

NCAA West Regional Tour-

W2-0

Sept. 7

William Jessup

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 25

@San Francisco State

5:30 p.m.

nament semifinal/Final

W 2-1

Sept. 10

@Cal State L.A.

Jan. 22

CSU Monterey Bay

7:30 p.m.

March 1-5

TBD

5:30 p.m.

NCAA Quarterfinals

L 5-0

Sept. 11

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7:30 p.m.

March 6

TBD

TBA

TBA

Sept. 15

@Simpson

W 3-0

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

7:30 p.m.

March 15

TBD

TBA

Sept. 17

Humboldt State

W 3-1

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 18

Sonoma State

L 3-0

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

7:30 p.m.

Aug. 17

@Nevada

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Sept. 22

Cal State Stanislaus

L 3-0

Feb. 10

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Aug. 25

@Southern Oregon

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Sept. 24

UC San Diego

W 3-2

Feb. 12

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L 2-1 (2OT)

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

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Sept. 24-25

@Saint Martin’s Inv.

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

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Sept. 27-28

@Western Washington Inv.

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

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Oct. 11-12

InterWest Wildcat Classic

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@San Francisco State

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Oct. 18-19

D-II Championship Preview

Nov. 6

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Nov. 7

@University of Pacific

Nov. 18 Nov. 22

TBA

MEN’S GOLF

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Nov. 20

L 1-0 (OT) L 1-2

Sept. 2

Western Washington

Sept. 4

Central Washington

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TBA 5th/ 5th

W 2-1

| 8-9-1

2nd

Dec. 4

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L 3-2 (OT)

Dec. 2-4

WOMEN’S SOCCER

TBD

Nov. 20

1st/1st

1st

Sept. 10

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Sept. 12

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Sept. 17

Cal Poly Pomona

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L 3-1 W 3-1 L 3-1

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Cal State East Bay

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W 2-1

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Oct. 2

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Oct. 8

San Francisco State

L 3-1

L 1-0 (OT)

Oct. 9

CSU Monterey Bay

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March 1-5

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Sept. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

W 2-1

Oct. 13

@Cal State Stanislaus

March 12-15

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TBA

Sept. 24

Humboldt State

W 1-0

Oct. 15

Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-1

March 23-26

TBD

TBA

Sept. 26

Sonoma State

W 4-0

Oct. 16

Cal State L.A.

W -31

Oct. 1

Cal State Dominguez Hills

L 1-0

Oct. 22

@Sonoma State

8th

Oct. 3

Cal State L.A.

L 2-0

Oct. 23

@Humboldt State

W 2-0

Oct. 29

@Cal State East Bay

L 3-2

L 2-0

Oct. 30

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WOMEN’S GOLF WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

| 7-1-0

|

Sept. 19-21

@Sonoma State Inv.

L 3-1

L 3-2 W 3-2

Sept. 27-28

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13th

Oct. 8

@Sonoma State

L 58-104

Oct. 11-12

@Viking Inv.

10th

Oct. 10

@Humboldt State

Academy of Art

W 73-55

Oct. 18-19

@Golf Mart Lady Otter Inv.

TBA

Oct. 15

@UC San Diego

L 3-1

Nov. 5

Cal Poly Pomona

Hawaii Pacific

W 64-46

Oct. 17

@Cal State East Bay

T 0-0

Nov. 6

Cal State San Bernardino

L 3-0

Nov. 23

Cal State Stanislaus

W 74-59

Oct. 22

San Francisco State

L 2-0

Nov. 12

@CSU Monterey Bay

W 3-1

Nov. 27

@Cal State Stanislaus

W 88-80

Oct. 25

CSU Monterey Bay

W 4-2

Nov. 13

@San Francisco State

W 3-2

Dec. 3

Humboldt State

W 62-64

Oct. 27

Cal State Stanislaus

W 2-1

Nov. 18-20

TBD

TBA

Dec. 4

Sonoma State

W 52-41

Sept. 2

Western Washington

W 2-1

Oct. 30

@Cal State Stanislaus

L 4-0

Dec. 2-4

TBD

TBA

Dec. 10

@Western Washington

W 65-62

Sept. 6

Seattle Pacific

W 1-0

Nov. 5-7

TBD

TBA

W 2-1 (OT)

Nov. 11-14

TBD

TBA

W 2-1

Nov. 19-21

TBD

TBA

Dec. 2-4

TBD

TBA

Nov. 7

@St. Mary’s

Nov. 19 Nov. 20

MEN’S SOCCER

| 15-7-0

Dec. 11

@Seattle Pacific

L 57-56

Sept. 10

@Cal State Monterey Bay

Dec. 30

@Cal State L.A.

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Sept. 12

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S P O RT S

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

always online >> theorion.com

Wildcats look to regroup after underachieving 2010 season Dane Stivers ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

With the Wildcats’ offensive dominance that was put on display last season, it was a disappointment to end up on the outside looking in come playoff time. But something about these wiser 2011 preseason ’Cats makes it seem like that won’t happen again this year. The ’Cats’ offensive slaughterhouse was met with underachieving arms and moments of complacency in 2010, as their 35-20 record was good for fifth in the California Collegiate Athletic Association but not good enough to make the CCAA Championship Tournament. The Wildcats’ absence from the CCAA playoffs in 2009 was its first in 14 seasons. The Wildcats’ emission from

postseason play came despite Honorable Mention All-American outfielder Adam Arakawa, who batted .374 with seven home runs, a team-high 46 RBIs, 27 walks and one error. Not to be outdone, National

Baseball 2010 Record • 35 wins–20 losses overall • 26 wins–14 losses in conference • 2010 NCAA Championship Tournament-West Regional Berth • 500th win for Dave Taylor as member of Chico State Staff • To get the full 2011 baseball schedule go to chicowildcats.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF • CHICO STATE SPORTS INFORMATION

ACTION JACKSON Second baseman Jackson Evans looks towards first base during a last season game. Evans averaged .360.

Gold Glove recipient Kevin Seaver, who broke Chico State’s single-season batting average record by hitting .442, played sensational baseball at first base for the Wildcats and All-CCAA Honorable Mention selection Jordan Larson hit .345 in the leadoff spot as he paced the team with 80 hits, 12 stolen bases, and 25 multi-hit games. But the 2010 preseason squad’s mentality looks to stray from the vibrant glamour of its own individual talents and focus on the team’s success instead, an outlook that was missing at crucial times last season. Other than injuries, the ’Cats’ own mental lapses and lack of focus are what will hurt the team most if they do not give attention to it, said junior second baseman Jackson Evans. “We can’t get complacent out there over any part of the season,” Evans said. “The season’s too short for that. We don’t want our season to end like last year.” When it comes to the Wildcats’ biggest strength, it would be the offense, which posted 411 runs and only allowed opponents to score a combined 306 runs, while 11 of the ’Cats’ 13 starters batted above .300 as well. But the key for the ’Cats success in 2011 will lie elsewhere on the field, as head coach David Taylor has recruited five pitchers with big arms to help solidify a rotation that was so inconsistent last season. Right-handed pitchers Scott Nartker and Bryn Calhoun will be looking to play significant innings alongside fellow incoming pitchers Kevin Brahney, Phillip Hymas and Sheldon Lechuga, who are all southpaws. Nartker and Hymas provide two big power arms, while Brahney’s control and location were on point during fall ball, as he walked just one batter in 30 innings. Calhoun is a tough, bulldog-

PHOTO COURTESY OF • CHICO STATE SPORTS INFORMATION

HEY BATTER Senior Johhny Hay connects during the 2010 season where the Wildcats went 26-14 in the CCAA conference. Hay had a batting average of .339 and started and played in 48–48 games. like pitcher, while Lechuga brings versatility, as he might be starting or coming out of the bullpen for the Wildcats. Sophomore righty Jordan Lindebaum will return one year after going 5-4 with a 4.84 ERA for the Wildcats, while senior right-handed pitcher Ian Waldron, who went 4-3 with three saves in a team-high 21 appearances last season, will also return.

But just because the coach made a point to recruit pitchers during the offseason for a more well-balanced ball club, the offense must remain in top form as well in order for the ’Cats to avoid last season’s disappointment, said junior right-handed pitcher Scott Newberry. “Our offense really started the season off strong for us, and then our pitching came through in the second part of the season,” he

said. “But we’ve got to be playing well on both sides of the ball for us to be successful.” With the start of the season less than two months away, the Wildcats must maintain focus and play to the best of their abilities from the season’s opening pitch if they are to erase the sting of 2010’s playoff absence. Dane Stivers can be reached at dstivers@theorion.com

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always online >> theorion.com | WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 Earl Parsons Entertainment Editor

Pop Culture Shock

Students program video game based on invasion of Stalingrad Ben Mullin STAFF WRITER

If your brains are fried after your first few finals, beware — that’s just how zombies like ’em. Though they’re not exactly picky as to who or what they’ll eat. If you want proof, look no further than the dimly-lit, high-tech computer lab that houses Chico State Game Studios, where a group of student artists, programmers, modelers and writers are making a thorough study of the undead menace for their latest game, “Communists vs. Zombies.” Josh DuJordan, a concept artist for the upcoming video game, set the scene for Chico State’s virtual venture into the zombie apocalypse. “‘Communists vs. Zombies’ is a strategy game in which you play a less-than-noble Russian commander,” said DuJordan, a senior majoring in applied computer graphics. “It’s your job to scare your troops into holding the line against a horde of zombies that surrounds Stalingrad, while you plot your own escape from the city.” Set in World War II in a parallel universe where German zombies, rather than Nazis, are invading Stalingrad, “Communists vs. Zombies” puts a radical new spin on popular war games like “Call of Duty,” replacing the glory of heroism with a frantic, look-out-for-numberone mentality. During his escape from zombie-infested Stalingrad, the player meets up with an interesting cast, including a semi-zombiefied German soldier called “Half-turned Hans.” Creator and director Robert Utter described “Hans” affectionately, citing several parts in the game where he makes an appearance. “‘Half-turned Hans’ reminds me of Ned Flanders,” Utter said. “He’s a happy-go-lucky guy that has been bitten by a zombie, and as you engage him over the first couple of missions, he gradually becomes

more of a zombie.” A plan is in the works to have Hans become a staggering joke throughout the game, shambling in and out of the story long after he’s been killed, Utter said. “We intend to do a ‘South Park’-slash-Kenny type thing where Hans just keeps coming back, no matter how many times he gets offed,” Utter said. Hans won’t be the only noteworthy character, said Scott Washington, a Chico State Game Studios manager. “There’s also going to be a woman named Evgenia, who’s carrying around her husband’s zombified head because she still loves him, but his head’s always going to be gnawing at her,” Washington said. Washington and Utter both described the process of researching the background for the game as challenging but fun. “It was painstaking,” Utter said “We’ve had creative meetings when we sat down for four to five hours at a time just reviewing the actual history of the Battle of Stalingrad.” It wasn’t all stuff y academic research, however. “We watched ‘Inglourious Basterds,’ ‘Sin City’ and the ‘Evil Dead’ series, trying to get ideas for the style of the game,” Washington said. “We decided we don’t want to be like ‘Evil Dead,’ where there’s blood everywhere. We just want a tasteful amount of blood.” The other people who want a tasteful amount of blood are the zombies themselves, who were put into the game for more than one reason, Utter said. “Zombies are dumb,” he said. “That’s why a lot of games use zombies — they’re easy to program. “They don’t need elaborate tactics, they don’t need to trick you, they just need to be hungry, approach you, surround you and eat you.” A testable version should be available as early as two semesters from now, Utter said. Until then, board up your doors, stock up on non-perishables and have a hefty blunt object handy, because a zombie apocalypse is coming. Ben Mullin can be reached at bmullin@theorion.com

ILLUSTRATION BY KRISTEN BROOKS

Wild Oak showcases artists on record label at Cafe Flo Lauren Beaven STAFF WRITER

THE ORION •KEVIN LEE

BASS OVER ALL Master Lady bassist Brandon Smith performs in Wild Oak’s “Artist Management Showcase” Friday at Cafe Flo.

Chico bands P.A. Harper, Master Lady and The Deaf Pilots don’t have much in common musically, but they’re all wild at heart. The three put on a show that gave different perspectives of the rock spectrum at the Wild Oak Music Group’s “Artist Management Showcase” Friday at Cafe Flo. The show was the capstone to the “Wild Oak WinterFest,” which began Dec. 3 and included the “Songwriters Guild Showcase” and “Heaviest in Chico III,” Wild Oak Artist Manager Zach Zeller said.

“The other two shows were very genre-based – just heavy metal and then singer-songwriter stuff – and tonight we have rock ’n’ roll, indie rock and experimental,” Zeller said. “It’s exciting. It’s a smorgasbord of music.” Solo artist Paul “P.A.” Harper hit the stage first, strumming a mint-green Fender softly and hitting all the right high notes. Harper switched up the soft sound two songs in, however, as he passed off the guitar to a bandmate. He was joined by a bassist, two keyboardists and two drummers, and announced the motley group taking up half of Cafe Flo

with their instruments as The Galapaghosts. Though the band remains separate from P.A. Harper and Wild Oak representation, their enthusiastic glitter throwing and drum-heavy, experimental sound had heads bobbing and feet tapping to music that was clearly a highlight of the show. The Deaf Pilots rocked out to a thinning audience, rounding off the night with a solid one-hour set after an energetic performance by Master Lady. Though this was only The Deaf Pilots’ second performance at Cafe Flo, the >> please see FLO | C4

Previously on ... Not surprisingly, the lowest moment in television history happened on VH1. On the cable network’s reality show “A Shot at Love,” men and women compete for a chance to pretend that they’re dating Tila Tequila, a pansexual party girl famous for nothing in particular. In the second season, her would-be suitors are forced to undergo a rather unusual test of love — in order to win Tequila’s affections, the contestants had to eat pig vaginas, presumably to simulate the experience of engaging in foreplay with her. “A Shot at Love” is just one example of the exploitative, superficial drivel that passes for reality TV every day. But while it’s easy to write off the television industry as uninspired and creatively bankrupt, closer examination reveals that television has reached a creative zenith with its serialized dramas that are unequaled in any other time in history. TV has become the most proficient medium for telling a serialized story, replacing the role previously held by comic books and, before that, Victorianera literary magazines. The beginning of serialized storytelling in television is marred by the soap opera genre, although there are a few great entries in the form of “Dark Shadows” and the satirical “Soap.” TV didn’t become a viable option for continual storylines until the success of “Lost” and “24,” and while those shows often contain hokey dialogue and gaping plot holes, it got executive producers interested in the format. Premium cable networks HBO and Showtime followed up with a slough of transcendent dramas, including “Six Feet Under” and “Dexter,” both of which feature the talents of the incomparable Michael C. Hall, an actor who was born for this format. As odd as it seems, cable is a better place for great TV than the “Big Four” networks. Cable seasons are usually between 12 and 13 episodes, which allows for tighter writing than the networks’ usual 22 episode orders. Since there are no commercials, HBO and Showtime are flexible about runtimes, while the networks stick to arbitrary 22 and 46-minute windows. In the era of DVDs and instant streaming, viewers can keep up with the ebb and flow of a serial drama without feeling left out. In fact, the serialized cable genre is so successful that the AMC network changed its entire philosophy to capitalize on it, premiering its new format with “Breaking Bad” in 2008, a naturalistic thriller so aesthetically precise that it feels like a Coen Brothers film on the silver screen. TV doesn’t always rot your brain. Sometimes it’s a rewarding experience. And it can’t get any worse. Tila Tequila made sure of that. Earl Parsons can be reached at entertainmenteditor@theorion.com

VIRAL VIDEOS >> SPEAKING

“I’ve watched you cakewalk around the Immaculate Conception for far too long.” Devendra Banhart “Shabop Shalom” 2007

“The Professor Brothers — Bible History #1 (Sodom and Gomorrah)” YouTube Brad Neely is the Web’s hidden genius. His hilariously surreal interpretation of the story of Sodom and Gomorrah is told in a series of still images as if a comic book is being read to you.

“The Spirit of Truth” YouTube In the ’90s, a crazy “preacher” called The Spirit of Truth, aka Reverend X, was given his own public access show, where he claimed he was God and read scripture from a phone book while dancing to Tupac. If this guy were given his own TV show, I would watch it 24 hours a day.


C2 |

WEDN WE WEDNESDAY, EDN DNES EESD SDAY, D DEC. 15, 2010

the good, th d the th bad b d & th the undecided d id d new releases

THE GOOD >>

>> “Autobiography of Mark Twain: Vol. 1” (MEMOIR) The master of American literature wrote a coffee table book about his life without even realizing it. The dense first volume of Twain’s personal story, locked inside a vault for 100 years after his writer’s death, is a fluid, meandering text that’s best appreciated by cracking open passages at random, as Twain employed the free range technique of writing “only about the thing which interests you at the moment.” Twain isn’t a confessional autobiographer, so don’t go into it expecting to learn any surprising revelations about the “Huck Finn” writer’s life, but the memoir is still an engrossing read that should be at the top of every classic lit nerd’s Christmas list.

>> “This is Happening” (ALBUM) LCD Soundsystem’s swan song album might be the best of 2010. “This is Happening” is a funky bookend to the band’s tradition of post-ironic dance funk. While the band was initially started as a side project, and while frontman James Murphy quit to focus on DFA Records, LCD Soundsystem’s brand of hipster parody/homage is going to be sorely missed.

>> “Brothers” (ALBUM) I didn’t think I’d be able to stomach another album of the Black Keys’ rehashed neo-blues, but I was pleasantly surprised. The tightknit melodies and stripped-down rhythms of “Brothers” don’t break any new territory for the drum-andguitar duo, but there’s an endless supply of great moments, including “Everlasting Light,” where singer Dan Auerbach cashes in his trademark croon for a smooth falsetto.

THE BAD >>

>> “Tell-All” (FICTION) Chuck Palahniuk is struggling to

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Chico’s musical cocktail Steve French forged from The Shimmies, La Fin Du Monde Tyler Ash STAFF WRITER

A new style of local sound could be heard high above West First Street at the Blue Room Theatre Saturday as a blend of local music enthralled a seated crowd over Collier Hardware. The mesmerizing tunes of Chico experimental favorites La Fin du Monde have merged with the sorrowfully soulful style of The Shimmies in the creation of Steve French, a conjoined experiment with the potential to win over any local music lover. The Shimmies drummer Jack Gingerich is now the lead guitarist for Steve French and Dan Elsen of La Fin du Monde is providing his specialized drumming skills to the newborn band. Rounding out the group is Stephen Galloway of The Shimmies on bass, local musician and sound engineer Brendan McDonough on guitar and vocalist Matt Hammons playing keys. Although a blend of both bands, Steve French’s sound is undeniably independent of the two. Their music resides somewhere amid the mellowness of Radiohead and the heavy grunge of Soundgarden, with Hammons’ voice sounding like the ungodly progeny of Thom Yorke and Chris Cornell. “It’s definitely somewhere in between The Shimmies and La Fin du Monde,” Gingerich said backstage in The Blue Room’s scene shop. “It’s way more straightforward than La Fin du Monde, but not nearly as structured and ‘songwritey’ as The Shimmies.” Steve French, the collaborative brainchild of Gingerich and McDonough, have been around for a little more than a year now. Having finally cemented their members, this was only their second show so far. “The original line up was Brendan and I, Chris Keene and Dan Elsen,” Gingerich said. “It was everybody just being really interested in being in a band with Chris Keene I think, but he didn’t have the time because he was literally in five bands.” They went through a few other bass players but just ended up

“settling” on Galloway. “And then Matt came after that, ’cause Chris was going to sing too, so we had take two people to replace one member,” he said. “That is the power of Chris Keene.” Their band name “Steve French” came from the TV series “Trailer Park Boys,” a Canadian sitcom/mockumentary that showcases the misadventures of a group of Nova Scotian trailer park tenants. Several of the main characters are ex-convicts, pot growers and alcohol abusers, all of whom cause plenty of laughs with their inane Canadian humor. In the fourth season episode “If You Love Something, Set It Free,” the boys of Sunnyvale Trailer Park believe that a Sasquatch has been stealing from their weed farm. Determined to get to the bottom of their pot problem, characters Julian, Ricky and Bubbles set out the next day to discover that a mountain lion was the one eating their crop. The dazed lion was then brought back to the trailer park for “rehab.” The character Bubbles, played by actor Mike Smith, is a cat-lover so he becomes attached to the cougar and decides to name it. “You look kinda French with your little moustache there,” he said talking of the darker fur around its face. “I’m gonna call you Steve French.” All of the members of the band are fans of the TV series and decided to settle on “Steve French” for the time being. They are in the process of choosing a new name, so the next time you see them they might be under a different working title. “We had a couple shows booked and we needed a name, and then we played a show and we’re like ‘You know, I’m not so sure about Steve French,’” Elsen said. “I like it a lot, but people will obviously think that we’re not a band, we’re just a dude named Steve French.” He noted that playing in Steve French was “refreshing” when compared to the complexities of La Fin du Monde. “We have some technical parts and some heavy parts, but so far it’s not physically draining like La Fin du Monde is,” he said laughing. Elsen was sad to say that La Fin du Monde is slowing down as more of its members get married and have kids, but he had a twinkle in his eye when he

THE ORION • ALLEN BROOME

LA SHIM DU MONDE Stephen Galloway of the Shimmies pounds his bass with Steve French Saturday at the Blue Room Theatre. Steve French is composed of musicians from The Shimmies and La Fin Du Monde. spoke of Steve French. “As long as The Shimmies guys aren’t too busy, I think we’ll be pretty active,” he said. The Shimmies were the opening act of the night and unveiled their new music video for their song “To All Beloved Enemies.” Their heartfelt songs warmed up the audience’s souls just enough to crush them with stringsplintering solos. The second band was Strix Vega, a touring threepiece band from Humboldt County, whose sound could be described as “mountain-progressive.” Bluesy instrumentals followed songs about the wild outdoors with

tempos filled with twists and turns reflecting a predator vs. prey woodland chase. Their name is derived from the genus name of the North American owl, “strix,” and a star in the Andromeda Galaxy, “Vega,” explained bass and synth player Andy Powell. Steve French was the third to perform, allowing a cheering Blue Room crowd to finally experience the mash-up of two local favorites. During Steve French’s last song, Hammons hammered on a Miller Brewing Co. beer keg to the beat of a “Terminator 2”-like instrumental while wearing a Batman mask. “There is no fate but what we

make for ourselves,” he quoted from “T2” before the song began, stating as a joke that it was from his favorite Batman movie. Elsen’s drum set stayed put for the headliner of the night, La Fin du Monde, who caused chills of technicality to run down audience members’ spines. Walls of progressive sounds ensued as a noise so complicated never sounded so easy on the ears. Steve French, The Shimmies and La Fin du Monde will be playing together again Dec. 30 at Duffy’s Tavern and once more on Jan. 7 at Origami Lounge. Tyler Ash can be reached at tash@theorion.com

find himself. Generation X’s neurotic prophet has grown bored of the “guy-goes-to-a-support-groupand-thinks-he’s-Jesus” formula of his career and began taking linguistic risks with “Pygmy,” a novel that fell far short of his readers’ expectations. He’s followed that up with “Tell-All,” a Hollywood murder mystery written in the style of gossip journalism in the 1930s. I can respect Palahniuk for trying new things, but the real problem with this book lies in its hyperbolic narrator’s forcefully flowery rhetoric, which remains a distraction throughout the course of the novel. If Palahniuk wants to move his fiction into new territory, he needs to keep his nihilism intact, or the end result will be disingenuous.

THE UNDECIDED >>

>> “True Grit” (MOVIE) You can never go wrong with the Coen Brothers. In their remake of the classic “True Grit,” Jeff Bridges will reprise John Wayne’s Oscarwinning role as alcoholic Marshall “Rooster” Cogburn, while Hailee Steinfield makes her acting debut as Mattie Ross, a 14-year-old girl who convinces Cogburn to avenge the death of her father.

>> “The Walking Dead” (TV) The first season of AMC’s “The Walking Dead” has been too up-and-down to make an accurate assumption about it. The show can’t figure out whether it wants to be a zombie shoot-‘em-up or a moody apocalyptic survival story. All judgments on “The Walking Dead” should be reserved for next season.

Coda celebrates with reggae, Dead covers Josh Hegg STAFF WRITER

Though the weather outside was frightful, the mood inside Cafe Coda was one of warmth and cheer as Reckoning and Boss 501 shared their music with a joyful and receptive crowd. Reckoning opened the show and navigated an extended set that had crowds savoring their every note. Made up of veteran players, Reckoning performed bluegrass covers of Grateful Dead songs in a style they called “Deadgrass.” “The most interesting thing about Reckoning is where we all came from,” said Paul Friedlander, a Chico State music professor who plays bass and contributes vocals for the group. “Between all of us we have about 150 years experience.” The ensemble consisted of banjo, mandolin, bass and acoustic guitar. Everywhere in the audience, people embraced their Grateful Dead favorites by singing along with grins that would warm Jerry Garcia’s heart. The lack of percussion in the ensemble didn’t faze the audience as people clapped along to the beat. Behind the bar, the Cafe Coda staff made use of forks and knives to make a fitting percussive soundtrack to the music. One of the highlights of Reckoning’s set was their use of vocal harmonies. All of the seasoned members

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

BRASS AND TINSEL Boss 501 trombonist and vocalist Charlie Francis performs at the “Very Grateful Christmas” festival Saturday at Cafe Coda. Grateful Dead cover band Reckoning headlined the event. contributed harmonies that never strayed far from pitch and added rich color to their sound. Though the musicians handled their instruments with the utmost care and sincerity, they were quick to let the audience know that they were there to have fun as well. Mandolin player Mark Wilpolt reminded the crowd that the Celebration Ale was especially well-brewed and suggested that everyone

partake. Multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Lloyd Foote paid homage to Grateful Dead’s rock ’n’ roll reputation by explaining the meanings of the songs. “We are going to try something different now and play a song about drugs,” Foote said. On and offstage, Reckoning shows a deep love and understanding for the music they were playing. “I’ve been playing around campfires half my life and this

is an excuse to play in front of people,” Wilpolt said. Final act Boss 501 came on stage donning matching Christmas sweaters and Santa hats. The only thing that could match the holiday spirit in the band’s clothing was their music and stage performance. After only a few songs, several couples in the audience were engrossed in the upbeat music and hit the dance floor. Boss 501 were created by a

group of Chico State students in 2006. The band formed from their common influences of energetic early reggae, said bassist Ben Stone. “We don’t just focus on one style of reggae,” he said. “We are a very contemporary act with classic influences.” In the few years that the band has been together, they have established a name for themselves in the genre, playing at various venues all around town and being one of the go-to opening acts when touring groups come through Chico. The band’s set was wellbalanced, incorporating saxophone and trombone in addition to the standard instrumentation of bass, drums, guitar and keyboard. The addition of these instruments gave the music a more confident sound. The band looked as visually appealing as they sounded. The whole set was full of excitement as the members danced around with their instruments. A slough of foot tapping and hand clapping ensued in the audience as the band played through their set. Boss 501 are looking forward to the future, where they will go on a mini-tour with veteran band The Slackers. The high point of the band’s tour will be its performance at San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall for a New Year’s celebration. Josh Hegg can be reached at jhegg@theorion.com


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Collector rotates art at University Gallery Stephanie Maynard STAFF WRITER

Notre Dame, ballet shoes, the back of a billboard and a Hawaiian shirt with crashing planes are all on display for the university to see. The University Art Gallery is showing the world from the eyes of some of Northern California’s top artists with the official reception of the Reed Applegate Collection Thursday. Applegate, a Chico State graduate and passionate art collector, has acquired more than 300 works in the last 25 years. For the show, Applegate had to choose only 12 pieces from his vast library. Many of the pieces were taken from Applegate’s personal collection, but he made a special point to include works from some Chico State professors and graduates, including a watercolor painting of Notre Dame by John Ayres. “I wanted to include John Ayres because he was really the founder of the art department,” Applegate said. “Most people only know him as the name of the building across the street.” University Gallery’s walls won’t stay empty as the show goes on. With so many pieces carefully stored in countless closets, Applegate was already accustomed to rotating what got to be on display at his Chico home. “I like each work for a little different reason,” Applegate said. “I don’t have a favorite. It’s like asking a parent which is their favorite child.” If Applegate sees something worth collecting, then he strikes an interest in purchasing it, he said. He has been known to make payments for years on a single piece of art. Applegate collects prints as well as originals, the former being a much cheaper way to

FLO: Wild Oak put show on to support bands continued from C1

“What I find really interesting about Applegate is that he approaches collecting on the basis of what touches him rather than a particular focus,” Tannen said. Because shows run for several weeks and Tannen is not always in the gallery, it is difficult to measure response through anything other than attendance, he said. “Hopefully what will happen is that people will come to the gallery and what they see will spark an interest in the art or the artist,” Tannen said. The final day of the show is today and gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

versatile trio jammed comfortably in the intimate setting. Calvin Van Burg made shredding the guitar look easy with intensely speedy fi ngerwork and singer Derek Julian dropped to his knees more than once, brow knit with concentration, strumming a vertical bass like he was painting a masterpiece. Wild Oak videographer Randall Jangula was impressed with the show. “I don’t know about anybody else, but my face is melted,” said Jangula, a junior music industry and technology major. The casual banter and laughter that fi lled Cafe Flo during the performances carried over as the Wild Oak staff trucked out the myriad of instruments from each band. “We were fierce,” said Van Burg of The Deaf Pilots’ performance. The Deaf Pilots drummer Ryan Fairley simply laughed at him. “Yeah, for a second out there I thought you turned into a lion,” said Fairley, a junior English education major. While on stage, each of the three bands took the chance to thank Wild Oak for hosting the showcase, which was a last-minute addition to WinterFest that the organization came up with only a month ago, Zeller said, adding that this is the fi rst year Wild Oak has represented each of the bands. “We were trying to shoot for fairly new bands locally that have played shows but want to get to the next level,” Zeller said. “We put them up above bands that just play in their garage.”

Stephanie Maynard can be reached at

Lauren Beaven can be reached at

smaynard@theorion.com

lbeaven@theorion.com

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

ZINGGER President Paul Zingg discusses a painting at the Reed Applegate Collection in the University Art Gallery Thursday. pursue his passion, he said. Applegate has no preferred style of art any more than he has a favorite part of his collection, he said. This was evident by the variety of art shown in the gallery — an abstract painting, landscapes in crayon, a scribbled portrait, a yellow Plexiglas Hawaiian shirt that would fit Goliath, a ballet in oils, a huge mural resembling doodles on graph paper, Notre Dame in water-colored blocks of blues and greens and more fill the gallery. The reception drew Chico State students and faculty, who chatted among each other or with Applegate, talking about the works and looking for a picture with that

NEW ROUTES

“zing”— literally. “Look, I’m in the show, almost,” said President Paul Zingg, as he stopped by a painting titled “La Zingarella” that had those words painted onto the canvas. Zingg heard about the show through the gallery curator, Jason Tannen. “I try and go to all the shows,” Zingg said. “What’s great is that we’ve got four galleries and they’re all terrific spaces.” Zingg is an art collector himself, he said. One of his favorite artists is pop-artist Wayne Thiebaud, who he heard would have a piece shown in the gallery. Zingg also recognized a piece by Robert Arneson from across the room by identifying the artist’s trademark — putting

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his own self-portrait into his paintings. Zingg has also contributed to university art shows, donating some of his Thiebaud pieces for a University Art Gallery show that ran from Sept. 29 to Nov. 9 this year and showing his own collection in 2005. The Reed Applegate show is the last of the semester, hastily put together by Applegate and gallery curator Tannen, who noticed a two-week opening at the end of the schedule and tried to fill it instead of letting the University Gallery “sit dark.” This is the fourth exhibition Tannen has worked on that focused on collecting rather than a particular artist or theme.


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Chico native returns for art show Candyce Chilson STAFF WRITER

Animal heads dangle from the branches of a large neon pink tree as hunters shoot at them. This is just one of Haley Hughes’ acrylic paintings to test the imagination. Hughes, 26, will reveal her artwork at the 1078 Gallery from Dec. 23 to Jan. 8. There will be three events in which visitors can expect entertainment paired with extremely diverse, transcendent and amusing pieces. The show, “Broken Shape,” will feature all new pieces. Hughes lives in Brooklyn and is visiting Chico to create all the work in the three weeks leading up to the show, she said. Although challenging, this was the perfect opportunity to create a whole new body of work. “The process in and of itself I enjoy,” Hughes said. “I think the idea that you can create something that affects people, and makes people think and see things differently through this visual image that you’re providing, I think that’s really powerful.” Hughes typically works with oil paint, but due to the short time frame of the show, she is using acrylic paint on canvases that she has built. Hughes spent a lot of her time growing up in Chico at the Blue Room Theatre, where she was interested primarily in performance art, playwriting and painting some of the pieces on set. At 18, Hughes embarked on a new journey as she left Chico and pursued a life in the busy streets of Brooklyn. She now works as the assistant to a sculptor, managing her studio and assisting in installing her shows. Until eight years ago, Hughes never completely focused on creating artwork in a serious manner, she said. Once she was

PHOTO COURTESY OF 1078 GALLERY

BROKEN SHAPE Haley Hughes is presenting her painting “The Graduates” as part of her art showcase “Broken Shape,” premiering Dec. 23 at the 1078 Gallery. in New York City however, she was inspired by the busyness of the city and she jumped into creating her own inspiring and abstract pieces. Hughes’ friends at the Blue Room lent her the “woodroom” at their venue while she stays in Chico. She is also creating some of her drawings at her sister’s barn. 1078 Exhibitions Chairman Thomasin Saxe discussed bringing some of Hughes’ work to display at the gallery. “I’m totally proud of her,” Saxe said. “For years I’ve been wanting her to do something at 1078.”

Although Hughes has had her work featured in about 10 art shows, this will be her first in Chico. The exhibit will be displaying eight to 12 paintings, 20 drawings and one abstract installation with mixed media, she said. Hughes has yet to create many of the pieces. Hughes defines her artwork as very abstract symbolic narratives. In the end, the ultimate meaning of her art is up to the viewer. “Most of them are landscapes with some abstractive, figurative narratives, and

they are very much about the chaos and confusion that exists, as well as the narrative that I am trying to express,” Hughes said. Hughes will be working 12-hour days to get everything finished. Typically one piece can take about a week to create. All of the pieces Hughes created for the show will be for sale at 1078 Gallery. The smaller drawings will range from $20 to $50 and the large-scale paintings, which are 7 by 9 feet, will cost $2,000 at most, although all of the prices are still being

negotiated, she said. Hughes’ art is filled with an array of vibrant colors — pinks, yellows, reds, a diverse range of blues and greens. This exhibit will analyze American rights and rituals of the past and present, according to the 1078 Gallery. Saxe defines Hughes’ art as “a little wild.” Her paintings and drawings are representational, but extremely abstract. They are dreamlike and weird — as well as very interesting, he said. The 1078 Gallery will be hosting three events while Hughes’ art is being

showcased. The opening night Dec. 23 will feature musical acts from local soft-folk artist Nate Pendery and alternative rockers The Great Good. The Americas, West By Swan, Chikoko and a surprise guest will fi ll the large room with music starting at 7:30 p.m Dec. 28. For the fi nal event, the play “Justice?” by Jesse Karch will be performed as well as “Piss Christ” by Forrest Gillespie, which will begin at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 8 Candyce Chilson can be reached at cchilson@theorion.com

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Another day at the office The Orion is now hiring for spring semester. Apply online at theorion.com/site/apply or go to Plumas Hall Room 001C.

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ JEB DRAPER


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Daily Dose T ODAY

Surrogate

9 p.m. @ LaSalles $5 admission

Devil Kat’s Rock ’n’ Roll Social 9 p.m. @ Lost on Main $5 admission

Furlough Fridays, That’s What She Said and Blue Sky ease the Thursday night blues with fun rock.

SAT U R DAY

F R I DAY

Chris Keene 8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5 admission

Cafe Coda is flying solo. Check out unaccompanied artists Michael Lee, Chris Keene, Lish Bills (Kirk Williams of Armed for Apocalypse) and Kelly Brown for a night of acoustic enjoyment. j y

“Festivus for the Rest of Us IV” 8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5 admission

This off-the-wall show features The Great Good, Shivaree, Peach, Knarly Claus and Early and Often. No word yet on the Airing of Grievances or Feats of Strength.

C7

Necessities >> SU N DAY

“Anne of Green Gables” 2 p.m. @ Chico Theatre Company $20 advance admission

It’s the final day to see the classic tale of a different orphan Annie.

MON DAY

Bear_E-Oke

9 p.m. @ Madison Bear Garden Free Sing about your burger madnes blues, your blue tatoos, or your dirty shoes – just be quick about it. There are other tipsy people who want to pretend like they’re performing for Simon Cowell.

T U E S DAY

Dollar Daze

6 to 9 p.m. @ The Graduate Go build your own burger and take advantage of Dollar Daze at The Grad. It’s from 6 to 9 brah.

ILLUSTRATION BY CHELSEA ROSS

The men of Surrogate, a Chico-based band with a craftful blend of indie pop along with witty lyrics, will be taking the stage at LaSalles. There will also be performances by alternative rock group Soft Crest and Sacramento rock group, The Lonely Kings.

T H U R S DAY

Dec. 15 - 21

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 |

<< Options TODAY

Reggae Night

8 p.m. @ Park Avenue Pub Complete your Wednesday night at this cozy neighborhood dive bar, which will be blasting reggae tunes all night long with a live DJ.

Dance Night 10 p.m. @ Duffy’s

DJ’s Jeff Howse, Spenny, Lois and a special guest keep the dance floor moving at Duff y’s every Wednesday. Duff y’s remains one of the longest standing bars in Chico still pumping beats from classic vinyl records.

T H U R SDAY

Clouds on Strings CD release 7 p.m. @ Cafe Flo $5 admission

The all-student prog rock quintet shows just how well it has come into its own with “The Strangest Thing We’ve Ever Seen.” Zach Zeller will be there to play while celebrating his birthday along with Gus and My Dads.

Djembe Drumming 7 p.m. @ Cafe Culture $10 fee

Greg Fletcher teaches interested individuals how to use the userfriendly hand drum.

F R I DAY

Energy Balancing 5 p.m. @ Cafe Culture Free

SAT U R DAY

Dick Dale

Sierra Nevada Brewery Tour

8 p.m. @ El Rey $20 advance

Had a stressful week? Well, finals are finally over. Slow things down and get on track for a positive break with a free energy balancing session at Cafe Culture.

The godfather of surf music, who brought us “Miserlou” and “Let’s Go Trippin’”presents his stuff at El Rey. Dale’s son Jimmy is also performing.

OilPanic

BETA

6 p.m. @ Cafe Flo Free Join Zocalo, Symbio and OilPanic for an evening of ambience set to a soundtrack of new and vintage chilled electronic beats.

SU N DAY

9 p.m. @ Lost on Main $2 cover after 11 p.m. Come step to dubstep at a BETA party. Tickle Fight will contribute as well.

11 a.m. @ Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Free Its a tour to make you “hoppy.” See how some of Chico’s local beer is brewed.

Festival of Crafts

10 a.m. @ 896 East Ave. (former Hollywood Video) Get into the holiday spirit by checking out local Christmas crafters and vendors.

MON DAY

Zumba

7 p.m. @ Cafe Culture $5 (first class free) Get up off your seats and stomp your feets to some thumpin’ latin beats. Zumba is an exercise regime that involves dancing to music with a strong base in small to large groups.

Cheapskate Mondays

6:30 p.m. @ The Pageant Theatre $2 admission Not every blockbuster has to be a budget buster, too. Come check out some quirky cinema before you head on home for the holidays.

T U E SDAY

The Tacklebox With the “Longest Happy Hour In Town,” this working man’s bar and grill will be sure to restock your fishing bait and your belly. Get the ’gator or the fried frog legs before you drink ’em down with their cheap pitchers.

Burgers and Brew If you haven’t tried the latest addition to the array of burger joints in Chico, you don’t know what you’re missing. Eat a cheeseburger in first class with your favorite beer or bottle of wine, and leave with the stench of fresh garlic fries on your breath.

STAFF FAVORITES >> HOLIDAY FOOD Tamales – Tamales are the best things to unwrap on Noche Buena, Christmas day or every day. If you really are what you eat, then wrap me up in a cornhusk. I must be a tamale. —Mark Rojas Features Designer

Turducken — Holiday feasts can be stressful and filled with conflict, which is often enhanced by the competition between poultry choices. It’s like sibling rivalry for food. Enter Turducken. A turkey stuffed with a chicken, stuffed with a duck – the construction sounds violent, but it keeps the peace over the holidays. — James Jelenko Opinion Columnist

Grandma’s Crab Dip — Christmas dinner is far more open than Thanksgiving, and every family has its memorable holiday appetizers. In my family, it’s crab dip. It doesn’t matter that it’s made with imitation crab and sour cream with onion powder. All that matters is that it’s familiar. — Earl Parsons Entertainment Editor


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WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

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Safety tips for online holiday shopping >> D2

Sarah Brown STAFF WRITER

T

he holiday season this time of year brings more than just Christmas. It is a time also for Hanukkah and Kwanzaa, but a shared tradition in all three celebrations is the candle. Hanukkah: ‘Happy Hanukkah’ Sarah Minton, a junior majoring in recreation, went to her kitchen on the last night of Hanukkah and lit eight candles on her menorah, she said. She finished the ritual by reciting a traditional prayer. This is the first year Minton celebrated Hanukkah without her family because she had to stay in Chico for her studies, Minton said. Traditionally, her family eats potato latkes, plays the dreidel and lights the menorah during the eightday holiday. The lighting of the menorah is a time to reflect on how one can add light by doing acts of goodness even in the darkest of times, said Chana Zwiebel, co-director of the Rohr Chabad Jewish Center. Jews light the menorah and eat fried foods, like latkes and donuts, to remember a miracle that took place long ago, she said. They play the dreidel, a toy similar to a spinning top, to remember the courage of the faithful. Hanukkah is observed during the Jewish month of Kislev, which tends to be in the Gregorian calendar month of December and this year was celebrated Dec. 1 to 9, Zwiebel said. It commemorates the miracle that took place more than 2,000 years ago. Although Hanukkah is not as celebrated as Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur, it is still important to the Jewish community, Minton said.

Kwanzaa: ‘Habari gani?’ or ‘What’s the news?’ When senior psychology major Ronneane Baldwin was a child, she began observing Kwanzaa through an organization called Jack and Jill, she said. During the week-long holiday from Dec. 26 to Jan 1, they lit candles to represent the seven principles of Kwanzaa and the organization would take the kids to Afrocentered cultural events. It was a time of bonding, pride and happiness, Baldwin said. During Kwanzaa, AfricanAmericans spend time with family, have parties and light candles, said James LuyirikaSewagudde, Jr., international and exchange adviser at Chico State. Kwanzaa was created in America in 1966 by Maulana Karenga in order to reaffirm what it means to be African-American, according to officialkwanzaawebsite.org. The holiday focuses on seven fundamental values of African culture, including unity, self-determination and collaboration. It’s not a religious holiday, but a cultural one. African-Americans take the time to reflect on the importance of community, Luyirika-Sewagudde, Jr. said. Although it started in America, people in Africa are also beginning to celebrate the holiday. African-Americans didn’t have any African-based holidays of their own, so Kwanzaa is the one thing

DICTIONARY

Cashmas

[Cash • mas] The primary holiday celebrated in capitalist cultures. A celebration of materialism. “Jodi spent 14 hours at the mall in celebration of Cashmas.” source: urbandictionary.com

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Shining a light on

Traditions ns and terms

Hanukkah ah ‘Dreidel I will play’ The four-sided r-sided dreidel has Hebrew letters on each side representing nting an acronym for the phrase, “a great miracle happened ed there.” Two or more players place their bet in the pot and d take k turns spinning i i the h dreidel. d id l Depending di on which side it lands on, the player may win the whole pot, half the pot or may have to up their ante. On the first evening of Hanukkah, light one candle. On the second evening, light two. On the third, light three, and so forth. Before lighting the candles, a blessing and prayer of thanksgiving is given to God.

Features Editor

holiday traditions

Symbols of Kwanzaa The seven symbols represent values and concepts reflective of African culture and contributive to community building and reinforcement. Their names in Swahili and English are: Mazao - The Crops These are symbolic of African harvest celebrations and of the rewards of productive and collective labor. Mkeka - The Mat This is symbolic of African tradition and history and the foundation on which African-Americans build. Kinara - The Candle Holder This is symbolic of continental Africans. Muhindi - The Corn This is symbolic of children and the future which they embody. Mishumaa Saba - The Seven Candles These are symbolic of the Nguzo Saba, the Seven Principles, the matrix and minimum set of values which African people are urged to live by according to their own needs. Kikombe cha Umoja - The Unity Cup This is symbolic of the foundational principle and practice of unity which makes all other symbols possible. Zawadi - The Gifts These are symbolic of the labor and love of parents and commitments made and kept by children. Sources: officialkwanzaawebsite.org, jewishchico.com

Christmas: ‘Merry Christmas’ Over the course of four weeks prior to Christmas day, Emily Weir, a senior communications sciences and disorders major, watches as members of Bidwell Presbyterian light candles on the Advent wreath, she said. These four weeks are known as Advent, a symbolic act that leads up to the Christmas celebration, Weir said. Her church’s congregation takes time to read scripture and reflect on the blessing of Jesus. The spirit of Advent is one of expectation, thoughtful sobriety and charity, said Father Blaise Berg, pastor at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church. It’s a time of preparation. The Christmas season follows Advent and lasts two weeks, he said. Ideally, the parties and festivities wait until the arrival of the Christmas season. Christmas is the day when the anniversary of Jesus’ birth is observed, Berg said. Joy and gift-giving are an integral part of Christmas, honoring above all the gift of Jesus.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 Ally Dukkers

Kwanzaa Seven principles 1. Umoja: Unity 2. Kujichagulia: Self-Determination 3. Ujima: Collective Work and Responsibility 4. Ujamaa: Cooperative Economics 5. Nia: Purpose 6. Kuumba: Creativity 7. Imani: Faith

that’s officially African-American, Baldwin said.

|

“To want to be a part of that joy is to want the good for anotherr person,” he said. Near the end of the Christmas mas season is a feast called Epiphany, Berg said. It commemorates the arrival rival of the Magi after Jesus sus was born. As for or things like evergreen, light and Yule logs, these contemporary traditions probably bly came from pagan agan traditions, said Micki Lennon, n, lecturer for the he department of religious studies. s. Christmas trees stmas st ee were introduced ntroduced in the nt U.S. by y German immigrants in century. n the 19th century Sarah Brown own can be re reached ed at sbrown@theorion.com @the eorion.com

PAGE DESIGN BY MARK ROJAS

The Ally Way... Finally 21 Tomorrow I will legally be able to do what I’ve been doing since I was 16. I am the last of my friends to reach 21, and sometimes I feel like I’ve missed out on parts of my social life, and even as if I was born a few years too late. The tradition of turning 21 in Chico comes with a few rituals including shoving your legitimate ID in the face of the bouncer at Riley’s while screaming and slurring that you’re 21. I am more excited to actually be able to go party at the bars than be able to drink there. The bars provide a place for partygoers to hang out with friends and meet new people. No longer will I have to seek out a house party that will inevitably be broken up before 11 p.m. or have to find a discreet0 hiding place to drink without being spotted by the police. Finally I will be able to partake in the bar scene – and I can’t think of a better birthday present. My roommates and many other Chico State students like to go to the bars on nights when they provide deals on drinks, karaoke, live entertainment or have events such as ’80s night. Other students in my situation, who have older friends, know what it is like to be unable to participate in these occasions and are forced to find other minors to socialize with, while your friends are dancing to Madonna at LaSalles on a Saturday night. There are not enough places for underage students to hang out without causing a noise violation or a complaint from a neighbor of a house party. Turing 21 has more social benefits for me than having the privilege to drink alcohol. I am interested to see what the bars are like in Chico, as well as in my hometown. Going to the bars over Christmas break will be a way to connect with friends from high school. Many people have told me that this is the last exciting birthday, and it is “all downhill from here.” As someone who enjoys any excuse to celebrate, I don’t see this as being true. Although turning 21 is a rite of passage in our culture, I hope every birthday will be as exciting as I expect this one to be. I know that I will have a place to go to have a good time for all of my future birthdays. My birthday falls on one of the last days of the semester, when I am sure everyone will be out celebrating. I will have finally put in my 21 years, and will have a place to hang out on weekend nights. Ally Dukkers can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com

WORD OF MOUTH >> What is your holiday tradition? “My dad and I always put up Christmas lights. Also, the night after Thanksgiving we decorate inside.”

“I have ten siblings and we put their names in a hat and buy one gift for each person.”

Caleb Szymanski

junior | music and recording arts

Nicole Etchison

sophomore | liberal studies

D

Related Article:

See holiday traditions above

“Every year my family goes to a night Christmas service at our church.”

“Up until Christmas Day we watch the movie “Christmas Vacation” every day.”

Kathryn Crabtree senior | religious studies

Jimmy Wright

senior | music and recording arts


D2 |

F E AT U R E S

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010

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the

face

SE X COLUMN>>

Boshion Crandall Bosh SE S X COLUMNIST

Single season There seems to be an airborne disease that has infected nearly every couple I know and propelled them to break up. Each time I sign onto my Facebook account another one of my friends is no longer listed as “in a relationship.” I too have switched my status to “single” and revisited Splitsville — the sad, cold and lonely town with a depressing population of one. I’m blaming the recent spike in single-ness on the chilly winter months — after all, it is the season of death. The shortage of sunlight has left the Esplanade’s tree branches bare and stolen the rose bushes’ buds. But most importantly, it’s robbed many of the life of their relationships. And perhaps the most pressing question for a newly single person is “when can I sleep with someone else?” I’ve searched for an answer to this question and have been unable to find one, and I imagine this is because there is no cookie cutter-solution. Everybody’s breakup was different and each person’s recovery time will vary. At one point in my life I was such a “bad ass” and could bounce back onto the playing field in a matter of days, much like how a baseball player, after being hit by the pitcher, will walk it off. However, I can’t seem to just “sleep off” my sorrows anymore and the very thought of it makes me slightly ill. The difference, I suppose, is that this relationship was more meaningful than the others and by hooking up with someone else I would be bastardizing the connection that my ex and I had. So what’s a woman or man to do? Well, first remember that your breakup misery, much like the frozen winter, is temporary. The seasons will change and so will the stages of grief. That feeling of nausea you experience when thinking about having sex with someone else will be replaced by the dawn of spring, the season of birth and the ever-so-popular “spring flings.” A good friend of mine reminded me that people come into your life for three purposes — a reason, a season or a lifetime. I believe the person that I recently dated was in my life for a reason and that the best thing for me now is to invest in someone for a season, so that I can move on, and I can’t seem to picture myself in a serious relationship with anyone else, yet. If you are lucky enough to be the “bad ass” I once was, then good for you. I’m jealous of your ability to get over things so quickly. But for everyone else, take your time and don’t rush anything. Eventually you will see the light again and you’ll be able to bask in the sunshine of a new season. And after that season has passed and helped you get over this slump we will be ready to welcome another “reason” into our lives — and you never know, maybe that reason will mean a lifetime for you. Boshion Crandall can be reached at sexcolumnist@theorion.com

Community gift giving Tasha Clark STAFF WRITER

Senior Ricky Herrera, a legal studies major, was shopping with a group a friends at the Westfield Galleria at Roseville when he noticed how many people were buying unnecessary things for themselves, he said. This made him wonder about those who don’t have this privilege. “If I can shop for myself, why can’t I buy someone in need a gift?” he said. Herrera and senior Caley Connolly, a legal studies major, went to Toys for Tots with the idea to start a toy drive on campus, Connolly said. Toys for Tots liked the suggestion and partnered with the Community Legal Information Center’s Family Law Project to collect toys to distribute to needy families, Connolly said. Herrera and Connolly spoke with a representative who was excited to work with them, Connolly said. This year, CLIC was the first organization in Chico to

participate with Toys for Tots to collect gifts to the community, she said. The center wants to spread holiday cheer, Herrera said. “It’s a great feeling making someone’s Christmas joyful,” he said. Fliers were put up throughout campus and in mailboxes promoting the toy drive, Connolly said. Herrera wanted the entire community to be involved in the charitable cause, he said. He advertised in stores and on Facebook. Originally the toy drive was supposed to end Dec. 3, Connolly said. However, it was extended until Friday. This allows more time for the center to collect gifts for the community, she said. Everyone is participating and helping, Herrera said. Students, faculty and the community are all dropping off gifts. Once all the toys are collected CLIC will give the gifts to Toys for Tots who will distribute them, Connolly said. Gifts can be dropped off at the CLIC office and the political science department located on the

seventh floor of Butte Hall. CLIC is not the only one with the holiday spirit of giving — the Downtown Chico Business Association is participating in the second annual Downtown Chico Gives Back Charity Drive, said Nicole Romain, administrative assistant for the DCBA. The holiday drive started three years ago when Romain received a call from the business owner of LuLu’s Fashion Lounge suggesting businesses should give back every year for the holidays, Romain said. The association put the word out to challenge business owners to give back, Romain said. The next year, businesses downtown decided to come together to make giving back into a charitable event. This year eight businesses confi rmed their participation, Romain said. There may be more who are participating in the event, but won’t let the association know until the end of the drive. Businesses like Powell’s Sweet Shoppe teamed up with Child Abuse Prevention Council of Butte

County and will be donating 10 percent of sales to the charity, she said. Community members can come by with their pets and take pictures with Santa Dec. 19 from noon to 4 p.m. at Nantucket Home Inc., Romain said. All proceeds will be donated to the Butte Humane Society. The Garden Walk Mall decided to participate in the holiday drive for the fi rst time this year, Romain said. It was initiated by Downtown Salon & Gallery to play a part in helping out those in need. The mall partnered with the Salvation Army, she said. All merchants organized a giving room in the Garden Walk Mall that has an angel tree, Romain said. People can come and pick a card from the tree that has a child’s name and present of choice, then bring the gift back and place it under the tree. “It gives a lot of owners joy by giving back to those who are less fortunate,” Romain said. Tasha Clark can be reached at tclark@theorion.com

Holiday Online Shopping Tips ‘Go straight to the site’ Rather than browse to online retailers through a search engine, type the store’s URL directly into the browser.

ILLUSTRATIVE PHOTO BY JEB DRAPER

Avoid online shopping cyber scams Kelly Smith STAFF WRITER

Rather than braving the hordes of frantic soccer moms at the mall, many have chosen to do their holiday shopping online. The world of electronic commerce enables consumers to shop at thousands of online stores. With this convenience comes some risk factors, such as stolen information, fraudulent charges and online scams. Even when students think they’re being safe, private information can be leaked onto the Web. Junior liberal studies major Carissa Phillips’ debit card was used for more than she thought after falling victim to identity theft, she said. Phillips bought gifts for her friends and family from sites she previously used and thought she could trust, she said. It was only a few days later that she noticed some alarming activity concerning her debit card.

“Two days after I went shopping on Amazon.com I checked my bank account like I usually do,” Philips said. “I saw that someone charged $200 to my card.” Phillips panicked, then called the bank and canceled the card, she said. After about three weeks of back-and-forth communications between Phillips and the bank, the bank refunded the fraudulent charges and sent Phillips a new card, she said. “It was a definite hassle,” she said. “On the positive side it has taught me to be more aware of giving out my personal information.” Representatives at Amazon. com declined to comment. Students can work to keep their information private by following a few helpful tips. Precautions such as keeping passwords secure, paying by credit card and using one’s intuition when shopping can reduce the chances of getting scammed on the Web, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse

website. When done safely, online shopping can be convenient for those needing to get their holiday shopping done in the midst of finals week. Senior musical theatre major Aaron Lyons has also taken advantage of the Web when doing his holiday shopping, he said. Lyons bought several things from the Urban Outfitters website this year, he said. “One drawback is that people can’t try things on before they buy them,” Lyons said. “It’s also a lot easier to spend way more money than you expected to because it’s so convenient.” Senior psychology major Dominic Trelford, an information technology support services lead analyst, knows it’s essential for students to protect themselves and their information from prying eyes, he said. “Before you start shopping online, make sure your system is running with up-todate anti-virus software, and

that you’re using a firewall to block potential intruders,” Trelford said. “Just as important, be sure that your computer has the latest software security updates installed.” Just because people can shop from home doesn’t mean their information stays at home, Trelford said. “Some have the assumption that information is secure because they’re not physically giving it to another person, they’re typing it,” he said. “Someone wouldn’t give out their social security number to a store clerk, but a surprising amount of people think it’s safe to on the Web.” It’s important for students to understand that even when taking all the technical precautions, information can still be stolen, Trelford said. Being aware and using intuition when shopping on the Web is key. Kelly Smith can be reached at ksmith@theorion.com

‘Be cautious about passwords’ Use a different password for each site, don’t let the browser store passwords and consider using a password manager instead of writing down all passwords manually. ‘Look for the signs of security’ Always look for the “https” prefix in the URL and the padlock icon in the browser’s status bar. Make sure that you shop with online retailers that use a protocol for transmitting private documents, and wait for the address bar to turn green as a signal that the page is secure. ‘Keep PayPal your pal’ Check accounts frequently. Use a credit card rather than a debit card online so payments can be stopped quickly in the event of a problem. ‘Watch for seasonal scams’ Be cautious with e-mails claiming to be shipping confirmation or package alerts that force the user to open a file attachment. Delete a message that claims to provide tracking information but doesn’t include a tracking number. A good thing to do is track a package through the retailer’s or shipper’s website. sources: privacyrights.org weirdsafety.org


E ATT U F EF A URRE SE S

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LOOKING BACK >>

c. 1975

c. 1980

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 |

D3

2001 | Buying, selling used textbooks to A.S. Bookstore THEN

“Book Costs Drain Buyers” Nov. 14, 2001 Before tuition prices and student blood pressures began rising every semester, one method of saving money and relieving stress was to buy used textbooks from the A.S. Bookstore.

Besides offering convenience, the bookstore offered used textbooks to students on a budget, said Bob Paolone, former book division manager of the A.S. Bookstore. The store did all it could to provide students with cheap, used books. By buying used books,

students could save up to 25 percent of their money, Paolone said. While the cost of books averaged around $300 for one semester, alumna Emily Begas thinks it’s worth it. “College education is priceless,” Begas said.

c. 1980

QA &

c. 1981

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

STOPLIGHT Brian Holderman, first-grade teacher at Marigold Elementary, stands with the device to control a noisy classroom.

Campus Spotlight:

c. 1983

c. 1985

Green. Yellow. Red. Shhh.

c. 1986

c. 1988

THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

TEXTBOOKS Jessica Jensen, a senior liberal studies major, buys back books at the A.S. Bookstore.

NOW c. 1988

c. 1995

In addition to buying books used, selling back the books at the end of the semester can give students a little cash after finishing their finals. By selling back their books to the A.S. Bookstore, students can get up to 50 percent back on the purchase price,

said Steve Dubey, director of the A.S. Bookstore. Students can find other places to sell their books back for more of a profit but the convenience of selling back to the bookstore is tough to beat, he said. The bookstore also offers resources for students to rent books through Chegg.com for a lower price, but must

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be returned at the end of the semester. Although Chegg is not affiliated with the bookstore, the bookstore still receives an undisclosed portion of the transaction. “That’s what capitalism is all about,” Dubey said. -Compiled by Gina Pence

Teacher Brian Holderman uses a machine shaped like a traffic light in his first-grade classroom at Marigold Elementary. It is designed to let the children know when the noise level gets too loud. The device was invented by Fran Rebello, faculty member in Chico State’s department of education, and is called the Yacker Tracker. The machine will illuminate green when the noise is at a good level, yellow when the kids start to get too loud and then red, which sets off a warning siren to let the kids know they are being too noisy.

Q: What is the purpose of the Yacker Tracker? A: It is a classroom management device for students to control their noise level. Q: Has it helped to control noise? A: Yes, the students are very aware of how it works and will even ask for it to be turned on during project times. Q: When does it work? A: You can set the decibel levels depending on the noise level. I can turn it down if they are working on a project, particularly art projects which causes a lot of noise. Q: What are the consequences if the siren goes off? A: If it goes off three times during an assignment the students will lose three minutes of recess, but can earn that back with one minute of silence. - Compiled by Ally Dukkers


D4 |

F E AT U R E S

WEDNESDAY, DEC 15, 2010

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Student redeďŹ nes self, life through sex change Gina Pence STAFF WRITER

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ EMILY WALKER

REBUILDING, INFORMING Senior social science major Aydin Kennedy began his gender transition in April 2008. Along with other transgender students and members of the Counseling Center, he created the Transgender Task Force to spread awareness on campus about gender awareness.

It can happen to you!

Aydin Kennedy avoided public restrooms for years. He would carefully plan out his schedule where he could always access a singlestall bathroom, he said, even refusing to use a public bathroom when he was desperate to relieve himself. Kennedy, a senior social science major, and other transgendered individuals face challenges that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a concern for most people. Kennedy began his transition April 23, 2008, when he began taking testosterone, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a birthday,â&#x20AC;? Kennedy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My wife and I celebrate it as my manniversary.â&#x20AC;? Hormone therapy was similar to experiencing puberty and menopause simultaneously, he said. He lost interest in activities and became uncharacteristically withdrawn. Kennedy had irreversible chest reconstructive surgery June 3, 2008, which allowed him to legally change his gender to male, he said. At the time, Chico State didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a system in place to change the gender marker in their records, and it took Kennedy eight months to change his records to reflect his new identity. As a result, Kennedy, along with counselors from the Counseling Center and students who identify themselves as transgender, created the Transgender Task Force, an on-campus group that works to spread awareness for gender diversity. Besides implementing a new form that made it easier for students to change names and genders, the

Rape 101

1000 W. Sacramento Ave. #D 343-0909

gpence@theorion.com

NO CAMPUS IS IMMUNE TO THIS PROBLEM!

In 84% of the attacks, THE VICTIM KNEW the perpetrator.

Nord Ave.

Gina Pence can be reached at

in a 2000 survey, it was estimate that colleges with 10,000 students might expect more that 350 rapes per year.

1 in 4 college women has been a victim of completed or attempted rape.

It is a complete sentence.

open to learning about different gender preferences, McKnight said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all sort of affected by gender norms, and this is a new area for some people,â&#x20AC;? she said. For other students who may be struggling with gender identity, Rodriguez encourages them to talk about it with a counselor and to stay positive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not everyone has to go through with this,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There will be times where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough and times when you feel like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on top of the world.â&#x20AC;? Kennedy also encourages a positive attitude and patience for those looking to change, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be kind to yourself,â&#x20AC;? Kennedy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get there. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take that next step when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready, and seek out people who support you.â&#x20AC;? While he often speaks to sociology classes as a part of the Transgender Task Force, he is insistent that he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to convince anyone that his choices were right or wrong, but rather that he wants people to respect his life decisions as he respects theirs. Some people were â&#x20AC;&#x153;passively not supportiveâ&#x20AC;? of his change by not using preferred pronouns or his chosen name, he said. While he acknowledges that people can be ignorant through their lack of experience with the transgender community, Kennedy only asks for understanding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am no different than any other human being trying to find self,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m asking for this space to live my life â&#x20AC;&#x201D; space and safety to pursue happiness.â&#x20AC;?

83% of rape victims are under 25 years of age.

Sexual violence primarily affects women and youth, however they are NOT the only targets.

NO.

group organizes speakers for classes and creates group activities for the transgender community, said Lana McKnight, a Counseling Center psychologist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Between knowing Aydin and other student clients working through this, I saw a real need for better resources,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, there are surprisingly good supports on campus.â&#x20AC;? Aaron Rodriguez, a transgender junior, found support at Chico State when he came here as a freshman, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have counselors or people to talk to in high school,â&#x20AC;? Rodriguez said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned more about it when I came to Chico.â&#x20AC;? While the transition has been a struggle, Kennedy regrets nothing, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I honestly believe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a better person for it,â&#x20AC;? Kennedy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Was I forced to become a more conscious human being? Absolutely.â&#x20AC;? Deciding to change genders was a deliberate action to live in an authentic way, he said. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think he was born in the wrong body, but rather his body was like a house with a weak foundation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The foundation was cracked, so I had to tear my house down, fix the crack and make some changes,â&#x20AC;? Kennedy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And then I built myself a fucking mansion, one nail at a time.â&#x20AC;? Kennedy kept his birth name a secret to keep his outward identity synchronized with his internal identity, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Using my birth name increases the capacity to see me as something different than what I am,â&#x20AC;? Kennedy said. Gender identity isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t something everyone struggles with, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to be

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ChicoChatter

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 15, 2010 |

STAFF COMMENTARY >>

Get paid at school

BULLETIN BOARD

Whistle while you work

This is your space to share thoughts, opinions, rants and raves and what life in Chico is about.

Amanda Jacobs STAFF WRITER

for “It’s so hard to study es Jon a ian Ind finals when the .” ek we all on is n maratho Daniel French senior | business

Students, staff and community members are welcome to submit posts to featureseditor@theorion. com, Facebook or Twitter. Include your contact information.

#ChicoChatter “I always love going home for the holiday s so I can spen d quality time w ith my family and friends.” Lauren Brook

“It snows in Paradise, w hy can’t it snow in Chico?”

senior | liberal stu

s

dies

Dominic Tre lford senio r | psycholog y

want ake me . I m ls a in “F times yself at ak.” m l il k to re ait for b can’t w holson Emily Tdietetics

ne with “I can’t wait to be do the holfinals and home for e more on idays. Also only .” on ati du semester until gra

D5

junior |

Alyse Kendig

senior | liberal studies

Kwando Buffet

When I first moved to Chico I was hit with all of the responsibilities of living on my own. Paying for rent, utilities and food made me realize that I needed an on-campus job — fast. I heard rumors of the competitive job market for students in Chico and was worried that I wouldn’t be able to find one. Most students prefer to work on-campus because the employers make accommodations for schedules and there is no work on the weekends or during school breaks. I wanted an on-campus job because I was new to the school. I thought it would be the best venue to get to know the campus and meet new people. In the beginning of my job search I applied for more than eight jobs in a week and got one interview. After having no luck, I kept searching. School was going to start in a week and jobs were starting to fill up. I turned to the Career Center for extra help with my job search. Andrea Lomeli, a junior liberal studies major who works as a student placement interviewer in the Career Center, helps students register and search for jobs using the school’s online job database called Simplicity, which currently has 521 job postings. “The resources are here,” she said. “We are knowledgeable and can get people the help they need to get a job.” The Career Center’s services include one-on-one appointments, resume building and advising when looking for career or part-time positions, said Tom Morford, a senior business major and student assistant at the Career Center.

How do I find out about oncampus jobs? By going to the Career Center in Student Services Center Room 270 and registering for their online job database Simplicity or by visiting the Human Resources website. When is the best time to apply? The best time to apply is in the beginning of the semester, Lomeli said. What should you have when you apply? Turn resumes in even if they are not required, as it shows responsibility and organization, Lomeli said. Resumes allow whoever is hiring to see the applicant’s overall experiences. What should be on your resume? Students should gear their experience on their resumes to the job they’re applying to, Bell said. What are the employers looking for? As a campus employer, A.S. Sustainability Coordinator Robyn DiFalco thinks it’s important for students to stand out on their applications. “We want to see that the student is not just looking for a job,” she said. “We are looking for someone that can articulate their specific interest in the position.” I built a resume and started applying to every job available. The Simplicity database has a lot of on- and off-campus jobs as well as weekend jobs, Lomeli said. They have jobs available now ranging from child-care to sales positions. I applied for a job that

Pregnant? Need Help?

called for hanging up posters on campus. It wasn’t my ideal position, but I got an interview. It turned out it was for a publicist assistant position in the public relations department for Chico’s School of the Arts. My boss hired me because of my background in journalism and writing. He told me he was glad he found someone that had experience that could not only help him hang posters but also write press releases. This job taught me a lot about the campus and let me get acquainted with many people. I work short shifts around my school schedule and my boss understands when I need time off because of a busy school week. For those students who are out of luck, there are other places to fi nd jobs on-campus besides the Career Center. Associated Students has its own human resources department and has jobs available for CAVE, the A.S. Child Development Laboratory and the Wildcat Recreation Center. A.S. positions can get up to 100 applicants, said Brianna Bell, a human resources student assistant. “It’s the luck of the draw with on-campus jobs,” Bell said. “It’s about your schedule fitting in.” I wanted to know exactly what steps students should take in order to get a campus job and compiled a list from a variety of sources. I got the job I needed was because I unknowingly took all the right steps. I applied to positions I didn’t really want, built a resume and cover letter, took interest in my duties and found a job. Taking the initiative is the first and last step in finding a campus job. Amanda Jacobs can be reached at ajacobs@theorion.com

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Issue 16  

Issue 16 of the Orion newspaper at Chico State

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