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Chico State’s Independen t S t u de n t Ne w spa pe r , since 1975

Wednesday October 6, 2010 Volume 65 Issue 7 1 free copy per person additional copies 50¢

Delayed budget shrinks admissions Heidi Parodi STAFF WRITER

Chico State will accept between 550 and 650 transfer students for spring 2010 – even though this year’s state budget is still unfinished. No other students will be admitted and the transfer

SPORTS >>

Horsing Around Chico State student Nellie Williams is a nationally ranked barrel racer

students will only come from Chico State’s service area, which is a 12-county block in Northern California, said Allan Bee, director of admissions for Chico State. California’s budget was supposed to be decided by July 1, but this year the decision has been pushed

back repeatedly and is still being discussed, Bee said. Up to 30,000 new students will be admitted across the California State University system for the winter and spring 2011 sessions despite the unknown budget for this year. Chico State got a command from the

chancellor’s office and it will be followed, said President Paul Zingg in an e-mail interview. “Our campus had no say whatsoever either in the new target which has been assigned to us or the amount of funding coming to us,” Zingg said. Admission numbers are

based on distribution formulas, he said. “The chancellor’s office and trustees are asking the campuses to admit students on the presumption that the legislature and governor will fund the CSU,” Bee said. Deciding to admit >> please see SPRING | A6

>> ENTERTAINMENT

Easy as A - B - C Improv show "The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee" opens today

FEATURES >>

Queer Week

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

ARE YOU EXPERIENCED? Jana Young of the Chico Paper Company [MIDDLE] shows Jake Early’s work in preparation for Chico Experience Week.

Campus events aim to educate and combat prejudice against those who identify with LGBTQ issues

Julia Vazquez STAFF WRITER

More than 100 events will celebrate Chico State and the surrounding community Friday with the launch of The Chico Experience Week. More than 145,000 invitations have been mailed out to members of the Chico State Alumni Association, said Susan Anderson, director of alumni and parent relations. There are two primary reasons The Chico Experience Week is important, said President Paul Zingg. “It reinforces the relationship between the university and the community and it really signals that we are two different sides of the same coin,” Zingg said. The second point is that the week will demonstrate how the university and the community of Chico share values in environmental issues and sustainability. Zingg thinks it will be interesting for alumni to come back and see what has happened to the university since they left, he said. “It reminds them of what the Chico experience means in their own lives,” Zingg said. This event will help students and alumni not only celebrate Chico State, but Chico as a whole, Anderson said. She has been planning The Chico Experience Week since summer 2009 because she wanted people to understand what the “Chico

OPINION >>

Porn enters new dimension Adult film industry has its sights set for 3-D

ONLINE >>

Watch video of Steve Martin's banjo show

STAFF WRITER

INDEX >> A2

Police Blotter

A4

Opinion

A8

Sports

B1

Entertainment

C1

Calendar

C5

Classifieds / Games

B5

Features

D1

Julia Vazquez can be reached at jvazquez@theorion.com

Gang crime in Chico down from 2009 Rudro Roy

Weather

experience” means. “We wanted to make it tangible,” Anderson said. “We really do not have a homecoming, and this will be our new, big, ongoing alumni event.” The Chico City Council declared Oct. 8-17 as the official The Chico Experience Week, she said. The event has sponsors such as Pacific Gas and Electric Co. and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., but will still cost the department of alumni and parent relations close to $20,000. The Chico Paper Co. will join the event Friday by unveiling a print that Chico State alumnus Jake Early made specifically for The Chico Experience Week. Early will provide a print for The Chico Experience Week for the next four years. “I want people to have an emotional connection to the piece and to remember their fond memories in Chico, especially for those who no longer live in Chico,” Early said. Early is one of many artists who will be contributing. More than 80 events are scheduled during the celebratory week — including art shows, farmers' markets, athletic activities, games and more, according to www.thechicoexperienceweek.com. A map and tips for finding parking during events is also available on the website.

High 76 Low 52° Isolated T-storms

Gang-related crime has taken a 22 percent dip so far this year. There have been 61 gangrelated crimes reported as of September 2010, compared to the 78 reported during the same period in 2009, according to Chico Police Department statistics. The latest suspected gangrelated activity was a drive-by shooting at 9:03 p.m. Sept. 22 on Humboldt Avenue, said Paul Ratto, a detective for Chico Police Department’s gang unit. There are about 1,100 documented gang members or associates in Chico. However, not all of them may live in Chico, said police Detective Mike Rodden. “Because Chico’s the biggest

town in this area, it could be guys from Oroville, Hamilton City, Orland coming here to do their shopping, or they have friends here,” he said. Chico also has an issue that some other towns may not – a large transitory population, Rodden said. This transitory population is comprised of students who may be from other areas and may have friends who are gang members or associates of gang members. The most prominent gangs in Chico are the Nortenos and the Surenos, which mean northern and southern in Spanish, Rodden said. Gangs in Northern California don’t organize themselves into streets like ones in Southern California. “If you look at any of our crime stat maps, you’ll see everything

kind of focused around that westside, downtown area,” Rodden said. “The gang members, they want go out and party too.” Fifteen of the 61 crimes in 2010 were felonies, according to the statistics. Among the crimes reported were 12 simple assaults, five physical fights and four cases of drug possession. No murders were reported. A simple assault is a lesser form of assault that may involve injuries that don’t require medical attention, said Robert Woodward, crime analyst for Chico Police Department. Although most gangs are based on ethnicity, street gangs may allow people of other ethnicities to join them, he said. Of the 1,100 documented gang members, about 40 to 50 percent are Nortenos and about

10 percent are Surenos, Rodden said. The rest are made up of Asian American gangs, black gangs and white-pride gangs such as Butte County Gangsters. These numbers are dependant on the officer and the victims involved, Woodward said. Some victims may not report gang-related crimes because they are afraid of retaliation, he said. And sometimes, it’s because the victims themselves are gang members. “Part of that mentality of being in a gang is that you don’t help the police in any way, shape or form,” Woodward said. “Even if it means giving them information about your opposing gang group.” Rudro Roy can be reached at rroy@theorion.com


A2 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 8, 2010

Campus Clips

General scholarships available for 2011-2012 >> The Chico State scholarship application for the 2011-2012 academic year opened Thursday. Scholarship recipients are selected in the spring for the upcoming academic year. In order to be considered for 2011-2012, students must submit an application no later than Dec. 15, 2010. Chico State provides scholarships based on a variety of criteria including academic merit, financial need, participation in clubs and activities, volunteer and community involvement, major and career goals. All students are encouraged to apply. For additional information on how to apply, go to www. csuchico.edu/fa/scholarships/csuchico.shtml Source: Campus announcements

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Weather >>

always online >> theorion.com

Forecast features highs/lows in degrees Fahrenheit source: weather.com

today

thursday

friday

saturday

sunday

monday

tuesday

76/52°

73/51°

77/52°

85/54°

86/55°

81/50°

81/50°

isolated T-storms

few showers

partly cloudy

mostly sunny

sunny

sunny

sunny

World News >>

World News compiled by The Orion’s Walter Ford

London, England – Druids have been worshipping the sun and earth for thousands of years in Europe, but now they can say they're practicing an officially recognized religion. The ancient pagan tradition best known for gatherings at Stonehenge every summer solstice has been formally classified as a religion for the first time in Britain. Source: Associated Press Acapulco, Mexico – Mexican

Islamabad, Pakistan – Gun-

Amsterdam,

police have identified 22 people

Netherlands – Dutch anti-Islam

men in Pakistan opened fire on

who were kidnapped by gun-

politician Geert Wilders is going

oil trucks bound for NATO forces in

men in the Pacific resort town

on trial Monday for alleged hate

Afghanistan, setting some 20 vehicles

of Acapulco and have found four

speech, even as his popularity

on fire and killing three people.

cars they were riding in, state media

and influence in the Netherlands

reported.

are near all-time highs.

Investigators are looking for more

The attack came shortly after Pakistan's ambassador to the U.S. vowed his country would go after terrorists on its soil.

Wilders incited hatred against

leads in the case, said the state-run

Muslims with remarks comparing

Notimex news agency Saturday.

Islam to Nazism and by calling for

a.m. local time on Monday, said Bin Yamin,

a ban on the Quran. If convicted, he

a deputy police chief. They told people near

faces up to a year in prison. He could keep

the trucks to run away, and most did. Then they

his seat in parliament.

opened fire.

Source: CNN.com

Eight gunmen entered the area at 12:15

Source: CNN.com

Source: Yahoo.com

A.S. Recycling loses thousands sorting through trash

A.S. Recycling Stats for ’09-’10 Plastic Bottles

20,840 lbs. = 166,720 plastic bottles

29,848 lbs. = 59,696

Glass Bottles Paper

THE ORION • JEB DRAPER

glass bottles

COMPOST COP A.S. Sustainability volunteer Michaela Cicero [LEFT] directs Stacy Park on proper recycling.

Reading Recycling Codes

202,104 lbs. = 40,420

Recycling Bins

Recycling Centers

reams of paper soft drink bottles

Compost

plastic grocery bags

6-pack plastic rings food containers

174,688 lbs. = 2.9 30-ton tanks

plastic zip ties

plastic milk jugs

plastic utensils auto parts INFOGRAPHIC BY LAUREN STORNETTA

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sconsiglio@theorion.com

C h i c o S tat e’s I n d e p e n d e n t S t u d e n t N e w s pa p e r , s i n c e 1975

Anthony Siino

[Corrections]

Stephanie Consiglio can be reached at

DESIGN

Source: Campus announcements

Just because Chico State students recycle doesn’t mean they are doing it properly. A.S. Recycling spends a good chunk of its time throwing away students’ trash instead of collecting the recyclables, said A.S. Recycling coordinator Eli Goodsell. Although students have the right idea to recycle their plastics, many aren’t educated on which plastics are recyclable and end up throwing trash in the recycle bins, he said. A.S. Recycling is losing more than $2,000 a year in labor pay because of how time consuming it is to separate trash from recyclables, Goodsell said. ■ VIDEO “We spend about five extra hours Get a closer look a week picking out trash,” he said. “A at A.S. Recycling’s large percentage of the stuff we collect compost sorting process at on campus has a lot of trash in it.” Most of the time is spent emptying theorion.com out plastic bottles because students use them as containers for their trash, Goodsell said. “We find nasty things such as chew, feminine products, sexual protection and miscellaneous liquids inside bottles,” he said. The contaminated liquids found in bottles goes by the term “the sauce,” said environmental studies program coordinator Mark Stemen. If bottles have trash such as candy wrappers in them, it is possible to get it out, Goodsell said. Students are discouraged from putting any liquids in the bottles. “If educated enough, hopefully people will buy things that can be recycled or reused and that would reduce waste costs on the university side,” he said. Students are directly affected because this hurts the university budget, which increases student fees, he said. “We actually started a new program in the Bell Memorial Union where students can compost everything except the plastic-ware and Pepsi cups,” Goodsell said. The bins are educational because students can learn how to recycle outside the BMU by seeing it done with the new composting bins, said senior humanities and recreation major Hannah Dillard. There are seven types of plastic and not all of them can be recycled, Goodsell said. The triangle on the bottom of plastics has a number on it, which stands for the type of plastic it is, Stemen said. Only numbers one and two are recyclable in Butte County, but people will recycle any plastic because of the triangle. People think anything that looks like paper is

recyclable, but it is trash if it has a plastic film on it, Goodsell said. Pretty much anything that is more than one material would be trash. “I for sure recycle glass and paper – when it comes to plastic I only recycle water bottles or Gatorade bottles,” Dillard said. “Sometimes I’m not sure about it, so I throw it in the trash.” If people aren’t sure about whether the plastic is recyclable, they probably just assume incorrectly that it’s better to recycle, she said.

DESIGN

Sutter Hall grand opening planned for Saturday >> A dedication ceremony for Chico State’s newest residential facility, Sutter Hall, will be held Saturday. The event will include a ceremonial ribbon cutting, facility tours for the public and refreshments for those in attendance. The ceremony will feature speeches from President Paul Zingg, Vice President for Student Affairs Drew Calandrella and University Housing and Food Service Director David Stephen. The 232-bed facility has been in use since the beginning of fall semester, but the dining area is still under construction and is expected to be finished later this year.

STAFF WRITER

EDITORIAL

Source: www.csuchico.edu/celt

Stephanie Consiglio

EDITORIAL

CELT Conference to boost educational practices >> Chico State Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching will present the 16th Annual CELT Conference from today until Friday. Hundreds of Chico State faculty, staff and students will join faculty from other California State University campuses and California Community Colleges to participate in a full schedule of conference sessions that will explore new ways to enhance high-quality learning and teaching. Registration for the conference is closed, but session walk-ins will be welcomed.

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New smoking ban proposed for business buffer zones >> A new initiative is being discussed to ban smoking 20 feet outside of businesses in Orland and Chico. The new project is being led by DeAnne Blankenship, program manager of the California Health Collaborative. This initiative for Chico and Orland exists to protect Californians from secondhand smoke outside of restaurants, bars and stores. A state law was passed in 2004 stating that one could not smoke within 20 feet of municipal, county or state buildings.

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U.S. apologizes for Guatamalan STI research >> From 1946-1948, the U.S. investigated the effectiveness of penicillin in treating or preventing syphilis and gonorrhea — and on Thursday, the U.S. apologized for intentionally infecting Guatemalans with sexually transmitted diseases. President Barack Obama called Guatemalan President Alvaro Colom to extend his apologies, Colom said. The tests were carried out on female commercial sex workers, prisoners, patients in mental health facilities and soldiers. More than 1,600 people were infected, according to the study.

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COURTESY OF • CHICOGREENLINE.COM

KEEP IT AS IS The Green Line is under debate at the Special City Council session Sept. 28. Community members are proposing to add language to the city's general plan that would keep the Green Line entact for years to come. The area in threat of broaching the line is near Estes Road.

Special City Council session debates Chico General Plan Teresa De Luz STAFF WRITER

Three important issues concerning Chico's General Plan were discussed at a special session City Council meeting Sept. 28. Keeping things “as is” Members of the community proposed an addition to the General Plan that would leave current legislation “as is” that protects open land from development. The “Green Line” is a boundary that prohibits development within its border and protects wildlife and agricultural land, said Desi Hatton, a recent graduate of Chico State who attended the meeting. Nobody from the public spoke to oppose the issue. An area of land located around Estes Road has recently been sold and may possibly be developed if the Green Line is moved, said Hatton, who is also a member of Concerned Citizens for Protection of the Green Line organization. Including the term “as is” will prevent the

Delta Chi to stay unrecognized Lindsay Woychick

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line being moved. Protecting the Green Line is vitally important to the sustainability movement, she said. “People should get behind protecting the Green Line because it will be protected indefinitely for later generations,” Hatton said. Biking to Hegan Lane The creator of ChicoBag, Andy Keller, has proposed a bike path accessible to the Hegan Lane Business Park. Hegan Lane, where Keller’s business is located, is located off the Midway. A ring bike path, which would not share space with cars, would be ideal for pedestrians and bicyclists who want to ride or walk to work, but feel unsafe doing so, Keller said. None of the public at the meeting opposed the proposition. “It’s a really unnerving situation besides the safety issue,” Keller said. “Its just unenjoyable to ride.” Keller thinks the nearly landlocked business park is an issue that cannot be ignored by the Chico City Council, he said.

“My point at the meeting is that this is a big enough idea that it needs to be in the General Plan,” Keller said. “It's not an afterthought – we need to make Chico a pedestrianfriendly city.” Park Avenue congestion Traffic on Park Avenue was an issue addressed by Keller and other members of the community. A proposed lane to provide more access to the Hegan Lane Business Park would cross through the “green zone” area of Comanche Creek, said Brendan Vieg, principal planner and project manager of the General Plan. People are passionate about the proposal, he said. The extended debate to protect this open space can be avoided by providing alternative routes, Keller said. “My idea would preserve open space and improve the value of business development in this area,” Keller said. Teresa De Luz can be reached at tdeluz@theorion.com

The future of the former Chico State fraternity Delta Chi is uncertain after its spring 2010 suspension. The fraternity has not given any indication of returning as a recognized chapter since its suspension, said Larry Bassow, adviser for the Interfraternity Council. Discussion between the university and the Delta Chi headquarters has not begun regarding the fraternity’s return to Chico State, he said. A decision on when, or if, the fraternity will return in the future is undetermined at this time. The chapter average GPA requirement was not met for several consecutive semesters, Bassow said. Delta Chi was the first fraternity suspended for failure to meet the policy implemented in 2005, which required a chapter average GPA of 2.5. The fraternity was given an academic improvement plan to improve the chapter average after its first semester below the required GPA, he said. Some changes were made by eliminating members with low GPAs, but the chapter consistently did not meet requirements. The faculty adviser and chapter president met with the fraternity after its first semester below the requirement to discuss strategies to improve grades, individuals in the chapter and culture, Bassow said. Delta Chi continued to fall short of requirements. The fraternity organized mentoring between alumni and current members along with a scholarship fund from the national headquarters in 2009, said Kyle Kubon, former Delta Chi president. Delta Chi eliminated socials during this time, and low membership rates made it difficult to field recreational sports teams. The lack of social events left members discouraged, Kubon said.

“It was really tough to keep the morale up of 15 or 20 guys,” he said. The reorganization of the chapter in spring 2009 by the national headquarters made the chapter see the urgency to make changes, Kubon said. The seriousness led to added study hours for members and some members were let go. “It came down to everyone putting in the effort, and not everyone did,” he said. The added effort by the chapter in what would be its final semester was not enough to keep Delta Chi recognized by the school. “It was too big of a hole before we started to kick it into high gear,” Kubon said. The fraternity was suspended by the national chapter in spring 2010 after failing to meet the required GPA chapter average after five consecutive semesters, said Ray Galbreth, executive director of Delta Chi, Inc., in a phone interview. Other reasons for the national chapter suspension included failure to pay dues and a decline in membership. “They started drifting in recent years, and we’ve been trying to pull them out of the negative turn they’ve taken,” Galbreth said. “But we couldn’t do it.” A director from the national chapter was sent to Chico State to redirect the chapter after its failure to meet the university and national requirements, he said. The Chico State chapter of Delta Chi, chartered in 1987, was a five-time winner of the President’s Cup in its early years, Galbreth said. A President’s Cup recipient is ranked in the top five of nationwide chapters for its accomplishments. Bassow confirmed the fraternity’s early standing in the Greek community. “They were one of the big ones for a long time and it’s sad,” he said. “It didn’t have to be this way, but it is.” Lindsay Woychick can be reached at lwoychick@theorion.com

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WEDNESDAY, OCT.6, 2010 |

A5

UNIVERSITY HOUSING >>

THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

DORM DINING The Whitney Hall dining area has been impacted with students due to delays at the Sutter Hall dining facility.

Meal plans undergo changes in face of Sutter Hall costs Walter Ford A SSISTANT NE WS EDITOR

Last semester, students enjoyed the Cash Equivalency Program that accompanied residential meal plans. This semester, the program has been scrapped in a cost-cutting measure by University Housing and Food Service. The fi nancial burden brought on by Sutter Hall forced University Housing and Food Service to cut dining options for students, said Jeffery Soon, associate director for A.S. Dining Services. “It was decided that the best plan to attack some of the fi nancial obligations was to eliminate the Cash Equivalency Program,” he said. The program allowed residents on the meal plan to substitute one meal at the

dining hall for a $6 meal at a number of on and off-campus locations, he said. The program cost University Housing and Food Service money because revenue from meals purchased at other spots on campus went to Associated Students, said David Houchin, associate director for University Housing and Food Service. “It was a very expensive transfer of money,” he said. “We can’t offer the equivalency program this year because of the high costs of Sutter.” The program was originally implemented to alleviate crowding at the Whitney Dining Hall, he said. The dining area at Sutter Hall won’t have the same space restrictions as Whitney Hall. The problem now is that the

campus, except Whitney and Sutter halls. Each student resident with a meal plan was given an allotted amount of dining dolOffering an We knew we lars for free alternative to alleviTo prevent would get some ate crowding overcrowding at Whitney at Whitney push back.” Jeffery Soon dining until Hall while the associated director for A.S. Dining Sutter dining Sutter Hall Services is complete, dining area he said. is being comFor the 1,620 students on pleted and to compensate for the absence of the Cash Equiv- meal plans, University Housalency Program, A.S. Dining ing and Food Service paid out Services is offering Retail Din- $195,300 in dining dollars, said Cindy Haws, meal plan ing Dollars, Soon said. The dining dollars were administrative accountant. The distribution of free dinnever supposed to be part of any food plan, but they have ing dollars was a one-time been added to food plans for expense to help with crowdfree because of the Sutter ing at Whitney, she said. “We haven’t fi lled to capacHall delays, he said. They can be used at most eateries on ity yet, but we haven’t seen Cash Equivalency Program was cancelled and Sutter Dining still isn’t ready, Houchin said.

lines like this before either,” Haws said. “The hope is that Sutter will be fi nished by Nov. 1.” Residents’ reaction Backlash related to the meal plan change was expected from some students, Soon said. “We knew we would get some push back,” he said. “Primarily from the sophomores.” Resident adviser Jacob McGowan has been on a meal plan for the past three years. The Cash Equivalency Program allotted more money per student to use outside of residential dining, he said. “I liked the equivalency program because I got a lot more,” he said. “For me, I was getting $30 a week for 16 weeks and now its $100 total

for 16 weeks.” McGowan thinks first year students haven’t complained about the system because they don’t know about the old system, but a lot of the returning students and resident advisers are upset about it, he said. “As a R.A., that’s part of our compensation so we kind of got downgraded,” he said. Some freshmen have already spent the allotted Retail Dining Dollars and are stuck eating dorm food unless they want to spend personal money, said freshman resident Ryan Koenig. “I’ve already spent all mine,” he said. “The food in the dorms is like eating cardboard with spray-on cheese.” Walter Ford can be reached at wford@theorion.com


A6 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT.6, 2010

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Academy e-Learning program aims to improve high-capacity classes Kelly Ward All accused of violating the law are innocent until proven guilty | Information cited directly from Chico Police Department Thursday, 12:51 p.m.: Subject disturbing the peace reported at 1000 block of Hobart Street. “Ex-resident is across the street and trying to pick fight with other residents. Reporting party told subject to leave, so now he is standing across the street yelling, throwing food at house.”

Saturday, 10:43 p.m.: Objects being thrown reported at 700 block of West Ninth Street. “Throwing bottles into the street. Group of white male adults.”

Friday, 3:26 a.m.: Shoplifting reported at 7-Eleven on 300 block of Walnut Street. “Intoxicated subject in the store. Subject is walking around the store, opening products and eating them without paying. Reporting party does not want to apprehend the suspect for the shoplift because subject is covered in urine.”

Friday, 2:10 p.m.: Threat reported at Marsh Junior High on 2000 block of Humboldt Avenue. “Subject said ‘If you don’t give me my hat back I am going to cocktail bomb the school.’” Friday, 3:41 p.m.: Suspicious circumstances reported at Safeway on 1000 block of West Sacramento Avenue. “Reporting party had car at a mechanic to get worked on, but she found it in the parking lot at Safeway. The mechanic has had the reporting party’s car to work on it for a couple of months.”

Saturday, 11:02 p.m.: Juvenile problem reported at 300 block of Mesa Verde Court. “Approximately 20 juveniles are running down the street ringing doorbells.” Sunday, 1:22 a.m.: Fight reported at 600 block of West Sixth Avenue. “Female was just punched in the mouth and is bleeding. Females still in physical. Males now joining in.” Sunday, 3:06 a.m.: Objects thrown at vehicle reported at 1000 block of East Avenue. “Reporting party advising her vehicle was just hit by eggs. Two teenagers threw the items.”

Friday, 11:40 p.m.: Subject disturbing the peace reported at 700 block of West Fifth Street. “Male subject sitting in a household chair in the middle of the road. No lights, etc., to alert drivers.”

STAFF WRITER

A developing program is educating select teachers on creating more efficient and engaging courses. The Academy e-Learning program, which is now in its second pilot year at Chico State, focuses on using multimedia resources as supplements to various courses, said Laura Sederberg, manager of the technology and learning program. The aim of the program is to make high-capacity classes more engaging for students, she said. It’s not yet known if the program has been able to save Chico State any money or if it’s making teaching more efficient, Sederberg said. The first year is in a phase of evaluation and a report will be issued in the next few months. There are currently 14 teachers involved in the program, she said. They are split into six groups to work on restructuring six different courses. With the program, teachers can add wikis – editable resource pages – to their classes so students can share information, she said. Professors can also add online activities on the class WebCT Vista for students to supplement their course’s lecture. The program also gets the teachers to work together to create an established curriculum for a course, which would make student learning similar even with a different

Lindsay Woychick STAFF WRITER

SPRING: $4.6 million in funds said Meredith Kelley, vice students without knowing the provost for enrollment manbudget may prove risky, he agement. Chico State’s campus received $4.6 million from said. “If we don’t get the fund- those funds. There’s a ing that we’re chance that expecting or, Our campus more money God forbid, we could come take another had no say into the syscut, it’s seritem, she ously going to whatsoever either said. effect how many in the new target “We have students we conbeen promsider in the fall,” which has been Bee said. assigned to us or the ised from the legHowever, the islature campus has suf- amount of funding additional ficient funding coming to us.” for spring 2010 Paul Zingg funding for 2010-2011 if the budget president year, but doesn’t come until the ink through because of one-time stimulus money, he is drawn on the budget, we’re not really sure,” Kelley said. said. The most important focus on This fall, the CSU system received an additional $106 mil- Chico State’s side of the issue lion in federal stimulus money, is to get enough classes for the

because he can use it to help so many students such as those who cannot learn all of the information in one class period, he said. There are some students that just need more time to process information, he said. Rushing students to get work done in a 50-minute class period can cause anxiety. This can reflect poorly on students’ grades “when in fact they’re wonderfully intelligent and can succeed,” Mazur said. The online lectures could help in an indirect way, he said. “There are some students who need a bigger font with visual impairments, and if it was posted online, they could manipulate that,” he said. The theater department is working on a new plan as part of the program, which will be put into effect during spring 2011, Mazur said. The theater department team of two teachers has launched an online program called “Pachyderm,” which will be a supplement to the lecture and give students online activities, Mazur said. It could also remove the use of a textbook so students could save money. Pachyderm is being piloted this semester and the current Theater 110 students will give their reviews on it at the end of the Fall 2010 semester, Mazur said. Kelly Ward can be reached at kward@theorion.com

Greek system reviewed

Saturday, 7:41 a.m.: Subject disturbing the peace reported at 200 block of West Third Street. “Subject is walking up to people and yelling at them. Appears intoxicated.”

continued from A1

teacher, Sederberg said. Unified curriculum makes teaching these classes more efficient for professors and gives them time to teach additional courses, she said. If a new professor comes in, there will already be an established curriculum for them to work from as well. Jacob Coleman, a sophomore biology major, is enrolled in Philosophy 102, another highcapacity class, he said. His teacher is not in the Academy e-Learning program and lectures three days a week, Coleman said. The traditional model is decent, but he does not get to meet people or learn more about the professor, he said. Closer interaction with the teacher where the teacher can learn is his name, and group work would be helpful. Mike Mazur, a professor of theater, is part of the program and is working on restructuring the Theater 110 class, which has about 250 students enrolled, he said. “There’s a lot of research that says that the traditional classroom model puts many students at a disadvantage,” Mazur said. Professors selected to be in the Academy e-Learning took a class over the summer that lasted about a month, he said. The summer class taught the professors how learning styles vary from student to student. Mazur likes this program

students enrolled, Bee said. “We can bring students here endlessly, but that’s going to make it worse for everybody if there’s too many students all trying to get the same class,” he said. The normal application period is Aug. 1-31, Bee said. Because there was no budget by Aug. 31, the CSU system extended the period to Sept. 27. Extending the deadlines puts pressure on everybody involved, especially when it comes to processing applications, he said. “It’s got to happen fast, both from our side – the folks who have to deal with the applications – but also from the student’s side because we need to let them know, because this is their life,” Bee said.

A review of the Chico State Greek community indicates that positive change has been made since a previous assessment made in 2005. University groups and members of the Chico community discussed changes to the system since 2005, said Thomas Jelke, president of T. Jelke Solutions, an independent consulting company who did an evaluation. A report of the data taken during Jelke's visit will be completed in about six weeks and will then be given to the Greek community for review, Jelke said. The current review was conducted at the request of the university to see what kind of progress had been made in the Greek system. A Greek system task force was created at Chico State to salvage the Greek community after Jelke’s 2005 report, he said. The company conducted the previous review during a tense time for the Chico State

Greek community and the university following the death of fraternity pledge Matthew Carrington, Jelke said. The focus is not on the survival of the Greek system anymore, but on how they can improve the community around them. Jelke met with members of the Interfraternity Council executive board Sept. 29 to discuss where the Greek community was then and now, said Travis Arendt, IFC vice president of programming and leadership. Unity among the individual fraternities and the pursuit of higher academic standards were noticeable changes discussed at the meeting, he said. The professionalism and consistency of IFC meetings, along with the increase to a 2.35 GPA requirement for fraternitybound students in spring 2011, emphasize the changes made from 2005. A closer connection between the Greek community, the university and the local community has also been better established, Arendt said. Having Jelke return was

beneficial because he had seen the previous state of the Greek system and was able to compare it to the current one, Arendt said. “It’s really nice to have somebody there who can represent what it was like and shine some light on what we have done and where we need to be,” Arendt said. Jelke also met with members of the Panhellenic Council during the visit, said Megan Alley, president of the council. A long-term goal set at the meeting is to include more nonGreek members in Greek-life events, Alley said. The council plans to involve the community in philanthropic events. The pursuit of improvement in the Greek system was noticeable, Jelke said. “They know that things aren’t perfect, but they are very clear about how they want to make things better, which is a distinction from last time where they thought everything was fine,” he said. Lindsay Woychick can be reached at lwoychick@theorion.com

Heidi Parodi can be reached at hparodi@theorion.com

Fraternity resigns from IFC Lindsay Woychick STAFF WRITER

COURTESY OF • DIGITAL- TOPO-MAPS.COM

ENROLLMENT RESTRICTION The university is taking measures to curb spring 2011 enrollment by only accepting transfer students from the university's service area. The area is made up of these 12 counties.

Epsilon Sigma Rho resigned from the Interfraternity Council in response to the planned GPA requirement increase for spring 2011. The fraternity made the choice to leave IFC after failing to meet the GPA chapter average of 2.25, said Andy Suarez, president of Epsilon Sigma Rho. The resignation from IFC also came after the decision that the GPA chapter average requirement for fraternities that are part of IFC will increase to 2.35 in spring 2011. Epsilon Sigma Rho, which became part of IFC in spring 2009, had a GPA chapter average of 2.06 upon entering the council, Suarez said. The chapter’s current average is 1.89. “Our main concern right now is education and getting our brothers to focus on school, rather than focusing on socials or events going on at school,” he said. The fraternity has made steps

to write new bylaws regarding academics and remove people from leadership roles within the fraternity who do not show that their focus is on education, Suarez said. The chapter has eight members, which he thinks makes it more difficult to meet the GPA requirement than it would have for a larger fraternity. The average number of members for IFC fraternities is 30 to 35 members, with the largest being more than 70 members, said IFC President Dustin Pesch. Each member’s GPA weighs more heavily in a smaller fraternity. “It’s a bummer to see them go, but hopefully it’s not permanent,” Pesch said. “If they get their member numbers up, it will be way easier for them to retain a higher GPA.” Epsilon Sigma Rho and Gamma Zeta Alpha were the only fraternities to serve as part of both IFC and the Multicultural Greek Council, Pesch said. IFC will now have just one multicultural

fraternity in the remaining nine fraternities. IFC would like more diversity on the council in the form of multicultural fraternities, Pesch said. It brings more perspective to IFC meetings. “We really want to see them back because they bring another aspect to the council that our other fraternities don’t,” Pesch said. The chapter wants to improve the GPA chapter average before returning to IFC, said Anthony Alfaro, former IFC representative for Epsilon Sigma Rho. “We want to show we can maintain it,” Alfaro said. “If we can’t maintain it, there is no point in getting back on board.” Epsilon Sigma Rho will now operate solely under the Multicultural Greek Council, he said. The chapter plans to return to IFC, but no definite date has been set. Lindsay Woychick can be reached at lwoychick@theorion.com


WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 |

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In Loving Memory Of

A5

Gina Marie Maggio

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Thumbs Up up to English grammar. Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo. Google it.

Thumbs Up up to rain. It may not be a popular opinion, but it’s a refreshing change of pace.

Thumbs Down down to txt spk. C@n n e 1 undrstnd u? Duz it sav tim3 4 re@lz?

always online >> theorion.com | WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

A8 |

Editorial >>

No reason to fear Sutter Cameras Smile, you’re on candid camera. Or you might be if you commit a crime near Sutter Hall. Theft and vandalism are inescapable issues on college campuses, particularly in dormitories, and there is no easy way of dealing with them. It’s difficult to strike a balance between protection and liberty. Nevertheless, the university has implemented a fairly elegant measure in attempt to reduce the staggering $63,000 worth of damages caused by theft and vandalism last year. In order to combat the criminal element in and around the campus community, the administration has taken preventative steps that may seem worrisome at first glance — installing video cameras. The recent addition of security cameras to the new Sutter Hall dormitory has obvious potential to raise concerns. However, the nature of the system and the placement of the cameras prevent potential abuse. Generally speaking, the new security system is a good thing — if not a bit excessive. There are 126 cameras in a dorm with a maximum occupancy of 222. We have no way to rationalize this — it’s just too wasteful, especially since the plan is to extend the system in effect at Sutter Hall to the entire Chico State campus. At least the university had the foresight to test the system on a small scale before implementing any major costly changes. If that many cameras are required to effectively monitor a living space for so few students, perhaps the system isn’t worth its weight. But aside from that potential weakness, the initiative is pretty solid. Though the idea of video security is often associated with an Orwellian oppression

of freedom — the term surveillance comes to mind — such stereotypes don’t apply in these circumstances. There is no concern for invasion of privacy, since the cameras are strategically placed so that their lines of sight do not invade private areas like bedrooms or bathrooms. And before you put on a puppet show for the cameras — the system is not active surveillance but passive monitoring, meaning the tapes are only viewed after crimes happen as a way to identify the guilty party. While this does nothing to stop a crime in progress, it can serve as an effective deterrent. The ominous, watchful orbs are very real reminders that crime has consequences. As far as we understand, the system would only be used to determine guilt in cases of harm unto others such as theft, vandalism, assault or other crimes of that nature. In this role, we favor the security measure. However, we do not condone use of the cameras to determine guilt in cases of personal rule infractions such as underage drinking or running in the hallways. We would like to see some numbers corroborating the effectiveness as cameras as deterrents, but that is not yet possible since the measure is so new. For similar reasons, we cannot say with any certainty that the measures taken to prevent abuse are effective — or conversely, necessary. It simply remains to be seen. Ultimately it comes down to an analysis of the risks and benefits inherent to the system. As long as camera use stays reactionary and is scaled down to better suit the number of students, it doesn’t seem to pose any real threat, and we encourage the university to pursue this as a viable security measure.

Bad professors taint tenure system Alexander Seymour OPINION COLUMNIST

It is one of the most disappointing experiences in education – searching for that relevant and compelling class and getting excited about learning its material, only to be greeted by a professor who is unable or unwilling to teach properly. This is the exception to the rule, and most teachers at Chico State are more than competent. Yet, most students, such as senior Jennifer Leslie, can recall having at least one professor who has sabotaged his or her own class. “I remember one seasoned professor passionate about his subject, but not so much about actually teaching,” Leslie said. “He would come into class grumpy, go around to each computer and say to each student, ‘You’re doing it wrong,’ without ever explaining what to do. The final came around without us learning anything. Something was wrong with that class, and it wasn’t us.” The results of this kind of teaching can wreck a class’ potential. “It ruined my motivation more than anything,” Leslie said. “I felt frustrated and defeated.” Regardless of the frequency of these experiences, it does the education system no service to keep professors like this in class. The problem is the teacher performance reviews. Most students are familiar with filling

out teacher survey forms, but these are only a small part of the review. Other aspects include a class sit-in by another professor, a committee evaluation and discussion with the teacher in question. Evaluations need not occur more than once every five years for tenured teachers, according to Article 15 of the California Faculty Association Collective Bargaining Agreement. If a class sit-in is needed, the teacher in question is informed at least five days in advance, which allows a chance to prepare a lesson plan that may or may not be characteristic of the normal classroom experience. Student evaluations, sit-in information and professor statements are then forwarded and discussed by a committee of other tenured professors within the department – a jury of peers, but a far cry from what would be found at a trial. This jury is made up of people who have been working with the teacher in question for years, meaning he may have friends and research partners reviewing his performance. The biggest conflict of interest is that the teacher and every tenured professor conducting the evaluation are all part of the CFA, and the criteria of the review are a product of the union’s bargaining. The CFA is

IL LU S T Y L T R AT IO ER N N E UM BY A NN

not going to be stringent in upholding quality standards that could keep its members out of work. While most professors truly care about their students’ education and take the written recommendations of the evaluation to heart, the CFA’s article 15 has left no room for reviews to result in the removal of a tenured professor. The evaluation committee can choose to move a peer to a different class or demote him to a lower level of tenure-ship, but this is exceedingly rare. In the political science department, the effectiveness of these reviews speaks for themselves. Professors who have received unfavorable reviews are demoted very rarely, said Eddie Vela, associate dean of behavioral and social sciences. “Honestly it’s really difficult,” Vela said. “There has been one demotion since 1989 that I’m aware of.” I’ve run into at least two professors since 2006 who needed a lot more than a demotion. Some professors, such as lecturer John Crosby, can see a clearer system of teacher evaluation that would be more beneficial to the school. “There needs to be a basic level of teaching proficiency that is required of all faculty, temporary and tenured alike,” Crosby said. “If this requirement is not met, the teacher in question should be put on probation, given a chance to improve and, failing that, must be let go.” Eventually, the CSU should consider bringing in a third party from outside the university to participate in performance evaluations in order to check and balance the current uniondominated system. There would also be benefits from reforming student evaluation surveys, which are often not taken seriously by students, but are still valued by professors looking to improve themselves. But those solutions will have little impact unless a door is left open for the expulsion of the few frustrating outliers who lose the interest or ability to teach. Until then, students should take an “early and often” approach to visiting ratemyprofessor.com during class registration.

Alexander Seymour can be reached at aseymour@theorion.com

EDITORIAL CARTOON >>

Housing problems get out of this world JJames Jelenko OPINON EDITOR O

ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER NEUMANN

Editorial Board Sports Editor

Video Editor

Managing Editor

Entertainment Editor

Online Editor

News Editor

Features Editor

Chief Copy Editor

Delaine Moore Patty Conover Anthony Siino Opinion Editor

James Jelenko

Lindsey Barrett Matt Shilts

Almendra Carpizo Photo Editor

Jeb Draper

Kevin Hagedorn Esmeralda Ramirez Katie Mills Art Director

Mark Rojas The opinion editor can be reached at

opinioneditor@theorion.com

Letters Editor

to the

Editor in Chief

You no longer need to watch the sci-fi channel to see what life in space would be like – in just a few short years, there will be a slew of space hotels available to the aspiring extra-terrestrial tourist. This may sound like an outrageous waste of resources, but there may be a practical application for this technology right here in Chico – if students can’t get control of our housing situation. Students, particularly those of us who have a low income, are often denied housing and left to stretch a tent between a rock and a hard place. It can get so overwhelming looking for affordable student housing that space hotels start to sound like a viable solution to this pressing problem – if the rent wasn’t too high I could live with the commute.

But before you make your reservation and look up the conversion from U.S. dollars to galactic space credits, there are a few tools students can use to leverage our collective presence into negotiating power with landlords. Student enrollment is dropping. California State University campuses are required to decrease enrollment this year and Chico State is no exception. The overall campus population of 16,934 students has dropped by 1,000 students since 2009, said Bill Allen, interim director of the university’s institutional research office. This gives more power to the students who are here. If there are fewer customers competing for housing, landlords are more likely to work with interested parties. Dan Herbert, president of Sheraton Real Estate Management, told the CN&R that rental companies will likely drop prices as a result of the drop in student numbers.

The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

Some companies, such as the Chico Rancheria Housing Corporation, provide monthly rent assistance to students in good academic standing. These changes can benefit our financial situation as starving students, but we have to be assertive and realistic about what we can spend. It can be awkward and uncomfortable to make demands, but there is a difference between being honest and being pushy. Just tell the landlord or rental company up front what you can afford, even if it’s beneath the asking price – it’s possible to catch a break and easier than beaming up to the Milky Way Hotel. More importantly, it will unify us as consumers and give us the power to demand fair and affordable rent. It’s best for students as individuals, as well as Chico as a community. James Jelenko can be reached at opinioneditor@theorion.com

Read the guidelines below for information on how to submit your own Letters to the Editor • Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

• The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.


Thumbs Down down to wearing suits on campus. Come on guys, you’re making the rest of us look bad.

Thumbs Up up to KCSC radio. They were kind enough to give us a show, so please listen to it. Thursday 6-7 p.m.

Thumbs Down down to mosquitoes. Summer is over — your reign of terror has come to an end.

Thumbs Up up to the leaves changing color. It’s beautiful, and “fall foliage” rolls so well off the tongue.

Thumbs Down down to the iPhone auto-correct feature. Is the word “roommate” really that close to “folklore”?

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 | always online >> theorion.com

| A9

Triple-D takes new meaning in adult film Joanna Hass OPINION COLUMNIST

While previously referring to the volume of a starlet’s talent, triple-D porn is taking on a whole new dimension – literally. As of August, a group of Hong Kong filmmakers announced their intention and movement to create the world’s first 3-D pornographic film, which is set to release in May 2011. What does this mean for the already engorged adult industry? Well, a new meaning of the term ‘gross profit,’ for one. It’s no secret that there has been a revival of the third dimension in cinema during the past couple of Oscar seasons, but was it just me or weren’t we all getting tired of paying extra money for a two-hour headache courtesy of Cinemark? And now this eye-popping genre is taking the sex world by force – how do you say, ‘No thanks means no thanks,’ in Mandarin? The film “3-D Sex and Zen: Extreme Ecstasy” is loosely based on a classic Chinese tale of a young man who finds a world of open sexual pleasure and the love of his life all in the same plot line – a feat in any dimension. What is more of a shocker is the fact that these filmmakers are doing this despite the likely outcome that the conservative Chinese government will block the attempts to release it within the country. But move over Anime, because the film crew has already arranged talks for release in Japan, among other northeast-

ern Asian countries, according the Daily China website. Worried that the rest of the world might feel left out from this ground groping into the world of cinematography? Well fear not, sex fans, because there is already an Italian response for a similar classic film re-sexing, as well as a pledge from the American filmmakers at Hustler to make your balls blue with a 3-D adaptation of “Avatar,” according to the website. Could this be the titillation our economy needs? We will have to watch the Chinese experimentation, as we will be able to see what it’s like to have a little fortune nookie between the sheets. This could be a virtual cash orgy. Good news for American masturbators – this could get Christine O’Donnell off your backs. Who knows, with the right technological breakthroughs, we could be looking at a “1984”-esque world where people don’t have to move to get their sexfilm fix because the virtual graphics will take care of the messy parts of the whole experience. Then again, by

to the

Letter Editor

Confederate Flag use inaccurate I am an alumni of Chico State and I recently viewed volume 65 issue 6 of the Orion. I am concerned with an illustration in the police blotter that displays a Confederate Flag. The illustration was pertaining to a disturbance in which a citizen was driving a truck around and yelling “white power.” My problem with this is that you assigned a Confederate Flag with this act of hatred. People of the South are proud of their history, my family included — though they are still branded as being racist pigs because of illustrations such as this. Though the Confederate Flag is used by institutions of hate, I encourage you to think deeper. There is so much more history regarding the Civil War than our government would like to admit. You are only encouraging the separation of fine people from our great nation and categorizing southerners as stupid rednecks who hate every other race. I have respected the views of the Orion for years, and I expect more from you as an alumni. Thank You Brad Sullivan Class of 2010

that time we’ll have devolved so far that our laziness will drive us all to obesity and pornography will probably be the only chance we have for sexual fantasy. Either way, it wouldn’t technically be you masturbating and by O’Donnell’s definition, you also wouldn’t be cheating on your spouse. And yes, ironically, how that makes sense is the hardest part of this entire situation to understand. But there you have it. The solution to all of our problems is literally coming at you in the third dimension in 2011. Joanna Hass can be reached at jhass@theorion.com

Government control stifles small business Nick Pike OPINION COLUMNIST

Since the lending crisis has put America into a full-tilt economic panic, it appears the government’s only solution is to dig the country out of a depression with collectivism. Since change in the White House has occurred, the answer to our economic downturn has come in the apparition of increased government control over the private sector, taxation of small business and unevenly distributing wealth. When I compare the theory of government intervention and the capitalistic foundation our country was based upon, I think of two dogs fighting over a steak – a constant ebb and flow between two voracious animals over a piece of meat so vital to each one’s existence. My concern is that by the time I graduate, entrepreneurs may be an extinct race and small businesses may be obsolete thanks to tax hikes and nationalized healthcare. As a business entrepreneur major with a business upbringing, I’ve

invested my time and knowledge into the free market opportunism that America symbolizes. Where is the line going to be drawn when Darwinism in the marketplace is put into play and natural selection is allowed to take its course? The government has already taken its share in big auto and big banking and has attempted to give out mortgage vouchers for the 8 percent of people who couldn’t afford it. There is a line where the government’s influence over the populous’ commerce needs to be drawn and allow small business to govern itself. By dumping money into unemployment, recovery acts and stimulus packages, we are only throwing money at a problem

– and small business is going to pay for it. It’s like the saying goes – “Catch a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime.” Between all of these cash injections, the president has amassed a $2.56 trillion deficit in 19 months compared to George Bush’s administration spending $4.97 million in all of his eight years, according to www.politifact.com. Sure you can blame some of it on inflation, but when so much money has been spent in so little time, you have to wonder how the current administration intends to pay for it. Thanks to the proposed tax changes of 2011 and nationalized health care, small business is going to be slain like a fish and gutted all over the docks. Businesses that accumulate over $250,000 in profits will receive a 4 percent increase from business profits – not personal income. This means proprietors are taxed on business income versus personal income, giving business owners less disposable income.

Capital gains tax is proposed to increase from 15 percent to 20 percent on businesses, and if the health care bill passes, most free enterprise will crumble. My dad, uncle and grandpa are small business owners and currently splits health care premiums for 20 of his top employees, which costs them $132,000 annually. They has 300 employees, and if the health care plan is put into action, it would be over $2.5 million per year just in health care premiums for a business that grosses $10 to $15 million per year. By the time businesses pay for health care premiums, they will have no profits left to keep them afloat. The government is so concerned with covering its hide that it doesn’t realize that the small businesses it is killing are the only answer to have a thriving market again. American capitalism is the footing of this country that promotes the opportunism and freedom that can’t be found anywhere else. Crippling small business and intervening with free enterprise is giving the meat to the wrong dog. Nick Pike can be reached at npike@theorion.com

PIECE OF MIND >> Have you ever had a professor who was completely unfit to teach? “Yes, I have. One professor taught us incorrect information and when his replacement quizzed us, everyone failed.”

Kemauree Daniel freshman | physics

Michael Keane

“Yeah, I had this math teacher who assumed everyone already knew the material and never gave students a chance to learn – then he based grades almost entirely on tests.”

sophomore | construction management

“Yeah, my economics teacher from three years ago wrote the book for the class, had us write a paper on it and do nothing else for the rest of the semester.”

“Yes. One professor refused to stand while teaching because she wanted to be on the students’ level, and most of the class was conducted through e-mail.” Katie Jewett

junior | graphic design

Laura Newport

senior | business administration


A10 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

N EWS

always online >> theorion.com

Marie Callendar’s Restaurant & Bakery

1920 E. 20th St. 530.343.8800

$6.99 All You Can Eat Salad Bar with two drink purchases

HAPPY HOUR

HAPPY HOUR from 4–7 p.m. & 9 p.m. to closing Monday to Saturday

All draft beer, wine and cocktails $2 OFF Show your school I.D. & get any pie for $6.99

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Rugby alumni play friendly game after competing in world cup >> B2

B

always online >> theorion.com | WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

Lindsey Barrett Sports Editor

From the Cheap Seats Athletic therapy Athletics play a role at every level of an athlete’s life. Kids play sports because they are fun. In high school, it’s a way to stay out of trouble, uble,, to stay in shape and to stay connected with a team that is like family. In college, athletes tend to treat their sport like a job. For those athletes who don’t make it to a competitive collegiate level, athletics can sometimes mean even more. I have known Miles Bell for a few years now. He was a wide receiver at Butte College in 2006 and 2007. On the surface, he seems to be someone that continues to be active and play sports in order to stay in shape, but if you dig deeper, you will find another reason. Bell, 24, lost his mother to a five-year battle with multiple myeloma when he was 21, and last summer he lost his father due to a suicide by police fire. Bell needed to get through his losses. Bell needed to play sports. “I’ll have a couple days out of the month where they’re still tough and sports are a complete outlet,” he said. “If there is an image in my head and I can’t shake it, I will play basketball or run just to get my mind off it.” Bell channels his frustration and energy into sports and tries not to let the loss of his parents affect his day-today life. “I just wanted to stay on path with what I was doing,” said Bell, who will graduate in May with a degree in kinesiology. I admire my friend and his determination to carry on so positively in life after everything that has happened to him at such a young age. “I didn’t want to let that change what I did or how I lived,” he said. “Sports were a huge center block of my life.” After the loss of his parents, Bell also found the comfort of friends and people close to him during recreational league games. “Every time I went to play basketball, I was surrounded by my friends,” Bell said. Currently playing on a mixture of basketball and flag football recreational teams through Chico State and the Chico Area Recreation District, he tries to play some sort of sport everyday. Bell considers himself to be competitive and enjoys pushing his limits, he said. “Athletics is the best way to have an instant challenge,” Bell said. “It brings out the best of you everyday.” In memory of his parents, Bell has a tattoo on his right shoulder incorporating two phrases – “never give up,” which was a family motto, and “home team.” “I can always look at it and remember it can always get better,” he said. “‘Home team’ is something my dad stole from the ‘Rocky’ movies. Everyone we basically loved was ‘home team.’” At every stage of an athlete’s career, athletics mean something different. Some people play sports to stay active and some people play as a social activity. Bell plays to keep his life on track. Lindsey Barrett can be reached at

of the week

lbarrett@theorion.com

’catfights

PHOTO COURTESY OF• NELLIE WILLAIMS

HORSING AROUND Nationally ranked barrel racer Nellie Williams rides her horse around a barrel during a Houston competition in March. Williams earned $7,500 despite struggling in the semi-finals.

Dane Stivers A SSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Though Chico State focuses primarily on sports that are nationally recognizable, former Chico State student Nellie Williams discovered that sometimes it is the overlooked sports that present the greatest opportunities. Last year, Williams was a Chico State business major struggling to manage school, her social life and a passion for the sport she loved. One semester and $72,000 later, Williams’ life has a more defined future. Williams does barrel racing – a sport where participants ride their horses back and forth around three barrels in a triangular route as fast as they can. She is currently ranked seventh in the nation in female rodeo barrel racing and will compete in the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association Finals. Williams has also racked up large sums of money from the 48 races she participated in this season. After struggling to manage her Chico State school schedule with the races, Williams eventually chose to put school on hold for the semester, dedicating her

self entirely to the sport she grew up with, she said. Much like any other sport, barrel racing has a regular season and a postseason. Competitors travel across the country and participate in different races from January until December, when the finals begin. This season, William’s national ranking has earned her a spot in the 2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas Dec. 2-11. As the biggest event of the season, this rodeo will give Williams a chance to be the national rodeo champion for the first time. The Cottonwood, Calif., native has moved up in standing since taking a semester off school and devoting all her time to her beloved horse, Blue Duck. Williams has raced with the quarter horse her entire life. Previously ranked 25th in the nation, Williams’ competitive nature has helped her climb up the standings to where she is today, said Lynn Kemen, Williams’ friend since high school. “She’ll go out and kick your butt, but she won’t rub it in your face,” Kemen said. “She’s competitive, but also very

modest.” Whether they place first in the finals or not, Williams’ and Blue Duck’s season has amounted to $72,000 so far. Each race during the season awards cash prizes to the first 10 finishers out of an average of 50 participants. A barrel race in Houston in March, which is one of the biggest races of the year, garnered Williams one of her heftiest cash prizes of the season – a whopping $7,500. But Williams struggled in the semifinals of a later round in the event, when Blue Duck tripped and cost the team further earnings. Still, that wasn’t even her largest earning at a single event. At a rodeo in Salinas earlier this season, Williams netted $8,000 in the barrel race. Without a close relationship with the horse, it is nearly impossible to win, Williams said. “He’s always been good with me, but it’s usually hard for him to get along with new people,” Williams said. “He must have had a mean streak in him when he was younger.” Blue Duck was named after an outlaw from the movie “Lonesome Dove” and helped

to achieve a new personal best time of 17.2 seconds in a race earlier this season. Williams’ love for barrel racing has existed since she was a kid and she would compete in junior and amateur races as often as possible, she said. But it wasn’t until Williams took time off from school that she could really put her whole heart into it. Her relaxed outlook on life

allows her to focus on the positive aspects of every race, even the few she might struggle with, said longtime friend Jackie McArthur. “She has a quiet calm about her,” McArthur said. “That allows her to stay at the top of her game without putting too much pressure on herself.” Dane Stivers can be reached at dstivers@theorion.com

48 races=144 barrels 144 barrels= $72,000

500 a barrel

$

ILLUSTRATION BY MAX ZAVALA

TEACH ME HOW TO BARREL RACE Three barrels are set up in a triangular pattern, and participants must ride around each barrel in a set pattern. The rider with the fastest time is declared the winner.

’Cats win Friday, game sees 11 yellow cards Isaac Brambila STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS

ROUGHING THE KICKER Sophomore forward Tyson Crim gets a slide tackle from behind by Cal State L.A. defender Tony Hernandez on Sunday. The Golden Eagles went on to win in overtime, 1-0.

Men’s Soccer 12:30 p.m. Friday @ Sonoma State 11:30 a.m. Sunday @ Humboldt State Women’s Soccer 3 p.m. Friday @ Sonoma State 2 p.m. Sunday @ Humboldt State Women’s Volleyball 7 p.m. Friday v. San Francisco State 7 p.m. Saturday v. Cal State Monterey

Forwards sophomore Tyson Crim and junior Ferid Celosmanovic gave the ’Cats a winning start Friday, but a dark, rainy Sunday morning foreshadowed a different conclusion. The weekend started with a controversial game against the Cal State Dominguez Hills Toros. An early goal by Crim and a two-goal night from Celosmanovic gave the ’Cats the 3-1 victory. However, the weekend concluded with a 0-1 loss to Cal State L.A. The spark that started a physical and angering match for both

sports

TO DAY I N

oct. 6, 1945 Tavern owner “Billy Goat” Sianis buys a seat for his goat for game four of the World Series and is escorted out as he casts “the goat curse” on the Chicago Cubs.

teams Friday occurred when junior forward Christopher Akwaja received a yellow card early in the game for running in front of Toro keeper Markus Dickerson, interfering with the goal keeper’s clearance. Following the quick yellow card were several questionable calls and 10 yellow cards that angered both teams and created aggressive attitudes between the ’Cats and Toros. The frustrations resulted in two red cards against the Toros before the end of the first half. Both teams were confused by how the game was officiated, said coach Felipe Restrepo. The ’Cats managed to get on the scoreboard in the second minute. Crim connected

a header from a corner kick by freshman defender Evan Johnston that came from the right, and the ball floated toward the left post and away from the keeper. The game took a heavy turn in the 10th minute when junior forward Josh Borja was competing for the ball on the right side of the goalie box and was elbowed in the face, which resulted in a foul against the Toros and a penalty kick for Chico State. As Celosmanovic set up to take the kick, Dickerson began taunting Borja, using profanity and questioning his courage because he was not taking the penalty kick himself, Borja >> please see SOCCER | B4

[ jock ] talk We can’t win at home. We can’t win on the road. I just can’t figure out where else to play.” - Pat Williams defensive tackle for Minnesota Vikings


B2 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT 6, 2010

Sports Shorts College sports around the nation

STAFF WRITER

Chico State alumni Lisa “Cheeks” Butts and Rachel “Naima” Reddick were competing against some of the best players in the world outside of London last month at the Women’s Rugby World Cup. In Chico, the women’s rugby team played its yearly alumni game Saturday. Butts and Reddick were two of the 15 alumni that played. Women’s club president Ramona Prieto was glad to have the alumni back, but only to an extent.

“Naima killed us out there,” Prieto said. It was enjoyable to have the former players come back and compete considering the tight bonds that are formed with teammates, she said. Butts also played well in the alumni game and seemed unstoppable on her two scores. Playing in the game Saturday appeared to be a breeze for Butts. While representing her country was an incredible experience it was also very stressful, Butts said. “A lot of pressure, you know, to win and put points on the

CCAA softball championship returns to Stockton >> The California Collegiate Athletic Association will return to Stockton’s Arnaiz Stadium for the 2011 CCAA Softball Championship Tournament, conference commissioner Robert J. Hiegert announced Wednesday. The doubleelimination tournament, held April 29 to May 1, will include the top four teams in the CCAA’s final regularseason standings. source: goccaa.org

Golfer of the week awarded to Sonoma State Seawolf >> Sonoma State’s Patrick Bauer was named California Collegiate Athletic Association Men’s Golfer of the Week for Sept. 22-28 Wednesday. Bauer, a junior from Coalfax, Calif., made an impressive 2010 2011 debut as he tied for individual medalist honors at the 39th Annual Western Washington Invitational that was held Sept. 27-28 at Bellingham Golf and Country Club in Bellingham, Wash. The three-time AllAmerican carded rounds of 67-71-69 for a career-best total of 9-under par 207 and tied Western Washington’s Brian Barhanovich for first place. source: goccaa.org

Wildcat of the Week

Brent Handa

men’s cross-country Brent Handa notched his first top 10 finish of the 2010 season, posting the Wildcats’ best time and coming in eighth during the Willamette Invitational this weekend in Salem. The senior helped the Wildcats to a second-place finish, as teammates Isaac Chavez and Adrian Sherrod finished in the top 10 as well.

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

PUSHING PAST Naima Reddick, a Wildcat alumna, heads toward the goal line in the rugby alumni game Saturday at Chico State. Reddick and teammate Lisa Butts played on the U.S. rugby team.

board,” she said. Reddick was at a loss for words when describing playing overseas in the World Cup. “It’s like you never want it to end, but everyday you’re like, ‘God this is so intense, maybe I’m ready to go home,’ but you don’t want to leave,” Reddick said. The team was in the United Kingdom for a couple of weeks with games from late August through early September. She was honored to play for the U.S. team and found the experience both unreal and extraordinary, Reddick said. “You never think that you’re going represent your country or wear the jersey,” she said. Making it to the World Cup was a long time coming for both Reddick and Butts. Butts started playing her freshman year of college and was a part of the 2001 Chico State team that won the Division-I national championship. “I was early to my first freshman class and saw the flier on the board advertising tackling and thought that was interesting,” Butts said. She had played softball in high school and thought she needed to pick up a new sport, she said. Reddick’s roots in the sport run a little deeper and go all the way back to her freshman year of high school when a good friend forced her to sign up to play rugby, she said. “I said, ‘What is that?’ and she said, ‘Shut up and sign your name!’” Reddick said. Despite a forced introduction to the sport, she took a liking to it after the first team meeting, she said. “They showed me a little video and I was like, ‘This is my game — I’m in,’” Reddick said. Her connection to the national

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

KICKIN’ BUTT Alumna Lisa Butts passes the ball before being part of a ruck — when a group of players huddle around the player on the ground who posses the ball to gain possession or advance up field. team started at an early age, as her high school coach was a player on the national team as well. After college, Reddick moved back to the Bay Area and played on the Berkeley All Blues club, which was being coached at the time by the U.S. women’s team coach. Butts played for the All Blues while still living in Chico, she said. She commuted back and forth from Chico to Berkeley twice a week. Butts and Reddick helped their team beat Canada, Ireland and Kazakhstan in the World Cup, according to the Women’s Rugby World Cup website. Both were glad to be back in California, and Reddick was looking forward to playing again with Butts, her teammate of many years, she said. Both plan to play for the All Blues again when the season starts up next spring. Blake Mehigan can be reached at

Common Rugby Terms Pitch – Name of the rugby field Restart – Same as kick-off in football. Used after team scores and at begining of each half. Try Zone – Same as football end zone. Ball must touch down in this area to score. Ruck – Group of players huddled and crowded around player on the ground who posses the ball to try to gain possession. Scrum – A formation that is used to gain possession when play has been stopped. The hooker is trying to kick the ball to the number-eight player, or forward. Grubber – A kick used with the purpose of regaining the ball. It is usually used by the offense to gain field advantage. Garry Owen – A kick that is high in the air, normally short enough that you can pressure the receiver or regain possession. source: guide.rugbyrugby.com

bmehigan@theorion.com

Wildcat momentum halted; lose 2 games, even record Kevin Augustine STAFF WRITER

The women’s soccer team ended a six-game home stretch on a sour note Sunday, losing the last two games to cap off a weekend filled with frustration that left them licking their wounds. Friday’s matchup against Cal State Dominguez Hills proved tough to swallow for the Wildcats who lost 0-1, leaving a bitter taste that would linger into Sunday. In the 83rd minute, Toro junior Jessica Murphy knocked in the game winner, a low-lining kick from the right of the penalty box that sailed past the fingers of diving goalkeeper Sydney Oliver, giving the Toros a second place ranking in the California Collegiate Athletic Association South Division. But it was a controversial call in the 73rd minute that kept the Wildcats off the board. A delayed offside penalty was called on junior midfielder Lisa Webster after she broke away from the defense, beat Toros goalkeeper Alyssa Congdon in the box and took a shot that was destined to score. The offside penalty was called mid-celebration, leaving both the players and fans in a state of confusion. For coach Kim Sutton, coming up empty handed after it seemed everything was going well is starting to feel like an all too familiar trend, she said. “It’s unfortunate when there have been so many times that we feel like we’ve

Wildcat

Line Bottom

Wildcat of the Week is a regular feature meant to acknowledge the contributions made by individuals to the team. Winners are chosen by The Orion sports staff from nominations taken from all sports. To nominate: sportseditor@theorion.com

always online >> theorion.com

Rugby alumni bring world cup skill

Blake Mehigan

CCAA Baseball championship location announced >> The California Collegiate Athletic Association will hold the 2011 CCAA Baseball Championship Tournament at the University of the Pacific’s Klein Family Field in Stockton, commissioner Robert J. Hiegert announced Wednesday. The doubleelimination tournament, held May 12-14, will pit the top four teams in the CCAA’s final regular-season standings with the winner as the conference’s tournament champion and granted automatic entrance into the NCAA Division-II Tournament. source: goccaa.org

S P O RT S

GAME 1

Chico State

0

Cal State Dominguez Hills

1

GAME 2

Chico State

0

Cal State L.A.

2

out-shot the opposing team, but came up empty,” Sutton said. The Wildcats put up 12 total shots compared to the Toros’ nine and have been outshooting their opponents so far this season, 12-7. The home team recorded five corner kicks, all coming in the second half, while keeping the Toros to only two corner kicks total. For senior midfielder Kelsey Ikemoto, the controversial call that wiped out the Wildcat’s goal changed the rest of the game, she said. “I feel like the refs stole this one from us,” Ikemoto said. “I don’t think Lisa was offsides on that play. It wouldn’t have been a tie had that goal not been counted against us – we could have held them off.” The sentiment was shared among other players as well. Freshman forward Carly Singer, who recorded one shot and one shot on goal, thinks the penalty was a difficult call to make, she said. “We just didn’t get our shots off and let one go,” Singer said. “The goal we had taken back near the end was too close to call.” The Wildcats looked to rebound from the loss in a contest against CCAA South Division leaders Cal State L.A. Sunday, but the ’Cats came up short again, losing 0-2 and falling to 5-5 on the year and 4-4 in conference play.

Wildcat Cross-Country The Chico State women’s cross-country team finished third at the Willamette Invitational in a field of 24 competing schools. The men’s cross-country team finished in second place in a field of 23 schools.

“When you have such a heartbreaking loss on Friday, sometimes it’s hard to bring that same energy back again on Sunday,” Sutton said. “The energy today was really low.” The Golden Eagles came out strong offensively, recording seven shots compared to the Wildcats’ two in the first period. It was Cal State L.A. midfielder Liz Franco who drilled a shot from outside the box in the 17th minute that glided just under the crossbar, putting the Golden Eagles on the board and sending the Wildcats reeling. In the second half, the Wildcats continued to struggle defensively. In the 87th minute, Franco scored again on a welldevised attack that set up a shot landing inside the near post from ten yards away. The score gave Franco a team-leading eighth goal of the season while she recorded seven shots and three shots on goal total. Offensively, the Wildcats couldn’t connect when it counted, recording only five shots compared to 11 by the Golden Eagles and recording no corner kicks. Junior defender Molly Downtain thinks Friday’s game had an effect on the team’s performance Sunday, she said. “We we’re a little tired from Friday’s game,” Downtain said. “We played our hearts out on Friday, but we were off today. We weren’t working as one unit.” Sophomore midfielder Michelle Grek also thought Friday’s game had lasting

Women’s Volleyball Chico State women’s volleyball was swept by San Bernardino, 19-25, 11-25 and 15-25 Friday. The following night, the ’Cats lost a five-set heartbreaker at the hands of the Cal Poly Pomona Coyotes, 25-20, 25-21, 20-25, 17-25 and 12-15

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

KEEP YOUR HEAD UP Wildcat Lisa Webster [left] moves to head the high ball but Cal State L.A. player Amanda Taylor gets the header first during Sunday’s 2-0 defeat. Webster and the Wildcats struggled during Friday’s game against Cal State Dominguez Hills as well, dropping a tight contest, 1-0. effects, she said. “We showed frustrated play today,” Grek said. “There are some things we still need to figure out. Now it’s just a matter of picking ourselves and our season up.” The Wildcats are looking to turn things around during a

Stats of the week Ferid Celosmanovic scored twice in Chico State’s 3-1 win Friday night at University Stadium against Cal State Dominguez Hills. The junior forward’s big day marked the second straight game he’s scored two goals.

tough stretch in the schedule with their next four games away from home, starting with tough conference opponents Sonoma State and Humboldt State. Kevin Augustine can be reached at kaugustine@theorion.com

Senior Kara Lubieniecki led 19 Chico State runners to a ninth-place finish with a time of 17:49.93 at the Willamette Invitational.


WEDNESDAY, OCT 6, 2010 |

S C H E D U L E S

always online >> theorion.com

B3

Fall 2010 >> it might get rowdy MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL | CONT.

|

MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SOCCER | CONT.

CROSS COUNTRY

|

Nov. 6

Red/White Scrimmage

3 p.m.

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills 12:30 p.m.

Sept. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

Nov. 7

@University of PaciďŹ c

5 p.m.

Jan. 7

UC San Diego

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 24

Humboldt State

Nov. 18

@Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 26

Nov. 22

Bethany University

7 p.m.

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 1

Nov. 26

Northwest Christian

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 3

Cal State L.A.

Nov. 27

Dominican

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 8

@Sonoma State

Dec. 3

Humboldt State

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 22

CSU Monterey Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 10

@Humboldt State

Dec. 4

Sonoma State

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 15

@UC San Diego

7 p.m.

Dec. 8

Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 17

@Cal State East Bay

2 p.m.

Dec. 11

PaciďŹ c Union

7 p.m.

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 22

San Francisco State

Dec. 30

@Cal State L.A.

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 24

CSU Monterey Bay

11:30 a.m.

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 10

@Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 27

Cal State Stanislaus

4:30 p.m.

Sept. 3

@Dominican

W 3-1

Jan. 7

UC San Diego

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 12

@UC San Diego

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 30

@Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Sept. 3

@BYU- Hawaii

W 3-1

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 5-7

TBD

TBA

Sept. 4

@Grand Canyon

W 3-1

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 12-14

TBD

TBA

Sept. 4

@Seattle PaciďŹ c

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 20

TBD

TBA

Sept. 7

William Jessup

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 25

@San Francisco State

5:30 p.m.

Dec. 2-4

TBD

TBA

Sept. 10

@Cal State L.A.

Jan. 22

CSU Monterey Bay

7:30 p.m.

March 1-5

TBD

TBA

Sept. 11

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7:30 p.m.

March 6

TBD

TBA

Sept. 15

@Simpson

W 3-0

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

7:30 p.m.

March 15

TBD

TBA

Sept. 17

Humboldt State

W 3-1

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 18

Sonoma State

L 3-0

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

7:30 p.m.

Aug. 17

@Nevada

exhibition

Sept. 22

Cal State Stanislaus

L 3-0

Feb. 10

@Cal State East Bay

7:30 p.m.

Aug. 25

@Southern Oregon

exhibition

Sept. 24

UC San Diego

W 3-2

Feb. 12

@UC San Diego

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 2

Western Washington

L 1-2 (2OT)

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 24-25

@Saint Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inv.

2nd

Sept. 4

Central Washington

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 27-28

@Western Washington Inv.

TBA

Sept. 10

@Cal State Monterey Bay

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 11-12

InterWest Wildcat Classic

TBA

Sept. 12

@San Francisco State

Feb. 25

@San Francisco State

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 18-19

D-II Championship Preview

TBA

Sept. 25

@Stanford Invitational

6th/9th

W 1-0

Oct. 2

@Williamette Invitational

2nd/3rd

Sonoma State

W 2-0

Oct. 16

@Santa Clara Invitational

TBA

Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Nov. 6

@CCAA Championships

TBA

L 0-1 (OT)

Nov. 6

@Doc Adams Invitational

TBA

12:30 p.m.

Nov. 20

TBD

TBA

11:30 a.m.

Dec. 4

TBD

TBA

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SOCCER MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GOLF

|

L 2-1

7 p.m.

| 5-3-0

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S VOLLEYBALL

| 8-5-0

L 1-3 W 3-1 L 1-3

Sept. 25

Cal State East Bay

L 3-1

W 2-1

Oct. 1

@Cal State San Bernardino

L 0-3

W 2-0

Oct. 2

@Cal Poly Pomona

L 0-1 (2OT)

Oct. 8

San Francisco State

7 p.m.

L 0-1 (OT)

L 2-3

Sept. 17

Cal Poly Pomona

Oct. 9

CSU Monterey Bay

7 p.m.

March 1-5

TBD

TBA

Sept. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

W 2-1

Oct. 13

@Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

March 12-15

TBD

TBA

Sept. 24

Humboldt State

W 1-0

Oct. 15

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7 p.m.

March 23-26

TBD

TBA

Sept. 26

Sonoma State

W 4-0

Oct. 16

Cal State L.A.

7 p.m.

Oct. 1

Cal State Dominguez Hills

L 0-1

Oct. 22

@Sonoma State

7 p.m.

L 0-2

Oct. 23

@Humboldt State

7 p.m.

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GOLF WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

|

|

Sept. 19-21

@Sonoma State Inv.

8th

Oct. 3

Cal State L.A.

Sept. 27-28

@Grand Canyon Inv.

TBA

Oct. 8

@Sonoma State

3 p.m.

Oct. 29

@Cal State East Bay

7 p.m.

2 p.m.

Oct. 30

@UC San Diego

7 p.m.

Nov. 7

@St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

2 p.m.

Oct. 11-12

@Viking Inv.

TBA

Oct. 10

@Humboldt State

Nov. 12

@University of Nevada

7 p.m.

Oct. 18-19

@Golf Mart Lady Otter Inv.

TBA

Oct. 15

@UC San Diego

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WEDNESDAY, OCT 6, 2010

S P O RT S

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Wildcat athletic oďŹ&#x192;ce does dirty work Sophia Horn STAFF WRITER

Chico State has a long history of accomplishments in athletics and has been home to an abundance of impressive student athletes, but there is an unseen side of the university that runs the athletic department. Students may not realize the signiďŹ cance of the Chico State Sports Administration. The group works solely for the athletic aspect of the university, including game scheduling, marketing, management and keeping the athletes in top condition. Mitch Cox, the assistant athletic director, was a former Chico State student and has been involved with college athletics for 20 years. Cox worked in the radio industry for several years before he heard about the opening at Chico State and decided to make a change, he said. His speciďŹ c position allows him to work with various aspects of sports administration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sometimes do game management and marketing,â&#x20AC;? Cox said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do a little bit of everything.â&#x20AC;? Cox switches between planning and scheduling games, and dealing with the publicity and ďŹ nances of the athletic department. As the assistant athletic director, Cox works closely with coaches and the actual athletes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We work as a team,â&#x20AC;? Cox said regarding his relationship with the coaches. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In any situation there will be conďŹ&#x201A;icts, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a great group of people and we resolve them.â&#x20AC;? Cox encourages students to support the school by coming to the games and enjoying them, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Student athletes who participate here appreciate the work,â&#x20AC;? Cox said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really think the actual students think about us, but they seem to enjoy themselves at the games.â&#x20AC;? Cox thinks that one of the

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ RYAN RICHARDS

TAKEN DOWN BY AN EAGLE Wildcat Nick Tedrow [12] gets slide tackled by Cal State L.A.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior defender Tony Hernandez during Sunday afternoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disappointing overtime loss.

SOCCER: â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Cats close with loss continued from B1 THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ KEVIN LEE

TRIUMPHANT TRAINERS Head athletic trainer Scott Barker [right] and his assistant Devin Tacla [left] discuss a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer matches this weekend. Barker helps with injury rehabilitation. main aspects of Chico State athletics is the beneďŹ t of being a Division-II school, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a Division-I program,â&#x20AC;? Cox said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Student athletes are not separated from student body and are regular students who just happen to be in sports.â&#x20AC;? Although Coxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position deals with multiple responsibilities for the athletic department, there are diďŹ&#x20AC;erent positions that are more speciďŹ c. Scott Barker, the head athletic trainer, is in charge of the health and well-being of the athletes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I deal with injury prevention, evaluation and rehabilitation,â&#x20AC;? Barker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I identify if athletes are capable of playing and help them.â&#x20AC;? Barker ďŹ rst became interested in the position when he realized his interest in the medical side of sports, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most athletic trainers participated in sports themselves,â&#x20AC;? Barker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But my playing days were over and I still wanted to ďŹ nd a way to be involved with competitive sports.â&#x20AC;? Barkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job as a trainer forces him to sometimes deliver unfortunate news to coaches and players, he said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nobody wants to hear they story,â&#x20AC;? Reid said. canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play,â&#x20AC;? Barker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But Reid works closely with the we manage their injury so there players, but in a less formal is no lifelong disability, hence way than Cox or Barker. they can make full recovery and â&#x20AC;&#x153;We spend a lot of time get back to playing the game together,â&#x20AC;? Reid said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m they love.â&#x20AC;? always in the gym for games, Barker thinks that working so if I see a player I will say for the sports administration is hello.â&#x20AC;? humbling, he Reid thinks said. that the main Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not purpose of the about the sports adminthe credit, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for credit, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for istration is to the athletes,â&#x20AC;? the athletes.â&#x20AC;? be there for Barker said. Scott Barker the athletes head athletic trainer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re our and make sure driving force students are at to make us work harder.â&#x20AC;? sporting events, he said. The athletics website has â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we want to do is see various stories on players and people at the games and for the games, but the people who students to see the quality of actually gather the informa- our athletes and the quality of tion for the site remain behind the athletic department,â&#x20AC;? Reid the scenes. said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Division-II sports, Luke Reid, who deals with there is a high level of comsports information and was petition, and we have a lot of also a former student at Chico talent.â&#x20AC;? State, thinks that the sports To ďŹ nd out more about the administration receives a fair diďŹ&#x20AC;erent positions in the sports amount of credit for the work administration or for general they do, he said. Chico State athletic informaReidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job deals with the tion, go to www.chicowildcat. statistics of the games and com. media relations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I basically decide whether Sophia Horn can be reached at or not to do a press release or shorn@theorion.com

said. The referee, who was standing a few feet away, immediately pulled out his red card and left the Toros one man short. Shortly after, Celosmanovic added to Toro troubles by scoring the penalty. The second red card came in the 29th minute after a dangerous slide tackle outside the Toro goalie box on the right side of the ďŹ eld. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The red cards turned them into animals,â&#x20AC;? Borja said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They just wanted our blood.â&#x20AC;? The disadvantaged Toros, by a two-man and two-goal deficit, attempted to get back in the game in the second half and added pressure to the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Cat defense, getting within a goal of the tie in the 53rd minute. But Celosmanovic brought the game back under â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Cat control in the 83rd minute, repeating the two-goal feat from the last game. After a successful Friday night, the NCAA sixth-ranked â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Cats saw their record lightly stained with a 1-0 loss Sunday to the Cal State L.A. Golden Eagles. The game was heavily battled in the midďŹ eld with only occasional attempts on goal by both teams. The ďŹ rst close call came in the 13th minute when Celosmanovic shot from about 14 yards out from the goal and hit

the crossbar. The â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Cats came close to scoring again in the 84th minute when Akwaja set Celosmanovic with a through ball. Celosmanovic was left against the keeper and dribbled to the right past him before he shot softly to goal, but the defense sprinted back and cleared the ball before it crossed the goal line. A minute later, freshman center midďŹ elder Luke Palmer dribbled from the right toward the center of the ďŹ eld and set Celosmanovic with a through ball. Celosmanovic shot from the left about ďŹ ve yards out, but goalie Thaddeus Caraway covered his post well and blocked the shot. With the scoreboard showing zeros at the end of regulation time, the game was forced into overtime. The goal came in the seventh minute of overtime from a long throw-in from the right by Toro midďŹ elder Joe Davis. Defender Julian Ringhof jumped and headed with little coverage from about nine yards, sending the ball just under the crossbar and across the goal line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve scored like this before, Joe always throws the ball all the way in like this,â&#x20AC;? Ringhof said. Isaac Brambila can be reached at ibrambila@theorion.com

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Editorialcore Relaxation redefined If the words “happy clouds” mean anything to you, then the hairy, smiling face of Bob Ross may have found its way into your brain somehow. Only Mr. Rogers rivaled the other PBS great’s skills in comforting, soothing monologue. Ross could step into one of his springtime paintings and coax a bear back into hibernation. I bring this up because, as you may have heard, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a bill Thursday that further decriminalized marijuana use, taking away the misdemeanor charge formerly associated with possession. This may bring Ross, the former host of “The Joy of Painting,” back into the entertainment spotlight. Or, at least, into the entertainment couch in the garage. Besides producing worldclass scenes on canvas in half an hour, the mild-mannered painter talks about plants, animals, acceptance and positive thinking. These subjects seem to strike a chord with many of those who smoke recreationally. Marijuana can create a greater appreciation for art and deep introspection. I mean, that’s what I’ve been told. It seems that watching an artist do a speed-run of an amazing Alaskan vista while telling you to just be yourself would be a dream come true for someone in that state of mind. He even invites non-painters to “just pull up the old easy chair and relax with us.” For $1,378.50, you can buy the “Bob Ross DVD Legacy” – a catalog of almost every “Joy of Painting” ever made – at bobross.com. With simple possession whittled down to a mere infraction now, the government will save loads of cash that they would have spent on court dates for misdemeanor offenders. Maybe they can buy a few of these sets and distribute them to collectives for rental, as an apology for the tax dollars spent processing those who possessed less than an ounce. But with the big beard, the afro, the easygoing attitude and the denim, maybe he’s too perfect as an accompaniment to marijuana. Maybe he’s a gateway host. Check out this quote from a video of his. Also on his website, the video uses footage from a show in which he paints a mountain combined with snowboard footage to promote a Forum snowboard. It suggests the use of something more sinister than a decriminalized plant. “If you could make snow break on these mountains, it’s unbelievable what you can do,” he coos. “No pressure, no pressure. I want him to pretend that he’s a whisper that just floated across the mountain. I can create any kind of world that I want. Nothing hurts here – no pain, nobody’s unhappy.” Matt Shilts can be reached at entertainmenteditor@theorion.com

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The Divi sion s

VIRAL VIDEOS >> SPEAKING

“Live your life one death at a time.” Overkill “Thanx for Nothin’” 1991

“‘The Social Network’ Trailer” Funny or Die

“Best Tattoo Idea in the World” College Humor

It’s not actually a trailer for “The Social Network.” It starts out as one, but turns into a greatest hits piece for “Between Two Ferns.” It merits watching.

A tattoo artist’s animated explanation of an idea a man sent in. This man had a vision.


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WEDNESDAY, WEDN WE EDN DNES ESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

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the good good, the th bad b & the undecided new releases

THE GOOD >>

Awaiting Await AAw waaaiiititing w tiiin ttin ing ng the ng tthhhee ‘Oncoming ‘Onc ‘‘O OOncoming On nco ncom nnc ccom cooom omi m ming mi ing ing ng Storm’ Storm Stor SSt Sto torm tto oorrrm orm rm’ m’’ m

>> “Belle and Sebastian Write About Love” (ALBUM) Belle and Sebastian, Scotland’s indie export, are coming out with their seventh studio album, and first in four years. While their big, their albums have all found a following somewhere, and for good reason.

>> “Sonic the Hedgehog 4” (VIDEO GAME) This game will be available for download on most gaming networks soon. It could be the first thing the “Sonic” series has done side-scroller will be in 2-D, and 1080p high definition on PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. If you have a hankering for some old-school platforming, this should satisfy you.

>> “The Age of Adz” (ALBUM) The prolific and meticulous Sufjan since his 2000 debut “A Sun Came.” Between EPs, full-lengths and compilations, he’s done 10 albums and hasn’t stopped innovating the whole time. This one takes a step in a more electronic direction, but he’s still true to his introspective, thoughtful core.

ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

as music we actually like,” Williams said. “We’re not really trying to do anything particular here, and it’s coming out better because of that.” Some metal fans may not put the deep, slow, groove-inspired riffs of Armed for Apocalypse in the same category as the faster, more melodic acts the band will play with Monday. But Williams isn’t worried about that, he said. “It’s always good to play with bands that are bigger than you are,” Williams said. In addition to playing to a wider audience, it’s helpful to pick up on the practices of successful bands, he said. As I Lay Dying are made up of Christian members, which could be problematic considering the image of some bands who run in the same circles. However, that is not the case in this situation, Mancino said. “I think that’s what’s really cool about the way the scene is now,” he said. “There are a lot of bands who can share the stage that have very opposing views on life, theology – whatever it might be.”

Armed for Apocalypse >>

From: Chico Genre: Downtempo sludge metal Members >> Kirk Williams: vocals, guitar Cayle Hunter: guitar, vocals Corey Vaspra: bass, vocals Nick Harris: drums

Unearth >>

From: Winthrop, Mass. Genre: Metalcore Members >> Trevor Phipps: vocals Buz McGrath: guitar Ken Susi: guitar John Maggard: bass Derek Kerswill: drums

All That Remains >>

From: Springfield, Mass. Genre: Metalcore Members >> Phil Labonte: vocals Oli Herbert: guitar Mike Martin: guitar Jeanne Sagain: bass guitar Jason Costa: drums

Matt Shilts can be reached at entertainmenteditor@theorion.com

>> “L “Lucha h Libre Lib AAA: AAA Heroes H off the Ring”

Carnifex >>

As I Lay Dying >>

(VIDEO GAME)

From: San Diego Genre: Metalcore Members >> Tim Lambesis: vocals Phil Sgrosso: guitar Nick Hipa: guitar Josh Gilbert: bass Jordan Mancino: drums

This is a game based on the colorful masked world of the Mexican “Lucha Libre” mock combat.

THE BAD >>

From: San Diego Genre: Deathcore Members >> Scott Lewis: vocals Cory Arford: guitar Ryan Gudmunds: guitar Fred Calderon: bass Shawn Cameron: drums

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOUSES OF BLUES

Show >>

>> “Life as We Know It” (MOVIE) Ah, the romantic comedy.

PHOTO COURTESY OF VICTORY PRESS CENTER

Some of the biggest names in American metal are set to meet at the Senator Theatre, and they’re employing some local talent to warm it up. As I Lay Dying, Unearth, All That Remains and Carnifex will tear up the stage Monday, and hometown guys Armed for Apocalypse will join them. Unearth vocalist Trevor Phipps started Ironclad Recordings, the label that picked up Armed for Apocalypse. “All I need to know is if the band is committed to touring and putting their best foot forward,” Phipps said in an e-mail interview. Armed for Apocalypse write songs and riffs that create such a dark feeling, he said. “I don’t give a fuck about trends and want to give a fair shot to any band out there that I feel deserves attention, but isn’t getting it,” Phipps said. Unearth and As I Lay Dying are both often categorized as “metalcore,” a hybrid of metal and hardcore rock. The term has stuck, but it may not be completely accurate, said As I Lay Dying drummer Jordan Mancino in a

phone interview. “The ‘hardcore’ part of our band isn’t necessarily a stylistic thing,” he said. “It’s more just a mentality. We’re very passionate about what we’re doing – we’re presenting something more than just music.” As I Lay Dying were bestowed the award of “Ultimate Metal God” by MTV2 in 2007. But, like the name of their genre, the title is just that, Mancino said. “It’s just a title, it doesn’t make us who we are,” he said. The award was a result of fan voting, so it’s more a testament to the passion of their fans who voted, he said. The group has worked hard to build a devout fanbase and its live shows are a big part of that, Mancino said. They want to put on the best show possible for the people who pay money to see them. Armed for Apocalypse is finishing up material for their second album, said vocalist and guitarist Kirk Williams. Depending on how the next record does, they could be upgraded from Ironclad to Metal Blade, the same label as As I Lay Dying and Unearth. “This album is definitely more true to us as people and

PHOTO COURTESY OF TARINGA

Stevens has written a ton of music

Matt Shilts

PHOTO COURTESY OF METAL INVADER

right in a long time. The simple

Metal royalty to gut Senator

PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC SANCHEZ

chimey sound isn’t for everyone,

8 P.M. MONDAY, OCT.11 Tickets: $20 at Diamond W Western Wear, or $17 from Armed for Apocalypse via their Facebook.

Sometimes it has been beyond successful, such as with “You’ve Got Mail” and “When Harry Met Sally.” This one does not look like it will be in that category. It should prove to be trite, shallow and mildly entertaining at best.

First play to spell trouble Ben Mullin STAFF WRITER

>> “My Soul to Take” (MOVIE) Fright-master Wes Craven wrote and directed this tale of evil and murder. It follows seven high-school kids who were born the night a serial killer allegedly died. High schoolers running from a serial killer? Craven may have done the “Nightmare on Elm Street” movies, but in this one, a soul goes into a kid the night he was born or something.

THE UNDECIDED >>

>> “Secretariat” (MOVIE) Critics will probably be impressed by this dramatic account of one of the most astounding horses in the history of racing. Hedge your bets though — it’s hard to imagine this one being any better than “Seabiscuit.” And how many horse racing movies do you need to watch?

THE LOCAL >>

>> “Idol Hands” (ALBUM) The local rapper’s newest album is officially released Oct. 8. His rhymes are impeccable, and he deals with a whole spectrum of topics. “The Process” is a mustlisten for anyone from Northern California.

Under the bright lights and pressure of do-or-die competition, the Chico State department of theater will spell out the audience’s greatest joys and deepest desires – one letter at a time. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” is a two-time Tony Award-winning musical that showcases improvisational comedy in a revolutionary way, said director Mike Mazur. The show puts the actors onstage against audience volunteers in a battle for spelling supremacy. “Every show, we pick four audience members to come up onstage and compete against our actors in an actual spelling bee,” Mazur said. “We try to have harder words for the audience members to get them offstage by the finale – but if we call a college professor up who knows all the words, what can we do?” This has led to some frantic improvisation during rehearsal, said actor and spelling bee hopeful Aaron Lyons. Lyons plays Leaf Coneybear, a 12-year-old homeschooled spelling bee champ who suffers from ADHD and acute social awkwardness. “We’ve brought in test audience members for rehearsal to keep all of us on our toes,” Lyons said. “It’s interesting to see how the audience reacts. Some of the non-scripted adlibbing that we do always tends to get a little crazy.” One speller in the bee, a

precocious political firebrand named Logainne Schwartzandgrubenierre, played by Niki Nansel, has a speech in the play in which she rants about a new topic every night. Nansel is required to come up with an on-the-spot speech every show about a completely new subject. Thus far, her rants have covered politics and pop culture alike, even addressing the fanatic fandom of the popular “Twilight” novels. The non-audience cast of “Putnam County” is a small one, totaling nine actors. Six of the characters are student spellers, two of them are adult moderators who try to manage the chaotic spelling bee and one is a Pat Sajak-esque usher, who consoles the fallen alphabetical athletes with a musical number. The student spellers who compete in the spelling bee represent different stereotypes, said Gerilyn Brault, who plays the prim spelling bee moderator Rona Lisa Peretti. The personalities displayed in the characters are diverse – an overachieving Boy Scout, a Catholic school wunderkind, an unconfident underachiever and a lexical prodigy from a broken home. But there is one thing each student has in common, Brault said. “All of the characters have a desire to fit in,” she said. “They recognize that they’re different, and the struggles they have just to get through adolescence and find themselves. It’s a great way for the audience to connect – to remember all the

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

YOU WIN Mikey Purdue [left] playing Chip Tolentino watches as Gerilyn Brault [right] playing Rona Lisa Pennetti hands Jackie Herbert as Olive Orstrosky her number at a rehearsal. “The 25th Annual Putnam Spelling Bee” will show in Harlen Adams Theater Oct. 6 - 9 at 7:30 p.m and Oct. 10 at 2 p.m. awkward years.” One such awkward moment takes place when the all-American Boy Scout Chip Tolentino runs up against his burgeoning at an inopportune time – and then sings about it. Tolentino’s “My Unfortunate Erection” is cued up just as he is getting ready to stand up and spell out a word that he is confidant he knows. Embarrassment scares him stiffer, and he is unable to continue competing in the bee. Stage manager Whitney Thayne described the scene with a rueful grin. “It’s one of the play’s most controversial songs, and there’s even a separate set of lyrics in the back of the script

for productions with younger kids,” Thayne said. “But this is Chico, so we’re going to go ahead with the original material.” The scene is hilarious and painful to watch, Mazur said. But it also reveals some universal truths about growing up. “It’s funny as hell,” he said. “We watch these kids and we say ‘Aw, don’t put him through that! That’s cruel!’ And yet, we sit there and watch, because we adults have all the same fears – we just mask them better.” Though “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” is lighthearted in nature, the show’s central theme of competition and friendship will leave audience members on

the edges of their seats, Mazur said. “It’s an incredibly funny, comic play,” he said. “But in the end we will tear at your heartstrings because if there’s a winner, there has to be a loser.” Ben Mullin can be reached at bmullin@theorion.com

Show info • Time Oct. 6 - Oct. 9 at 7:30 p.m., Oct. 10 at 2 p.m. • Place Harlen Adams Theatre • Tickets $6 student, university box office


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E N T E RTA I N M E N T

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E N T E RTA I N M E N T

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Steve Martin shows bluegrass skills, stays funny Tyler Ash STAFF WRITER

Laxson Auditorium brimmed with bluegrass and laughs Saturday night as Steve Martin & The Steep Canyon Rangers took the stage for a sold out show with more than 1,200 in attendance. Few have accomplished a career as diverse as Steve Martin, who has now added the title of music performer to his list of achievements. Not many people can pull off being an actor, comedian, author, playwright, producer, musician and composer. That many skills could only be attributed to a true Renaissance man of entertainment – and he knows it, too. “I know it’s kind of strange coming here,” he said of his new music career to the audience. “It’s like you were home and your spouse said, ‘Oh honey, I hear that Jerry Seinfeld is doing an evening of original tunings he wrote for the bassoon – I gotta see that!’” Martin has incorporated his lifelong love for the banjo into some of his comedy acts and albums during his earlier career, but never to this extent. “I guess I’m doing two of my favorite things right now – comedy and charging people to hear music,” he said to a crowd in hysterics. “A lot of people come to me and they say ‘Steve, why a music career? Why now?’ And I say to them, ‘Hey, you guys are my band!’” Aside from the hilarity, Martin wasn’t joking about a music career. He’s put a lot of time and effort into his songs, as well as his comedy act for the tour. Backup vocalist and fellow banjo player Graham Sharp backed up this claim. “We’re probably the first band he’s played with so he developed this unique style of his own and has all these original songs,” he said. “He’s a genuine lover of the banjo. I mean, he’s crazy for it.” Guitarist and lead vocalist

Woody Platt added to Sharp’s testimony on Martin. “He’s got a work ethic like you’ve never seen and passion for an instrument and for performing,” he said with a beer in his hand. “He doesn’t take anything easy.” Martin’s first bluegrass album, “The Crow: New Songs for the Five-String Banjo,” was released in May 2009 and received a Grammy for the best bluegrass album this February. Early in the show, Martin and The Steep Canyon Rangers played a song called “Rare Bird Alert,” which he wrote for a new movie he’s currently working on that will be in theaters sometime next year. He will be costarring with Jack Black and Owen Wilson in “The Big Year,” a movie based on a 1998 book by Mark Obmascik about competitive bird watching. Martin and The Rangers played a few songs from their new self-titled album that they finished about three weeks ago and is set to be released in February, including a break-up song called “Go Away, Stop, Turn Around, Come Back.” After the song, Martin showed the audience his “$600 set list,” which was an iPad he used to update his Twitter page between songs. “My audience demanded it,” he said. He introduced each member of The Steep Canyon Rangers between songs and when he introduced stand-up bass player Charles Humphrey III, he told the audience about his unusual bass. “I love having Charles on the road with us because the bass also doubles as a refrigerator,” he said before leaving The Rangers to play a few of their earlier songs, including one from their 2009 album “Deep In The Shade.” He asked Humphrey for a beer before walking offstage. The bass player spun his instrument around, lifted out a secret compartment in the back and

THE ORION •KEVIN HAGEDORN

THE DEVIL WENT DOWN TO LAXSON Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon rangers perform Sat. Oct. 2 at Laxson Auditorium. The actor, writer, comedian and banjo player won a Grammy Award for his 2009 album “The Crow: New Songs for the Five String Banjo.” pulled out a bottle of Sierra Nevada Torpedo. The Chico crowd went wild as Martin walked ■ VIDEO backstage to Go to our website, “Google him- theorion.com, self,” beer in to see video of hand. Steve Martin and The Steep the Steep Canyon Canyon Rang- Rangers. ers played a newer song called “There Ain’t No Easy Street” and an older one called “Lovin’ Pretty Women,” which Humphrey said was about Tiger Woods. The audience clapped along to the beat before Martin stumbled back onstage saying he was too drunk to play and asked them if they could do one more without him. The Rangers showed their musical versatility with a barbershop-quartet style spiritual

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called “I Can’t Sit Down.” “I listen to that song every night I think ‘Gee, religious people have such beautiful music and art, and atheists really have nothing,’” Martin said. “Until now!” He then handed out copies of what Martin called “the only atheist hymnal,” which he titled “Atheists Don’t Have No Songs.” The seasoned entertainer told his audience about the band’s times on the road in the tour bus. “Sometimes there’s laughter, sometimes there’s tears – and I know this goes on because they tell me about it when I call them from a private plane,” he said as the audience roared with laughter. “The sad thing about that joke is it’s true.” Sharp responded with a quip of his own. “Except you never call,” he said. “We wait by the phone.”

Martin played a few solo songs with the fiddler, Nicholas Sanders, including “Wally On The Run,” which is about Martin’s yellow Labrador retriever, Wally, who wanted to play fetch while he was working one day. The song began as a duet between Martin and Sanders, who would make dog barking and whimpering noises with his fiddle at times during the song while Martin would talk to him as if he were Wally. At the end of the song, the actual Wally trotted onstage for a few ear scratches before going backstage again. Martin and The Rangers received a standing ovation after their last song, “Calico Train.” After about a minute of ear-splitting cheers for more finger picking and punch lines, they came back out to play two more songs, including a bluegrass classic by Ervin T. Rouse called “Orange Blossom

Special.” The song was filled with fastpaced fiddle solos from Sanders and Platt’s twangy vocals. Country chills ran down the crowd’s spines as Steve Martin & The Steep Canyon Rangers came alive. When the song came to an end, the crowd roared as the band bowed and bid farewell. Among the members of the audience that night was President Paul Zingg, who has been a Steve Martin fan for more than 40 years, he said. “The fact that he wrote all of that music and the lyrics is just a reflection of how talented he is,” Zingg said after the concert. “If you read his plays or his short stories, you get the same feeling of a rare talent – and he’s a hell of a banjo player.” Tyler Ash can be reached at tash@theorion.com


WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 |

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Folk talent shares stage, fills seats, pleases crowd Candyce Chilson STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

DANGER IN A BOLO TIE Zach Zeller, a music industry major, fills Cafe Coda with his folk rock sounds Friday. Erin Lizardo, Mad Bob Howard and Rustwater joined Zeller in performing.

Appetizers and beer covered the tabletops as guitar strings hummed the night away. The sounds of indie, blues and rock music filled the air as Zach Zeller, Erin Lizardo, All on Seven, Mad Bob Howard and Rustwater stood against the dimly lit red wall at Cafe Coda. Small groups of people walked through the door, and the tables at Cafe Coda filled up as Friday night progressed. The soft lighting welcomed people with a thirst for music, such as 19-year-old Max Goolsby. A fan of Zeller, he always likes to frequent Cafe Coda because of the quality acts, he said. Mad Bob Howard started off the night, setting the tone for the entire evening. With a blue button-down shirt and black slacks, Howard stood alone picking at his guitar strings and singing in a low and raspy voice, comparable to lead singer Dave King of Flogging Molly. The atmosphere made it easy to get caught up in the songs as Howard sang one of his newest tunes, “Lost Drunk and Crazy.” Slowly strumming at his guitar,

his lyrics seemed both rebellious and heartfelt as he sang about losing a girl he cared about. Cafe Coda offers an intimate way to hear music because the audience can interact more with the musicians, as they are seated only a few feet away from the stage. “It’s always nice to get those first couple songs out of the way,” Howard said after his first two songs. “You never know how it’s going to go.” Rustwater then took to the small stage with his harmonica around his neck and an acoustic guitar wrapped over his shoulder. His powerful, deep and raspy voice filled the room as he feverishly hissed on the harmonica and pounded on his guitar. His songs were filled with stories and spoke about the human experience of highs and lows. He mentioned that he has been called a “lyrical genius,” which he didn’t seem to take too seriously. “I’ll take that,” he laughed. Will Watje, senior music recording arts major, enjoyed Rustwater’s performance for one specific reason, he said. “His voice,” Watje said. “He

has a really cool, distinct voice.” On day three of their tour, All on Seven, a duo out of Sacramento, brought a charismatic presence to the stage. The band consists of Kayla Schureman and Evan Palmer, both vocalists and guitarists. The two matched well as they harmonized and played off each other, turning toward one another in a playful manner. The pair played tunes from its most recent album, “The Cars, The Bars and The Lights: Part One,” as well as a cover of Brandi Carlile’s “How These Days Grow Long.” Their voices soared together to make a melody charming and sweet, akin to the style of Lady Antebellum. The night proceeded in a relaxed way when Erin Lizardo and Zach Zeller took the stage. Both sitting down, Lizardo at the electric keyboard and Zeller on guitar and a bass drum, they began to play Lizardo’s set. Lizardo, an acoustic indiefolk artist, has a soft, but soulful voice. Zeller harmonized with Lizardo to the slow and delicate beat of the music. The two share a unique indie-rock sound, humble and soft. Zeller and Lizardo frequently

play together whenever the opportunity arises, but they have managed to build up successful solo careers as well. Zeller, senior music industry major, began playing music more than seven years ago, he said. He describes his style as alternative indie-rock, but enjoys all types of music. After playing a couple shows a month in Chico with a four-piece band, the Redding native likes to play at least one solo show a month. “I like to mix it up,” Zeller said. “I can play new songs that the band hasn’t learned yet.” The pair switched up the instrumentation for Zeller’s set. Zeller continued to play the bass drum, but moved to acoustic guitar while Lizardo played the accordion. He played old songs and some new ones from his upcoming album, set to release in February 2011. Cafe Coda offered a special blend of artists, each with their own style and musical flair that worked well together. “I felt good about the show,” Zeller said. “I liked the differences between the bands.” Candyce Chilson can be reached at cchilson@theorion.com

The Makai release final LP before hiatus Josh Hegg STAFF WRITER

The ground will open, pillars of fire will spring from the earth and heavy metal will ring throughout the land Saturday as The Makai release their newest LP, “Embracing The Shroud of a Blackened Sky.” The album-release show will draw from a well of local talent. Mad Bob Howard, Zabaleen and Teeph will lend their artistry to the crowd at Monstros Pizza, before The Makai step up to destroy the

place. For six years, The Makai have kept Chico engrossed with their blend of heavy music, and fans of their previous work will be excited by this new release as well. Zeke Rogers, who plays guitar and provides vocals for the group, thinks the new LP is the group’s best work to date, he said. The music is diverse, but still rooted in something that is undeniably metal. “The album has some of the most varied stuff we’ve ever done,” he said. “It’s more melodic, but at the same time

it has some of the slowest stuff we’ve ever played and some the fastest stuff we’ve ever played. It’s really all over the place.” “Embracing The Shroud of a Blackened Sky” consists of one 28-minute track. The song took more than a year and a half to record and was something The Makai had wanted to do for a while. The Makai had always talked about writing a continual album and the time seemed right to do it, said Ian Makau, guitarist and main songwriter on the album.

The LP release also doubles as the first of two send-off shows for The Makai, who are going on an extended hiatus after the album is released. Teeph frontman Sesar Sanchez, a local music proponent, understands the impact of losing the group. “Chico is losing a really good go-to band that they enjoy watching,” he said. “There is never going to be another Makai – they will be missed.” In celebration of The Makai’s music and what they have given to the Chico music scene, they will be playing

material from throughout their career, including some songs not often heard. Even with the last Chico shows drawing close, The Makai want to make sure people know that this is not to be a solemn occasion. “We don’t want these shows to be to serious,” Rogers said. “We just want to have fun playing metal with bands we like to play with.” Bands come and go in Chico, and there is still an abundance of talented acts for people to see around town. But as Sanchez put it,

there will never be another The Makai. Josh Hegg can be reached at jhegg@theorion.com

Show info • Time 8 p.m. Sat. Oct. 9 • Place Monstros Pizza • Bands The Makai, Teeph, Zabaleen, Mad Bob Howard • Cost $5 donation

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Coming out in style RAYRAY to host art show in celebration of LGBTQ awareness Stephanie Maynard STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • ELI MAY

LOOKING AHEAD Christina Brower, artist and gay rights activist, is never far away from art. Brower helped start Coming Out for Art, which will happen on National Coming Out Day at RAYRAY Gallery.

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See the rainbow – celebrate the rainbow. On Monday, which is National Coming Out Day, RAYRAY Gallery and the Stonewall Alliance Center are hosting the Coming Out for Art show. The show, which is now in its second year, was the brainchild of Christina Brower. “I was unemployed at the time and didn’t have a whole lot going on and all the time in the world, so I started to think about what I wanted to do,” Brower said. “To my knowledge, there had never been a gay/lesbian art show in Chico before.” Brower partnered up with local Stonewall Alliance Center to host the first show celebrating lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer acceptance, she said. Brower has been a gay rights activist for about six years, she said. She grew up in Oroville and Susanville and went to prom with her gay best friend. The atmosphere was not always welcoming. “There was one time we were walking down the street and four cars in a row shouted at us,” Brower said. “I had Slurpees thrown at me, and a glass Snapple bottle.” The bottle broke and cut Brower’s face, she said. “The police told me, ‘Well what did you expect?’” Brower said. One of her pieces used to advertise the event shows seven women in black and white wearing nothing but their underwear, each pair in a different color of the rainbow. “I was in Victoria’s Secret when I saw all this underwear laid out in a rainbow on a table,” Brower

said. “I thought that was so cool and should be a photograph.” For the first show, she used a similar-style photo for posters – two women in black and white with colored paint smeared on them, Brower said. This year’s show uses the same concept, but with two male figures. “I wanted something both provocative and that would accurately represent the show,” she said. The rainbow underwear photo was used to make bookmarks promoting the event at the Stonewall Alliance Center. They were gone within the week, said Jackie HumphreyStraub, a board member of the center and one of the art show’s key organizers. She has been working with the center since June. HumphreyStraub helped out at last year’s show and enjoyed it so much she wanted to help again, she said. Some of her favorite pieces of art included giant metal sculptures of a penis and a vagina. “The show offers an ability to safely express thoughts about sexuality,” Humphrey-Straub said. Humphrey-Straub looked into working for a non-profit organization after graduating from Chico State in May 2009 with a degree in social work and a minor in women’s studies, she said. “I never came out my last year at my internship,��� HumphreyStraub said. “I was pretty much forced into the closet by my boss who made it very clear he was against Prop 8.” The ordeal was an eye-opener, she said. “I wanted to go find work where I knew I would be valued as a human being,” she said. As of Sept. 27, the show has 20 confirmed submissions, though it’s hard to estimate how many there will be by the show date, Humphrey-Straub said. “Last year we had 60 submissions and a lot of those didn’t

come in until the day of,” she said. The show will feature many different media, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculptures and even a woman who is painting her own body as an art piece, Humphrey-Straub said. Of the pieces already submitted, some are from Chico State students. Freshman Taylor Sullivan has submitted acrylic paintings and sculptures to the show. One of her sculptures is of two shackled hands, painted black and reaching upwards, representing both the struggle that everyone experiences in life and a need to keep fighting and hoping, Sullivan said. Sullivan came out to her family last year, she said. “My family’s pretty conservative Christian,” Sullivan said. “I know they still love me, but it was hard.” Before coming to Chico, Sullivan researched LGBTQ support and community groups and found Stonewall, she said. She joined the first week and became involved in the second. At 18, Sullivan is one of the event’s younger artists. The youngest artist of the show is likely Christina Brower’s 6-year-old daughter, Ariane, who drew a picture of herself, her mother and Brower’s girlfriend smiling and standing under a rainbow. “I want more than just the LGBT community to show up for the event,” Brower said. “I want people who might not have been interested to come in and feel something, like that classic picture of the little girl in Vietnam, how it just hits you in the heart. I want my art to do that.” The show will be held at 6 p.m. Oct. 11 at RAYRAY Gallery on 530 Broadway St. Stephanie Maynard can be reached at smaynard@theorion.com

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E N T E RTA I N M E N T

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C7

Necessities >> T ODAY

People on the Moon 9:30 p.m. @ Lost on Main Free

People of the Moon, a psychedelic grunge band will be playing along with Wicked Honey. Both add their own sound to classic rock, experimental electronic sounds and alternative rock music.

F R I DAY

SAT U R DAY

SU N DAY

TyBo B x CD Bo D Rel elea e se ea se

Makai LP Release

“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”

T H U R S DAY

ThirdSeven 8 p.m. @ Cafe Flo $5 admission

8 p..m. @ Ca afe fe C Cod oda od a $5 adm mis isssi sion

Cafe Flo will be alive with the dreamy sounds of Portland’s ThirdSeven. The Rock Creek Jug Band and Jeb Draper will also add their own flavor to the mix. Can you think of a better way to spend your Thursday night? Me either.

Don’t mi m sss thi hiss al all ages show wcas wca ase of ase s me of Ch so hic ico o St S ate’s best hip-h be hop a art rttists. Also Al so featu t riing tu n EyeQue, e Lyn yn ngu guis isti is tixx an ti a d W lldy Dia Wi iamo mond mo nd. nd

8 p.m. @ Monstros Pizza $5 donation

The Makai’s last show for a while is sure not to disappoint. Teeph, Zabaleen and Mad Bob Howard won’t hurt either.

2 p.m. @ Harlen Adams Theater $6 student admission Six kids learn life lessons amidst comedy and musical numbers.

T U E S DAY

MON DAY

As I Lay Dying

Evil Dead, the Musical

8 p.m. @ The Senator Theatre $20 admission

Big time metal acts As I Lay Dying, Unearth, All That Remains and Carnifex join locals Armed for Apocalypse for a Monday night promoting As I Lay Dying’s “The Powerless Rise,” an album three years in the making.

7:30 p.m. @ Chico Cabaret $10 student admission Halloween is almost here and you know what that means...... Horrifying, putrid BLOOD AND GUTS!! Go see Evil Dead, The Musical at Chico Cabaret and make sure to get a seat in the Splatter Zone!

<< Daily Dose Oct. 6 - 13

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Soul Union 9 p.m. @ LaSalles $3 cover

T H U R SDAY

Pants Optional

9 p.m. @ Origami Lounge Free

The funkadelic band Soul Union will be playing Wednesday night showcasing their danceable beats. The show will also feature Forward Vision Band and Salsa Bella.

A night of acoustic artistry will ensue at The Origami Lounge with Pants Optional. Joining the bill will be some of Chico’s finest songwriters, Erin Lizardo, Zach Zeller, Fera.

AVL Looms Demonstration

“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”

7 p.m. @ Cafe Culture Free

AVL Looms is celebrating their new location and Artoberfest by welcoming people to come learn how fabric is made. There will be weaving and spinning demonstrations and staff members will be assisting those that would like to try their hand at driving a loom.

7:30 p.m. @ Harlen Adams Theatre $6 student admission Everyone hated spelling bees as a kid, but as subject matter the newest musical from the CSU Chico School Of The Arts, there will be plenty of things to enjoy.

F R I DAY

West by Swan

8 p.m. @ Monstros Pizza $5 donation Get ready for some “experimental noise” from West By Swan. Also featuring Wah Wah Exit Wound and Clouds on Strings.

Fourth Annual Community Dance Challenge 7 p.m. @ Sierra Nevada Big Room $12 pre-sale

Make a bet on your favorite local businesses as they compete in various dance categories for major bragging rights. Chico Community Ballet, Full Force Dance Company and Studio One Ballroom will perform.

SAT U R DAY

Oktoberfest

4 p.m. @ Sierra Nevada Hop Field $30 for meal, beer stein and two drink tickets Blow glass, eat food, drink beer and listen to music. It’s not a tough sell.

Guitar Project

8 p.m. @ 1078 Gallery $5 student admission Warren Haskell and friends are set to serenade. Haskell has a Master’s in classical guitar, so you know he’s not messing around.

SU N DAY

Rich & Kendall Country Showcase 6 p.m. @ Scotty’s Landing Free

Enjoy a country music night out on the river.

“European Treasures”

2 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium Northstate Symphony presents a treat for classical music enthusiasts.

MON DAY

Wayne Thiebaud: Works on Paper Exhibit

10 a.m. @ University Art Gallery Free Chico State puts one of pop-art’s preeminent painters on display, with prints of his iconic American still lifes.

Bearfoot

7:30 p.m. @ The Sierra Nevada Big Room $20 admission Harmonizing “newtimey, post-bluegrass” with a pair of fiddles and a mandolin, Bearfoot is this century’s high-energy answer to depression-era string bands.

T U E SDAY

“Mad as Hell”

7:30 p.m. @ Harlen Adams Theatre Free Are you mad as hell about our current state of medical care in the U.S.? Then come to see The Mad as Hell Doctors at Harlen Adams Theatre to learn about advocating a single-payer health insurance.

’90s Night @ LaSalles

Don’t be the “Man in the Box.” Break out of your “Rusty Cage” and go drink an “Even Flow” of alcohol at LaSalles for ‘90s Night. You’ll have a “Tubthumping” good time if you “Go the Distance.” Just “Come as You Are.”

STAFF FAVORITES >> LOCAL BANDS The Deaf Pilots — The Deaf Pilots may be newbies to the Chico music scene, but they’re surely not lacking in quality. They take catchy beats to the next level with impressive musical talent and versitility – after all, when’s the last time you saw a band pick up in the middle of a set and completely switch instruments? —Lauren Beaven Staff Writer

MaMuse — I really like MaMuse. Beautiful harmony, beautiful ladies and beautiful images always accompany them. What’s more, they travel by bicycle! What more can you ask for a band to represent Chico so well?

— Sarah Brown Staff Writer

Trucker’s Wife — When I saw the lead singer strut onto the stage wearing a Skeletonwitch shirt, I knew this band was coming from a good place. Their energy rocks, they scream like banshees and they’re just fun to listen to.

— Anthony Siino News Editor


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Queer Week aims to educate people, create welcoming environment >> D2 always online >> theorion.com |

D

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 Almendra Carpizo Features Editor

In a nutshell...

THE ORION • RYAN RICHARDS AND ALLEN BROOME

KEEPING STUDENTS HEALTHY The Student Health Center provides affordable medication and free reproductive health services for Chico State students.

Student Health Center offers affordable overthe-counter medicine Amanda Jacobs STAFF WRITER

Over-the-counter medications are being sold at the Student Health Center’s pharmacy for half the price of big drug stores CVS/pharmacy and Walgreens. For more than 15 years, the

pharmacy has offered the generic versions of medicines from Tylenol to Pepto-Bismol. While CVS/pharmacy sells 100 caplets of Tylenol for $8.49, the Student Health Center’s pharmacy sells the same quantity of the generic brand for $1.85. The pharmacy carries 82 allergy, cold, sore throat, cough, pain, fever, contraceptive, vitamin, stomach and topical over-the-counter medications. Sophomore nursing major

Sarah Chanhmisay thinks it’s good for the health center to offer this service because college students can’t afford high prices, she said. Students don’t have to go out of their way for medicines that they need. The Student Health Center can offer low prices at the pharmacy because it is controlled by the California Department of General Services, said interim pharmacist-in-charge Tammy Meigs. The department oversees >> please see MEDICINE | D5

Comparing Prices Qty.

Student Health Services Center

100 caplets

$1.85

$8 . 49

$6.64

8 oz

$1.85

$3.99

$2.14

24 tablets

$1.85

$4.49

$2.64

30 tablets

$4.62

Students Save

$23.99

$17.37

INFORMATION COURTESY OF STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES CENTER AND WALGREENS.COM

DICTIONARY

auto tan

[auto • tan] Artificially enhancing one’s tan in pictures by editing the photo. “She just auto-tanned the photo, she’s actually really pale.” source: urbandictionary.com

Family PACT program offers free services at Student Health Center

saw the need to make a change in order to make family planning services more affordable for students, said Stephanie Dunbar, chair of the student health advisory council. With the changing econKelly Smith omy also comes a change in STAFF WRITER pharmacy prescription prices, Talking about oral contra- said Tyrone Walker, a cusceptives can make some feel tomer service representative for uncomfortable, yet for many Walgreens. “For a 28-day supply of Ortho students, the use of birth control of is not only smart, but Tri-Cyclen Lo, the cost would be $79.99,” he said. also essential. For Yaz, another popular College students in Butte choice, the County make cost is $87 up 75 percent Paying $80 per month, of reported STI Walker said. cases, accorda month for birth More expening to the Butte County control is ridiculous.” sive brands Public Health Carissa Phillips such as Seajunior liberal studies major sonique are Department. $237 for a This year, the Student Health Center has three-month supply. Junior Carissa Phillips, a libjoined the Family Planning Access Care Treatment program, eral studies major, has gone to also known as Family PACT, a the Women’s Health Specialists government-sponsored repro- in order to avoid the high cost of ductive health care program her birth control prescriptions, that provides no-cost services to she said. “Paying $80 a month for birth men and women in California. The initial physical exam in control is ridiculous,” Phillips a health care provider’s office said. “Now that the school is could range from $20 to $200, offering these free services, I’m according to the American Preg- sure more students will start nancy Association website. The using this program.” The Family PACT program average monthly fee for each supply of pills ranges from $5 to was chosen to make reproduc$30 or more, depending on the tive health services that had gone up in price free again, individual’s medical coverage. The Student Health Center >> please see FAMILY | D5

Acknowledging heritage Less than 14 percent of Chico State students identified themselves as Hispanics last fall. I am among the ones that did. That I was a minority wasn’t apparent until I moved from San Diego to Chico. Since then, it has become important to try to stay connected to my culture. This was especially important Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, which is celebrated as National Hispanic Heritage Month. Unlike in San Diego, my culture is not everywhere every day in Chico. It’s important to recognize the efforts of individuals and organizations that are actively helping and educating not just Hispanics, but everyone on campus to appreciate their culture as well as helping minorities feel that they still belong. So I want to take the time to recognize some of the efforts and contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans and organizations to Chico. Friday, Lambda Theta Nu Sorority, Inc. hosted its annual Latina Youth Leadership Conference. This organization has brought middle school girls from the area together for 10 years and taught them about selfesteem and getting into college. Lambda Theta Nu’s efforts, as well as efforts of the other organizations, are an asset to the community, especially to the young girls who were a part of the conference. The Cross-Cultural Leadership Center is probably one of my favorite places on campus. This cultural hub is tucked away in the southeast corner of the Meriam Library, where some of the different multicultural organizations offer information on different events taking place. During Hispanic Heritage Month, the CCLC sponsored different events, along with A.S. Live, A.S. Bookstore and other sponsors. They held documentary viewings, lectures and shows for students who, like me, wanted to observe and honor different cultures. Members of Movimiento Estudiantial Chicano de Aztlan are also valuable to Chico. These students hold different events all year, including the Cesar Chavez teach-out, where they go to different elementary, middle and high schools to teach about who Chavez was and why we celebrate him. MEChA was also involved in organizing events for Hispanic Heritage Month and it constantly aims to raise awareness about issues affecting Hispanics. It’s crucial to recognize and remember Hispanics who have contributed to the U.S. during Hispanic Heritage Month. However, it is also important to acknowledge those individuals who are helping keep our heritage in our communities. Almendra Carpizo can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com

Related Article: See Lambda Theta Nu, D4

WORD OF MOUTH >> Have you ever stolen anything? “When I was learning to ride a bike, I took somebody’s little red bike and was riding it through the mobile home park in the sand — then I just LaDona Knigge left the bike there.”

assistant professor | geography

“One time I got chased in Mexico for stealing a bracelet. I was 13 ... I still have that bracelet.”

Devon Schuppert freshmen | business

Melissa Foster senior | history

Related Article:

See Burglarized, D2

“I stole candy from a candy store. I think I was 8. Me and my brother had a candy store in the backyard and sold it to our neighbors after we stole it. ”

“I stole a pack of gum from the store and I never chewed it because I was guilt-ridden.”

Brandee Bethard senior | recreation


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

F E AT U R E S

always online >> theorion.com

the

face SE X COLUMN>>

Boshion Crandall Bosh SE X COLUMNIST S

Self-pleasure good for you Apes, dolphins and elephants all have something in common with you and me — masturbation. Some people are horribly ashamed to admit they’ve pleasured themselves because of an age-old stigma against it. I’ve denied it many times, but I’ve recently vowed to own up to my right to self-service after learning the health benefits of masturbating. The medical community once believed that masturbation was a “serious medical-ethical problem with dire results,” according to a FOXSexpert article. It just recently began endorsing its positive effects. Publications such as “Onania,” circa 1712, attributed masturbation to diseases and disorders because of the loss of semen. Similarly, females were chancing hysteria, jaundice and epileptic fits. Masturbators also risked going blind, according to doctors during that era. Unless an orgasm was confused for an epileptic fit in 1712, it’s safe to say we don’t run any of the mentioned risks, and we certainly won’t go blind because – let’s be real – most of us would be sightless by now. If anything, spending a little time as the master of your domain will make you see things more clearly. Masturbating relieves stress and keeps your heart rate, blood pressure, reproductive system and brain chemistry in superior condition, according to the article “You won’t go blind” from the Men’s Health website. It also kick-starts the immune system and builds men’s resistance to prostate gland infection. For women, self-pleasuring provides resistance to yeast infections, relief during painful menstruation and reprieve for chronic back pain. It’s also void of STIs, making it the safest form of sex. It’s proven to be a mood booster and a natural sleep sedative. Basically, it’s a wonder drug. If you find yourself counting sheep at night, then a game of hide-and-seek with your fingers could be what you need to enter into a deep slumber. If you’re feeling stressed and uptight, it’ll increase your blood flow and relax you. Additionally, masturbating affords some of the most mind-blowing orgasms. For some women who can’t orgasm from vaginal intercourse, this is a great way to become familiar with what made the Herbal Essences women so happy in the shower. It provides people the opportunity to understand what they like, want and need in order to climax. This leads to increased awareness about our bodies, amplified confidence in the bedroom and better sex. For men, occasionally crowning the king will increase stamina — take it from me. I was making out with a young man who took an oath not to masturbate and ended up prematurely ejaculating as we kissed. I became an advocate of pitching the purple tent that day. Masturbation is normal, it’s safe and people and animals have been doing it for ages. Moreover, it’s healthy. If your college life is anything like mine, then the occasional stress reliever or pick-me-up is necessary. Just be sure to lock your door. Boshion Candrall can be reached at sexcolumnist@theorion.com

CHICO BURGLARIES, FIRST QUARTER 2010

MAP COURTESY OF CHICO POLICE DEPARTMENT

House burglarized; more than 700 victims in Chico Ally Dukkers ers STAFF WRITER R

You’ve been in my house, seen the photos on my refrigerator and maybe you’ve even helped yourself to my food. Maybe you recognize me from my photos or the clothes you’ve seen in my closet. Maybe I’ve passed by you unaware as you smile to yourself, my presence your own inside joke. Maybe you’re reading this now and having another laugh to yourself. Maybe a neighbor heard the loud crash as you threw a rock at my front window, creating an opening to help yourself into my home and my things. There were 704 burglaries committed in Chico in 2009, according to the Chico Police Department website. Three weeks ago, I was victim to one of them. This was not the first, but the third time this has happened to my roommates and me in one year. At 1 a.m. on Sept. 10, my roommates and I returned home to find a hole the size of a watermelon in the window next to our front door and shattered glass blanketing the living room. My initial instinct, even before the 9-1-1 call, was to run inside and

see if my laptop was still there. they struck again, this time Thankfully, it was. My room- taking it up a notch from petty mate, who was on her third theft. laptop since living in our house, The robbers had taken my was roommate’s keys, which were sitw not so lucky. When the cops arrived, they ting by the door when they broke crouched around the house, in. We thought that they were guns raised, making sure the interested in the keys because robbers were gone. They sat my of the mini debit card she had roommates and me on the curb attached to her key chain. Howand questioned us individually, ever on Monday morning, I woke asking if we had any enemies or to a conversation between my suspicions of roommate and who the cula police offiprit could be. cer – she was Three days The thieves informing the took two of after the break-in, officer that her my room- they struck again ...” car had been mate’s purses stolen. and mine. More than 11 They took percent of total belongings that I need everyday crime in Chico in 2009 was auto and that have sentimental value theft, according to the website. – things that hold no worth or My roommate’s car still hasn’t benefit to someone else, such as been recovered. my planner. This had so much The worst part of the situation personal information and dead- is feeling violated and uncomlines in it that are meaningless fortable in my own home. It’s to someone else, but essential a terrible feeling when someto me. one can help themselves to your We began to replace our possessions and get away with belongings. We made trips to the it. When my roommates are bookstore to repurchase text- gone and I’m by myself, there’s books and to Lens Crafters to be always that vulnerability in the fitted for new eyeglasses – not back of my mind that the expehaving them made it impossible rience could repeat itself. to see the board in class. Purses, wallets, credit cards and ID Ally Dukkers can be reached at cards all had to be replaced. adukkers@theorion.com Three days after the break-in,

Safeguard your home: >> Avoid announcing your vacation on your Facebook page. It’s easier than you think to look up your address. Also, never leave clues that you are away. Have a friend collect mail so delivered items don’t pile up. You can also ask them to park in your driveway to make it appear that you are present. >> Leaving a window open during the day may be a way to let in a little fresh air, but to burglars it’s an invitation in. >> Don’t let your alarm company install the control pad where people can see if it’s set. Also, don’t ever forget to set it. >> Burglars may not have enough time to break in to the safe where you keep your valuables, but if it’s not bolted down or hidden, they can just take it. >> A TV or radio can be a good deterrent. You can buy a $35 device that works on a timer and simulates the flickering glow of a real television at faketv.com. Making your residence appear occupied, even when no one is

home, will deter criminals. >> Keep your keys by your bed. If you hear someone breaking in, setting your car alarm off can scare a burglar away, and even cause curious neighbors to look outside their windows. >> Secure sliding glass doors. Place a metal rod or piece of plywood in the track. These will help prevent burglars from forcing the door open or lifting it off the track.

Safeguard personal property: >> Write down the serial numbers of all serialized property. Keep the number in a safe place – away from the item itself. If the item doesn’t have a serial number, use an engraver to mark your driver’s license number on valuable items. University Police has engravers you can borrow. >> Photograph your valuables. >> Purchase a cable to secure your laptop computer to the desk in your room.

INFORMATION COURTESY OF READER’S DIGEST AND UNIVERSITY POLICE

Queer Week aims to educate, welcome Sarah Brown STAFF WRITER

The sun had already set when one of three men shoulderchecked junior Jillian Ruddell last year and said “faggot.” He kept saying the word, but it didn’t phase her and she continued on with her friends. The three men followed her into the street and pushed her. They called her a “stupid dyke” and continued to make offensive comments. Ruddell, a multicultural and gender studies major, was afraid, but it wasn’t an entirely new experience for her, she said. She had experienced prejudice against her “butch” appearance before. What bothered her most was that passersby looked the other way, and that her antagonists were also a minority. “The fact that they singled me out seemed so idiotic to me because they have probably faced prejudice in their lives as well,” Ruddell said. It is experiences such as these that spurred faculty and staff at Chico State to start an

Related Article: See Campus Spotlight, D4 See Coming out in style, C3

annual event known as Queer Week three years ago, she said. They decided Chico needed to be a more educated and welcoming environment for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer community. The weeklong event aims to raise awareness, said senior Jamie Humphreys, a nursing major and intern at the Women’s Center. Everyone is welcome to attend and learn more about this particular population that they are likely to encounter in their daily lives. Events include a panel for discussions, movie night, “coming out” potluck and a march downtown, among others, Humphreys said. The hope is that people who don’t understand LGBTQ issues might gain a raised awareness about what queer people experience in the community, said junior Kimberly Edmonds, a staff member at the Women’s Center and political science and multicultural and gender studies

major. There is still prejudice against those who identify with LGBTQ, which spurs negativity. It appears that hatred lives on campus, as well, she said. Several fliers that were posted in Modoc Hall to advertise Queer Week have been pulled off the bulletin boards within 24 hours of them being hung up. Despite this opposition, those at the Women’s Center hope for a large attendance and want everyone they reach to enjoy themselves, Ruddell said. Hopefully something new will be learned. She thinks people feel they have a right to be aggressive and use abusive language toward the queer community because it’s a minority group, Ruddell said. Queer Week is an opportunity to change all that. “This event really is a little bit of hope in a community that’s not always accepting of LGBTQ individuals,” Ruddell said. “It has been a positive event and has shown to be progressive for the campus.” THE ORION • SARAH BROWN

Sarah Brown can be reached at sbrown@theorion.com

SPREADING THE WORD Program coordinator for Queer Week Kerrie Lione [left] and junior Lisa Ricchio [right] hand out event fliers.


WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 |

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D3

LOOKING BACK >>

c. 1975

c. 1980

c. 1980

c. 1981

c. 1983

c. 1985

c. 1986

c. 1988

c. 1988

c. 1995

1983 | Security addressed with escorts, shuttle “Volunteers for escort service needed” Feb. 16, 1983 In an effort to make the Chico State campus secure for students in 1980, the Student Development Program established a campus-escort service. During this time, a campuswide security service escort was only available during the period surrounding Pioneer Days. Student Development worked in conjunction with Public Safety, the housing

program, Educational Support Programs, Rape Crisis Intervention and Associated Students. In order to make the escort service possible, student volunteers were needed, said Cleo Blash, former director of the Student Development Program and escort service coordinator. During this time, the service was provided by fellow students. The service extended past campus boundaries and was available for cyclists and pedestrians, and two escorts were available for each person’s request.

NOW

THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

LIGHTING THE WAY Blue Light Phones used on campus.

Thirty years later, the university still seeks to make the campus safe for students, faculty and campus visitors. A new addition to the safety measures this semester is the Campus Connection Shuttle Service. This service is provided to staff, faculty, students and university visitors as an alternative to walking alone on campus during hours of darkness. The safety shuttle travels throughout the main campus,

parking structure, parking lots and University Village. Many can take advantage of this service by using the Blue Light Phones located throughout the campus. Escorts can be reached by dialing extension 5555 from any campus phone, calling 530898-5555 or by going directly to the University Police Department office on the corner of Normal Avenue and West Second Street. Community Service Officers drive the shuttle. They are nonsworn student employees of University Police hired to provide community services to the

campus as well as support services to the police department. The shuttle runs 6 p.m. to 12 a.m. seven days a week during the fall and spring semesters. Senior Daniel French, a business major, thinks more people need to be more aware of these resources, he said. “I have night classes and I always see people walking alone on campus,” he said. “If more people knew about the safety escorts and shuttle, they would feel more at ease getting around campus after hours.” -Compiled by Kelly Smith

Tests remain valid way to measure progress Gina Pence STAFF WRITER

There are three things a person can always count on — death, taxes and tests in college. With information so readily available with the click of a mouse, why do teachers still bother with tests that ask students to memorize and recall information? A) It’s still a valid method of assessment. B) It’s difficult to assign papers to larger classes. C) For most majors it’s important to be able to recall information. D) All of the above. The answer is D, all of the above. Projects, research papers and performance-based evaluations have been incorporated in professors’ syllabi to supplement

basic tests. Classes that once relied on multiple choice, true or false, fill in the blank and short answer tests for a final grade are now including more complex assignments, said Susan Porter, assistant professor in the department of professional studies in education. “Tests will never be replaced – they have some validity,” she said. “In addition to the tests, what can I do that will mimic real world application?” Professors look for testing methods that simulate career experiences, Porter said. “We do a lot of projects based on performance assessments,” she said. “We go out and observe students teaching in the field as a method of assessment.” By watching student teachers, professors are able to evaluate students’ performances in a

manner that imitates real world application, Porter said. However, tests may be preferable to research papers for medical students and other applied sciences. Tests can be an effective way to measure what students have retained from their online surfing, said freshman Alesha Williams, an agricultural business major. She thinks it’s easier to know how much information a student has learned by being able to answer questions on a test. Methods of evaluation are only valid if they’re testing the abilities associated with that method, said Steven Koch, an assistant professor in the department of professional studies in education. “Does a test measure what the test claims to measure?” Koch said. “If a multiple choice test claims to test recall

abilities, then it would be a valid measure.” Koch assigns multiple-choice tests on the textbooks through Web CT Vista to encourage students to read the material, he said. But even more important than finding information is learning how to use it properly. “Digital learners are really good at mining for data and information,” Koch said. “Where I don’t find students to be so strong is putting that information together.” Digital learners are the generation that grew up using technology as a way of communicating, recording, educating and understanding society, according to www.tweenparenting.about.com. For some students, it’s easier to use Google to find information, said senior Matthew Burns, an entrepreneurship major.

“Whenever you’re away from school, you won’t have to retain this information,” he said. Al Schademan, assistant professor and Single Subject Credential Program coordinator in the department of education, thinks tests themselves are valid, but they are a means, not an end, to evaluating at the university level, he said. Because of the complexity and depth of the subjects taught at the university level, tests cannot be the only method of assessment. “There should be multiple forms of assessment, both ongoing and summative, that are connected to the course goals and are authentic in that they connect to the real world,” Schademan said. However, poor testing performance is not always a result of the digital age. Tests hit at certain cognitive styles, and various methods

of evaluation can be beneficial or detrimental to students depending on the learning type, Porter said. Anxiety can block a student’s ability to test well and have a crippling effect on performance. Apprehension and anxiety can block a person’s ability to recall and retrieve memorized information, she said. “If the student already has trouble with testing, it can become a double-obstacle situation,” Porter said. Chico State offers resources for students who have trouble with testing at the Disability Support Service office, in Student Services Center Room 170. “If someone really is struggling with testing, it’s a resource meant to help them,” Porter said. Gina Pence can be reached at gpence@theorion.com


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Campus Spotlight:

Jillian Ruddell earns award for her activism, academics

QA &

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ KENNEDY COKER

TOP OF CLASS Jillian Ruddell, the youngest director of the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center, earns award. Tasha Clark STAFF WRITER

Junior Jillian Ruddell, a multicultural and gender studies major, was an awarded the Hearst/CSU Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Sept. 21, along with $2,000 and a laptop. She was among 23 other students from diďŹ&#x20AC;erent universities in California recognized for academic achievement and overcoming adversity. Ruddell is also the youngest director of the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center. Q: How did you become involved with the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center? A: My freshman year I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a sense of community, and someone told me to check it out. I put on a conference that same year, the LGBTQ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Leadership Conference. I got an interview for the directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position, had the skills and was hired. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the youngest director.

This is my second year directing and third year working at the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center. Q: Why were you nominated for the Hearst Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award? A: I was nominated for the award through the Rawlings scholarship because of my letter of recommendation and was acknowledged through my activism. Q: What was the ďŹ rst thing you did after receiving the news that you won? A: I called my mom and mentor Dr. Sara Cooper to share the news. I was ecstatic about winning the award. Q: What type of activism do you do? Why do you think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important? A: Sexual assault prevention and awareness, informing the campus and community of LGBTQ issues and identities. I mostly promote human and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights. I do it to create a community that is more accepting and welcoming for all individuals, regardless of sexual orientation, gender presentation or life experience. Q: What changes are you trying to establish on campus? A: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to start a gender and equity center which will be LGBTQ and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center programming. It will be somewhere to go to meet like-minded individuals establishing a community. Chico State has given me an opportunity to be an activist because so much needs to be done on this campus. Q: What plans do have after you graduate? A: Continue to higher education, get a Ph.D in sociology, maybe become a professor in gender sexuality. Tasha Clark can be reached at tclark@theorion.com

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ RYAN RICHARDS

TOGETHER THEY STAND Eighth-grade girls work together to try to stand at the same time on a 1-by-1-foot box by holding onto each other in a workshop promoting leadership during the Latina Youth Leadership Conference hosted by Lambda Theta Nu Sorority, Inc.

Lambda Theta Nu reaches Latina youth Tasha Clark STAFF WRITER

Promoting the value of higher education is not easy, but Lambda Theta Nu Sorority, Inc. has been raising awareness through the Latina Youth Leadership Conference. The multicultural sorority hosted its 10th annual conference Friday that exposed Latina middle-school students to diďŹ&#x20AC;erent aspects of higher education. It has been around since 2000, said Kristina Vassallo, president of Lambda Theta Nu. This is a national conference and all of the chapters participate. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the biggest community service event of the year. One of the sororityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ideals is to promote higher education, Vassallo said. Lambda Theta Nu wanted to promote to younger girls that it is possible to go to college, despite being a minority. Most of the seventh and eighth-graders will be ďŹ rstgeneration college students, said senior Emma Campos, a

liberal studies major and member of Lambda Theta Nu. Often, parents want to help them succeed, but they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the opportunity to receive a higher education and might not have all the answers. There were four diďŹ&#x20AC;erent workshops that focused on leadership, self-esteem, higher education and pride and heritage. During the leadership workshop, the girls were split up into two groups. Each group gathered around a black block where each girl held her foot on it for at least 10 seconds. The goal was to work together to get everyone on the block at the same time. The participants are all from diďŹ&#x20AC;erent schools, but are working together, said Amy Hormann, the program coordinator for the Cross-Cultural Leadership Center. The objectives of the workshop were problem solving, communication, teamwork and strategy. Melissa Virrueta, presenter of the self-esteem workshop, questioned girls on self-image issues.

This workshop aims to teach them to recognize the concept of self-esteem, because most girls their age donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think about it, Virrueta said. For the higher-education workshop, the students had a brainstorming session discussing barriers that would keep them from going to college and successful strategies and resources they can go to for help, such as parents, mentors and counselors, said Caren Fernandez, associate director of Student Support Services who has been a part of the conference since it started in 2000. The conference has added a culture aspect to the workshops, said Jessica Torres, who chaired the conference. It helps the girls learn about where they came from, so they can learn more about who they are. For a few years now, organizers have been successfully trying to incorporate pride and heritage into the workshops, Torres said. Elizabeth Alaniz, the adviser of Lambda Theta Nu, hosted one segment of the pride and heritage workshop. She showed

a video clip of Baile Folklorico, a cultural dance from Latin America. Another segment of the workshop was an activity called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Step into my Circleâ&#x20AC;?, which Vassallo presented. The participants formed a circle around her and if they agreed with the question Vassallo asked, they stepped into the circle. Lambda Theta Nu wants the girls to become aware that there are other people ďŹ ghting for the same thing they want, Vassallo said. If they set their mind to it and believe in themselves, they can accomplish anything, no matter where they come from. There have been success stories regarding the conference. Some students that have attended the conference went to college, Torres said. It is rewarding because they attended and learned a lot. They took what the conference established into perspective and applied it to their lives, she said. Tasha Clark can be reached at tclark@theorion.com

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about Halâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really excited d dressing an es rti pa loween, the best parts up! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the about Chico.â&#x20AC;? Danielle Damiano junior | criminal justice

Students, staďŹ&#x20AC; and community members are welcome to submit posts to featureseditor@theorion. com, Facebook or Twitter. Include your contact information.

the going to win â&#x20AC;&#x153;Giants are ould riot s. People sh World Serie e, lets s every wher in the street aos.â&#x20AC;? have mass ch zzarini Vincent La al justice senior | crimin

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;People shou ld start payi ng attention to th e governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race. People donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; t know who they are or what they stand fo r. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important.â&#x20AC;? Jake Nester

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administration

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m obsessed with the rock wall at the WREC. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been going almost every day for the past three weeks. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cool social atmosphere and nice workout.â&#x20AC;? Chris Dupuis

junior | anthropology

â&#x20AC;&#x153;What th e hell. Th many ho t guys on ere are so campus a I only see nd them on ca Is there s ome secre mpus. t hot man society I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t kno w about? .â&#x20AC;? Danielle Ghiglier seni i relations

r the day â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited fo because n, ee after Hallow l of the thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when al sale.â&#x20AC;? candy goes on ele Mariah Kintz ations ernational rel

sophomore | int

D5

FAMILY: Students can receive no-cost STI testing with plan continued from D1

Dunbar said. Now the bill goes to the Family PACT program instead of the students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Student Health Service picked up the program because we had to up the prices on certain birth control methods,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where a method used to be $20, it is now $60. Pap smears became $10 and so on. Due to these changes in pricing, students were being deterred from the health center.â&#x20AC;? The program allows students to receive free Pap smears, STI testing and treatment, emergency contraceptives, birth control, testicular exams, mammograms and health education, among other services, Dunbar said. To qualify, a student must be under the age of 55 for females and under the age of 60 for males, make $1,805 or less per month and must

be a California resident, she said. A student also must lack insurance that provides reproductive health care, though having previous health insurance does not disqualify a person from the program. Students must also reapply for the program annually to make sure their information is still the same and that they are still eligible, Dunbar said. Students looking to apply for the Family PACT program can get printable applications on the Student Health Service website to schedule an appointment to meet with a staďŹ&#x20AC; representative. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This program does nothing but beneďŹ t the students,â&#x20AC;? Dunbar said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sole purpose. It covers the cost of reproductive health care that would otherwise cost students money.â&#x20AC;? Kelly Smith can be reached at ksmith@theorion.com

OďŹ&#x20AC;ered at the SHC Female Patients: â&#x20AC;˘ Birth control methods and supplies â&#x20AC;˘ Health education â&#x20AC;˘ Annual exam â&#x20AC;˘ Pap smears â&#x20AC;˘ Colposcopy (referral) â&#x20AC;˘ Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) testing and treatment â&#x20AC;˘ Gynecological complaints â&#x20AC;˘ Urinary tract infections (UTI) â&#x20AC;˘ Menstrual problem treatment â&#x20AC;˘ Pregnancy testing and counseling â&#x20AC;˘ HIV screening â&#x20AC;˘ Emergency contraception (morning-after pill) Male Patients: â&#x20AC;˘ Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI ) testing and treatment â&#x20AC;˘ HIV screening â&#x20AC;˘ Condoms and supplies Education and counseling

MEDICINE: Prices low continued from D1

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the prison system and all of the California State Universities and negotiates with providers for lower prices. The pharmacist is bound to contractual agreements to buy the products on the list from the department, Meigs said. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy anything on the list from other providers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We generally donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t charge much for our overall cost because we are a non-proďŹ t organization,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t charging as much as Walgreens.â&#x20AC;? These medicines are sold for a reduced price and have a small

mark-up to cover the pharmacyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administrative costs. Nancy Lor, a junior student assistant in the pharmacy, thinks coming to the oncampus pharmacy is more beneďŹ cial to students than going to CVS/pharmacy or Walgreens because of the price variance, she said. Most commonly, new students from out of the area come in during the fall semester in need of allergy medications and bug bite remedies, Meigs said. The Student Health Center recommends antihistamines, but makes other recommendations as well.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;No question is a dumb question if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the answer,â&#x20AC;? Meigs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I encourage students to come in and ask questions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to ask.â&#x20AC;? The biggest diďŹ&#x20AC;erence between shopping at a big pharmacy and the Student Health Center is the fact that the center caters to students, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the students get a more personal service here,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At some of the bigger stores they are so busy, and students get lost in the shuďŹ&#x201E;e.â&#x20AC;? Amanda Jacobs can be reached at ajacobs@theorion.com

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Issue 7