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Read on if you dare for a Halloween scare >> C2, D1

Chico State’s Independen t S t u de n t Ne w spa pe r , since 1975

Wednesday OCTOBER 27, 2010 Volume 65 Issue 10 1 free copy per person additional copies 50¢

Election Coverage >> A6, A8

Before going to the polls Tuesday, learn about the candidates and see who The Orion editorial board endorses

SPORTS >> B1

Men's soccer

Men's soccer sweeps weekend at home

Life of student celebrated Jeb Draper PHOTO EDITOR

About 150 people gathered on a rainy day to show support for the family of Jesse Kohen and to honor the memory of him. Despite the rain, family members, friends, coworkers and community members met Sunday afternoon at One-Mile Recreation Area to celebrate the life of Kohen, 26, by doing something he loved – going for a run. The rain did not stop the event, but instead showed

the impact Kohen’s life had on the community, said Casey Kohen, Jesse’s brother. The group participated in a two-mile run in Lower Bidwell Park and gathered afterward in a parking lot to share memories with each other and with the Kohen family. “There are no fairweather friends out here,” Casey Kohen said. “Weather like this would have just inspired him.” Nik Mendoza, a manager at LaSalles and a friend of Kohen, organized the

event through Facebook and was pleased with the turnout, he said. “Different people deal with grief in different ways,” Mendoza said. “I wanted to take that energy and do something positive.” Kohen died in a singlevehicle accident Oct. 19. He was driving eastbound on Highway 32 just east of Highway 99 when, for an unknown reason, his vehicle went off the left side of the roadway, said Chico police Sgt. Rob >> please see RUN | A6

THE ORION • JEB DRAPER

HOLDING IT TOGETHER Bob Kohen, Kay Kohen and Casey Kohen embrace after finishing the memorial run.

Departments reorganized

ENTERTAINMENT >> C1

Zoo Zoo coming to Chico

Stephanie Consiglio

Vaudeville, circus acts, visual effects and puppetry combine at Laxson

STAFF WRITER

Last-minute costumess Don’t let costume prices scare you this Halloween. Find affordable, last-minute alternatives at thrift stores.

STAFF WRITER

There is no trick to how authorities will approach the upcoming Halloween celebration, and there will be no treat for students who have a run in with the law. Student Judicial Affairs regularly receives the names of people who have been arrested, then deciphers who are Chico State students, said Connie Huyck, interim director for

OPINION >> A9

Cycle of violence Columnist tells personal experience with domestic violence, offers guidance

ONLINE >> theorion.com Video coverage

The Pakistani Student Association hosted a fundraising dinner to support flood victims in Pakistan.

INDEX >> Police Blotter

A3

The Webz

A4

Opinion

A8

Sports

B1

Entertainment

C1

Calendar

C5

Auto Directory / Games B5 Features

D1

Stephanie Consiglio can be reached at

kward@theorion.com

sconsiglio@theorion.com

NIGHTMARE Julia Vazquez

A2

Kelly Ward can be reached at

RECURRING

FEATURES >> D2

Weather

the money they would have gained for the past two seasons,” Jamali said during his presentation. Donations were asked of everyone in attendance. Few were able to donate large amounts, but two people pledged to split a $5,000 donation and one person pledged $1,000. A.S. President Amro Jayousi was at the fundraiser and thought highly of the Pakastani Student Association and of what they were doing for Pakistan, he said. “I thought their effort was very honest and noble – and needed,” Jayousi said. “A lot of people need help in Pakistan.” After the presentation, there was a large buffet of traditional Pakistani foods, including biryani rice, pulao rice, chicken qorma, vegetable bhujia and naan bread, and ending with a very sweet dessert similar to rice pudding called “kheer.” If anyone would like to donate to help the victims of the flood in Pakistan, they can go to the Islamic Relief USA website or contact the Pakistani Student Association at psachico@ gmail.com

The departments of education and professional studies in education are joining together again as one department after 17 years of separation. The Academic Senate passed a proposal to combine the two departments Thursday. The departments have been separated since 1993, said Deborah Summers, chairwoman of the department of education. Part of the idea was to have more specialized teachers in addition to credentialed teachers. The merger will improve communication and services to the school districts that the department works with and to other departments and colleges within the university, said Phyllis Fernlund, dean of the College of Communication and Education. The funding for both departments is being combined so there won’t be a cut in the budget of either office. “We’re not taking away classes or funding from the students, we’re just reorganizing the way we do things,” Fernlund said. The new college organization will take effect fall 2011, she said. Students who are already in the programs will probably see few changes, but they will be able to take courses from an expanded number of faculty members, Fernlund said. Senior Thomas Whitcomb, a history and social science double major, sees the pros of the arrangement, he said. “I think working with the same teachers over and over can only give you one perspective, and a variety is very beneficial,” Whitcomb said. The merger between the two departments will reduce the number of departments from seven to six, but will not affect the other five departments, Fernlund said. “For the incoming students, there will be several new programs that will be combined for a much richer experience,” Summers said. “Not that it’s not good right now – it will just be better.” The change won’t affect the students in any negative way, Fernlund said. The School of Education Information Center will continue to provide a variety of services to students, Fernlund said.

High 67° Low 47° Sunny

Student Judicial Affairs. “When we receive the names, we determine whether or not to call a student into our office and see if what happened is a violation of Title 5,” Huyck said. Students are subject to disciplinary action if they violate any of the Title 5 California Code of Regulations. Grounds for student discipline include plagiarism, disorderly or indecent behavior relating to the university or its

members – which can occur on or off campus – and public intoxication while on campus or at a university-related activity. If an intoxicated student decides to walk home and wants to cut through campus, he or she could be subject to disciplinary action under Title 5, Huyck said. There were a total of 142 arrests throughout the 2009 Halloween holiday weekend, and the Chico >> please see CAUTION | A2

Students aid flood relief Kelly Ward STAFF WRITER

Sobs could be heard throughout Selvester’s Cafe-by-the-Creek Thursday night at the fundraiser for the victims of the flood in Pakistan. From the approximate 100 people in attendance, the Pakistani Student Association raised $3,443 from ticket sales and donations. The event cost $20 to attend. The event started with a reading from the Quran by senior electrical engineering student Wail Ghazali in traditional Arabic. Qasim Malik, president of the Pakistani Student Association, then showed a slideshow depicting the devastation of the flood, which took place in July. The slideshow contained several pictures of villages too flooded to be salvaged alongside statistics stating that 1.2 million homes were destroyed. There were images of Pakistani people trudging through water up to their thighs, with a figures stating that more than 20 million people were affected by the flood and 8.6 million of them were children less than 5 years old. About 2,000 people were killed because of the flood,

THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

SERVING RELIEF Shazia Khan [LEFT] and Fouzia Khan [RIGHT] dish up traditional Pakistani food to guests. Malik said. After the slideshow, there was a video of an AlJazeera report on all of the children affected by the flood in Pakistan health centers. Many of those in attendance were wiping their eyes and covering their faces as the video showed three people struggling to help one another stand up in the steady current of the flood. Some shed tears as they watched the small group trying to stand, but continually falling down in the current. Following the video, Hamayoun Jamali, a representative of the Islamic

Relief USA organization, gave a slideshow presentation of what the group is doing to help Pakistan now. In this presentation, the focus was on the 2 million homeless people, the 72,000 children at risk for death from malnutrition and what Islamic Relief USA has done for the people of Pakistan. Islamic Relief USA has raised more than $12.5 million for Pakistan and $3 million for tents and supplies to shelter the homeless, Jamali said. “These people lost their families, their homes, their livestock, seeds and


A2 |

N EWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

Campus Clips

Weather >>

always online >> theorion.com

Forecast features highs/lows in degrees Fahrenheit source: weather.com

today

thursday

friday

saturday

sunday

monday

tuesday

67/47°

64/45°

64/49°

61/49°

64/47°

70/48°

75/51°

sunny

showers

cloudy

showers

cloudy

partly cloudy

sunny

Workshop offers insights into intimate relationships >> Safe Place is hosting a free workshop called the “Do’s and Don’ts of Intimate Relationships” from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. today at Selvester’s Cafe-by-the-Creek, according to campus announcements. The workshop will cover the warning signs in unhealthy relationships, keeping healthy boundaries and breaking old patterns. For more information, call Safe Place at 530898-3030 or Catalyst Domestic Violence Services at 530-343-7711. See related story on A9. Source: Student Announcements

World News >>

World News compiled by The Orion’s Walter Ford

Paris, France – Strikes in France have cost the country an estimated 200 million to 400 million euros per day. Workers were upset with plans to raise the retirement age from 60 to 62 and other pension issues. They staged rolling strikes, protests that have led to violence with police and blockaded oil refineries and terminals. Source: yahoo.com Istanbul, Turkey Kabul, Afghanistan – Afghan

– Former NBA Most

President Hamid Karzai acknowl-

Valuable Player Allen Iverson Mexico City, Mexico – Four

has entered into a verbal agree-

edged Monday that he receives

heavily armed men stormed a

ment to sign a $2 million contract

millions of dollars in cash from Iran and

Tijuana drug rehabilitation center

to play for the Turkey Besiktas

that Washington gives him “bags of money”

and killed 13 people Sunday night.

basketball team, said Seref Yalcin,

The assailants are still at large. These

president of the team.

slayings are similar to previous attacks

Source: CNN.com

because his office lacks funds. When asked if the U.S. actually gives bags full of cash to the presidential office, Karzai

carried out in Juarez rehab centers over

said, “Yes, it does give bags of money.”

the past year.

Source: yahoo.com

Source: CNN.com

Chico Police Department: Chico State: -Bringing in 100 officers -Dressing in plain clothes -ABC decoys enforcing alcohol sale laws -Ban on glass

Enloe Medical Center:

-Student Judicial Affairs wants names of those arrested -No visitors in dorms -CADEC providing Chico Safe Rides Thursday through Sunday from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. Free with -Free driving service for patients valid CSU Chico ID. Call (530) 894-TAXI (8294) without a way home -Does not check if patients are students.

Julia Vazquez can be reach at jvazquez@theorion.com

C h i c o S tat e’s I n d e p e n d e n t S t u d e n t N e w s pa p e r , s i n c e 1975

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Ways to stay safe:

Officials’ Halloween safety plan:

Anthony Siino

[Corrections]

were treated for trauma, providing blood draws to check lacerations, contusions or people’s alcohol level, Chavira alcohol, Chavira said. said. Last year, there were four. “It’s hard to predict if we People should be aware will get more people this that during the Hallowyear,” she said. Another way that Enloe Medical Center prepares is by -If planning on going out, having a detoxiknow how to get home and fication holding don’t walk alone at night. area where patients are given fluids, checked to -If hosting a party, keep it make sure they small and don’t allow any are breathing correctly and can strangers to attend. wait to sober up, Chavira said. -If planning on drinking, know Patients without the signs of alcohol poisoning alcohol-related issues can wait and make plans to not drive. there, too. “We will also have a free driving service for people who do not have a ride een weekend, all persons home,” she said. “We did it arrested by law enforcement last year and will be doing it for being drunk in public this year.” or other related issues will They also assist officers by be charged, said University Police Sgt. Corinne Beck. “There will be a glass ban in place, and people cannot have glass bottles or open containers in public,” she said. Officers will not tolerate violent behavior and will be actively enforcing all alcohol violations, Beck said. -Detoxification center “Our main concern is to protect the campus, com-Blood draws to check alcohol munity, facilities and properties,” she said. level for police officers

defensive, we are just making sure everyone is cool,” he said. “If you are fighting, breaking the law and if you are drunk to the point where you can’t take care of yourself, we’re going to be all over that.” They will also have officers in plain clothes walking the streets, Merrifield said. “I am surprised I do not see more people get seriously hurt on Halloween than we normally would,” he said. Every year, Enloe Medical Center anticipates that there will be an increase in patients that weekend and starts preparing in early October, said Christina Chavira, a communications specialist for the center. “One of the things we do to prepare for an increase in patient activity is to increase our staffing, particularly in the emergency department,” she said. Last year, the emergency department had 20 patients – all with injuries related to Halloween activity – that

DESIGN

Source: Student Announcements

Friday and Saturday and 100 on Sunday, including four on horses, Merrifield said. They will also bring in officers from Butte and Glenn County, six officers with horses from Stanislaus County and Alcoholic Beverage Control agents for the weekend. “ABC agents will be checking bars and restaurants just to make sure alcohol is not being sold to minors and have minor decoys to make sure liquor stores are not selling alcohol to them as well,” he said. Since there are usually large crowds in the streets, they also have officers that are trained to deal with crowd control, Merrifield said. “We have officers that are equipped and trained to do crowd-control functions, and they have different types of tools they use,” he said. At their discretion, police have pepper-ball guns, projectiles and tear gas, but do not plan on taking it to that level, Merrifield said. “We are not here to be

DESIGN

Pumpkins to be dropped in name of physics education >>The Society of Physics Students is getting into the Halloween spirit by putting on the 23rd annual Pumpkin Drop. Pumpkins will be dropped from the south side of Butte Hall Thursday as a way to explain Galileo Galilei’s theory of gravity. The event will feature actors playing Albert Einstein, Aristotle, Galilei and Sir Isaac Newton explaining their theories of gravity. For the grand finale, students will use Galilei’s Law of Falling Bodies to drop pumpkins in sync with the cannon blasts of Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture.” See related story on D3.

continued from A1

Police Department is prepared to deal with similar numbers, said Sgt. Rob Merrifield. “We have to plan for the worst-case scenario, especially if it is a super warm evening and students have invited more friends into town than they normally would,” he said. Weeks before Halloween, the Chico Police Department prepares an operation plan to arrange staffing, decide who will handle what and go over their mission and objective, Merrifield said. “You will see that our enforcement posture is very proactive, visible and engaged with the crowds,” he said. “We are not going to just sit at the headquarters and wait for something to happen – we are going to be out there mixing around with the people, and let them know we are here to keep everything safe.” Chico police will have approximately 80 officers on

EDITORIAL

Source: Student Announcements

CAUTION: Police prepared for crowds

EDITORIAL

Companies seek interns, recruits at Nov. 3 career fair >> The Career Planning and Placement Office will host a career and internship fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 3 at the Bell Memorial Union Auditorium. Companies such as SunPower Corporation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Peace Corps, Enloe Medical Center, Martin Brothers Construction and the Resort at Squaw Creek will be looking to recruit students for internships and full-time positions at the fair. For more information, contact the Career Center at 530-898-5253.

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N EWS

All accused of violating the law are innocent until proven guilty | Information cited directly from Chico Police Department Thursday, 1:48 p.m.: Neighbor dispute reported on 1000 block of Columbus Avenue. “Reporting party is complaining about woman sitting in backyard topless. Yard does not have fence around it and there are small children running around.” Thursday, 5:43 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported at 200 block of East Seventh Street. “Male subject hanging out in front of reporting party’s residence for the last hour. Subject was taking to himself, trying to skip pebbles at one time through a neighbor’s kitchen window.” Friday, 12:12 a.m.: Urinating in public reported at Beach Hut Deli on 100 block of West Second Street. “Subject was urinating on the business doors. Reporting party no longer in the area.” F Friday, 1:30 p.m.: Drunk in public reported at Courtesy Motors on 2000 block of Cohasset C Road. “Male subject stumbling in front of the business and in and out of traffic. Now subject b iis lying in the gutter.”

Friday, 9:15 p.m.: Assault and battery reported at 10 block of El Cerrito Drive. “Juvenile male, about 13 years old, is kicking people. Reporting party’s parents are holding him down. Pulling reporting party’s mom’s hair.” Saturday, 12:50 a.m.: Drunk in public reported at 200 block of East Third Street. “Male subject laying in the middle of the street with hands down his pants. Reporting party believes subject has wet himself.” Saturday, 12:08 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported at 400 block of Sequoyah Avenue. “Unknown male subject on foot in the area and appears to be aimlessly wandering around. Subject appears to possibly be intoxicated.” Sunday, 6:01 a.m.: Suspicious circumstances reported at 900 block of Ivy Street. “Reporting party advising unknown transient male just attempted to open reporting party’s door. Reporting party confronted him and he stumbled off.”

Friday, 8:41 p.m.: Transient problem reported at 300 block of Salem Street. “Subject passed out in elevator. Reporting party attempted to board elevator on first floor, unknown what floor elevator is on now.”

Sunday, 7:57 p.m.: Subject disturbing the peace reported at Torres Community Shelter on 100 block of Silver Dollar Way. “Subject has been asked to leave, he seems to have mental health issues and is yelling at himself and reporting party.” Police Blotter compiled by Rudro Roy

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 |

A3


A4 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

National News

Source: www.nytimes.com

California News

Heidi Parodi The Computer Information Systems program at Chico State recently became ďŹ rst to receive accreditation on the West Coast. Accreditation is earned when a non-government and o-site professional group evaluates a program and gives it a stamp of approval, said Ben Juliano, associate dean of the College of Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Management. The accreditation was received from ABET, Inc. – a worldrenowned organization that is an accreditor for college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering and technology, he said. “This is the ďŹ rst time Computer Information Systems has been accredited and is the ďŹ rst on the West Coast,â€? Juliano said. “And we’re pretty proud of that, and I know there are a bunch of other programs that are following suit.â€?

Source: www.cnn.com

Employers in computer science are picky about whether students come from an accredited program or not, Juliano said. In his experience, employers have said they will not look at programs that aren’t accredited. Even though the program is now accredited, it shouldn’t be more diďŹƒcult to get into, he said. ABET, Inc. would not provide information on which schools had applied for this accreditation. “Especially with the job market, you would think people would want some other bragging right,â€? Juliano said. “But we are going to brag about being the ďŹ rst in the West Coast.â€? Universities come to ABET, Inc. and ask for accreditation for their colleges within the university, then go through a process of assessing themselves, said Keryl Cryer, a communications specialist for ABET, Inc. Schools submit a self-study, which examines everything in the program from the curriculum to institutional

support. ABET, Inc. sends a team of volunteers to the campus to review everything that can’t be ďŹ gured out from the self-study, Cryer said. The examination includes everything from reviewing syllabi and textbooks to interviewing students and the vice provost of information technology, Juliano said. “It’s a lot of work going through an accreditation review,â€? said Tamra Donnelly, administrative analyst and specialist for the provost and vice president of academic aairs. Out of 11 programs in the college, nine of them are accredited, Donnelly said. Of these nine, seven are accredited by ABET, Inc. “Our goal is to have 100 percent of all the undergraduate programs we oer to be accredited,â€? Juliano said. Heidi Parodi can be reached at hparodi@theorion.com

Day dedicated to sustainability Heidi Parodi STAFF WRITER

Student dies as result of shark attack at Surf Beach >> A shark attack killed a 19-year-old UC Santa Barbara student Friday. Lucas McKain Ransom died after having his left leg bitten o at Surf Beach. The shark was described as being 14 to 20 feet in length. The attack happened about 100 yards oshore, where Ransom was pulled underwater by the shark. Surf Beach and two other beaches nearby closed for 72 hours after the attack.

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Computer science program accredited STAFF WRITER

Student loan debt increases alongside unemployment >>The average student loan debt increased 6 percent from 2008 to 2009 for graduating college seniors. The loan debt averaged $24,000 per student last year. This rise is similar to increases is costs over the past four years for students. However, unemployment rates for college graduates ages 20 to 24 reached the highest annual rate at 8.7 percent in 2009, making paying o debts diďŹƒcult.

N EWS

Campus Sustainability Day ďŹ lled Trinity Commons with booths Oct. 20, gearing up for the This Way To Sustainability conference in November. Participants at the booth for the conference were out recruiting and informing people about their cause. Conference cocoordinator Ciara Meanes was among the participants. “We are looking to bring community members – most importantly students, faculty and sta on Chico State campus and Butte College campus – to learn about sustainability,â€? Meanes said. The conference will go on for three days, she said. There are workshops and exhibiton halls, along with sponsors and exhibitors from Sierra Nevada

Brewing Co., Waste Management, Recology, PaciďŹ c Gas & Electric Co. and more. People come from all over the country, said Luann Manss, a senior majoring in recreation and a leader in the sustainable movement on campus. Some students ride bikes to the conference from other areas of the state, promoting sustainability in their daily lives. It was the largest studentrun sustainability conference in the nation last year, Manss said. It was also the second largest sustainability conference in general. The conference is free for all students, kindergarten to college age, Meanes said. If you’re a community member, it costs $25 a day. This conference is structured to not make any profit, she said. Instead, all funds

get recycled for the following year. “If you need volunteer hours, we’re also looking for volunteers thoughout all three days of the conference,â€? Meanes said. Other booths at Campus Sustainability Day included the Student Democratic Club, A.S. Bookstore and the Wildcat Recreation Center. Along with these was the Community Legal Information Center booth that oered free legal information and promoted its programs Right 2 Recycle and Environmental Advocates. Senior philosophy major Anastasia Worden helped work the booth. “We are trying to get part of a grant to set up our recycling program,â€? Worden said. Heidi Parodi can be reached at hparodi@theorion.com

>>The Webz _

Previews to this week's: Blogs. Videos. Comments.

monday

friday

By Emily Hirshman

By Nick Pike

■ There’s something about the fall that makes me miss home the most. On a cool, crisp day when the leaves are changing and the wind is blowing, I get really homesick. Today was one of those days. It started just like any other and somewhere around my second cup of coffee I starting thinking about years past and old friends. My birthday, being just a week away, has compounded my longing for familiar faces. allegedadult.wordpress.com

■ Hip hop and reggae greeted me as I walked in to the dark wood stained bar known as the Banshee. It’s an eclectically classy joint that not only quenches thirst but offers some of the best pub food for less than 10 bucks. I heard nothing but raving positive reviews about the food that the Banshee dished out, so I figured no better time than when mom was up visiting to show off Chico’s unique bar food. chicocollegedining.wordpress.com

tuesday

>> VIDEOS

ALLEGED ADULT

GOOD EATS

CZECH TO CHICO

By Thomas Lawrence â–  Try any airport in America, from San Francisco International, to the “Golden Triangleâ€? in Mississippi, and security is going to be a hassle. This is because of a lack of trust in the wrong places and incompetent employees in important positions. Whilst taking a ight to Dublin from Prague recently, we had to go through a passport check twice because we didn’t know where to check in. In America, it would’ve been hell. czechtochico.wordpress.com

Multicultural Night

Chico State students celebrated diversity with an extravagant multicultural talent show Monday night.

wednesday

WEEKLY JUICE

By Christina Rafael ■ Where did all my money go?! Sound familiar? I’m guessing yes. In an age where our debit account balance can be accessed with the stroke of a button or two, who actually keeps track of receipts and logs their purchases? I do. I aim to tell you what works for me and easy ways to keep track of money. Never again experience a painfuloverdraft fee. weeklyjuice.wordpress.com

thursday

CHARMS OF CHICO By Rebecca Hucker

■ The Phoenix Building Gift Shop is the place to go if you are looking for a gift idea or want to find something made from a local artist. You can pick from a wide variety of items including scarves, bags, Pandora jewelry, Kleen Kanteens, children’s toys, postcards and more. The store is a favorite shopping destination for both students and visitors staying in Chico for a few days. charmsofchico.wordpress.com

Ultimate frisbee tournament

Watch Chico State’s Women’s and Men’s Ultimate Frisbee teams get down and dirty at last weekend’s CHUG tournament.

>> ONLINE COMMENT

“I feel so sorry for Jesse.â€? By Flamencochueca Chico State student died in traďŹƒc accident. Online exclusive. Oct.. 21.

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 |

A.S. government at work Walter Ford A SSISTANT NE WS EDITOR

Amro Jayousi

Kate Knutsen

Kristina Barger

Nathan Brady

Amro Jayousi

Position: President Platform: Additional $5 for A.S. Revenue Sharing, identifying the student voice and more students on university committees. Impact on campus: Jayousi founded a coalition with the intent of giving students an active voice. It has tackled such issues as the upcoming Diversity Action Plan and the alteration of resident hall food plans. Jayousi has also been proactive in his outreach to students to fill student committees. What to expect: Jayousi wants to have an extra $5 allotted for the student-organization revenue-sharing program. It should be ready by the next Associated Students elections. He also wants to lay the groundwork for a venue where students can address student leaders directly.

Kristina Barger

Aaron Allnutt

Alan Rhoades

London Long

Aaron Rodriguez

Jaypinderpal Virdee

Natalie Park

Position: Executive Vice President Platform: Improve A.S. Government, A.S. organizations in general and the relationship between the two. Impact on campus: Barger has organized team-building retreats with A.S. government officials and leaders of various A.S. organizations. Barger also organized an ice cream social with A.S. officers and management of A.S. Bookstore. What to expect: After a meet and greet with people at the Cross-Cultural Leadership Center, Barger wants to work on a better way for students to hold A.S. officers accountable.

Aaron Allnutt

Position: Vice President of Business and Finance Platform: Education and awareness. Impact on campus: Allnutt reviews all A.S. expenditures. What to expect: Allnutt wants to lay the groundwork so that someday there will be an on-campus resource that would help students be fiscally responsible. A financial resource center for students could be possible in two to three years.

Photos by Ryan Richards, Kevin Lee and Walter Ford

Jaypinderpal Virdee

Position: Commissioner of Community Affairs Platform: Community Service. Impact on campus: Virdee is continuing the student volunteer program ’Cats in the Community. He also contributed to Rock the Vote and is helping with a Halloween safety effort called Walk Under the Influence. What to expect: Virdee is planning a job fair in March for students of all academic years.

Aaron Rodriguez

Position: Commissioner of Multicultural Affairs Platform: Help student organizations become self-sufficient. Impact on campus: Rodriquez organized the 27th annual Multicultural Night. He also serves on the Diversity Scorecard Committee and has contributed to the development of the Diversity Action Plan. What to expect: The Diversity Action Plan will be released early November. Currently, Rodriguez is also looking into ways that A.S. can fund A.S. organization fundraisers so they can sustain themselves.

Nathan Brady

Position: Director of Legislative Affairs Platform: Dedication, leadership and accountability. Impact on campus: Brady acts as a liaison for Chico State to all the other California State Universities. He also organized Rock the Vote. What to expect: Brady is looking to create a Chico State lobby core that would train students how to be lobbyists. A pilot program is expected to begin next semester.

London Long

Position: Director of University Affairs Platform: Wants to develop a University Affairs Council. Impact on campus: Long sits on the General Education Advisory Committee. She also sent surveys to students asking for input on possible general education pathways. What to expect: Long will assist in selection of general education pathways and has plans to put on an academic fair next semester.

Kate Knutsen

Position: Vice President of Facilities and Services Platform: Making the Wildcat Recreation Center accessible to all students. Impact on campus: Knutsen organized the Wrectacular event and is also responsible for getting blocks put on railings around the BMU to prevent people from sliding down them. What to expect: Knutsen has plans to fix the stairs inside the BMU and hopes to lay the groundwork for the BMU to reach LEED status.

Alan Rhoades

Position: Commissioner of Environmental Affairs Platform: Freshmen outreach, connecting student organizations with the position. Impact on campus: Rhoades has revived a program that aims to get freshmen involved with sustainability efforts called Stewards of Sustainability. He is also working on the Zero Waste Initiative and is vice chair of the Sustainability Fund Allocation Committee, which allocates $80,000 for student projects annually. Rhoades is also involved in public relations work for the upcoming This Way to Sustainability Conference. What to expect: Rhoades is helping put on Eco-fest next semester.

Natalie Park

Position: Commissioner of Student Organizations and Programs Platform: Make student organizations aware of the money available to them. Impact on campus: Park has organized a workshop with about 20 student organization leaders to educate them about revenue sharing, organization funding and how A.S. can work for them. What to expect: Park will be contacting student organizations that are part of the revenue sharing program in the spring semester to check their progress and assist in any problems. Walter Ford can be reached at wford@theorion.com

■ More content For more information regarding A.S. officer responsibilities, go to theorion.com

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

always online >> theorion.com PHOTO BY JEB DRAPER

IN HIS FOOTSTEPS Family and friends jog at Sycamore Pool as a tribute to Jesse Kohen’s passion for running. Kay Kohen [middle] wears her son’s high school football jersey.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FACEBOOK

PASSION Jesse Kohen runs in the San Francisco Marathon.

RUN: Community gathers in spite of rain

STAFF WRITER

Jerry Brown Jerry Brown intends to make an overhaul of the postsecondary system, which includes creating a representative group to create a new California Master Plan for Higher Education, according to his website. “He’s about making sure education is properly funded,” said Dylan Shelters, president of the Chico State Student Democratic Club. Brown thinks the education system needs to bring people together so that they can reduce extraneous costs, Shelters said. Brown also wants to stop spending so much money on prisons and move that funding to higher education without risking public safety, according to his website. “I recently blocked a proposed $8 billion prison hospital expansion, which was unnecessarily expensive and which would have added substantially to our state’s deficit,” Brown said. He would also like to continue introducing more online learning and technology in colleges. “Technology can increase educational productivity, expand access to higher learning and reduce costs,” according to his website. Brown also supports the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act – legislation that would exempt certain undocumented immigrants from paying out-of-state tuition at public universities and colleges. The DREAM Act also provides access to scholarships derived from non-state funds to undocumented immigrants. In a speech he gave at UCLA, Brown spoke about undocumented immigrants and higher education. He thinks that California has enough wealth to continue to have a great university system and get every person into college if they qualify, he said. “Now when I say every young man and young woman, I mean everyone – whether they are documented or not,” he said. “If

Jerry Brown

Meg Whitman

they went to school, they ought to be here, and that will be one of the first bills I sign.” Meg Whitman Meg Whitman plans to fix higher education by cutting from welfare and making other budgetary reforms to invest $2 billion into the California State University and University of California systems, said Ryan Fedrizzi, president of the Chico State Republicans. “She wants to reduce the lifetime welfare limit from five years to two years, because she accepts the reality that welfare is a big budgetary burden on our state,” Fedrizzi said. It’s not that Whitman wants to pick on the poor, he said. “It’s just the reality that it’s a big bubble waiting to burst,” Fedrizzi said. Whitman does not see eye to eye with Jerry Brown on the DREAM Act. “Jerry Brown and I couldn’t disagree more on this issue,” Whitman said. “The state of California is in economic meltdown, and one of Jerry Brown’s top priorities is to give financial aid and in-state tuition breaks to undocumented immigrants.” She does not think the DREAM Act is a good idea. Whitman thinks that no undocumented immigrants should be permitted to join a UC or CSU or community college, Fedrizzi said. “It increases tuition fees indirectly because you would have to fund the more poor undocumented students,” he said. Federizzi thinks it is unfair to documented American students that come from out of state to pay large amounts of money for tuition, if undocumented

Chelene Nightingale

immigrants are able to pay instate tuition “if they pay any money towards their education at all,” he said. Whitman is against the DREAM Act. “The truth is the state can’t afford either right now,” Whitman said. Chelene Nightingale Chelene Nightingale’s has similar ideas as Meg Whitman toward higher education. “A lot like Meg, Chelene realizes there’s money that’s supposed to be promised to the schools that isn’t reaching the schools,” Fedrizzi said. Nightingale wants to find out where the money is going and hold the schools more accountable to use the money without having furloughs even after expanding the budget, he said. Nightingale, like Whitman, wants to cut things in the state to get more money for all areas, not just higher education, Fedrizzi said. “In general, Chelene is more strict about cutting things, if she views something as either the state has no business being involved in a certain area, or unconstitutional, or just flat out like misappropriation or like fraud, she’ll just wipe it out and say, ‘We can’t do that,’” he said. As far as the Dream Act goes, she wants to prohibit instate tuition for undocumented immigrants and opposes them attending any public schools, according to her website. “Chelene is a hard-line no in regards to the Dream Act, she’s just definitely like no go,” Fedrizzi said.

Bob Evans

Kelly Ward

Kohen made an impression on his coworkers, such as kinesiology major and LaSalles employee Kyla Morrison. “He was loud and obnoxious, but a delightful human being,” Morrison said. People really need to pay attention and be careful, said Kyle Lema, a longtime friend of Kohen. “Regardless of what happened, it happened,” he said. “And everyone has to deal with the consequences.” Jeb Draper can be reached at photoeditor@theorion.com

QUOTES FROM CITY COUN CIL CAND ATES>> COLLECTED BY TERESA ID DE LUZ

“I’ve watched the city and the council for the last four years, and in my opinion, they have had a ver y narrow age nda . The biggest problem the city of Chico has and the citizens of Chi co have is the lack of jobs. When I see the council sticking to the ir agenda that doesn’t include jobs, I disagree with it. For the sake of our citizens and the sake of our city, we nee d to make jobs our No. 1 pri ority. When we do this, we can be sure to provide the basic ser vic es the city is expected by the citizens to provid e. Police, fire, fixing our roads – those types of things.”

Bob Kromer

Stances on higher education

in more students like him.” The family has been overwhelmed by the support shown by the community, he said. “Jesse was definitely born and raised Chico,” Bob Kohen said. Sometimes parents don’t realize the effect their children have on people’s lives, he said. “It’s amazing to see how far it goes,” he said. Kohen was also a licensed personal trainer and worked at In Motion Fitness, Mendoza said. He also worked at LaSalles for about two years, but left at the beginning of last summer to pursue his other interests.

Kohen, is a faculty member at Chico State in the department of education and his mother is a teacher at Pleasant Valley High School. “We are grateful that no one else was involved,” Bob Kohen said. A foundation has been set up in memory of Kohen that will provide scholarships for students who participate in programs at Loma Vista School, he said. “I’m really sad that all those special needs kids are not going to have Jesse,” Bob Kohen said. “I hope this foundation brings

Mark Herrera

bachelor’s degree in adaptive physical education. He planned on entering the credential program to work with children with special needs, Casey Kohen said. He was involved in the athletic department at Pleasant Valley High School, where he had been assisting a wrestling coach, said John Shepherd, principal of Pleasant Valley High School. Kohen also worked as an instructional aid at Loma Vista School, working with students with disabilities enrolled in the Chico Unified School District. Jesse Kohen’s father, Bob

“My main points are fi xing the local econom y, creating jobs and getting our city finances back in order. I believ e if we don’t address those issues, then we wo n’t have the revenue to do a lot of things we all like to do, like pub lic art and parks and all kinds of other things that are ver y near and dear to all the residents . But first, we need to make sure our fiscal res ponsibility is in order bef ore we start working on the things that would be nice to have, so we can take care of the must-have issues.” “We’re all headed tow ard the future, that’s the main part of my platform. I feel as if we have lost a part of our roo ts and have been disconnected from a pas t that is the reason tha t we ’re here. I feel we need to keep things loc al and work together, and we need to work for each other for a pos itive future. We can’t have a positive future without a healthy env ironment. A thriving com munity will only be as healthy as the environ ment in which it reside s. I want to know that my actions will make us proud for our future.” “My platform is based on three pieces – protec ting the fiscal health of the city, our financial hea lth; supporting economic develo pment, including job cre ation; and also protecting and enhancing our downto wn. With respect to city finan ces, you know when we have just come through this horrible recession, we have to be really wise as to how we spend every dollar ava ilable.”

Mary Flynn

time, pending results of his autopsy. Kohen grew up in Chico and graduated from Pleasant Valley High School in 2003. He was involved in athletics and had a love for running. After high school, Kohen moved to Santa Barbara, Calif., and enrolled at Santa Barbara City College. It was there that he developed a passion for physical education and working with kids, said Kay Kohen, Jesse Kohen’s mother. He later enrolled at Chico State in the kinesiology department and was working on a

Brahama Sharma Quetnin Colgan

Merrifield. Kohen over corrected, went across both lanes and crashed into a tree. A nearby police officer witnessed Kohen driving by in excess of 70 mph, and the crash occurred seconds after, Merrifield said. The officer responded to find Kohen in critical condition. He was taken to Enloe Medical Center where he was pronounced dead, Merrifield said. The cause of the accident is being investigated, he said. Information regarding impairment is not available at this

Scott Gruendl

continued from A1

■ Q&As Candidates answer questions at theorion.com

“I’m trying to give a voi ce to those Chicoans who feel like they don’t have a voice. I fee l like the conversation is dominated by the extremes of either side. That leaves us working class folks in the middle that are just unhear d.”

“The City Council seat should not have a platfor m for any political entity. It should ser ve the entire population of Chico, including the students. I want to make sure the discussio ns on the council are thoughtful and structu red – no pet projects.”

"I really want to contin ue to manage the city ’s budget because we’re in such difficult times right now that tha t tak es a lot skill and patience and effort. The way I view it is I don’t want to hand something off to somebody that’s not in better sha pe than the way I found it, and right now the city’s not. Not becaus e it hasn’t been managed properly, but bec ause of the economic downturn. The next part is compact urban form, and what that me ans is keeping Chico’s footprint smaller in order to stop urban sprawl and protect the Greenline.”

Kelly Ward can be reached at kward@theorion.com

*Mark Sorensen not available for comment

Budgeted money to provide revamp of Taylor Hall, plans in motion Lindsay Woychick STAFF WRITER

The humanities and fine arts building project received funds to rebuild Taylor Hall after the state budget’s completion this month. A provision in the recently completed state budget sets aside money for the planning stages of the project, said Joel Zimbelman, dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. An architect selection process

for the project will begin in spring 2011, with a construction starting date estimated for 2013, said Lorraine Hoffman, vice president for business and finance, in an e-mail interview. The California State University Office of Capital Planning, Design & Construction assigned $2.8 million for the project’s initial planning and working drawings, she said. The total cost of the project will be about $50 million. Funding to complete the project

will come in the form of state general obligation bonds, Hoffman said. The bonds are sold to interested buyers from around the state in order to pay for the cost of building. The final project would result in more than 600 jobs, according a legislative report done by the CSU Office of Advocacy and State Relations. This would benefit the state as a whole by stimulating the economy. Many goals should be accomplished with the project, in

addition to the physical rebuild, said President Paul Zingg. A stronger link between the university and the downtown is one such goal. The building’s design will also complement West First Street, as well as buildings around it like Kendall Hall. “It’ll be an interesting challenge, and hopefully it will be seen as an attractive challenge to architects and builders for that project,” Zingg said. Keeping with Chico State’s sustainability efforts, the

building will be built to at least fulfill U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED silver certification, he said. Despite its recent funding, the building project has been slow to develop. Plans for the project began more than 15 years ago, Zimbelman said. Continued budgetary problems in the state halted any building progress. The existing building will be demolished, with the possibility of salvaging a mural located

on the Salem Street side of the hall, he said. The building will be home to the art department, foreign languages department and English department, with the possibility for additional departments. The new building will increase in size from the current Taylor Hall, doubling the building’s square footage, Hoffman said. Lindsay Woychick can be reached at lwoychick@theorion.com


always online >> theorion.com

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 |

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Election Endorsements >> CITY COUNCIL

BOB EVANS Chico needs practical city council members who want to bring commerce, comfort and appeal to the city, which is why we are endorsing candidate Bob Evans. The council should represent all spectrums of the community – including students and commerce. Evans’ master’s in business administration as well as his experience in managing Lifetouch lends to his credibility when he speaks

CITY COUNCIL

SCOTT GRUENDL As a strong incumbent candidate, Scott Gruendl represents what is right with Chico City Council. He has a strong sense for protecting the interests of the city, including protecting the Greenline and stopping urban sprawl. Having been on the council for eight years both as a council member and former mayor, Gruendl has the experience to get plans in action that not only protect the

CITY COUNCIL

MARK HERRERA We support Mark Herrera for Chico City Council, mainly for his enthusiasm and interest in students’ issues. He may not have experience in public office, but he has the drive and fresh ideas to bring to the discussion. As a recent graduate from Chico State, we have

GOVERNOR

JERRY BROWN We support Jerry Brown for governor of California, but in the interest of full disclosure – we’re not entirely thrilled about it. Selecting a gubernatorial candidate to support felt like picking last for kickball – there are only a few players left, and we have to pick one. As students, we are compelled to support the candidate who we feel can best improve higher education. While the candidates have not communicated a clear plan for fixing the UC or CSU systems, Brown’s actions tend to be more in line with student interests – his experience as a school adminis-

about his devotion to turning the local economy around. While he has never run for political office before, Evans is not a stranger to community involvement. He served on the advisory board for the CSU Chico Center for Manufacturing Excellence and is a member of the Rotary Club of Chico. As a member, Evans served on the Scholarship Committee that annually awarded $30,000 for college scholarships – much of which went to Chico State students. As president of the club, he initiated a fundraising effort for an endowment fund for students seeking higher education in vocational fields. This candidate has the interest of the students and the community in mind.

trator gives him insight into the struggles students face daily. As attorney general, he blocked an $8 billion proposal for prison expansion that would have added substantially to the state’s deficit — an example of costcutting savings that could go to higher education. As governor in the 1970s, he increased funding for Cal Grants by 50 percent. Also, he is a supporter of the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act – evidence of his desire to improve higher education and make it readily available to those who seek it. We have concerns that Brown isn’t as active a politician as we would like – all the best intentions in the world don’t necessarily translate to results – but we’d rather have an unsuccessful do-gooder than someone who will successfully act against our interest. When it comes to higher education, Jerry Brown is the right choice for California.

Managing Editor

Entertainment Editor

Online Editor

News Editor

Features Editor

Chief Copy Editor

James Jelenko

Lindsey Barrett Matt Shilts

Almendra Carpizo Photo Editor

Jeb Draper

Kevin Hagedorn Esmeralda Ramirez Katie Mills Art Director

Mark Rojas The opinion editor can be reached at

opinioneditor@theorion.com

ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER NEUMANN

Alexander Seymour OPINION COLUMNIST

Many students choose to abstain from making the trip to class on Fridays. The reasons for this are numerous, such as hangovers, overdrinking on Thirsty Thursdays, benders, lack of sleep, hangovers, laziness, Power Hour, hangovers – I could go on. Some people see this truancy as a problem – but not me. I realized a couple years ago that I was missing the most pleasant day of the week to actually attend Chico State, thanks to a general lack of student attendance. I came to this revelation quite by accident one Friday morning. Much like the living dead, I dragged my body to campus,

so affected by the previous night’s activities that I actually thought it was a Thursday. The first thing I noticed was that the panhandlers and protestors were sitting this one out, allowing me to go about my business without having to deal with serious issues or to address my miserly ways. But I soon noticed something else – instead of having my throbbing head greeted by a raucous crowd rushing to class, campus was clear and serene. The classroom was much the same, sparsely populated with room to spread out. I was surprised to actually see the teacher and my fellow students on the other side of the classroom. I’ve noticed that, combined with a little TGIF attitude, this freedom of movement and visual space has influenced the way people conduct themselves during Friday classes. People are more jaunty and friendly, and the spatial freedom is translated into a freedom of thought.

Letters Editor

to the

Video Editor

Opinion Editor

Jenks,” “True Life” and “The Buried Life,” that actually document real people that live trying lives. These are the shows that spread positivity and promote inspiration by filming the struggle of real people, which is what reality television should be geared toward. Unfortunately, ratings show that the public prefers scripted “faux-ality” over regular people having their plausible lives documented. I never thought Big Brother would come in the form of fist-pumping East Coasters teaching the public about “T-shirt time.” What baffles me is that many audiences truly believe that these shows are real – as if a camera crew hopped out of a van and started filming strangers off the street. This isn’t the case, and it is evolving our culture into a barbaric way of living. We are engrossed in watching countless hours of sex, violence, substance abuse and pure stupidity –believing that we are delving into someone else’s

faith that he will have student interests in mind, especially since Herrera is the only candidate that has reached out for student support. We think that he understands what Chico’s needs really are and that he will fight for those because of the love he has shown for the city. Herrera’s platform to advocate for environmental issues displays his connection to what citizens care about and what affects our green city. To us, Herrera represents a young, fresh voice that will represent students’ needs and focus on improving the city for the future.

Sports Editor

Anthony Siino

Nick Pike OPINION COLUMNIST

the early ’90s. The concept was to throw seven eccentric 20-somethingyear-olds together in a house for a few months, then wait for the drama to unfold naturally. Since then, reality TV has completely taken over. The public masses have become glued to TV screens nationwide and applying the so-called “real” characters’ attitudes to their daily lives. Nowadays, I can flick on the TV and watch reruns of any form of “reality.” From short people to obese people, whiny heirs to STD contests, women who have way too many children to insight into celebrities’ scripted home lives – the reality movement has become a mosh pit of mindless entertainment, trickling its way into the public’s way of life. MTV, VH1 and E! spare no shame in adopting the majority of shows that lack any form of reality and deceive viewers into believing these lifestyles portrayed are the norm. However, there are a few shows, such as “World of

real life experiences. Many haven’t realized that although we may use reality TV as a channel to space out or live in someone else’s shoes, the shoes we immerse ourselves in are never walked in. It’s sad to see that people would rather vicariously be embraced through subpar programming than engulf themselves in their own lives. While others are being proactive and exploring the world in their own realities, the rest of us would rather spend our time catching up on the last episode of “Flavor of Love” or “Basketball Wives.” Instead of conversing about aspirations and worldly issues, we spend our days reenacting the latest episode of “Hogan Knows Best” or “Jersey Shore.” Let’s get real here – live your own life and make your own reality. Don’t be permeated by the low-grade entertainment that many so willingly devote their lives to. Nick Pike can be reached at npike@theorion.com

Friday truancy calms, improves campus

Editor in Chief

Patty Conover

Irony of ‘reality’ TV detracts from positive potential

Between watching teen pregnancies go awry, rock stars being vied for by their groupie admirers and young adults rooming in mansions with unlimited amounts of “smooshing” and boozing, I think it’s safe to say reality TV has hit an all-time low – and we’re paying for it with our lives. Dating back to the early ’40s, the idea of reality television initially was to capture “real people” in “real moments” and actions that weren’t scripted or premeditated that could connect with the audience in a way never attained in scripted film. That idea has evolved into a cesspool of terrible scripting, city’s interests, but also con- regurgitated show concepts tinue to move it into the future. and a form of entertainment These plans include improving that kills more brain cells air quality, protecting Bidwell than I could even dream of on Park and creating new parks a Thursday night. The reality TV bubble first and open space, which are projects that are in the best interest came to fruition when “The of the city. He has an impres- Real World” hit airwaves in sive track record for protecting and voicing students’ interests, especially during summertime elections when many students aren’t present. For an example, he voted against the disorderly events ordinance and helped create the free bus ride program. As an alumnus of Chico State and a part-time faculty member at the university, we can count on Gruendl to be a voice and representative for students, while also protecting the city’s interests as a whole.

Editorial Board Delaine Moore

Thumbs Up to hyperbole. It’s the absolute best thing ever.

Thumbs Down to negativity. It’s the absolute worst thing in the world.

Thumbs Up to the Giants making the World Series. No, seriously, it happened.

The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

Class discussions regularly wander off into frontier territory, where a little humor and a laid-back attitude infiltrate the lectures of even the stuffiest professors. Granted, this can lead to weird topics for classroom conversation when normally structured or authoritarian professors let their guards down and try to tell stories, but this can be funny and even help students get involved. The absence of the typical crowds did wonders for my head, but it had another, more magical effect – it allowed the healing touch of nature to reassert its hold on Chico State. The campus is actually quite beautiful when one takes time to sit down in the grass and just let the senses take it all in. Instead of lying in bed shivering off a headache, I was being reminded of the natural wellspring our college is surrounded by. Birds and other small creatures crept out of the wooded areas, presumably to scavenge bits of refuse overlooked by the campus sustainable movement. Without the threat of being trampled or accosted by students, birds become the new big kids on campus. Senior Zach Peper noticed this one day on his way to class. “I was walking to class with a coffee in my hand,” Peper said. “As I took a sip, I looked up, but didn’t expect to see a big hawk sitting in a tree, eating a pigeon. I was so impressed with this astounding display of raw nature, I ended up late for class.” Fortunately, on these laid-back days, lateness can often be overlooked. Fridays at Chico State are like Animal Planet – you get nature’s beauty as well as its uncut ferocity. Friday can become a day of clear thinking and reflection that people miss out on during the rest of the week when they’re trying to catch up on schoolwork or unwind. Ironically, the mental and natural harmony on campus can only be maintained if students continue to skip Friday classes. I humbly ask you readers to keep skipping – those of us who show up have a good thing going over here. Alexander Seymour can be reached at aseymour@theorion.com

Read the guidelines below for information on how to submit your own Letters to the Editor • Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

• The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.


Thumbs Down to people who call multiple times but don’t leave a voicemail. What - you’re too cool to talk to a machine?

Thumbs Up to Youtube. The world is a better place when it’s autotuned.

Thumbs Down to the bars closing early on Halloween weekend. Have fun in the streets, Chico.

Thumbs Up to Fermilab’s studies in theoretical physics. The universe could be a hologram? Take the blue pill, Neo.

Thumbs Down to leaf blowers. We can’t help but react like a dog to a vacuum.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 | always online >> theorion.com

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Domestic violence reveals viscious yet breakable cycle This cycle continued until I wound up in jail. I went back to him, and he called me a “jailbird” and had even more control over me. The law sought redemption from me by requiring a year in an Anger Management/Batterer’s Intervention program – it was there that a pivotal change occurred in me. I learned that relationships are not a power game, that he was in control most of the time and that he called all the shots. Recently, the domestic violence agency Catalyst showed a documentary on campus about a young woman in Pennsylvania whose life was cut short because of this cycle of violence. A detective who was covering the case explains the timeline of violence from its sanguine start to its haunting finish. Catalyst’s theme this year is that “domestic violence affects everyone,” even if you’re not directly involved in an abusive relationship, said Jackey Humphrey-Straub, a client services advocate for Catalyst. A whole community plays a part in domestic violence, whether it’s through raising awareness or by setting good examples of healthy relationships for children. “It takes seven times on average for a victim to get out of an abusive relationship,” she said. Catalyst plans on showing the sobering documentary, “Telling Amy’s Story,” again from 2 to 4 p.m. today at Butte College’s Culture and Community Center in Oroville. My conviction did not come through when I went to jail, though I was humiliated in front of my family and labeled a “batterer” by the law. It came through, slowly but clearly, in the counseling and camaraderie I found with the women in my anger-management program. The cycle of violence is hard to break, and abusive relationships even have an addictive quality for some. Society must not back away when a victim is in an abusive relationship, but should educate and support those in need of resources so that a person can see a way out. When you’re caught in the cycle of violence, you see no end, no way out – you only see the next stage.

S Serena Cervantes O OPINION COLUMNIST

IL L

Four years ago around this time in October, I was arrested for breaking my husband’s cologne bottles. This month celebrates awareness for domestic violence. Consequently, I am reminded of the time in my life when I got caught up in the cycle of violence – a pattern of abuse that agencies like Catalyst recognize and use as a tool to help explain the dynamics of an abusive relationship. There are three stages in the cycle – the first is the tension-building stage, the second is the abuse stage and the third is the honeymoon stage. I remember knowing that I had lost control of my sense of self when I heard the bottles shatter. I had projected my anger into a violent act and remember thinking that I had become like him – that I had become a sort of monster. I had been giving up control of my life to him piece by piece all along the way, until I had nothing to give up except angry dispossession. I had lost myself through investing in him until there was nothing left of me to be spent on a normal existence, except the shell of an angry 19-yearold woman. The setting was Grover Beach, Calif., and I was living high off my newfound independence, working at a women’s underwear store and renting a room in a deserted and soon-to-be flophouse. He was 20-something when he moved in. After a couple summer months, we got married on what should have been some sort of a sign – Sept. 11. I didn’t know what I was getting into, but I soon realized that I was playing with fire. The fighting started off with arguments, but it snowballed into constant verbal abuse, even through text messages. We’d attack each other with big emotional blows, breaking each other down, and sometimes it turned physical. Then, through negotiation and guilt, we’d build each other back up, and everything was flowers and sunshine.

US TR IO AT NB YT YL ER NE UM AN N

Serena Cervantes can be reached at scervantes@theorion.com

Community, student relationship ‘dysfunctional’ Joanna Hass OPINION COLUMNIST

To the world, we might be leaders of tomorrow, shapers of the future or even just typical college students, but to the so-called permanent residents of Chico, we are no more Wildcats than we are pesky flies buzzing in annoyance. Just about every Chico townie and local yokel complains that students don’t get more involved in the local scene or government or policies or whatever. However, when groups like the Concerned Citizens of Chico practice underhanded tactics in the pursuit of nearly eliminating the student voice in Chico, there has to be a point when we all step back and ask, “What went so wrong here?” I’ve witnessed my fair share of lovers’ quarrels and listened to many tearful phone calls while comforting friends and loved ones on their relationship woes, but there is no relationship as dysfunctional as that of Chico and the students who try to call it home. Sometimes watching these two groups interact gives me a little voice in the back of my head chanting, “Jer-ry! Jer-ry! Jer-ry!” The local scenes – or government, or policies or whatever – aren’t receptive to student involvement, so the cycle goes that it’s not something we want to keep getting our hopes up about. It’s not a hard concept to understand – even the mouse currently

terrorizing my kitchen cabinets at night learned to avoid the traps I set out once it realized it wasn’t welcome. In fact, we can see the community taking steps to silence our squeaking campus in real time. A non-partisan group by the name of the Concerned Citizens of Chico has taken on the duty of finding out just how many people don’t care whether the students have a say in local government or not. A randomly sampled survey was sent out to 6,000 Chico residents during June of this year that asked many questions. The most interesting were those concerning student involvement in Chico’s local government. Although this completely biased survey showed obvious signs of unfair preference against students, it is still considered the driving force behind the petition to move voting day for Chicoans to the summer months – when a large chunk of students have left the vicinity. I can see how those in favor of the movement would feel justified by a survey that showed a majority of people agreed with them, but where’s the argument here? The only response that students can rightly have to this is “Duh?!” There was never a chance for students to have a say in the matter, so of course they were the minority. That’s like asking a packed lifeboat if there’s room for one more. No one is going to say yes because it threatens their survival as they know it

ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER NEUMANN

– even if that threat is only in their heads. What’s more interesting is that even though there was a small majority in favor of moving the voting date, there was a vast majority in favor of simply keeping the vote out of reach for those of us deemed non-permanent residents – or should I call

us the lower class, the collateral damage, the crust? How do you even begin to classify what qualifies as a permanent resident? Is there a minimum number of years? If so, what about those who have recently moved to the area, but intend on staying forever? And how about those who qualify for

permanent residency and then skip town the day after the polls close? Do their votes get taken away from the total tallied? More importantly – how many different colors of jellybeans will be in the jar before I submit my guess? What’s our stance on muggles? If we let the werewolves vote, do we have to

let the vampires vote, too? The only thing that’s clear from this survey is not that these supposedly concerned citizens care when students vote, but that they don’t want us to vote in the first place. Joanna Hass can be reached at jhass@theorion.com

PIECE OF MIND >> How do you feel about Friday classes? “Not good. Friday is the prequel to the weekend.”

Patrick Woods

freshman | civil engineering

Joey Gmuender

junior | mechanical engineering

“It’s just another day at class, but with an added bonus. Often teachers give you extra credit points for being around on a Friday.”

“It sucks, but I go. I’m ready to start the weekend at this point. The good thing is it actually keeps up some momentum for getting next week’s homework done.”

“I’m an engineering major, so I am forced to because of my heavy class load. If I were to not go class on Friday, it would make school much harder.” Alex Bemis

junior | kinesiology

Ashley Kosch

senior | international relations


A10 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

N EWS

AA/EOE

always online >> theorion.com


Ferid Celosmanovic brings global talent to Chico soccer >> B4

B

always online >> theorion.com | WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

Lindsey Barrett Sports Editor

From the Cheap Seats

THE ORION • MARK ROJAS

HEAD FIRST Nick Tedrow heads the ball during Friday’s 1-0 win against San Francisco State. Isaac Brambila STAFF WRITER

Two goals by junior forward Christopher Akwaja and two powerful volleys by freshmen midfielder Luke Palmer gave the ’Cats another winning weekend. A lone goal by Akwaja Friday set off a welcome home for the men’s soccer team with a 1-0 win over the San Francisco State Gators. After Sunday’s games were moved to Monday because of rain, Akwaja and Palmer scored for the 3-1 victory over the Cal State Monterrey Bay Otters. Although it was cold Friday night, the atmosphere in the side-

lines was heated after constant remarks by Gator coach Joe Hunter toward the referees. The ongoing heated discussions between Hunter and the referees started after a seemingly unimportant out-ofbounds call. Immediately, the infuriated coach stood up and began protesting the decision. “You guys are missing calls!” Hunter yelled at the referee. Hunter continued to pressure the referees and occasionally argued with Chico State coach Felipe Restrepo until the linesman asked him to stop. “Knock it off,” the linesman said to Hunter. “Am I being watched?” Hunter responded. It is the spirit of the game – the competitiveness of it gets emotions going, and you have to argue for calls, Restrepo said. The game was heavily fought in the middle

of the field and provided few scoring opportunities. The only goal came in the 16th minute off the cleats of Akwaja. He received the ball at half field and sent a long, through pass to sophomore forward Tyson Crim. Crim dribbled down the right side while Akwaja continued his run toward the center of the goalie box. Crim sent a low, hard cross to first post that seemed like it would be easily rejected by Gator defense, but a flawed kick sent the ball directly to the center of the goalie box, where Akwaja was waiting. Akwaja received the ball and hesitated for a second before he shot powerfully with his left foot to give the ’Cats the winning goal. “I knew the ball was going to come back to me – it was a one-two go, hit it, finish, bombaso, inside the goal,” Akwaja said. On Monday against the Otters, Akwaja put the ’Cats ahead in the 17th minute after a through pass he

successfully shielded with his body. He then softly tapped the ball to the right of the goal as the keeper ran out in an attempt to get to Akwaja before he shot. The game continued with both teams attempting to get close to the goal, but taking few shots on goal. The Otters struck back in the 56th minute when ’Cat defense was unable to clear a corner kick. The ball bounced around five yards from the goal as defenders tried to clear it, but Otter senior midfielder Grant Robson got a foot on the ball and brought the Otters back in the game. The first of two powerful volleys by Palmer came in the 60th minute. After a cross that was rejected by Otter defense, the ball floated before coming down to where Palmer was standing. Palmer waited for the ball and timed his shot before he hit it powerfully to where the goalie was standing. The keeper tried to block the ball with both hands, but the ball bent his hands

and rolled over him before bouncing on the goal line and into the goal. Nineteen minutes later, a throw in by senior defender Ryan Nevarez gave Palmer a chance at another volley shot. The cross came from the right as Akwaja was attempting to get to the ball, but defense managed to get a head on it. Again, Palmer was standing just inside the goalie box and, after one bounce, he struck the ball with his right foot, sending it to the top left corner of the goal and giving the ’Cats the 3-1 victory. Restrepo had been encouraging Palmer to take more shots on goal during practice, Palmer said. “I was just trying to hit it on target and hopefully get something out of it,” he said. “It was fun to get my first goals.” Isaac Brambila can be reached at ibrambila@theorion.com

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

GOTCHA! Luke Palmer takes a shot on goal Monday.

Wildcats split weekend as end of season nears Kevin Augustine STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • ELI MAY

of the week

JUST KICKIN’ IT Junior midfielder Lisa Webster takes a shot at the ball Friday night while a San Francisco State defender Sarah Whelan tries to stop her. The Wildcats lost 2-0.

’catfights

Men’s Soccer 4:30 p.m. Wednesday v. Cal State Stainslaus 7 p.m. Saturday @ Cal State Stanislaus Women’s Soccer 7 p.m. Wednesday v. Cal State Stanislaus 4:30 p.m. Sunday @ Cal State Stanislaus Women’s Volleyball 7 p.m. Friday @ Cal State East Bay 7 p.m. Saturday @ UC San Diego

The Wildcats came up short against the San Francisco State Gators Friday, losing 0-2 in a drizzly matchup at University Soccer Stadium. The game featured many of the same elements that have characterized their season so far – strong play on both sides of the ball along with missed opportunities and an overall loss of momentum. In the first period, the Wildcats kept pace with the California Collegiate Athletic Association North Division-leading Gators, with both teams getting three corner kicks apiece, though the Gators were able to take six shots on goal compared to the Wildcats’ five. To coach Kim Sutton, the momentum gained in the first period would be momentum lost in the second period, she said. “We we’re tough at the beginning of the game,” Sutton said. “We stayed all over them in the first half. The beginning of the

second half, we get five minutes of solid play, and they come back with goal after goal.” In the second period, the Wildcats had the edge in shooting, taking six shots with three of them coming within the first six minutes, setting up multiple chances to score and take the early lead. The Wildcats had the advantage in corner kicks as well, getting two corner kicks compared to one for the Gators. But the Gators made the most of their chance, and in the 59th minute, Gator Sara Ordaz connected on a cross from Michelle Kay that sailed left past Wildcat freshman goalkeeper Megan Foster, giving the Gators a 1-0 lead. Less than 10 minutes later in the 68th minute, the Gators scored again off a header by Kaitlin Dick that was set up from a corner kick by Andrea Carey, which increased their lead by two while washing away any CCAA-playoff hopes for the Wildcats. To Sutton, the game’s

sports

TO DAY I N

oct. 27, 2004 The Boston Red Sox won the World Series in a four-game sweep against the St. Louis Cardinals for their first championship in 86 years.

conclusion is more than just a loss – it’s indicative of their year so far. “It’s been the story of the season,” Sutton said. “We feel like we outshoot and have better chances than our opponents, but come out on the losing end. We executed our plan, we got the chances we wanted, we beat them in the flanks, we got the crosses, but we have no finish.” At the end of the game, the Wildcats had the advantage in both shots and corner kicks, but nothing to show for it. For junior midfielder Lisa Webster, who recorded a shot that was a part of the surge early in the second period, the results are all too familiar. “We worked and kept trying to the end,” Webster said. “It’s just frustrating how the season has been.” To freshman forward Abby Glasgow, the loss adds insult to an already injured season. “We didn’t have anything to lose, so we just went out there and gave it our all, only to come >> please see SOCCER | B2

Long distance relationship I love to watch people’s faces when I tell them I’m not a Giants or a 49ers fan. When they find out I root for all the teams from Los Angeles, I enjoy hearing the remark from everyone, “But you’re not even from L.A.” It doesn’t matter who I am talking to, everyone then proceeds to lecture me that since I’m from Northern California, it is only natural for me to like the Bay Area teams. It’s not my fault I like the L.A.-based teams. When I was growing up, my dad introduced me to the world of sports. We would sit and watch ESPN for as long as we could until my mom came into the room and told us to turn the TV off. It’s only natural to go along with whatever teams he liked. I wasn’t going to sit through a Dodgers game and root against him – he probably would have kicked me out the living room. Another question I also often face is, “Is your dad at least from L.A.?” Of course when I reply that he is not, the lecturing starts up again. I never really questioned where my dad got his love for the Lakers, Dodgers and Rams – who are now in St. Louis – but he told me he liked watching the best, so when Kareem AbdulJabbar and Magic Johnson were playing, that’s who he wanted to watch. One thing I am not – and always have to defend myself against being – is a bandwagoner. Just because I like the Lakers doesn’t mean I only started liking them when they got Kobe Bryant and started winning championships. I have never really understood why fans have to be based on location. I didn’t grow up in San Francisco either, so why should I root for its teams just because they’re closer? Does this mean that if I move to Boston, I have to become a Red Sox fan just because I live in the same city they play in? The only time I can really see being a fan simply based on location is when a person is new to a sport, knows nothing about it and can easily follow a team. I am trying to get into hockey this season and I am going to root for the San Jose Sharks. It might be because all my friends like that team and I can easily ask them questions and watch the games with them, but it is also because the games will be broadcast more often than those of a team from another region. Although the Dodgers sadly didn’t even make playoffs this year, I’m not automatically going to become a Giants fan because they made it into the World Series for the first time since 2002 and have a chance to do something they have never done since being in San Francisco. Just because they are close in proximity and heading to a championship game does not amount to a justifiable reason to be a fan. Lindsey Barrett can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com

[ jock ] talk The rules of soccer are very simple, basically it is this – if it moves, kick it. If it doesn’t move, kick it until it does. - Phil Woosnam Welsh soccer player and manager


B2 |

S P O RT S

WEDNESDAY, OCT 27, 2010

Sports Shorts College sports around the nation

STAFF COMMENTARY>>

Pitching proves difference in Major League postseason Blake Mehigan

CCAA women’s volleyball weekend recaps >> The Cal Poly Pomona women’s volleyball team survived two match points in the fifth game, but ultimately fell 3-2 to Cal State L.A. on Thursday night in front of 543 fans at Darlene May Gym. The Cal State San Bernardino women’s volleyball team defeated NAIA-member Cal Baptist 3-1 before a crowd of 255 at Coussoulis Arena Thursday, improving to 16-2 overall heading into this weekend. source: goccaa.org

Cal State L.A. defeats Cal State Dominguez Hills >> Cal State L.A.’s men’s soccer team posted a big 3-1 win against California Collegiate Athletic Association South Division-leading Cal State Dominguez Hills Oct. 20 at Jesse Owens Stadium in the Billie Jean King Sports Complex. The Golden Eagles scored two first-half goals and added another in the second period to snap a three-match winless streak and get back in the conference race. source: goccaa.org

Chico State golf wins D-II Championship Preview >> The Wildcats held off top-ranked North Alabama on its home course to win the Division-II Championship Preview by two strokes at the Shoals Fighting Joe Golf Course in Florence, Ala., the same course that will host the National Championship Tournament May 17-20. The Wildcats’ 4-over par 292 was the day’s second best round and enough to hold off the hard-charging Lions for the ’Cats’ second title in four fall tournaments. source: goccaa.org

Wildcat of the Week

Kevin Rei men’s golf

Great rounds of golf have become the norm for the Chico State men’s golf team over the years, but the Wildcats’ 9-under par 279 Monday was especially special. Kevin Rei carded a 4-under par 68. Rei’s 32-36–68 matched his season-opening 68 for his best round of the season. It also matches him with Kyle Fouts of Northeastern State in the race for medalist honors. source: chicowildcats.com Wildcat of the Week is a regular feature meant to acknowledge the contributions made by individuals to the team. Winners are chosen by The Orion sports staff from nominations taken from all sports. To nominate: sportseditor@theorion.com

always online >> theorion.com

STAFF WRITER

Except for hermits and cave dwellers, most people are well aware of the Major League Baseball playoffs taking place right now. This is especially evident on campus with the copious amount of San Francisco Giants hats, shirts and other paraphernalia. But I don’t want to talk about the fanfare. Instead, there’s an aspect of the game that few thought would have dominated the playoffs so far – pitching. In past years, teams with potent offenses have controlled the postseason, including the New York Yankees, Tampa Bay Rays, Philadelphia Phillies and several others. However, this year pitchers have ruled the postseason. Pitchers with serious junk or breaking-ball pitches, such as wicked curveballs and hellacious sliders, are becoming more noteworthy than power pitchers – those who throw fastballs in the range of 90 mph. The Philadelphia Phillies’ Roy Halladay threw a no-hitter in his playoff debut against the Cincinnati Reds and was one walk away from throwing a perfect game. It wasn’t long thereafter that another player would have a similar breakthrough playoff debut. The Giants’ Tim Lincecum went a full nine-inning game in his playoff debut against the Atlanta Braves, allowing just two hits without surrendering

one run. Had Halladay not done so well, Lincecum’s performance would have probably received more attention. Both of these one-game performances were newsworthy, but consistency is the key. The Texas Rangers’ Cliff Lee has only surrendered two earned runs so far in three postseason starts against the Rays and Yankees. He has yet to lose a game in his postseason career, giving him an unreal 8-0 playoff record. Many other players have been pitching forces as well. Matt Cain, Jonathan Sanchez and Brian Wilson of San Francisco, Colby Lewis of Texas, Cole Hamels of Philadelphia and Andy Pettitte of New York, who holds the current record for postseason wins in a career at 19, have all had stellar performances. Pitching has always been essential to the playoffs, but this October just feels different than any I can remember. I can’t recall there being this many influential performances in postseason play in past years. Many games have been extremely close. They have come down to late-inning heroics from pitchers and batters alike and been decided by only a few runs. Giants’ announcer Duane Kuiper coined a fitting slogan for San Francisco’s style of play. “Giants’ baseball – torture” describes many of the tense, tight games the Giants have been in. This past season was quite an obscure one, too, with two players throwing perfect games. The first came in early May

PPLAYOFF PITCHING STATS • First Fi postseason no-hitter since 1956 sin •Pitchers threw five no•Pi hitters, including two hitt perfect games for the first per time in one season since tim 1880. 188 •NL pitchers’ earned-run average of 3.98 and AL’s ave 4.10 ERA each were the 4.1 lowest since 1992. low •There was an average •Th home runs hit per of 1.90 1 game – the lowest since gam 1993 (1.78). 199 •Record 14.12 thrown •Re strikeouts per game this stri past season. pas ILLUSTRATION BY MAX ZAVALA

from Dallas Braden of the Oakland A’s against the Rays. The second perfect game happened near the end of May when Halladay pitched a gem against the Florida Marlins. This was the first time in 140 years that two players pitched perfect games in the same month. Also, consider that only 18 others have accomplished this same feat in the 100 plus years the league has existed, and the feat becomes even more amazing. Perhaps there is a correlation between homerun regression and increased pitching prowess. Just a few years ago, there were a dozen or so players hitting 50 homeruns in a season, but only two players hit over 40

continued from B1

Dane Stivers A SSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Wildcat

Line Bottom

homeruns. Outfielder Cody Ross and catcher Buster Posey have been huge for the Giants, along with needed contributions from various players throughout the first two rounds. In previous years, an offensive powerhouse like the Yankees would not likely have gone winless in September against left-handed pitchers as they did this season. But that appears to be the shift, and a good one at that. Better pitching and worse hitting may make for lower-scoring games, which some may find boring – but I beg to differ. Blake Mehigan can be reached at bmehigan@theorion.com

SOCCER: Wildcats beat Monterey

Nationally ranked Wildcat rests up to get claws back

Being a promising freshman with nationally recognized talent is quite a start for any collegiate career. Having to sit helplessly on the bench and watch your team struggle to win half its matches would be a significant contrast for year two. Makenzie Snyder has found that the toughest part of her sophomore volleyball season is knowing she could help the team, but not being able to, she said. Snyder red shirted this season due to an injury she suffered last summer. When her left wrist hurt after she dove to keep a ball from hitting the court during a 2009 preseason practice, she initially thought it was little more than a sprained wrist, Snyder said. Initial x-rays were in full agreement and the outside hitter was “given the go ahead” to play during the season. During her 2009 campaign, Snyder helped the ’Cats claw their way to a 23-9 record, including 14-8 in conference, as she contributed a whopping 538 kills over the course of the season and 4.72 kills per set, ranking her second in the nation. Her wrist did not seem to be a problem. However, postseason x-rays spotted a fracture in her wrist. After the ’Cats were controversially kept out of the California Collegiate Athletic Association playoffs in favor of a team with a worse conference record, Snyder decided to have surgery. The off-season wrist surgery proved to be more problematic than initially expected, as complications caused Snyder’s rehabilitation to prolong well

homeruns this season. It would be hard to argue that better pitching performances haven’t affected this in some way. With the decreased dominance in hitting and increased presence of capable and tough pitchers, the league has seen a paradigm shift from batters dominating baseball to pitching often being the deciding factor in games. This is not to discredit the offense or say that it has been non-existent. The Giants offense has scored when they’ve needed, and so have the Phillies batters. The Rangers have been noticeably effective this postseason with several players batting over .300 and a few with multiple

THE ORION • BEATA DUAPLIN

READY TO POUNCE Makenzie Snyder gets ready for a serve in 2009. Snyder is redshirting the 2010 season due to a fractured left wrist she suffered during the 2009 preseason. into the summer. As tests continued to show repairable damage in Snyder’s wrist – damage that may cause arthritis later in life if not tended to – Snyder had to make a choice. Should she contribute another stellar volleyball season in 2010 with the injured wrist or red shirt the season and further rehabilitate to avoid problems later in life? With the help of her trainers and coaching staff, she chose not to make a penny-wise and pound-foolish decision and red shirted her 2010 season. This season’s eligible players are young, including five sophomores and six freshmen playing key roles on the team, and Snyder can only watch from the bench. The Wildcats have struggled to secure .500 at 11-11 this season, and Snyder’s helpless situation is frustrating for her, said teammate Jacqueline Johnson. “She knew she could put the ball away at any moment,” Johnson said. “She’s dedicated to her work ethic, so it’s hard for her with her little disability right now.” Even though the First Team All-West Region and First Team All-CCAA selection player can’t contribute to her team at the

Women’s Volleyball The ’Cats split the weekend at 1-1 losing to the Sonoma State Seawolves in five sets on Friday before notching a tight 3-2 victory on Saturday against Humboldt State.

moment, she is happy with the recent improvement and maturity shown by her young teammates over the past couple weeks, Snyder said. Sophomores Sable Villaescusa and Jessica Leek provide leadership for young freshmen such as Makenzie Fahnestock and Alex Shurtz, forming a promising core of exceptional talent to grow from season to season. “We’ve looked way more like a team than we have in a long time,” Snyder said of the Wildcat’s recent four-game surge. “Our team is so young – one advantage to that is they can get better together.” The youthful Wildcats are learning to play with a more mature mindset throughout each match, even without many upperclassmen to show them how. Snyder has learned to grit her teeth and just sit on the sidelines watching each match rather than playing, said sophomore middle hitter Kayla Baumgardner. “We have to keep her motivated sometimes on the bench because it’s hard for her since she can’t play,” Baumgardner said. “It gives her a different perspective of the game.” Dane Stivers can be reached at dstivers@theorion.com

Stats of the week 1. The ’Cats’ fi ve-set triumph over Humboldt State Saturday was the 124th victory for coach Cody Hein since taking over the program in 2003, making him the volleyball coach with the most wins in school history. source: chicowildcats.com

up short once again.” However, there was much to celebrate – including the weather – for the team at University Stadium Monday. The Wildcat matchup against the Cal State Monterey Bay Otters was postponed due to heavy rain on Sunday. The Wildcats came out on fire against the Otters that sunny afternoon, winning 4-2 and reaching within distance of .500 before the season is over. The scoring started early in the 18th minute, with the Otters’ Bekah Luna taking a shot from the left flank off penalty kick. The ball sailed over freshman goalkeeper Sydney Oliver, giving the Otters the early lead. The Wildcats responded in the 23rd minute when Webster took a shot from the middle of the box that went through Otter goalkeeper Graciela Holguin’s hands. The Wildcats kept up the attack in the first period, taking nine shots compared to the Otters’ five. The ’Cats maintained offensive momentum in the second period. In the 69th minute, freshman forward Carly Singer volleyed a cross to junior defender Molly Downtain, who sent a header toward the far right post and gave the Wildcats the lead. The Wildcats continued the offensive attack when junior midfielder Blake Lopes launched a corner kick from the right side, connecting with sophomore midfielder Jennie Barto, who headed the ball into the far right corner of the net, and increasing the Wildcat lead to 3-1. But neither Barto nor the Wildcats were finished. In the 75th minute, she launched a shot from the middle of the box that was over the hands of Holguin and in the net for a 4-1 lead over the Otters. The Otters cut short the celebration in the 76th minute when Bekah Luna scored again, this

2. Chris Akwaja of the men’s soccer team scored twice over the weekend, tallying the lone goal in a 1-0 victory against the San Francisco State Gators and another goal in a 3-1 triumph over Cal State Monterey.

time off a Sherene Thompson corner kick that was headed by Luna into the far left corner of the net. But the Otters were unable to recover beyond Luna’s two goals, and the Wildcats added a much needed win to their season. The Wildcats, 7-8-1 on the season and 6-7-1 in conference play, know their chance for a CCAA playoff berth passed, said Luke Reid, sports information director. However, there was much for the team to rejoice over after Monday’s win. It was the 100th career win for head coach Kim Sutton, who is now in her 10th season coaching the team with a 100-66-35 record overall. “Players off the bench did a great job upfront,” Sutton said. “Jennie Barto had a great day – she helped in doing what we’ve been struggling to do all season, which is finish strong.” Barto came out strong for the Wildcats, scoring her first and second goals of her collegiate career within six minutes. “We haven’t had the season we have been wanting, so we had a ‘soccer gods’ thing in the locker room before the game to rally everyone, and I just felt it once I got into the game,” Barto said. Downtain thinks the game isn’t about playoffs as much as it’s about her teammates, she said. “This game was really important to us,” Downtain said. “We really needed a win for our morale. These last few games are really about the seniors.” The Wildcats will honor them on Senior Night at their fi nal home game tonight against the Cal State Stanislaus Warriors, and then face the Warriors again on Saturday in Turlock to wrap up the season. Kevin Augustine can be reached at kaugustine@theorion.com


S C H E D U LE S

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WEDNESDAY, OCT 27, 2010 |

B3

Fall 2010 >> it might get rowdy MEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL | CONT.

|

MEN’S SOCCER | CONT.

CROSS COUNTRY

|

Nov. 6

Red/White Scrimmage

3 p.m.

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills 12:30 p.m.

Sept. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

Nov. 7

@University of Pacific

5 p.m.

Jan. 7

UC San Diego

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 24

Humboldt State

Nov. 18

@Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Sept. 26

Nov. 22

Bethany University

7 p.m.

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 1

Nov. 26

Northwest Christian

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 3

Cal State L.A.

Nov. 27

Dominican

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 8

@Sonoma State

L 1-2

Nov. 20

TBD

TBA

Dec. 3

Humboldt State

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 22

CSU Monterey Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 10

@Humboldt State

W 2-1

Dec. 4

TBD

TBA

Dec. 4

Sonoma State

7:30 p.m.

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 15

@UC San Diego

Dec. 8

Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 17

@Cal State East Bay

W 3-1

Dec. 11

Pacific Union

7 p.m.

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 22

San Francisco State

W 1-0

Dec. 30

@Cal State L.A.

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 25

CSU Monterey Bay

Dec. 31

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

2:30 p.m.

Feb. 10

@Cal State East Bay

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 27

Cal State Stanislaus

Jan. 7

UC San Diego

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 12

@UC San Diego

5:30 p.m.

Oct. 30

@Cal State Stanislaus

Jan. 8

Cal State East Bay

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 5-7

Jan. 14

@Cal State San Bernardino

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

5:30 p.m.

Jan. 15

@Cal Poly Pomona

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

Jan. 21

San Francisco State

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 25

@San Francisco State

Jan. 22

CSU Monterey Bay

7:30 p.m.

March 1-5

TBD

TBA

Jan. 28

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7:30 p.m.

March 6

TBD

Jan. 29

Cal State L.A.

7:30 p.m.

March 15

TBD

Feb. 3

@Sonoma State

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 5

@Humboldt State

7:30 p.m.

Aug. 17

@Nevada

Feb. 10

@Cal State East Bay

7:30 p.m.

Aug. 25

Feb. 12

@UC San Diego

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 18

Cal Poly Pomona

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 24-25

@Saint Martin’s Inv.

2nd

Feb. 19

Cal State San Bernardino

7:30 p.m.

Sept. 27-28

@Western Washington Inv.

Feb. 24

@CSU Monterey Bay

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 11-12

InterWest Wildcat Classic

Feb. 25

@San Francisco State

7:30 p.m.

Oct. 18-19

D-II Championship Preview

Sept. 25

@Stanford Invitational

6th/9th

W 1-0

Oct. 2

@Williamette Invitational

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Sonoma State

W 2-0

Oct. 16

@Santa Clara Invitational

2nd/4th

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W 3-0

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@CCAA Championships

TBA

L 0-1 (OT)

Nov. 6

@Doc Adams Invitational

TBA

L2-3 (OT)

W 3-1

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

| 8-5-0

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Sept. 3

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7 p.m.

Sept. 3

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W 3-1

TBD

TBA

Sept. 4

@Grand Canyon

W 3-1

Nov. 12-14

TBD

TBA

Sept. 4

@Seattle Pacific

5:30 p.m.

Nov. 20

TBD

TBA

Sept. 7

William Jessup

5:30 p.m.

Dec. 2-4

TBD

TBA

Sept. 10

@Cal State L.A.

Sept. 11

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

TBA

Sept. 15

@Simpson

W 3-0

TBA

Sept. 17

Humboldt State

W 3-1

Sept. 18

Sonoma State

L 3-0

exhibition

Sept. 22

Cal State Stanislaus

L 3-0

@Southern Oregon

exhibition

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UC San Diego

W 3-2

Sept. 2

Western Washington

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Sept. 4

Central Washington

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@Cal State Monterey Bay

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Cal Poly Pomona

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Sept. 17

MEN’S SOCCER

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always online >> theorion.com

Globe-trotting forward scores big in Chico Isaac Brambila STAFF WRITER

Since childhood, powerful free kicks, high aerial headers and fancy dribbling have been part junior forward Ferid Celosmanovic’s arsenal when it comes to scoring goals. The versatile forward has scored 11 goals in 14 games, displaying different talents by scoring almost every goal in a different way than the last. Originally form Brcko, Bosnia, and with early soccer experience in Speyer, Germany, Celosmanovic was practically born dribbling a soccer ball. During his childhood days in Germany, he would spend most of his time playing soccer, Celosmanovic said. He joined his first team called F.V. Speyer when he was about 5 years old, and has not stopped playing since. During his childhood years, it was hard to keep him away from a soccer ball. “It was basically going to elementary school, getting out and then playing until nighttime,” he said. Even when he was not playing with his club team, he was out playing in the street with other kids, he said. “At first, my dad didn’t let me because there was lots of older kids, but I’d still go,” he said. When Celosmanovic was 11 years old, his parents decided to move to the U.S. in search of better job opportunities, he said. The only great difference for him was that kids in the U.S. don’t play soccer in the streets like they do in Germany, he said. He had to look harder for a place to play. Shortly after his arrival, he set out to fi nd a team and about two weeks later, he found one – the West Valley Tigers. With the Tigers, Celosmanovic traveled back to

Europe where he played against youth teams in Portugal, he said. There, he had the opportunity to practice with two teams – Vitoria FC and CS Maritimo. After his adventure in Portugal and a couple of years playing in San Jose for the West Valley College Vikings, Celosmanovic decided to continue his soccer adventures in Chico.

We like to call him a ‘game changer’ around here.”

Ryan Nevarez

Celosmanovic’s teammate

He knew that Chico State had a competitve soccer team because he had played against them when he was a Viking, he said. Close communication about life in Chico with ex-Viking teammate senior midfielder and forward Josh Johnson and experiencing the friendly, small-town vibe when he visited helped him decide. After a few calls from coach Felipe Restrepo, hee decided to don the Wildcat colors. “A lot of people here are way nicer than people back home,” he said. “You just say hi to someone you’ve never seen in your life, and they say hi to you – it’s really cool” So far the transition has been seamless and Celosmanovic has scored 11 goals this season to prove it. His teammates know that if they get the ball to him, there is a great chance that he will score, said senior defender Ryan Nevarez.

“That’s one of the first things I noticed about him when I first saw him play,” he said. “He has a lot of different solutions to a single problem.” Having him on the field makes his teammates’ jobs easier and gives other teams something to worry about because they have to adjust their game to him, Nevarez said. It is no surprise that the team often refers to Celosmanovic by the effect he has on the field. “We like to call him a ‘game changer’ around here,” Nevarez said. Junior marketing major Taylor Grantt enjoys attending the home soccer games and thinks Celosmanovic is one of the best players he has seen in a while, he said. “I don’t see many people who kick the ball the way he does – he has total ball control,” Grantt said. “He can bend it whatever way he needs to.”

ANATOMY OF A GOAL 1. It was a long clearance off a free kick. Celosmanovic looked back and sprinted toward where he thought the ball was going to land. He had two defenders on him, but used his speed to rush past both.

3. Celosmanovic makes a cut to the center of the field just outside the goalie box, using his dribbling skills, creativity and acceleration.

Isaac Brambila can be reached at ibrambila@theorion.com

2. Celosmanovic received the ball just outside the goalie box on the left side, then brought the ball down between two defenders by shielding it with his body, using strength and ball control.

4. Celosmanovic noticed that the goalie was standing too far outabout six or seven yards—so he made a quick decision and cleverly chipped the ball over the keeper into the back of the net.

Brcko, Bosnia and Herzgovina Celosmanovic was born in Brcko and lived there until he was 4.

Speyer, Germany Celosmanovic moved here when he was 4 and played for F.V. Speyer.

San Jose, California Celosmanovic moved her when he was 11 and played for the West Valley Tigers youth team.

Portugal Celosmanovic played here with the West Valley Tigers and practiced with two teams—CS Marítimo and Vitoría FC.

Chico, California Celosmanovic joins the Chico State mens soccer team in fall 2010.

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Matt Shilts Entertainment Editor

Editorialcore

Actors to play animals acting like humans Tyler Ash STAFF WRITER

Chico Performances will unleash a zoo of untamed actors and a ferocious amount of talent Tuesday at Laxson Auditorium with Imago Theatre’s “ZooZoo.” Imago Theatre combines the variety acts of vaudeville with the mastery of puppetry and the visual effects and comedy of Cirque du Soleil. In “ZooZoo,” its latest creation, animals are put in human situations to demonstrate approaches to everyday challenges that only a creature might achieve. “It’s not like a play at all,” said co-creator Jerry Mouawad in a phone interview. “It’s more like going to the circus and the zoo at the same time.” Imago Theatre was founded in 1979 by Mouawad and Carol Triffle in Portland, Ore., and has toured internationally for more than 20 years. It began when they started experimenting with different kinds of performances in mask theatre. “ZooZoo” is a combination of their most recognized work, “FROGZ,” which appeared on Broadway in 2000 and 2002, as well as some of their other works. The performance will include

a variety of animals with human-related predicaments, including dining anteaters that can’t get their waiter’s attention in a restaurant, a frog with an inferiority complex that can’t jump as high as his amphibious friends, penguins playing musical chairs, human-like hippos struggling with insomnia, rambunctious rabbits and a mysterious rump-faced worm. “Our animals are not a representation of the real animals in the world – they’re a representation of our images of these animals,” Mouawad said. The costume for the worm is initially confusing – the arms are actually the actor’s legs, and the worm’s face is the performer’s bottom. “We really just wanted to try and see what would happen if we placed a mask on an unusual part of the body,” Mouawad said as he talked of the talented “handstanding” worm. During the show, the performing animals tend to “wander” into the audience, looking for someone to help them out in their time of human-like hardship – and to provide more personal humor with their spectators. “Probably half the show is in the first three rows,” Mouawad said.

THE ORION • IMAGO THEATERS

BEARING IT ALL Imago Theatre’s “ZooZoo” consists of animal characters doing human activities. Originally based in part on other Imago plays, the show goes on Tuesday at 7:30 in Laxson Auditorium. Director of Chico Performances there too, and pretty soon you just Dan DeWayne is excited for Imago give yourself over to it and say, Theatre’s return to Chico, this ‘Yeah, this is totally plausible.’” being their second time performMany people have never ing here in 10 years, he said. heard of such a performance as “They’re pretty amazing,” he “ZooZoo.” said. “To be able to interpret the Construction management movements of the animals is major Teddy Yorke was excited to such that you have to buy into the hear that the spectacle actually idea that they’re alive. That’s an exists, he said. extraordinary accomplishment.” “That sounds legend – wait for Many people don’t think about it – dary!” Yorke said as he learned the incredible talent these per- of the awe-inspiring exhibition. formers have to be able to make Physics major Spencer Johnthese creatures move, he said. For son is also enthusiastic about the a child, the world of make-believe show. can be accessed on a whim, mak“I’m so psyched, high-five!” ing “ZooZoo” an entirely credible Johnson said as he slapped hands observation. with Yorke. “They’re totally believers,” DeWayne said. “It takes adults Tyler Ash can be reached at just a little bit longer. We all get tash@theorion.com

Show info • Time 7:30 p.m. Tuesday • Place Laxson Auditorium • Cost $14 student, $16 senior, $18 adult, $23 premium

PHOTO COURTESY OF IMAGO THEATRE

Surrogate to play double set Josh Hegg STAFF WRITER

Fans of Surrogate will congregate at Cafe Coda Friday to watch the band perform two sets of material spanning their entire discography. The idea for a two-set show was the brainchild of Dan Elsen, who handles booking at the local venue and worked with band members, such as bass player Daniel Taylor, to create a different kind of show that suited Surrogate’s style. “Both Dan and us wanted to change things up from the typical three-band shows that are always at Cafe Coda,”

Taylor said. The problem with threeband bills is that people will go outside or go to the bar if they don’t know or like the opening band, Taylor said. “For this show, what you see is what you get,” he said. Surrogate started as a side project for Chris Keene, lead singer and guitarist. He then teamed up with drummer Jordan Mallory and worked to put together the indie-pop group. The band released a demo that allotted them a slot on the roster of prestigious indie label Tooth & Nail Records. They have released two records thus far and are in the process of recording a

new EP. The show, which will feature one mellow set and one louder one, will present music spanning Surrogate’s entire career, Keene said. The band will play a few old songs that fans will recognize from the first album and will premiere some new tracks from their upcoming EP. “The show will be a look back at Surrogate,” he said. “It’s all our friends coming to see us perform, so it’s going to have a fun, loose vibe.” The show is also a treat for the under-21 fans who rarely get to see the group perform. “An all-ages show is a rare

occurrence in Chico,” Taylor said. The band is looking to expand its fan base to include the younger demographic, said vocalist and guitarist Michael Lee. “Surrogate doesn’t have much of an all-age, under-21 fan base,” Lee said. “It would be nice to expand that.” Keyboardist Daniel Martin joked that they are playing the show for the one or two fans that had been pestering the band to play at an allages venue. “We don’t want people to misinterpret what we are doing,” Taylor said. “We aren’t doing a show like this

to be self-indulgent or condescending. We just have fun trying new things and changing the pace. More than anything, it is a big experiment to see what people think.” Josh Hegg can be reached at jhegg@theorion.com

Show info • Time 9 p.m. Friday • Place Cafe Coda • Bands Surrogate • Cost $5

“Djentrification” I’d like to take a moment to talk about a term I’ve learned over the past year. Like “chug” and the popular “dun,” – as in “dun dun dun dun dun dun my Sharona” – “djent” is a word used to describe a sound in music using its sound as a word. You know, onomatopoeia. I first heard of it in a guitar video featuring producer and musician Misha “Bulb” Mansoor. He was talking about different effects and tones, and “djent” came up. With my musical “street cred” in jeopardy, I did what I always do when I hear a term I don’t know – I acted like I knew it anyway. Listening to Mansoor’s work eventually gave me some understanding of the term, and luckily I found an Urban Dictionary entry for it. As the entry and Mansoor himself have recommended, the best example is the beginning of the first track of his band Periphery’s self-titled debut, “Insomnia.” For those who care about the technical stuff, it has to do with high-sensitivity compression and plenty of mid-range volume. For those who don’t, listen to that song and you’ll have your vocabulary word for the week. There was one more important aspect to the term though – super-deep tunings. Djent aside, many bands have used this bone-rattling method of guitar use to get a heavier sound for some time now. Groups such as Meshuggah, Mastodon, Whitechapel and many more have explored the depths of guitar tone, and it’s spread like an infection throughout contemporary guitar-driven music. Northern California’s Deftones have been doing this gradually over their careers and on their newest album, “Diamond Eyes,” they go the deepest they’ve ever gone. Their 1995 debut “Adrenaline” used standard guitar tunings. They’ve gone from that to an F# tuning, which is kind of like going from sedan tires to monster truck tires. Like them, local groups Teeph, Cold Blue Mountain, Amarok and Armed for Apocalypse have adopted this. All of these groups achieve ridiculous levels of heaviness. On Chico List – a website for local metal, punk and indie shows – Cold Blue Mountain was once described as “ball-dropping heaviness of heavy.” Because they’re local guys, I have a spot in my heart for them. But they need to learn the lesson that Tolkien’s dwarves of Moria didn’t – don’t delve too greedily and too deep. Matt Shilts can be reached at entertainmenteditor@theorion.com

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E N T E RTA I N M E N T

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W WE WEDNES WEDNESDAY, D ES DN SDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

the good, th d the th bad b d & th the undecided d id d

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new releases

THE GOOD >>

STAFF COMMENTARY >> >> “Nothing” (ALBUM) N.E.R.D.’s newest attempt looks like another interesting foray into crossover country. Their blend of hip-hop, pop music, funk and rock has been pleasing fans since the turn of the millennium.

“Halloween” (1978) A psychotic murderer escapes from a mental institution and goes on a killing rampage on Halloween night while his doctor chases him through the streets. You’re sure to get your fill of epic screams and terrifying suspense – just don’t watch it alone.

>> “The Archers on the Beach” (ALBUM – EP) Besides having an awesome name, Destroyer has produced some quality indie and shoegaze-type stuff since the mid-’90s. This EP should bring them in the 2010s nicely, and even though frontman and driving creative force Daniel Bejar is nearing his 40s, he’s still got it.

>> “The Pacific” (DVD) HBO’s second World War 2 miniseries was somewhat disappointing to fans of “Band of Brothers,” but that doesn’t mean it was bad. It stands alone proudly and should be a welcome addition to anyone’s DVD collection.

>> “Gran Turismo 5” (VIDEO GAME) The franchise that has defined racing games for 12 years is at it again. Granted, you still buy cars, win races and buy more cars, but there’s also vastly improved graphics and a course designer. Just get it.

THE BAD >>

>> “Cardiology” (ALBUM) Wow. Good Charlotte are still around? The last cool thing this group did was being playable characters on “Madden NFL 2003.” Exploring the boundaries of the unoriginal for some time now, the quintet has few ideas and fewer ways in which to express them.

“It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” (1966) The whole gang is ready for Halloween festivities. Linus waits for the Great Pumpkin, Snoopy is geared up in his flying ace attire and the gang all have their trick-or-treat bags ready in this classic cartoon that you can’t help but smile at.

“Dracula” (1931) This is based on a novel about vampires, heroes and damsels in distress – but no, it’s not “Twilight.” This Halloween classic features a blood-sucking beast who’s much more famous and formidable – Count Dracula – and he’s bent on making the beautiful Mina a member of the undead.

“Frankenstein” (1931) Bringing corpses back to life proves tricky in this emotional and grim masterpiece about mad scientist Dr. Henry Frankenstein, whose attempt at resurrection creates a monster with a criminal mind.

Lauren Beaven STAFF WRITER

October in Chico is traditionally a time of creative costumes, off-the-hook parties and candy-filled bliss, but while the kegs roll out, Halloween’s movie potential lies untapped. No doubt many students’ nights this weekend will be full of haunting fun, which is why now is the perfect time to pick up a spooky holiday DVD. Grab a piece of pumpkin pie, kick back in your black-and-orange pajamas and wait out the impending “headaches” we’ll all be having Sunday morning with a good Halloween movie. The common association between Halloween and horror films is not the limit to the holiday’s motion picture repertoire. Whether you’re the chills-and-thrills kind of person or the feel-good film type, there’s bound to be a good movie out there for you. If you’ve got your heart set on horror, go for something supernatural or seasonal that might include ghosts, jack-o’lanterns, seances or costumed villains. Not just any scary movie will make the cut for this holiday. The “Halloween” film franchise offers hours of suspense, screams and masked murders. The nine sequels, remakes and spinoffs, not including the 1978 original, have made Michael Myers an icon of fear. If blood, gore and murder scare you away from the idea of

this holiday’s movies, there are plenty of other options. Classics such as the 1931 versions of “Frankenstein” and “Dracula” make up the middle ground between Halloween horror and family films. I’m far from a fan of scary movies, but my dad let me watch these as a kid, and I walked away with minimal nightmares. They are shot in black and white, but Boris Karloff, who played Frankenstein’s monster, and Béla Lugosi, who played Dracula, carry these creepy classics to the top of my Halloween list. Halloween movies with happy endings exist, too. Our friends at Disney established this generation’s stake in family-friendly Halloween films with both “Hocus Pocus” and “The Nightmare Before Christmas” in 1993. Take a trip to a video store, add a movie to your Netflix queue or visit the Blockbuster Express kiosk on campus this week for a little alternative Halloween entertainment that doesn’t include dressing up. Lauren Beaven can be reached at lbeaven@theorion.com

to make Halloween night frightfully memorable

>> “Beverly Hills 90210: Complete Series” (DVD)

Extra weekend treats

There were love triangles, pregnancies, graduations, murders, mayhem and a slew of spin-offs

For the over 21 trick-or-treaters

such as “Melrose Place” and “Models Inc.” The melodrama

LaSalles:

entertained people for a decade

Thursday: the staff will be dressing up as rock stars Friday: “Zombie Prom” Saturday: “Heaven and Hell” Sunday: “Haunted Mansion”

– but with a price tag of well over $200, this is not a good buy for any but the most die-hard fans.

THE UNDECIDED >>

Lost on Main:

Friday: “Freaks’ Masquerade” Halloween-themed drink specials all weekend

Duff y’s Tavern:

>> “DC Universe Online”

Saturday: Ramones cover band Pinhead and The Shankers play at 9:30 p.m. Sunday: Duff y’s will be a party of the “Halloween Parade.”

(VIDEO GAME) In the same vein as “City of Heroes,” this massively multiplayer, online, role-playing game allows the user to control a super-powered hero or

For all ghouls and goblins

villain. A game like this will attract a good many buyers, especially

Cafe Coda

with the DC name attached, so you should probably wait until some others make the purchase and see what they say before shelling out serious cash.

>> “Towers of Midnight” (NOVEL) The long-awaited 13th edition of Robert Jordan’s “Wheel of Time” series was finished by Brandon Sanderson, who will also finish the final book in the series, “A Memory of Light.” Fans

Closing Time LaSalle’s: 2 a.m. Crazy Horse Saloon: 2 a.m. Riley’s: between 1 a.m. and 2 a.m. Madison Bear Garden: 10 a.m. Duff y’s Tavern: 2 a.m. Joe’s Bar: 1:30 a.m. 33 Steaks, Booze and Jazz: 12 a.m. Normal St. Bar: between midnight and 2 a.m. Bella’s Sports Pub: 12 a.m.

Friday October 29: “A Night With Surrogate” 9p.m., $5 at the door

Blue Room Theatre

Friday, Saturday and Sunday: Halloween: Live ~ John Carpenter’s slasher classic, 10:30 p.m. $5 at the door

Cafe Flo

Saturday: Team Jafar with Donovan and Shane of Hail the Sun, 8p.m. $5

El Rey Theatre

Sunday: Jackie Greene, 6:30p.m. $23 in advance

of the series, though still mourning Jordan’s death, can be happy that his vision is being completed. They also have to worry about the quality of the end of a series they have been into for several years and thousands of pages. Buyer beware.

“Casper” (1995) The greedy heir to the Whipstaff Manor employs a ghost whisperer and his daughter to take care of Fatso, Stinkie, Stretch and Casper the friendly ghost – four specters who are reluctant to leave the premises.

“Beetlejuice” (1988) Tim Burton perfects dark comedy in this story of a recently deceased couple that employs the help of a scheming and mischievous “bio-exorcist” named Betelgeuse when their home is sold to an unappealing family.

Halloween movies playing Tinseltown • “My Soul to Take 3-D” 9:45 p.m. • “Paranormal Activity 2” 11:50 a.m, 1:00 p.m., 2:10 p.m., 3:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5:40 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 8:00 p.m., 9:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. • “Saw: The Final Chapter” Comes out 12:01 a.m. Friday

Downtown bars

A lot of people loved this series.

“Hocus Pocus” (1993) When Salem, Mass., resident Max Dennison inadvertently resurrects three 17th century witches on Halloween night, he must find a way to save his younger sister, his crush and himself by putting the Sanderson sisters down for good.

*Bars may close earlier upon police request, said to Dan Burns, the manager of Joe’s Bar THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

WITCH’S BREW This concoction, a “bartender’s choice” from Madison Bear Garden, is just a sample of treats – or tricks – that await revelers who hit the town for a few drinks on Halloween.

“The Nightmare Before Christmas” (1993) Jack Skellington, the “Pumpkin King,” is unhappy with Halloween Town and sets out to bring the Christmas spirit to his land in this twisted but heartwarming Tim Burton classic.

Stephanie Maynard STAFF WRITER

Halloween is the perfect time to have a witch brew up a cocktail, but it’s also the best weekend to take a cute zombie to prom. All over Chico, the bars and pubs are gearing up for the Halloween weekend. Chico State students can expect costumes, drink specials, live music and themed nights at their favorite venues. LaSalles will host Friday’s Zombie Prom with a live band dressed as zombies. The employees of LaSalles decided on the theme, said assistant manager Lisa D’Amico. “We did a Facebook group to see what everyone wanted and generate ideas,” D’Amico said. LaSalles will have different themes from Thursday to Sunday, D’Amico said. On Sunday, there is a general theme of “haunted mansion” – but the staff will be dressing as “freaks and geeks.” “I’m going as Hermione from ‘Harry Potter,’ and another one of the staff is going as Lady Gaga,” D’Amico said. D’Amico expects Saturday to be the bar’s biggest night, she said. For their “heaven and hell” theme, half of the bar will be decked out in heavenly costumes and the other half in hell-inspired wear. This is a theme LaSalles has used before. D’Amico doesn’t expect crowds to get too devilish or out of hand, she said. “Our staff is trained to handle crowds really well,” D’Amico said. “The biggest thing is people who get too drunk, and that usually happens outside the bar – and there are lots of cops around.” Staff of other bars expressed similar feelings, such as Sue Reed of Lost on Main. “I’ve noticed that the crowds have increased in the past couple of years, but the kids are really well behaved,” Reed said. “Halloween is coming back in a good way.” Other bars are sticking to tried-and-true drink specials,

said 33 Steaks, Booze and Jazz proprietor Tyler Cooke. Over the weekend, they will have specials on vodka with lemonade, vodka with Rockstar and “big kids’ Kool-Aid.” There will not be a cover charge. “Our main focus will be on Friday and Saturday, since people still have to wake up and go to work or school on Monday,” Cooke said. Halloween falling on a Sunday means that this year’s partying is going to be more spread out than previous years, he said. “Last Halloween was on a Saturday, so this will be a whole different experience,” Cooke said. “Sunday will be an abnormally busy Sunday, but it will still be a Sunday.” He has been working at bars since 1998 and remembers when there were lines to get into bars that went past the Bell Memorial Union, Cooke said. “That just doesn’t happen anymore,” he said. Cooke is not the only one to comment on a decline of student patrons. Doug Roberts, owner of Duffy’s Tavern, has also noticed this trend. “So many people are going back to their roots of house parties,” Roberts said. Duffy’s Tavern plans on the big nights being Saturday and Sunday, Roberts said. Roberts is not concerned about crowds, he said. However, others have a different prediction, such as Joe’s Bar manager Dan Burns. “So many out-of-town people come into town and think this is the weekend to go crazy,” Burns said. “You can find crowds six to eight people deep on the sidewalk. It’s gotten to the point where we don’t think police can do much if we had a problem.” Joe’s Bar will have a full staff and a few extras on hand during the weekend. There will be drink specials and the staff will be in costume. “We want everyone to be safe and sane come Monday morning,” Burns said. Stephanie Maynard can be reached at smaynard@theorion.com


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City Plaza, rest of world celebrate â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thrillerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ RYAN RICHARDS

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLOSE TO MIDNIGHT? Hundreds gathered downtown to perform Michael Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrillerâ&#x20AC;? during the 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrill the Worldâ&#x20AC;? Saturday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrillerâ&#x20AC;? fans worldwide joined in at the same time. Candyce Chilson STAFF WRITER

THE ORION â&#x20AC;˘ RYAN RICHARDS

THRILL â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrill the Worldâ&#x20AC;? dance instructor and participant Elisabeth Schirmers gets into character in the City Plaza. She was part of a worldwide synchronized dance to Michael Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thriller.â&#x20AC;?

The living dead marched onto the grounds of the downtown City Plaza in full zombie character to break the record for largest, worldwide, simultaneous dance to Michael Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cultural phenomenon, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thriller.â&#x20AC;? Zombies of all ages ran amok for the second annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrill the Worldâ&#x20AC;? in Chico, dressed head-to-toe in costume. From the ghastly white and black facial makeup with blood accents to clothing with rips and tears, 253 people gathered to all begin to dance at 4 p.m. Back in 1982, Jackson released one of the most recognized songs in the nation. The 14-minute music video for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrillerâ&#x20AC;? was named the most inďŹ&#x201A;uential and culturally signiďŹ cant music video of all time in 2009 by the National

Film Registry of the Library of Congress. The video is known for its scenes of gruesome zombies dancing alongside Jackson as he himself becomes one of the dancing corpses. The screenplay received recognition worldwide, and many admit they love to show oďŹ&#x20AC; their thrilling moves. Senior sociology major Jennifer Ward was among the dancers in the City Plaza. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much horrible stuďŹ&#x20AC; going on in the world, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice just to have a good time,â&#x20AC;? Ward said. The countdown began and the zombies took their places lying down on the cement as the beginning sound eďŹ&#x20AC;ects of lightning and thunder began. Fitting perfectly with the weather in Chico, the dancersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; makeup and clothing began to get wet as the rain added an extra gory eďŹ&#x20AC;ect of a scary movie. Krista Jacobson, graduate

student and communications sciences and disorders major, thinks â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrill the Worldâ&#x20AC;? was a great event â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially since Halloween is right around the corner, she said. Dancers began practicing the choreography for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrillerâ&#x20AC;? on Sept. 11. There were also tutorials oďŹ&#x20AC;ered online to learn the dance from home. The creaking sounds of caskets opening signaled the zombies to awake from their slumber in full character, and they began to mirror Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s epic music video. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrill the Worldâ&#x20AC;? got its start in 2006 in Toronto, Canada, according to the eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. Guinness World Records named the 62-person dance as the largest â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrillerâ&#x20AC;? dance worldwide. Since then, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrill the Worldâ&#x20AC;? has managed to gain quite a following. In 2009, a new world record was set as 22,571 people from

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33 nations performed Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit at the exact same time. Nursing major JeďŹ&#x20AC; Reyes thought the event was a great ďŹ t for Chico, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is one of the great things about Chico,â&#x20AC;? Reyes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It even gets the kids involved.â&#x20AC;? Reyes and Ward plan to get a â&#x20AC;&#x153;ďŹ&#x201A;ash mobâ&#x20AC;? going by setting up music at the Tinseltown movie theater and at Chico State to randomly get people involved in a simultaneous dance, he said. Despite the rain, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrill the Worldâ&#x20AC;? went oďŹ&#x20AC; without any problems. Many showed up with umbrellas in hand to watch Chicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attempt to help break the world record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a great time watching and I encourage people to come out next year,â&#x20AC;? Jacobson said. Candyce Chilson can be reached at cchilson@theorion.com

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E N T E RTA I N M E N T

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 |

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Science, sculpture showcased at sustainability show Ben Mullin STAFF WRITER

Quirky contraptions will dangle over Mayan myths and ingenious inventions at the first Sustainable Art and Architecture Exhibition Monday. The exhibition, which Butte College’s new art gallery will host, is the product of a countywide call to give the abstract idea of sustainability shape, size, texture and color. The show will parallel “This Way to Sustainability VI,” a joint venture between Chico State and Butte College. Alexandra O’Neil, chairwoman of the art department at Butte College, organized the show in the hope that the conversation of conservation would translate more coherently onto canvas, she said. “In the past, Butte College’s sustainability conference has been attended by industry insiders,” O’Neil said. “I think this exhibition is going to attract a whole different set of people to the concept of sustainability.” She has been preparing for the exhibition by having her art students build wacky machines from recycled parts in the tradition of absurd cartoonist Rube Goldberg, O’Neil said. Goldberg’s cartoons depict contraptions that rely on a maze of gears and pulleys to complete a mundane task, such as wiping one’s mouth. O’Neil’s students are working on machines that perform many functions to inform their audience about different aspects of sustainability, she said. “I told my students they don’t have to work, they just have to look like they could work,” O’Neil said. The unfinished contraptions include a 5-foot wine pourer made entirely from corks and recycled wood, as well as a giant display that compares the inner workings of a dingy chicken factory to the relative

bliss of a pasture. Hillary McNeill, a student assistant who works at the Butte College Art Gallery, suggested some unorthodox placing for the contraptions as she walked through the art building. “The chicken display’s probably going to go there,” McNeill said, pointing at a hole in the ceiling between the first and second floors. “We’re hoping to have enough art submitted to decorate not just the gallery, but the entire art building.” McNeill rattled off a list of works in progress that will be featured in the upcoming show – a sculpture made entirely of scavenged metal scraps, a printed comparison of human and cow anatomy and a collection of environmentally friendly casting molds made from recycled paper. “This is the art that the molds create,” McNeill said, indicating a stylized square tile with the texture of foam. She pointed at a crock-pot stewing strips of newspaper in a dark brown substance that would eventually become the casting molds. “The brown coloring is made from beets that I bought at Thursday Night Market that have been cooked in the crockpot for a few hours,” she said. “Let’s not open it.” Though some of the artwork featured at the exhibition will be suspended from the ceiling, at least one piece will be suspended in time. The work of art that inspired O’Neil to organize the Sustainability Exhibition was a serigraph – ink on cloth – that brought ancient Mayan mythos into the 21st century, she said. The piece, created by Andy Rader, is titled “Myth of the Earth Stabbing” and is a contemporary reimaging of a mural painted on the Mayan ruins in Guatemala. However, rather than depicting a struggle between Mayan gods or a bloody battle between two

THE ORION • KENNEDY COKER

THIS WAY TO SUSTAINABILITY Chico State art instructor Sandi Escobar [right] working with students Melissa Miller [middle] and Brian Boggs on their pieces for the art exhibit. The show will be held at the Butte College Art Gallery from Monday until Nov. 21. tribes, Rader’s serigraph tells the story of the BP oil spill. While taking O’Neil’s summer class, one of the assignments was to take something from one of the cultures the class was studying and update it, Rader said. “At that time, the BP oil spill was on the news all the time, so I decided to combine that with Mayan art,” he said. The piece shows a Mayan warrior standing on a canoe, plunging his spear into the ocean as a rich Mayan administrator counts his money and deliberately stares in the other direction.

Rader, who is in his second year of formal art training, is honored to be the inspiration for the exhibition, he said. However, he doesn’t expect to win the cash prizes that will be given to the top three artists. “Because there’s money being awarded at the show, there’s going to be a lot of really talented student and professional artists from the Chico area entering,” Rader said. “I’m glad that my art could be the seed that this exhibition grew from, but I don’t expect to win.” The upcoming exhibition will combine science with the humanities to convey a

more complete emphasis on sustainability. The show will feature a display on a new water filtration system designed by Butte College students, said Jennifer Payne, secretary of Butte College’s art department. “They’re going to make a model of their system with our 3-D printer, which uses lasers to cut shapes from a block of resin,” Payne said. “We’re using art as a vehicle to integrate the disciplines of art and science, and help them work together.” Ben Mullin can be reached at

Exhibit info Community members are welcome to submit art that deals with sustainability, justice, peace or democracy. Submissions received before the reception will be judged, with a first place prize of $1,000. • Dates Monday to Nov. 21 • Place Butte College Art Gallery • Reception 3:30 p.m. Nov. 5 • Cost Free

bmullin@theorion.com

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T ODAY

Triple Cobra 9 p.m. @ LaSalles $5 cover

The Soft White Sixties and Hair, Gin and Tonic support San Francisco’s Triple Cobra for a night of throwback glam rock.

T H U R S DAY

Reggae Night 9 p.m. @ Lost on Main

Get down and celebrate the island sounds with Lost On Main. Join the party and start jammin’ to the tunes.

F R I DAY

Surrogate

8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5 admission Kick back and chill out with the indie pop sounds and lyrical witticism of Surrogate this Friday night at Café Coda.

Necessities >>

SU N DAY

SAT U R DAY

Jackie Greene

Haunted Mansion

7:30 p.m. @ El Rey Theatre $23 advance admission

2 p.m. @ The Pageant Theatre $6 student admission

This Sacramento-based singer-songwriter has toured with the best of them, including B.B. King, Phil Lesh and Buddy Guy. His soulful roots rock should cure any fan of the blues.

LaSalles gets deckedout for Halloween. Come for the music and decorations, stay for the costumed bar staff.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20, 2010 |

MON DAY

Bear-E-oke

@ Madison Bear Garden 9 p.m. If you’re drunk enough to get onstage, but sober enough to sing coherently, Bear-E-Oke may be right for you. Just remember – gesturing with your glass does not compensate for a flubbed lyric.

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T U E S DAY

Black Hole of Calcutta

8 p.m. @ Monstros Pizza $5 donation Sick of the week already? Go bash some heads and eat some pizza at Monstros for a good ol’ punk show. It’ll be sure to make your blood boil as it gets spilled on the sawdust.

<< Daily Dose Oct. 27 Nov. 2

<< Options TODAY

Devil Kat’s Rock ’n’ Roll Social 9:30 p.m. @ Lost on Main $3 cover

Enjoy some rock as Shelby Cobra takes the stage with Hot Mess. Also featuring a performance from That’s What She Said.

Open Micful

7 p.m. @ Cafe Culture Free Songwriters, poets, musicians and comedians all have the opportunity to entertain the crowd. Cafe Culture provides all the equipment for anyone to show off some talent.

T H U R SDAY

Chico Ska Orchestra 8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5 admission

Dust off your dancing shoes because the good folks of Chico Ska Orchestra will have you grooving at Cafe Coda.

F R I DAY

Omara Portuondo

7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium Free Anaura heads from San Francisco to Chico to showcase their indie pop-rock sound. Also featuring Jeb Draper and Deedee Vest.

Countdown to Armageddon Fera 8 p.m. @ Monstros Pizza $5 donation

8 p.m. @Cafe Flo $5 admission

Metal will reign supreme at Monstros Pizza. The heavens will split open with the sounds of amplified guitar and thunderous drums.

Had a stressful week? Gather your thoughts Friday morning on a stroll around Chico State as you learn a bit about the remarkable collection of native and exotic trees and shrubs on the campus and mansion grounds.

SAT U R DAY

SU N DAY

MON DAY

Champagne Brunch

African Dance Class

“Chamber Music”

Our hometown dubstep heroes BETA perform with special guests NovaTRON and Dr. John.

Good food and good drinks to celebrate Halloween, last night’s party and today’s hangover.

Get out of your seat and greet the heat of the drum’s beat with quick feet.

Pinhead

“Halloween Live”

7 p.m @ Cafe Culture

Get ready for this absurdest play about eight women in an insane asylum who all think they’re famous. The crazy ladies come together to prepare for an attack they think is coming from the men’s ward.

BETA Halloween Bash

9 a.m. @ 33 Steaks, Booze and Jazz

9 p.m. @ Lost on Main $5 cover

9:30 p.m. @ Duff y’s $5 cover

7:30 p.m. @ The Blue Room Theatre

Local Ramones tribute band Pinhead and local favorite The Shankers pair up to bring a rocking start to All Hallow’s Eve.

The horror classic gets the theater treatment in this original work.

@ Cafe Culture 5:15 p.m. $10 fee

Zumba Dance Class

Shimmy and shake to Latin rhythms paired with easy-to-follow dance moves. Zumba combines quick and slow beats with resistance training to burn calories.

T U E SDAY @ Wismer Theater 7:30 p.m. $6 student admission

Zoo Zoo

7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium $14 student admission The circus is coming to town! But not just any circus because in “ZooZoo,” all of the people are the animals! Cirque du Soleil-style mimes, puppeteers, visual effects and humor are coming to Laxson but entirely through the life of animals.

STAFF FAVORITES >> HALLOWEEN CANDY Candy Corn — Candy corn has been an essential part of Halloween ever since I can remember. This treat may be pure corn syrup, but the festive colors and promise of an intense sugar high keep me coming back for more. —Lauren Beaven Staff Writer

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups —The only thing better than Hershey’s chocolate is peanut butter covered in Hershey’s chocolate. Reese is a genius when he put the two together. Mini, large, pieces – I will take Reese’s chocolate however I can get it. — Almendra Carpizo Features Editor

Bottlecaps — All of your favorite sodas conveniently transformed into a semi-tasty candy! What more could you ask for?

— Tyler Ash Staff Writer


C8 |

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

always online >> theorion.com

Friday

NO.

Saturday Sunday Halloween

Zombie Prom

It is a complete sentence.

Heaven and

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STYL

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APARTMENTS cont. Location 2423 North Ave #C, #1 1161 Citrus Ave #G, #O, #N 925 Chestnut St #4 371 E 7th St. #1 630 W. 2nd Ave #11, #16 238 Hazel #3 1245 Esplanade #8, #10 923 W. East Ave #11 939 W. East Ave #9 2135 Elm St. #2,#7,#9, #10 220 W. 22nd St. #4

Bd/Ba Rent Dep. 1/1 $590 $690 2/1 $685 $785 Rent Special 1/2 month FREE!!! 2/1 $695 $800 2/1 $850 $950 3/1 $750 $850 2/1 $800 $900 2/1 $685 $785 2/1 $650 $750 1/1 $575 $675 1/1 $400 $500 3/1 $625 $725

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico 895-1733 www.reliableproperty.com

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CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Brandman University is accredited by, and is a member of, the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).


Thrift Queen offers clothing, accessory deals for Halloween >> D2

& Skulls always online >> theorion.com

|

Comparing celebrations of Halloween, Dia de torical holidays holidays los Muertos, two cultural, historical

Mexican holiday es honors, celebrates es deceased relatives Amanda Jacobs STAFF WRITER

Kelly Smith STAFF WRITER

Trick-or-treating, one of Halloween’s most practiced traditions, dates back more than 2,000 years and didn’t always involve fluff y costumes, pillow cases full of candy or even the same name. The Oct. 31 celebration is a mixture of ancient Celtic practices, Roman Catholic religious rituals and European folk traditions that have merged together over time to create the modern-day Halloween, said anthropology professor William Collins.

The Celtics held the belief that the year was divided into two parts – summer representing life and winter representing a time of death, he said. The last days of October represented a time of death. “This was the time they celebrated Samhain,” Collins said. “At that time, the distance between the world of the living and that of the dead was very thin, and spirits – good and evil – could pass through the boundary to visit the living.” During Samhain, the Celtics wore horrific masks to ward off the evil spirits, tricking them into thinking they were already evil persons, Collins said. This is where the tradition of costumes takes its root. The traditional orange and black colors of Halloween >> please see HISTORY | D5

Halloween by the numbers • One-fourth of all the candy sold annually in the U.S. is purchased for Halloween. • Halloween is the second most commercially successful holiday – Christmas being the first. • More than $1.5 billion is spent

on costumes each year and more than $2.5 billion on other Halloween paraphernalia. • More than 93 percent of children under the age of 12 will go out trick-or-treating. source: www.purpletrail.com

Mireles said. However, the cross has become an essential part of today’s altars to show acceptance of Christianity. Families such as Moran’s have decorated the altars with their deceased loved ones’ favorite food dishes, drinks, imitation sugar skulls and “pan de muerto,” or sweet bread, Moran said. Her mother and grandparents have been celebrating the tradition since she was a child. It is believed the high aromas from deceased’s favorite dishes, flowers and candles can be consumed by the spirits, according to the website. Family members then physically eat the foods after their essence is gone. The day is very colorful and beautiful, Moran said. It is meant to be a celebration and not a time for mourning. Maria Garcia, a member of MEChA, hasn’t been able to eexperience ex xpe peri peri rience en nccee ttoo oo o o much mu ucch of of Dia Dia ia de de los Muertos llo os M Mu ueerrtto os

growing i up in i the th U.S., th U S she h said. id id However, she’s excited to be part of the event at school to honor her heritage. “I want students to respect it, get interested in it and want to know more about it,” she said. “I want them to know what’s going on.” Amanda Jacobs can be reached at ajacobs@theorion.com

Dia de los Muertos translations: Día de los Muertos - Day of the Dead ofrenda - an offering; refers to the goods set out on the altars pan de los muertos - bread of the dead papel picado - colorful tissue paper with intricate, festive designs cut out calavera - a skull; also a slang term for “daredevil” source: www.azcentral.com

ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHELSEA ROSS

Halloween celebrated harvest, connection between living, dead

Yellow marigolds will cover veeerr a v table draped in cloth, as a 4-foot4--fo 4 foo otttall altar full of photos, ssweet weeet w wee et bread and sugar skulls sit on on top top to of it in honor of deceased lloved ov o veed d ones. The Movimiento Estudianud diia anntil Chicano de Aztlan will bring briing ng Mexican culture back to to life life li fe in Chico in celebration off the th hee 3,000-year-old Mesoamerican rriica can tradition “Dia de los Muertos,” to oss,,” or Day of the Dead. MEChA will build a tradididi tional altar in the Studentt Services Center Plaza and table from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Nov. 2. They will sell sweet bread and give out pamphlets on the history of the day. The goal for the eventt is to educate students from other om o ot ther her he cultures about Dia de loss Muertos Muer Mu e tto os and teach them about the hee Mexih Mex xican culture, said Carla Moran, a Mo M ora ran, n, n, an internal affairs offi ffice ccer er for ffo or or MEChA. “It’s something that, as as a ccululul lture, we’d like to get out there,” utt tthe u here here he re,”” she said. “It’s a big thing ing in in n our ourr culture to celebrate the Day Day y of of the the Dead and honor our loved ones.” ved ed o nes. ne s.” s.” Dia de los Muertos b began ass a egan eg na way for Aztecs and MesoamerMessoa oame merrican civilizations to celebrate l b t death as a continuation of life, according to Azcentral.com. Since then, Spaniards Christianized the tradition by moving it from the month of August to All Saints Day and All Souls’ Day in November, according to the website. Families in the U.S. and in Mexico build altars or mini shrines for their deceased on tables that they fill with flowers, food, pictures and candles. Professor Gerardo Mireles, adviser for MEChA, encourages the club’s students to educate the Chico community on the day and explain why certain symbolic items are used when making an altar. “The idea was modified to meet Christian beliefs; however, some of the essential aspects of an Altar or Ofrenda are still the same,” Mireles said. “The Xempazuchitl flowers or marigolds are the flowers that are in bloom during time du urriing ing ng tthis his tti hi ime me in in southern sou so utthe herrn n Mexico.” M Me Mexi ex xiico co.” .” Some about So S ome ome me tthings hiing h ngs a ab bo ou ut Dia Dia Di ia Muertos have dee llos d oss M o ueert u rto oss h ave av remained rre em ma ain ined ed tthe he he same, ssa am mee,

D

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 Almendra Carpizo Features Editor

In a nutshell... OK to be frightfully sexy Soon we’ll see a flood of thigh-high stockings, low-cut shirts, visible bras and booty shorts. This isn’t your grandma’s Halloween – and it isn’t your little nephew’s, either. Halloween night, which is more like Halloween weekend, involves a parade of half-naked women in lingerie, men who are busy ogling them and a lot of alcohol. In order to avoid being a hypocrite, I will confess that II’m m one of those women. However, I am much tamer Howe in my wardrobe choices than some of the “costumes” that out there. are o Some people have a probSo lem with the way women’s Halloween costumes have Hall changed over the years. They chan may argue that it lacks crema ativity or sets feminism ati back, but I only agree with ba the first part. One of the aspects of feminism is that people should in have the right to make hav choices. If a woman chooses cho up the sex appeal and to amp a dress up as Sultry Stray, dondre ning a sexy cat costume, then nin she should go for it – just like sh any woman can choose to an dress up like a zombie bride. dr I understand that some feminists want to fight fe against the objectification of ag women and that men ogling w them may be disrespectful, th but my guess is that women b who are wearing the Smokin’ w Hot Fire Fighter costume are H probably OK with getting the p attention – if at least for that a one weekend. o Juliet Williams, an associate professor at UCLA, thinks dressing sexy is a celebration of self-objectification, which has a certain amount of empowerment, she said in an article in the Calgary Herald. When I went costume shopping with friends, one friend asked, “What’s the sluttiest thing I can wear?” However, after trying on more costumes than the number of cavities a kid gets after Halloween, she changed her mind. “I’m not a hoe!” she kept yelling as she tried on costume after costume. She wanted to release her inner vixen, but she realized it wasn’t inside the bag of the Naughty Nurse costume. I encourage women to be sexy for Halloween, whatever sexy may mean to them. However, there is only one problem I have with sexy Halloween costumes – the lack of creativity. If women want to be sexy then they should do it, but try to remain classy. Last year, I saw four women wearing only bras and boy shorts – they didn’t even attempt to throw on a pair of mouse ears. They were just walking through the streets of downtown in their mismatched underwear. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t show too much skin, but at least attempt to be creative in your costumes and find your inner vixen. I chose to be a magician last year, I might of had a tuxedo jacket and shorts, but my fishnet-stockings made me feel sexy. Almendra Carpizo can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com

DICTIONARY

WORD OF MOUTH >> What are you going to be for Halloween? n? “My two other girl roommates and I are going to be Peter Pan, Tinkerbell and Wendy. The next night we are going to be the Three Little Pigs.”

Halloweekend

[ha • low • wee • kend] When Halloween falls on a weekend, the entire weekend is then Halloweekend. “I have some mad parties to go to this Halloweekend.” source: urbandictionary.com

Kate Finegold sophomore | English

“Our roommates are all going to be woodland creatures, so I’m going to be a raccoon.”

“I’m going to be Forest Gump. I think it’s a unique choice because a lot of people wouldn’t think of being him.”

Kevin Crowe junior | marketing

Related Article:

See Thrift store costumes, D2

Allie Richter

senior | communications

“I’m going to be a Hooters girl because I have some of the stuff.”

Daniel Etheredge senior | business


D2 |

E ATT U F EF A URRE SE S

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

always online >> theorion.com

Thrifty costumes aren’t trick, but treat

the

face

Tasha Clark and Gina Pence THE ORION

On Halloween, the streets of Chico are filled with characters ranging from cheerleaders and bikers to flappers and Dracula. The possibilities are limitless – unless the $60 to $100 price tag is too much. Halloween is only a few days away. With costume prices rising p g as the

SE X COLUMN>>

Boshion Crandall Bosh SE S X COLUMNIST

Dream Works As she walked away in a fury, she grabbed her hand and pulled her close to her. She kissed her hard – her lips transformed the anger into passion. The kiss was hasty, but the emotion behind it wasn’t. Her lips softened, and they began to gently embrace one another. Clothes began to fall off as their bodies moved together rhythmically. The softness of her touch made her tremble. Just as she was about to climax, she abruptly shot out of bed and opened her eyes, noticing the blinding white glare coming through the window. The weight of reality was so startling she lay back down in defeat and closed her eyes, hoping to pick up where she left off. “Wow,” I responded to my friend’s account of her recent dream. “I wish I could get laid in my dreams.” It’s not that I don’t have sex dreams – I do. They are just depressingly PG-13. I’ve dreamed about a wildly attractive man who pulls me into him and gently caresses my back. He holds me so close, and I can feel his hot breath on my face. As he moves to kiss me, the dream camera pans to the window where drapes are lightly fluttering in the wind, mimicking a lowbudget soap opera. I can’t believe this is what my subconscious gives me to dream about. My sex life hasn’t been this lame since high school. Our minds have somewhat of a “dream censor,” according to an article by Dr. David Delvin and psychotherapist Christine Webber on netdoctor.co.uk. This repressor works similarly to what I call my “parental control censor.” It tends to clean things up a bit when necessary. However, Delvin and Webber think this censor is usually a result of someone with a very strict puritanical outlook, according to the article. Last time I checked, I wasn’t exactly the living model of morals, nor was I incredibly prude – unless my sixteen year old self has come back to haunt me. All I want is a nice, hot, steamy sex dream – maybe one that produces an orgasm – with a tall, dark and handsome man. I don’t think it is too much to ask. Sigmund Freud hypothesized that dreams were the mind’s arena to experiment with fantasies in an uninhibited way and that these trials of the imagination are directly reflective of what occupies our thoughts. Taking Freud’s findings into consideration, I have decided that I am determined to have a sex dream, no matter what. My plan is to put my preteen do-gooder self to rest and focus on every scandalous and dirty fantasy known to the average college student. Anyone else who has been sex-dream deprived can try if they like. Happy wet dreams. Boshion Crandall can be reached at sexcolumnist@theorion.com

Cheerleader Making it to the top – that’s the trick . With this costume, you’l l be the team’s first pic k. Costume set - $15

holiday weekend looms closer, students on a budget can have trouble finding costumes that are creative and affordable. Thrift stores around Chico can offer a quick solution to students struggling. Thrifty Bargains on 2432 Esplanade, offers students and the community affordable costumes and clothes. The aisles of clothes and accessories give g

customers the opportunity to get creative with their costumes, said employee Cassie Swanson. “We have costumes, we have pieces of costumes and we have a lot of stuff for students to use,” she said. “People will use clothes found here to piece together something creative.” Besides being more affordable than retail stores, shopping at thriftt

ter l ska al e r u Fig e ice hot h t his t Mel ng in t o . l e t nigh costum et - $12 s e tum Cos

stores can be a fun group activity. Searching for the perfect complimentary article of clothing or accessory can be an adventure. Another thrift store, Thrift Queen on 641 Nord Ave., has a collection of vintage and Halloween clothing and accessories, said Tanya Schuttenberg, owner of the store. She searches around Northern California all year to supply her shop with y cclothes and accessories for custtomers to take advantage of. “I’m a treasure hunter,” Schutttenberg said. “I love clothes, ccostumes and accessories. Instead of doing it for myself, I In do it for others.” d Giovanni LoCascio, a junior mechanical engineering major, m was looking for a Clark Kent cosw tume at Thrift Queen, he said. tu It was his first time visiting the store after hearing about it from sto friends. fri “I heard it’s packed with crazy stuff, so I came here,” LoCascio stu said. sai Tasha Clark can be reached at Tash tclark@theorion.com tcla Gina Pence can be reached at gpence@theorion.com

son el Jack f Micha the “King o ck is a h b T g . n Brin llowee his Ha oween cosPop” t ll a t. H he res r of a ut all t .99 thrille o t a e ill b - $8 tume w vinyl pants 9 $14.9 t a Black h a r o d .9 1 9 fe Black e jacket - $2 $1 m u t love Cos hite g One w

Thrift Stores • Salvation Army Thrift Store 1358 East Ave. (530) 343-1086 • Quality Thrift Store 1405 Park Ave. (530) 894-2326 • Salvation Army Thrift Store 700 Broadway St. (530) 342-2192 • Thrift Store 2234 Park Ave. (530) 894-0286 • Thrift Queen 641 Nord Ave. #B (530) 342-4282 • Arc Store 2020 Park Ave. (530) 343-3666

d Mai x y cos e y s l ea l this n r . With you ca he men t h , t i e tum up – w e - $10 n clea Costum - $5 ts T igh

Tapatio Man Spice up your Halloween night with Tapatio Ma n. Be the flavor of the party. Yellow jacket - $12 Red scarf - $2 Sombrero - $1 Bring your own jeans.

Super Mario Earn a tr ing eve eat by becom ryone’s plumb favoritte er. May e b e you’l the nig l end ht wit Blue lo h a real Peac ng ove h ralls - $ . Red ba 12 s Red lon eball hat - $ 4 g-sleev ed shir t -$ 5 Musta che - $ 4

Q&A with Thrift Queen store owner Tanya Schuttenberg knows all about being thrifty. She is the owner of Thrift Queen, on 641 Nord Ave., and is ready for a time where customers fly in and out the door – Halloween. Schuttenberg provides many clothing items and accessories for Halloween costume ideas. THE ORION • EMILY WALKER

ROYAL HIGHNESS Tanya Schuttenberg, owner of Thrift Queen, has been running her used clothing business for 10 years.

Q: How long have you had the thrift store and when it is open? A: It’s been around for 10 years

and is opened year-round. Halloween season attracts more customers – during this time the store is opened from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

shopping at 1,000 places. Q: Do you give advice on costumes to customers? A: I have lists of ideas for girls and guys.

Q: What is your store filled with? A: The store is filled with vintage, Halloween clothing and accessories, which I collect all year around Northern California. Shopping here is like

Q: Do you ever run out of stock? A: Never. I have back-up stock. I still have items after Halloween is over. - Compiled by Tasha Clark

Paranormal activity rumors haunt Chico PHOTO • KENNEDY COKER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION • JEB DRAPER

GHOSTLY SIGHTINGS It is rumored that the spirit of an older woman has been seen sitting in the balcony seats and moving around above the stage of Laxson Auditorium. Ally Dukkers STAFF WRITER

Nightmares, lights flickering, clocks stopping at 3:37 a.m. and light bulbs shattering – what sounds like scenes from “Paranormal Activity” are actual accounts of a supernatural presence from witnesses on campus and around Chico. Jodi Foster moved to Chico from Montana in 2000 with her 3-year-old daughter and found a home at 125 Parmac Road in the Walnut Apartments, she said. The night before she moved in,

however, she had a dream that told her not to live there. She ignored the dream, then experienced paranormal activity her first night in the apartment, she said. At night, lights would flicker and the four clocks in her apartment would suddenly stop at 3:37 a.m. “I thought, ‘Am I nuts?’” Foster said. “‘Do I need medication?’” Foster had reoccurring dreams of a girl being kidnapped and taken to a rural field, she said. Foster also had several friends stay over who witnessed the presence of a spirit in her

apartment. Later, she found out that her dreams were similar to a case of a missing girl named Marie Elizabeth Spannhake, who had been abducted in 1976, Foster said. Her dreams proved to be in actual relation to the case, and Foster worked with the Chico Police Department to locate the body of Spannhake. Sgt. Rob Merrifield was the detective on the Spannhake case and remembers meeting with her to share information, he said. “Nothing was produced from

the case, however,” Merrifield said. Foster only stayed in the apartment 30 days before moving out, Foster said. After this experience, she decided to use her predictive thoughts and dreams to help others. “I have psychic abilities,” Foster said. She views her abilities as a gift and is now working on her book “A Perfect Miracle,” which will be published in the beginning of 2011, she said. Foster also helps others by doing psychic readings when they witness

a haunting. “I have a gift, I use it to help other people,” Foster said. “It was not given to me to better my own life. It is like being a doctor – a doctor can’t operate on themselves.” She recently helped The Salvation Army, whose employees thought their storage room was being haunted by a demon, she said. It has been said that other activities have taken place on campus, and there is a rumor that the sculpture in front of >> please see HAUNTED | D5


always online >> theorion.com

LOOKING BACK >>

c. 1975

c. 1980

c. 1980

E ATT U F EF A URRE SE S

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010 |

1997 | Chico State helps provide safe trick-or-treating for kids THEN “Campus offers Halloween alternative for kids” Oct. 29, 1997 Halloween in Chico has a rich tradition of crazy parties and plenty of entertainment for adults. However, for children who live in Chico, the opportunities for trick-or-treating can sometimes be limited. Chico State hosted the 13th Annual Halloween Carnival Oct. 31, 1997, to give families a

safe Halloween experience. The 1996 Halloween carnival, which hosted 2,000 kids, was an opportunity for the campus to give back to the community, said Jodi Wall, formerly of A.S. Programming. “It helps establish a good reputation for the school and it’s a way we can give back to the community,” Wall said. Giving children a safe place to have fun was one of the priorities of the carnival. During Halloween weekend,

the police department was forced to focus on the south side of Chico where the parties were, said Mike O’Brien of the Chico Police Department, who is now a lieutenant. By having an event that was catered to children, it gave them a safe place to enjoy Halloween. “This is a controlled, safe event for kids,” O’Brien said. “Parents know where the candy is coming from and they don’t have to send their kids into unfriendly neighborhoods.”

c. 1983

c. 1986 PHOTO COURTESY OF • DOWNTOWN CHICO BUSINESS ASSOCIATION

TRICK-OR-TREAT IN CHICO STREETS The Downtown Chico Business Association, Associated Students and community help put on the Annual Treat Street to provide safe trick-or-treatting for children.

c. 1995

&

Pumpkin drop demonstrates Galileo’s theory

c. 1985

c. 1988

QA

NOW The 11th Annual Treat Street event, which replaced the carnival, now includes the downtown business area while serving younger members of the community. Children 12 and younger are invited to go to downtown from 2 to 5 p.m. on Sunday to trick-ortreat in Chico stores. In addition to trick-or-treating, a costume contest, a

bounce house and food vendors will entertain the young participants. The Downtown Chico Business Association, along with sponsors from Associated Students, Chico State and the community, put together the event for children and the community, said Stephanie Yunker, event coordinator for the Downtown Chico Business Association. “It’s for the kids who may not be able to go out after dark, or who may live in bad areas and

chances to trick-or-treat may be limited,” she said. In the past, police discouraged people from going downtown because of raucous parties. The Downtown Chico Business Association worked to bring a better tradition to the downtown area and to encourage people to shop downtown. “Instead of shutting it down, we tried turning it around,” Yunker said. -Compiled by Gina Pence

PHOTO COURTESY OF• SOCIETY OF PHYSICS STUDENTS

PUMPKIN SMASH, BASH The 2009 Pumpkin Drop by Butte Hall.

Campus Spotlight:

c. 1981

c. 1988

The 23rd annual Pumpkin Drop will be held Thursday on the south side of Butte Hall by members of the Society of Physics Students, said David Kagan, chairman of the department of science education. Society of Physics Students will reenact Galileo Galilei’s Law of Falling Bodies, which he demonstrated by climbing to the top of the Tower of Pisa to show that a large ball and a small ball would hit the ground at the same time. Q: What is the purpose of the pumpkin drop? A: They want to share their love of science with our community by sharing the story of the development of the theory of gravity through the years. Q: How many pumpkins

are dropped? A: About 25. Q: Was it hard to get permission to do this? A: You might think it would be hard, but the wonderful thing about this university is that everyone is here to help students with their educational goals. The pumpkin drop requires the efforts of people from Facilities Management and Services, Environmental Health and Safety, Risk Management, University Police and many others. Without their help and positive attitudes, the pumpkin drop would simply not be possible. Q: Whose idea was this? A: Two students came up with this idea – Dave Snyder and Ben Catching. They were back here for the 20th annual Pumpkin Drop and threw out the first pumpkins. Q: Where do you get the pumpkins from? A: We buy them. Anyone want to donate them to us? Q: What time will the pumpkins be dropped? A: High noon – that’s when the pumpkins meet their maker! Q: Is it always in the same spot? A: The original Pumpkin Drop was in the breezeway of the library. When the crowds grew too large, it was moved to Butte Hall. Q: Will there be a crowd? A: About 300 people. -Compiled by Ally Dukkers

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D4 |

F E AT U R E S

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 2010

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STAFF COMMENTARY >>

Decorating for Halloween cheap, fun Sarah Brown STAFF WRITER

Trying to decorate for Halloween on a student budget can be a trick more than a treat. I decided to accept the challenge – not for my sake alone, but for the sake of the entire student body.

GHOST BUSTER Light the way by making this lantern out of a paper bag, white construction paper, glue and scissors.

First step: Decide on a theme Halloween decorating isn’t a time to be eclectic. Choosing a theme helps narrow down choices and keeps your focus on the necessary items. Obviously there’s the fear factor to consider first. Stores offer lots of scary items for your haunted house, gothic or basic Halloween decor. It’s easy to find witches, bones, spiders and more at nearly every store you visit. If fear isn’t your thing, you can opt for cute and whimsical or choose the natural, autumn look. I chose the latter because it can be stretched over a longer period of time into Thanksgiving.

Second step: Browse for ideas Get your hands on ads, catalogs, magazines and Google searches to study decoratating ideas. This really helps get the creative juices flowing and nd d assists you in thinking outside de the box. Third step: Start with what you u have I think I have an advan-tage here over most students because I’ve lived in town for several years, giving me time to collect a plethora of vases, jars and random things that can be used for my project. However, I don’t have many roommates to share the cost of decorating, which will go a long way for most students. I used yellow and orange fabric to cover a coffee table and entertainment center, then set out vases and baskets of varying sizes. I filled a large vase about one-fourth full of dried red, black and white beans. I also set a variety of dried grasses in the vase that resulted in a pleasing centerpiece. Fallen leaves from different trees are scattered on the entertainment center, along with a large, white bowl full of grasses

and red berries. At this point, the only thing I spent money on was a dollar for or a bag of red kidney ne ey beans. s

HOUSE OF TERROR Don’t buy a pumpkin this year, just use a paper bag, black and yellow construction paper, glue and scissors, and build an eerie home. If you’re going for a haunted theme, find fallen branches and paint them black, then hang tissue ghosts or dried-apple skulls on them. Use black yarn for webs or brown nylons stuffed with paper and painted to look like a dead man’s head.

Cut bat shapes from black paper and tape them all over your porch and use paper punchers to create confetti. Fourth step: Go Shopping To avoid spending more than is necessary, prioritize the things you really need for your ttheme. Pumpkins of varying ssizes are likely to be on that list. li For my autumn theme, I needed pumpkins, flowers ne and a door decoration. I was an pleased with a door wreath I ple found at Dollar Tree. It has a litfou tle scarecrow swinging on the wreath and a banner that reads, wre “Welcome.” “We Overall, I ended up buying O candy, flowers, red beans and 14 pumpkins that range from miniature to large. The total cost was about $30. The trick was to cut my shopping list in half and be happy with what I ended up with. The treat is that I have a decorated home fitting for both Halloween and Thanksgiving.

SACK BOY Find a burlap sack, stuff it with old newspapers, tie with ribbon (or rubber band), use key tags for eyes by coloring in with Sharpie, draw mouth and add a splash of red paint.

Sarah Brown can be reached at sbrown@theorion.com

Where to shop: Thrift Stores Pro: Affordable options. Con: Limited options. Dollar Stores Pro: Affordable options. Con: Sometimes low quality isn’t worth it. Wal-Mart Pro: Good deal on fog machines. Con: High volume of shoppers may buy all the good stuff. WinCo Pro: The bulk-candy factor. Con: Limited options on other Halloween decor. Pumpkins may not be as cheap as other places. Michaels Pro: Best selection of themes. Con: Only coupons and sales make it affordable.

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time the one his n e e it “Hallow ck eyeliner w nless an ro U c . s y k u o g a ird lo ting we se then out get d becau day.” n a b a in n every he is allowee H e k li it’s s w Kern Matthe administration busines

HISTORY: Began in ’20s continued from D1

were meant to represent the harvest, said senior Nick Kokinos, a management information systems major and Halloween enthusiast. The Halloween festivals were meant to mark the separation of harvesting season and winter – black is associated with death, while orange represents the color of autumn and the harvest. Trick-or-treating has its roots in an ancient practice known as “going-a-souling,” when people seeking to protect themselves from unfriendly spirits would wear costume disguises – usually animal furs and head pieces – so the menacing spirits would think the people were dead, according to the History Channel website. It is presumed that All Saints Day and Halloween were brought to America by Western European settlers and were celebrated by the late 17th century, Collins said. It is now

celebrated in much of the world as the adoption of Western cultural practices increases. The traditional Halloween – as people practice it today – didn’t make its mark on the U.S. until the 1920s and 1930s, when Halloween became a community-centered holiday, according to the History Channel website. The practice of trick-or-treating was revived between 1920 and 1950. Pumpkin carving is also a popular part of modern America’s Halloween celebration. The practice originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed “Stingy Jack,” according to the History Channel website. As the myth goes, Stingy Jack invited the devil to have a drink with him. Jack tricked the devil, who then wouldn’t allow Jack’s entrance into hell. Jack was sent off into the dark night with only a burning coal to light his way, according to the website. He put the coal

into a carved-out turnip and has been roaming the Earth with it ever since. The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as “jack of the lantern,” or jack-o’-lantern. The original jack-o’-lanterns were carved from turnips, potatoes or beets, according to the website. This tradition carries on today with the yearly carving of pumpkins. Senior Kyle Holmquist, an applied computer graphics major, thinks that the traditional practices of the original Halloween traditions should be revived, he said. “Over the years, Halloween has become more about who has the hottest costume, not the most realistic – and for children, who has the largest bag of candy,” Holmquist said. “I don’t see why the traditional values of Halloween can’t be brought back. Kelly Smith can be reached at ksmith@theorion.com

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Ayres Hall is haunted. Summer Armstrong, administrative support assistant for the department of art and art history, is skeptical of this, she said. She suspects this myth is derived from the actual story behind the female statue that is holding a little boy up to the heavens. The artist, Susan Bardin, designed the sculpture as a memorial for her cousin who went missing in Florida, Armstrong said. Inside the cement are some of her cousin’s clothes and a love letter from his wife. “The artist hoped that the sculpture would help him to live in the hearts of his family, even

if his body was never found,” she said. Ayres is not the only place on campus that has suspected a spiritual presence. Rumor has it that the ghost of an older woman has been seen sitting in the balcony seats of the Laxson Auditorium. Dan Goodsell, performance outreach coordinator, was skeptical until he witnessed a suspicious incident in the auditorium, he said. Four years ago, all the seats and carpets in the auditorium were being redone, he said. Goodsell and colleagues were deciding on a new carpet, and Goodsell laid out a sample and asked if it was a good choice. Immediately after he did so, a

light bulb in one of the chandeliers in the balcony broke, shattering over the seats. “That’s when I decided to find another carpet sample,” Goodsell said. “Imagine what would have happened if we had chose that carpet – people would have been thrown off the balcony.” The experiences he’s heard of the old woman’s ghost are not threatening, he said. She just moves around above the stage. “Stories like mine add to the rumors,” Goodsell said. “It’s either a coincidence or evidence of something to look out for.” Ally Dukkers can be reached at adukkers@theorion.com

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