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Chico State’s Independent Student Newspaper since 1975

MAKING A SPLASH

WEEKLY WEBCAST

The 1078 Gallery exhibit featured water media art by local artists. Story c1

A summary of this week’s top headlines. Video theorion.com/multimedia

VOLUME 67 ISSUE 8

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

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Protesters occupy downtown Chico

CAMPUS >>

Chico State scholarship applications are now available online for the 2012-2013 school year. Scholarships are awarded each year to qualified students who need financial help, participate in clubs and organizations, maintain a good GPA and volunteer in the community. Applications can be found online at www.csuchico. edu/fa and are due by midnight Dec. 15.

To put it in its most simple terms, we are protesting greed.

MICHAEL HILL Occupy Chico leader

on across the United States, on Wall Street and in New York City,” said Travis Santana, a Chico resident and one of the leaders of the Occupy Chico branch of the movement. “We are making a stance for ending corporatism in our government.” About 100 to 150 protesters took up positions at intersections near U.S. Bank, Bank of America and Chase and yelled in unison, “The banks got bailed out, we got sold out.” Demonstrators were unified in their displeasure with government and the banks.

Andre Byik Juniper Rose THE ORION

Chico has been occupied. A nationwide movement dubbed Occupy Wall Street saw an incarnation in Chico on Saturday as demonstrators rallied in front of banks downtown. Protesters gathered from about 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., raising signs and yelling chants as some passing motorists honked in support, and others did so to drown out the demonstrators. “We are in solidarity with the occupancies that are going

Some held signs reading “We are the 99 percent,” “Occupy Chico,” and “Everything is OK, go back to sleep.” Passers-by, some with children in strollers, negotiated the cramped sidewalks downtown. “To put it in its most simple terms, we are protesting greed,” said Michael Hill, a leader of Occupy Chico. “We are protesting a monetary system that puts money and profits on a level of higher importance than life.” As demonstrators stopped in front of Chase, one protester was yelling “You got sold out”

to passing motorists. “We need a government that’s paying attention to the needs of average people,” said John Nipert, a first-year in Butte College’s paramedic program. “If I could get a job that wasn’t just a summer job, I’d be pretty stoked.” Nipert was laid off from his summer job three weeks ago, and it was the first demonstration he participated in, he said. “It’s the economy, stupid,” he said. “Isn’t that what Clinton said?” The protesters have good >> please see OCCUPY | A7

Pepper spray attacker still sought after street assaults

Source: Advancement Communication and Education Staff

Juniper Rose STAFF WRITER

A Pride march will be occurring Friday for Queer Week. The march will be from 5 to 6 p.m. in Trinity Commons. The week’s activities will represent how the LGBTQ community aims for equality among its allies. Source: Student Announcements

Check out the festivities from this weekend. Story A3

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

FESTIVE DANCE Professor Vern Andrews and alumna Karin Hilgeman polka during Sierra Nevada’s Oktoberfest.

Fashion design company Chikoko is having a fashion show displaying its cirque-

styled clothing to the sound of beats on Oct. 21 at Cal Skate. The show is sure to amaze with the eclectic styles that are presented in this collection. Source: Artoberfest.org

Judge gives 7 year sentence for stabbing “I feel relieved,” Igbineweka said. “I feel it was a victory for students in general.” Police were able to link DNA that was found THE ORION on the knife used in the assault to Aguilar, A 21-year-old man was sentenced to seven and he was named a suspect in the stabbing years in prison for the stabbing of for- in January 2011. A statewide manhunt for Aguilar commenced as he remained mer Associated Students President out of the area until August when he Joseph Igbineweka. turned himself in. Jorge Ceja Aguilar of Chico was He was then held in a county jail, sentenced to the upper term of four awaiting his Oct. 4 sentencing. years for assault with a deadly Justice or Igbineweka was present for Aguweapon and three years for inflicno justice, ilar’s sentencing, and said it was tion of great bodily injury, for a total important to get his side of the story of seven years in state prison, said I was on the record. Mike Ramsey, Butte County district already “I know what happened that night,” attorney. Aguilar pleaded no contest to fel- moving on he said. “Justice or no justice, I was with my already moving on with my life. The ony charges of assault with a deadly system worked for me.” weapon and pleaded guilty to an life. Igbineweka said there are many allegation of causing great bodily victims of violent crimes that don’t injury, said Niels Bringsjord, deputy JOSEPH receive justice, and he attributes the district attorney. IGBINEWEKA success of his case to the Chico com“That is a strike under the laws of Former A.S. munity and Chico State. California,” Bringsjord said. “He will President “I can’t say thanks enough,” he spend his time in state prison rather said. than county jail.” Going forward, Igbineweka plans Aguilar stabbed Igbineweka seven times on April 18, 2010. Police initially to go back to school next year. “I made it my priority to go to law school,” arrested a “person of interest” for a hate crime, but a lack of evidence forced that per- he said. son’s release. After surgery and physical therapy, Igbin- Andre Byik can be reached at eweka, who now lives in San Francisco, was abyik@theorion.com left with scars and only partial use of his Juniper Rose can be reached at left hand. jrose@theorion.com Andre Byik Juniper Rose

“ “

Former Celtic Woman singer Orla Fallon will be performing

at 7:30 p.m. Oct 19 at Laxson Auditorium. Fallon has been said to have the “voice of an angel” and sings Irish style music. The event will include Irish jigs and numerous love songs. Source: Chico Performances

INDEX >>

A pepper spray attacker is still on the loose more than two weeks after his last reported attack on a Chico State student. Chico police officers are patroling the southcampus area where the attacks on two female Chico State students took place, said Chico police Sgt. Rob Merrifield. Other law enforcement agencies have been informed of the case and the suspect’s description, and are also on the look out for him. Despite search efforts, there has been no progress toward finding the attacker, Merrifield said. Gathering a better idea of who the attacker is would help to find him, however lack of information makes it difficult to make any reliable assumptions, he said. “All we know is it was a white male in his early 20s about 6 feet tall and wearing a dark hoodie,” Merrifield said. Still, Chico police are doing their best to locate and arrest the attacker before he is able to do it again, he said. Because the attacker has focused on two different areas in the same neighborhood, it is likely that he either lives in or is comfortable with that area, Merrifield said. Either that, or he has been targeting the area because it is where the type of victims he is looking for would primarily be. Based on his past attacks, the attacker is targeting females who are alone and in their late teens or early 20s, Merrifield said. The attacker is most likely targeting these people for the purpose of kidnapping, and the logical reason for kidnapping in this case would be sexual assault, Merrifield said. Typically attackers in these types of scenarios are socially incompetent, Merrifield said. “A case like this where he doesn’t try to talk a woman into doing anything but just goes right to trying to disable them could be an indication that the attacker isn’t comfortable talking to women or doesn’t feel like he could talk them into a position where he could take advantage of them,” Merrifield said. Some have suggested that the attacks may be gang related, said one of the victims, a sophomore communications major who was attacked Sept. 25 on Hazel Street. “The whole scenario — the nice car, totally blacked out and set for something, the group of guys in the car — leads a lot of people to think it is some sort of gang initiation,” the woman said. “There were at least three people in the car, and honestly, I think that they were going to kidnap me, and then probably gang rape me and leave me.” The victim said she thinks the only reason she was able to get away is because she didn’t react how the man expected. “I just had that mind set like ‘This is not happening,’” the victim said. “I was on the ground kicking him, and as I jumped up and shoved him I remember registering, ‘Oh, he’s surprised.’” While only two attacks were on the police >> please see ATTACKS | A7

INSIDE >>

World News

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Daily Dose

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Volleyball team’s winning streak continues as Makenzie Snyder joins the 1000th kill club as the sixth Wildcat in the programs history. Story B2

Features Up ‘til Dawn prepares students for November’s letter writing fundraiser. Story D1

Opinion Former Orion managing editor discusses his struggle with bipolar disorder. Story A10


A2 |

NATION >>

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WORLD NEWS >>

A federal appeals court denied a request from a coaliton of civil rights groups and the U.S. Department of Justice to stop parts of a controversial Alabama immigration law from going into effect. One provision of the law includes having police determine whether one is an illegal immigrant or citizen in any legal stop or detention. The law has been referred to as the strictest anti-immigration law in the nation.

Nigeria — Three former state governors have been arrested for allegedly embezzling funds up to $615 million. The former governors are of Ogun, Oyo and Nasarawa and are likely to appear in court this week. State governors enjoy huge powers and correspondents say the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission has made high-profile arrests before but has found it hard to make charges stick. Source: BBC

Veracruz, Mexico — Sixtyseven bodies were found by the Mexican navy who arrested eight people in connection with two incidents involving the deaths. These eight suspects are being called “Zeta Killers” based on an Internet video of men stating they are a vigilante group against the Zetas cartel. Mexican officials have instead identified the men as members of the Jalisco New Generation cartel. Source: CNN International

United Kingdom — “The Human Centipede 2” film was denied rating by the British Board of Film Classification but has recently been rated 18, following cuts made to the film. The two minutes and 37 seconds of cuts addressed all the concerns of the BBFC, which included “sexual violence, graphic gore and the possibility of breach of the law relating to obscenity.” Source: BBC

Oslo, Norway — The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to three women who will share the award. The winners are Ellen JohnsonSirleaf, the first woman elected head of state in Africa, Leymah Gbowee, who promoted efforts to end Liberia’s civil war, and Tawakul Karman of Yemen, who called her honor “a victory for the Arab Spring.” The three women will be presented with the prize in Oslo on Dec. 10. Source: Reuters

Madrid, Spain — A Spanish bullfighter will likely lose sight of his left eye after a bull’s left horn ripped into his face resulting in eye, bone, muscle and skin damage. Juan Jose Padilla was reported as stable by hospital officials, however surgeons have not been able to repair a severed facial nerve. It has been reported that Padilla will likely suffer facial paralysis. Source: Associated Press

Source: CNN

Safety cited as new gate blocks BMU driveway Sam Kelly STAFF WRITER

In Topeka, Kan., people suspected of domestic battery have been neither charged nor prosecuted as of Sept. 8. As a result of severe budget cuts, the district attorney said the office no longer has the funds necessary to prosecute any of the city’s misdemeanors. The Topeka City Council will soon vote on a measure that would remove domestic battery from the list of crimes that are currently illegal in the city. Source: Yahoo! News

CALIFORNIA >>

The installation of a new gate intended to control access at the Hazel Street driveway will restrict students from being dropped off between the Bell Memorial Union and the Student Services Center. The gate costs about $20,000 and will provide safety and order to a driveway that sees roughly 50 to 60 deliveries to the BMU each week, said David Buckley, Associated Students executive director. “If somebody were to be seriously injured, $20,000 is well worth it,” Buckley said. “I really look at it from a safety perspective.” Laurel Meyer, a senior sociology major, said she and her friends have been dropped off in the area before and thinks the driveway is safer because there is not a busy street to cross. “I can see why they would be concerned for pedestrians,” she said. “But I haven’t seen any near accidents there before.” Two companies, Valley Communications Inc. and Gate Pro, worked to complete the parking barrier gate, which involved cutting into the pavement to lay

sensor wires and running the cables to make the pulley system necessary to lift the gate. The gate was near completion Friday as contractors installed the necessary components for the gate to function, said James Jimerson, lead technician for Valley Communications, Inc. The gate was put into use Monday. Everyone who needs access to the gate has to get a proximity card, Buckley said. The card must be held near the sensor to open the gate There are other areas around campus where it is suitable and safe to be dropped off besides the Hazel Street driveway, Buckley said. The loop on Warner Street across from the parking garage is an ideal spot to drop off students. “So you maybe have to walk an extra 80 feet to get to the library,” he said. “Personally I think that’s probably the best drop off location.” The loop takes more time because of the light and the traffic, and the driveway is still the most convenient drop-off spot, especially in the rain, Meyer said.

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

RESTRICTED ACCESS A new gate between the Student Services Center and the Bell Memorial Union was installed to prevent people from being dropped off. The gate was about $20,000.

Sam Kelly can be reached at skelly@theorion.com

Fiscal fury after bank signals $5 debit fee Molly Rose Livingston STAFF WRITER

Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed a law banning the sale, possession and distribution of shark fins. The removal of fins from sharks causes harm to the health of the ocean and has contributed to the considerable reduction of some shark populations, Brown said. Both Oregon and Washington have put forth comparable bans. The ban will go into effect Jan. 1, 2013. For more on bills passed this weekend go to A6. Source: San Francisco Chronicle

THE ORION •MICHELLE REINMUTH

PAYING UP Bank of America customers found out they will have to pay $60 annually if they want to keep using their debit cards on a regular basis.

In response to Bank of America’s recent announcement that they will charge customers $5 a month for debit card usage, many are considering putting their money elsewhere. “I’ll probably go to Chase,” said Eric Yust, a senior civil engineering major. Yust, who uses his debit card more than cash, will put the $60 a year toward food and gas instead, he said. “I don’t think it’s unfair,” Yust said. “They can charge whatever they want. But I think they’re going to lose a lot of customers.” It is not just students that are opposed to the new fee. President Barack Obama voiced his disapproval of the new charge in an interview with ABC News last week, saying it was “not good business practice.” A new rule, referred to as

the Durbin Amendment, has with recent regulations,” she limited the amount banks can said. “When customers have charge for a debit card transac- questions about the fee, we tion. Debit card fees, are making sure they which used to averunderstand the value age 44 cents before and convenience of the new rule, can now debit cards.” be a maximum of only There are ways to They can avoid the charge, Riess 21 cents plus .05 percharge cent of the transaction. said. The changes went into “Customers can whatever effect on Oct. 1. avoid the fee by getthey want. The new rule is ting cash at the ATM, expected to cost banks But I think which is free,” she they’re more than $6 billion said. “Also by using a year, which means checks.” going new costs for customIf people do not use to lot of ers in order to make their debit card fee in up for the lost revenue customers. any given month they from interchange fees, will not be charged, according to an artiRiess said. ERIC YUST cle in The New York The charges are Senior civil engineering major Times. set to begin early Betty Riess, a next year, Riess said. spokesperson for Bank Account holders will of America, said her company is be notified 30 days before the dedicated to being transparent charges begin. about the new charges. “The economics of offer- Molly Rose Livingston can be reached at ing a debit card have changed mlivingston@theorion.com

“ “

Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck announced changes to his command structure Monday in response to a retiring deputy chief and financial difficulties. The city’s ongoing financial difficulties have slowed the pace of regular promotions to a crawl. Source: Los Angeles Times.

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A3 PROST Guests at Sierra Nevada’s second annual Oktoberfest Friday lift their mugs in celebration. The brewery debuted their Sidecar Amber Ale Friday and served seven additional locally brewed beers, including the popular draft named Oktoberfest. Visitors sit at community tables to match the setting of an authentic Oktoberfest festival.

OKTOBERFEST PHOTOS BY • FRANK REBELO

Griffin Rogers A SST. NE WS EDITOR

Polka pounded through a tent the size of an aircraft hanger as guests raised their glasses for cheers during Sierra Nevada’s second annual Oktoberfest Friday and Saturday evening. Brian Grossman, general manager and son of Sierra Nevada owner Ken Grossman, grabbed a genuine stein off a beer barrel, flipped the silver top and took two long swallows of amber colored beer, carefully avoiding a spill on his lederhosen. “And for the pork I’ve got this,” he said proudly, unhinging a sheath from his hip with an intricate handle protruding out the top. “A bore tusk knife. I’ve been waiting for a time to use this.” The Weyermann family, owners of the Weyermann Speciality Malting Company in Bamberg, Germany, gave the knife to Grossman after a visit. It wasn’t until Sierra Nevada’s Oktoberfest that an appropriate opportunity presented itself. Many of the guests were dressed in similar traditional German clothing, minus the bore tusk knife, and rolled up to the event in carts pulled by tractors. Once inside, visitors either found a seat at one of the long, vertical tables in the center of the tent or took part in eating, drinking and other festivities. “There is no halfway in this crowd,” Grossman said. Bill Manly, communications coordinator, said Sierra Nevada tried to maintain an atmosphere for Oktoberfest that was similar to the festivals held in Germany. “It’s kind of a natural fit for us since we are a part of the beer culture,” he said. Sierra Nevada’s Sidecar Amber Ale CHEERS FOR BEERS Attendees of Sierra Nevada’s Oktoberfest were able to drink Sidecar Amber Ale, which made its debut, and experience seven additional beers that were pumped from 30 taps.

HEATING UP Glassblower Mark Del Fava molds an object after pulling it away from the heat during Sierra Nevada’s second annual Oktoberfest. Glass blowing demonstrations were held throughout the event for the entertainment of onlookers, who watched from bleachers setup around the area. PIG OUT A pig carcass rests on a table near Oktoberfest’s dinner buffet. Four whole pigs were used for the event. They were deboned courtesy of Chico Locker and Sausage Co. Inc. Each pig was marinated using a case of Sierra Nevada Porter.

made its debut during the festival Friday, and patrons got to experience seven additional beers, all pumping out of three trailers and about 30 taps. However, Oktoberfest guests were exposed to other cultures besides drinking. Several bands played during the festival, including the hardcore polka band Polkacide and the popular headlining band MarchFourth Marching Band. If ticket-buyers didn’t want to dance, they could watch glass blowing demonstrations at the opposite end of the tent. Dinner was included in the $40 dollar ticket price for one evening of entertainment. Four whole pigs were deboned and marinated using a case of Porter for each hog. German potato salad, sausage and sauerkraut salad accompanied the pork as well. “No ones coming to Oktoberfest unless they have a deep-seeded appreciation for swine,” Manly said. Holding Oktoberfest on the brewery’s Estate-hops field creates a great opportunity to open up and let Chicoans enjoy the facility, Manly said. Sierra Nevada has become a big part of the community and is looking for new ways to interact with residents. This year’s festival nearly doubled in size since its debut last year. The event was such a success in 2010 that a decision was made to expand Oktoberfest to two days instead of one. This means more bands played and more tickets were sold. Saturday tickets were sold out nearly 10 days before the event, and about 1,500 tickets were sold for Friday, Manly said. The brewery planned to sell no more than 2,000 tickets each day. Griffin Rogers can be reached at grogers@theorion.com

POLKA PARADISE Neil “the Basa” Kaitner plays the clarinet wearing his leather lederhosen. Several bands played at Oktoberfest Friday and Saturday, including hardcore punk band “Polkacide” and the popular headlining band “MarchFourth Marching Band.” An area is cleared near the stage so visitors can dance or participate in the chicken dance.


A4 |

POLICE BLOTTER Information cited directly from Chico Police Department or University Police Department. University Police Wednesday, 4:07 p.m.: Elevator malfunction reported at Meriam Library. “Elevator one. Poor reception, reporting party indicated elevator not moving. Two inside.”

Chico Police Friday, 12:19 a.m.: Drunk in public reported on the 600 block of West Sixth Street. “Subject in car unable to get out due to level of intoxication.” Friday, 1:56 a.m.: Noise complaint reported on the 1000 block of Mechoopda Street. “Group outside being loud and smoking marijuana. All subjects are near a truck/sitting in the back of the truck.”

Thursday, 2:20 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported at Trinity Hall. “Telling reporting party about the voices in his head and God telling him to do things.” Saturday, 12:47 a.m.: Robbery reported at Meriam Library breezeway. “Advised a male adult with gray hoodie and baggy jeans last seen running northbound on Ivy Street from Student Services Center stole their camera.”

Saturday, 12:46 a.m.: Fight reported on the 400 block of West Sixth Street. “Possible gun. Reporting party heard that someone had a gun, no description. Started fighting again. Intersection filled with subjects.” Saturday, 1:26 a.m.: Noise complaint reported on the 400 block of West 10th Street. “Party is getting out of control. Not so much with noise, but subjects are jumping over fences into reporting party’s yard, etc. Worried about property getting damaged.”

Saturday, 2:12 a.m.: Assist other agency reported on the 100 block of Cherry Street. “Assist Chico Police Department with fight in front of WREC.”

Saturday, 1:31 a.m.: Disturbance reported on the 1200 block of Warner Street. “Vehicle reckless in area, almost hit the reporting party and then parked. When subjects exited the vehicle they started yelling racial slurs at the reporting party. Suspect now on porch of residence near corner.”

Subject in car unable to get out due to level of intoxication.

FRIDAY, 12:19 A.M. Chico police records

Saturday, 2:35 a.m.: Suspicious circumstances reported at University Police lot. “Unknown subject pushed event golf cart into vehicle.” Saturday, 3:25 a.m.: Narcotics violation reported at Esken Hall. “Resident adviser advising smell of marijuana and will meet officer in lobby.” Sunday, 10:51 a.m.: Grand theft reported at the soccer stadium. “Advertising signs stolen, KZFR news sign and KNVN sign.”

Saturday, 3:33 p.m.: Knife reported on the 1000 block of Humboldt Avenue. “Reporting party is passerby and observed group of eight or so juveniles whistling at a vehicle that was driving by. Vehicle slowed down and one juvenile pulled a hunting knife from his pants and waved it at the vehicle. Reporting party thinks it was some sort of gang interaction.” Saturday, 9:39 p.m.: Drunk in public reported on the 300 block of Main Street. “Very intoxicated female causing disturbance. Attempting to fight with people at pizza place.” -compiled by Andre Byik

Potential consolidation worry students Katherine Deaton STAFF WRITER

In an attempt to save money, Chico State plans to reorganize departments, schools and programs within the university into fewer colleges. University officials held informative meetings last week to engage students, faculty and staff in discussions about the possible ways to restructure the school, although several faculty members continue to fear for the future of their departments. The biggest concern is the speed of the process, said Mike Kotar, chair of faculty and student policies for the Academic Senate. Those that wish to submit a model will have two weeks to do so before the models are reviewed by the academic reorganization team. Nikki MacDougall, Associate Students director of University Affairs, said faculty are also concerned with job security and the future of their departments. Faculty members of the College of Agriculture voiced concerns for staff during the Oct. 5 Q&A session. Sandra Flake, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, said turnover is a continuing occurrence and is not a part of the reorganization. “This is not about staff losing jobs,” Flake said. The opportunity to reorganize is available because of two open deanship positions, Flake said. Instead of hiring a dean for the existing College of Business and for the College of Communication and Education, Chico State has decided to realign schools into fewer colleges, which will result in administrative savings of roughly $500,000 for each eliminated college, she said. “We are estimating based on the cost of salaries, benefits and operations expenses of an ‘average college dean’s office,’” Flake said. “When we get further in the process, we should be able to estimate more precisely.” Despite the advantage of potential savings, some students are still concerned about the changes. MacDougall has spoken with many students who want to know if their major will be affected once the process is complete, she said. Students should know the reorganization of colleges does not mean current student degrees and degree paths will be altered or removed, Flake said. Administrators are close to a partnership in the master’s program in agriculture where students can take classes from other colleges within Chico State’s online program. This may extend to undergraduate programs as well, she said. Still, keeping students involved in the process is a priority for Associated Students. “When you look at other committees that we’re on … it’s interesting that when the

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college is being reorganized there aren’t any students on the board,” MacDougall said. Members of the academic re-evaluation team include Flake, William Post, vice provost of Information Resources, Arno Rethans, senior vice provost, and others. MacDougall said for right now at least, A.S. is being informed, but is not in close participation with the reorganization. However, they plan to get more involved as the process continues. The Educational Policy and Procedures Committee is comprised of faculty and staff members from multiple departments and has two A.S. representatives, MacDougall and Executive Vice President Elyse Gutowski. A few members of the committee are trying to act as consultants that would be working closely with the academic re-evaluation team, MacDougall said. Currently, the committee’s chair, Lori Beth Way, is planning to ask the committee members to help keep students informed, MacDougall said. Flake said that she invites students to talk with faculty, departments and existing colleges, and she plans on speaking with students on the Academic Senate. Lori Fuentes, executive assistant to the provost, encourages students to get involved in discussions about the realignment. “Students should attend the open sessions, check the academic reorganization website regularly for updates,” Fuentes said. Frequently asked questions are available on the webiste as well as information on the fourth Q&A session, which will be from 3 to 4:30 p.m.Thursday in the Student Services Center Room 150. There are also three suggestion boxes located by the spiral staircase in Kendall Hall, by the Admissions Office front desk in the Student Services Center and inside Meriam Library in the first floor lobby to the left of the entrance to the Student Computing Lab, according to the reorganization website. The reorganization models will be submitted online and the interactive model building tool will be available to everyone with access to the Chico State portal beginning Monday at the latest, according to the reorganization website. The initial exploration of the academic reorganization is phase one of the process and will continue through Nov. 11. Once Flake and other facilitators review the submitted models, phase two will begin Nov. 28, which will include campus discussion and feedback regarding approved models. Recommendation and implementation will take place between February and June. Katherine Deaton can be reached at kdeaton@theorion.com


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011 |

A5

Apple founder dies after battle with cancer

He was a visionary — creative, smart, fearless, and innovative.

HEIDI FLATO communications associate at Verizon Wireless.

Raquel Royers STAFF WRITER

One of the most influential technological masters of his time, Steve Jobs, the cofounder of Apple Inc., died Wednesday at the age of 56. Jobs died from pancreatic cancer, which he suffered with for seven years. Jobs was the visionary CEO behind the iPod, iPhone, iPad, and other Apple products that revolutionized how media is consumed. In memory of Jobs’ death, numerous outlets were honoring him in their own ways. Apple changed its whole website front page to a memorial. “Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being,” the company

said on the site. “Those of things.” Wijnhamer is not the only us who have been fortunate enough to know and work one to admire the way Jobs with Steve have lost a dear used his intelligence and creativity. friend and an inspir“He was a visioning mentor.” ary — creative, Apple also offered smart, fearless, an email address for and innovative,” apple users who would said Heidi Flato, like to send words of communications condolences or memoassociate at Veriries of Jobs. zon Wireless, an Apple is not the only iPhone retailer. business mourning “He didn’t just Jobs. Cory Wijnhamer, STEVE JOBS The former CEO want to bring great of the Chico Scene, was the visionproducts to marhas created a Facebook ary behind the ket. He wanted to page called “iheart iPhone, iPod and iPad products. change the world Steve Jobs” for others and he did. I love to share and celebrate the fact that he his life. “I’m bummed out,” Wijn- always had the end user hamer said. “He is someone in mind and knew how to I have looked up to because deliver an experience that of how he uses his mind consistently thrilled.” His last project, the iPhone and thinks differently about

4S, will be available in Verizon Wireless and AT&T stores Friday and can be preordered online, according to an Apple news release. Although many were expecting the iPhone 5 to be released, the 4S shouldn’t be underestimated since it’s more than just a slight addition, Wijnhamer said. The iPhone 4S will include many new features but will have the same outside appearance, or “skin.” New features such as a higher resolution camera and video recorder, a personal assistant named Siri, higher quality graphics, longer battery life and much more will be contained in the new edition. Siri allows for the user to vocally command their phone to make calls, text message,

set appointments, respond to emails and much more. Some are still wondering why the iPhone 4S came out instead of the iPhone 5. “Why is it the iPhone 4S,” said Carolyn Kardach, a senior finance major. “Why would they do that? Why isn’t it the iPhone 5? That would make more sense.” Despite having no change in the way the outside looks, the inside of the phone is completely renovated. Some students still hold trust in the products. “Usually it’s a little better, a little faster, better quality and more light weight,” said Kelsey Bracewell, a senior graphic design major. Raquel Royers can be reached at rroyers@theorion.com

TECHNOLOGY

Voice command feature headlines new iPhone Apple bucks iPhone 5 rumors with faster, smarter, cloudier iPhone 4S

Siri

Source: Apple.com

ILLUSTRATION BY TERCIUS BUFETE

Camera

Say hello to Siri. It is the equivalent of a robotic servant built into the iPhone. Ask Siri almost anything and it will have an answer and pull up the page necessary for reference or extra clarity. Siri will also send text messages, dial numbers, schedule appointments and answer back to emails all from voice commands.

The iPhone 4S has a camera with distinct editing settings and easy access buttons. The camera is 8 megapixels with custom lenses and larger aperture of f/2.4. Extra lenses were added from the iPhone 4 to let in more light and allow better focus on subjects.

A5 Chip

iCloud

Gamers will be praising the new A5 chip feature. The chip is two times more powerful than the iPhone 4’s and can download graphics seven times faster. Games and highly interactive apps will run much faster and smoother with the chip. The battery life has also improved, lasting up to eight hours of consecutive phone use.

The iCloud wirelessly transmits your pictures, music and data on the phone to other apple devices such as a Mac computer or iPad, so you don’t have to hook up the phone to transfer data. iCloud does everything automatically as soon as new content is recognized on the iPhone.

iOS5 iOS is the foundation of the iPhone operating system. iOS allows the user to see all of their notifications from different applications in one place. Notifications of text messages, emails, Facebook and Twitter can all be viewed now in one spot instead of going to each different application.


A6 |

news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

BILL BREAKDOWN

Gov. Jerry Brown faced a Sunday deadline to sign or veto legislation that hit his desk. Brown decided on almost 900 bills this year, including many that will impact students. Here are some of the bills that can affect you.

Assembly Bill 131 (Dream Act) Author: Assemblyman Gilbert Cedillo, D-Los Angeles. What it is: Allows undocumented college students accesss to state-funded financial aid.

VETOED.

Senate Bill 28 Author: Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto. What it is: Would have increased fines for driving a vehicle while using a hand-held device, as well as enforce fines on cyclists using hand-held devices.

SB 8 Author: Leland Yee, D-San Francisco. What it is: Allows the public to request public records from auxilliary organizations such as the CSU, Chico Research Foundation and Associated Students.

VETOED.

SIGNED.

SIGNED.

Senate Bill 185 Author: Sen. Ed Hernandez, D-West Covina. What it is: Would have authorized colleges to take race, gender, ethnicity and other “relevant factors” into consideration for admission.

AB 144 Author: Assemblymen Anthony Portantino, D-La Canada Flintridge, and Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco What it is: Makes carrying an unloaded handgun in public a misdemeanor.

DIED AT DESK.

SIGNED.

AB x1-39 Author: Assemblyman Roger Hernandez, D-West Covina. What it is: Would have prohibited the CSU system from giving raises during budget cuts using state funds and student fees and would cap CSU president salaries at $300,000.

AB 183 Author: Assemblywoman Fiona Ma, D-San Francisco. What it is: Buying alcohol at a self-checkout is now illegal.

VETOED.

SIGNED.

AB 1389 Author: Assemblyman Michael Allen, D-Santa Rosa. What it is: Would have required law enforcement to give 48 hours advanced notice for DUI checkpoints.

AB 353 Author: Assemblyman Gilbert Cedillo, D-Los Angeles. What it is: Drivers who are driving under the influence will not get their vehicles impounded at DUI checkpoints.

BILLS STILL IN SENATE:

AB 889 (BABYSITTING BILL)

SB X1-25

Dining employees unhappy with new discount policy Sam Kelly STAFF WRITER

Unlike previous years when A.S. Dining Services personnel could purchase their meals at the cost of the food, they now get a 10 percent discount on the total price — much to their dismay. The decision, adopted by the A.S. board of directors in May, centers around the idea of equality, giving all A.S. employees a 10 percent discount on businesses this semester instead of giving varying discounts across the board. The policy was adopted in July and the full effects were not seen until the start of the fall semester. It’s a complex issue dealing with a lot of different people and it is important for employee morale to get this right, A.S. President London Long said. “They say you can’t make everyone happy,” she said. “But it is very important that we try.” In the Oct. 3 A.S. board of directors meeting, A.S. Executive Director David Buckley, gave a presentation detailing several options available for staff discounts as well as the

current system in use. Of the four options, the only variables are special discounts given to dining services and Wildcat Recreation Center employees, but the Wildcat Store discounts are We are the same for so much all employees. broader The debate for dining that the employees equity centers on becomes either a 10 percent dismuch count for A.S. more dining or complex meals available at cost for employees. All A.S. DAVID BUCKLEY employees A.S. Executive Director receive the following discounts at the Wildcat Store: 20 percent off general books, supplies, gifts and clothing, 10 percent off Clinique and convenience store products and 5 percent off software. Buckley said it is a tough to please all employees because of the diversity of people employed under the A.S.

“ “

umbrella. “Its not that there’s a right or wrong answer in these things, often times the board has to make difficult decisions and usually you don’t make everyone happy,” Buckley said. In a Sept. 16 meeting of the A.S. board of directors, a number of A.S. student employees attended the meeting to share their opinions about the discounts. Students attending included A.S. dining employees and one Wildcat Store employee. The other meal plan needs to be reinstated to fairly compensate employees and allow us to be aware of what our menu items taste like so we can offer better service to our customers, said Geoffrey Cohen, an A.S. Dining Services employee at the meeting. Chico State is one of a few schools in the country with A.S. controlling as much as it does, and that means there are more entities to deal with than most schools, Buckley said. “We are so much broader that the equity becomes much more complex,” he said. Sam Kelly can be reached at skelly@theorion.com

SB X1-26

SIGNED. SB X1-27

Queer Week attractions seek awareness lesbian rights, Cooper said. Despite having never heard of the STAFF WRITER event, junior Nicole DaBranca was Designed with a goal of interaction interested in attending because of the and education, the fourth annual Queer awareness it brings to the community. Week began Monday with the intention This event shows that it’s OK to be difof raising the awareness of the strug- ferent, she said. One of the several events planned gles and achievements of the Lesbian, for the week, “Coming Out Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer community. for Art,” is sponsored by the Presented by the Gender and PROPOSITION 8 Stonewall Alliance Center. Sexuality Equity Center, Queer 2008 VOTING The Stonewall Alliance Center serves the LGBTQ commuWeek includes a movie night BREAKDOWN nity throughout Chico. The with two relevant films, workButte County relationship between Stoneshops, a discussion panel and 56.1 percent yes more. wall Alliance and GSEC is 43.9 percent no Queer Week also seeks to important because it broadexpose people to something Glenn County ens resources and allows us they might not consciously 73.3 percent yes to support one another, said expose themselves to, said 26.7 percent no Ange Bledsoe-Briggs, a junior Abby Teicheira, the LGBTQ proand a program coordinaYuba County gram coordinator at GSEC. tor at the Stonewall Alliance Teicheira, a senior, has been 67.6percent yes Center. involved with Queer Week since 32.4 percent no The week will end with the its inception. Pride March, a walk to raise Source: The event has a great impact, awareness and show support. California provides more education and Election Data Participants will meet from will hopefully lead to a better 5 to 6 p.m Friday at Trinity society, Teicheira said. Commons. Previous queer weeks have A discussion and potluck focused on different themes. One focused will close the week with a people sharon California’s controversial Proposition ing their experiences coming out. 8, the banning of gay marriage. This The events throughout the week are year’s theme is centered on activism, planned entirely by students in GSEC. particularly in the LGBTQ community. This year’s Queer Week will coin“We’re Here, We’re Queer: The cide with National Coming Out Day Stonewall Riots,” an event facilitated and will hold events dedicated to by Sara Cooper, professor of Spanish, both. follows the activism theme. The riots were a seminal event and made a big Dani Anguiano can be reached at change in the activism for gay and danguiano@theorion.com Dani Anguiano


news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011 |

A7

Disc golfers catch approval in vote

They had already made up their mind. They weren’t interested in our position.

JEFF CRAWFORD Chico Equestrian Association president

Katherine Deaton STAFF WRITER

Mounting tensions over Sherwood Forest resulted in a city council vote in favor of disc golfers, despite safety concerns by local equestrians. The vote approved an expansion in Sherwood Forest, which would allow disc golfers to learn the game on a short course until they feel comfortable playing an advanced course like Peregrine Point, said Michael Keys, a player on the Chico Outsiders disc golf team. “Most of the players in the community are beginners and students,” Keys said. “The new site that is proposed would be good for bike riders to go to. It would dramatically decrease the impact that’s on Peregrine Point.” Chico State student Eric Loustale is a fourth-year business administration major and avid disc golfer. “I would like to see a disc golf club start at Chico State because disc golf is fun, easy, cheap and a great way to experience the outdoors,” Loustale said. The Chico Outsiders and the Chico Equestrian Association have battled over the use of Sherwood Park and other Bidwell Park locations for years. During the Oct. 4 city council meeting, the Sherwood Park expansion was approved 5-0 with Mark Sorensen abstaining and Mary Flynn absent. “They had already made up their mind,” said Jeff Crawford, president of the Chico Equestrian Association. “They weren’t that interested in our position.” The reason council needed to vote on a new short course was because the existing Highway 32 short course location

THE ORION • BRETT EDWARDS

GOING THE DISTANCE Freshman Austin Grosch flings out a disc in the Sherwood Forest. The Chico City Council voted unanimously last Tuesday to allow disc golfers to practice their sport on site, despite significant safety concerns raised by the Chico Equestrian Association. was closed to regain environmental health of the area, said Todd Cathers, president of the Chico Outsiders. Mayor Ann Schwab also noted during the meeting that re-establishing the course would cost $120,000. The Outsiders and city council members considered 12 sites in 2010, which were all rejected, Cathers said. After reconsidering the sites, the council determined the Sherwood Forest location most appropriate, if the Chico Outsiders paid for the course. The cost would be approximately $8,000 and would take four to five years to complete. Currently, the Chico Outsiders have two disc golf sites,

the existing site in Sherwood Forest described on their website as a “kids course” and an advanced course called Peregrine Point, located off Highway 32 east of Chico. It isn’t disc golf they have an issue with, but the safety concerns the location of the course poses, Crawford said. Kathleen Woodard, a member of the Chico Equestrian Association, said the only access equestrians have to Lower Bidwell Park is along the levy. “If disc golf targets are installed next to the levy on either side it will totally cut off our access to lower park,” Woodard said. Council member Andy

Holcombe put the consistent safety concerns voiced by members of the Equestrian Association into question by referencing an email from an equestrian who said she thinks “it’s just a matter of communication and education.” Removing his glasses, Holcombe asked Woodward if he thought communication and education could result in a safe use of the park by both parties. With her hands folded neatly at the podium, Woodard responded that when she rides in upper park she sees a lot of bikers and hikers. “People are very good about co-use of the park, but we don’t have the flying objects issue,” she said.

The vote Tuesday night will not be the end of the battle for either organization. The Chico Outsiders have at least $8,000 to come up with assuming nothing goes wrong throughout the process, Cathers said. The Equestrian Association will also have to find a new means to access lower park in a safe way. “We have three or four horse trainers in the club, and we’re going to be holding a Frisbee desensitivity training session for our members free of charge,” Crawford said. “We’ll be doing our part to make it as safe as possible for everyone.” Katherine Deaton can be reached at kdeaton@theorion.com

CLOSE CALL A fire truck responds to reports of smoke at Towne Lounge on Main Street. The owner said the building was evacuated as a precaution.

THE ORION • ANDRE BYIK

WEALTH OF ANGER Demonstrators assembled downtown and in front of area banks Saturday for a continuation of Occupy Chico protests. The movement, which started as a demonstration on Wall Street in New York City, is spreading nationwide.

THE ORION • JUNIPER ROSE

Smoke causes scare at bar Juniper Rose STAFF WRITER

Fire trucks lined Main Street at 6:30 p.m. Friday as officials were called to investigate smoke coming out from a downtown establishment. The Towne Lounge, a downtown bar, was evacuated and the fire department was called “just to be on the safe side,” owner Woody Sjostrom said. Firefighters responded to the report of smoke in the attic of the Towne Lounge, said Chuck Fry, fire

apparatus engineer for Chico fire. Crews investigated the inside of the building, the attic and the roof. It was discovered that the smoke could be attributed to a malfunctioning heating vent, Sjostrom said. “We were glad it wasn’t a serious problem, and no one was endangered,” Sjostrom said. “It’s always better safe than sorry.” Juniper Rose can be reached at jrose@theorion.com

ATTACKS: Altered plans in wake of assaults continued from A1

report, there were more attacks that were not reported, the victim said. “It just sucks that people don’t report things when they should,” she said. If all the attacks had been reported it would have spread the word quicker and could have prevented more attacks from occurring, the woman said. “I wish the other girls would say something,” she said. “It’s just different when you know someone that it has happened to.” Hearing things like this first hand raises awareness in a different way than hearing something through a police report, said Christopher Navarrete, a senior music education major. “It’s really good when a victim tells its story,” he said. “It gets people’s ears opening up and makes us realize we are all potential victims.” It is important for people to know they should

not walk alone at night no matter what the circumstances are, said Brooke Wolford, a junior music education major. “I never walk home alone anymore, but I used to,” she said. “It gets late, and some people don’t have any other options. The latest bus runs at 9, and a lot of people don’t have someone they can get a ride from at night.” For some students, awareness is not enough. After the attacks, fifth-year Geoffory Felver got a license to carry a concealed weapon. Not only will the weapon protect him from attack, but it also puts him in a position to be able to help protect others, Felver said. “Now I carry a concealed weapon whenever I’m walking around downtown,” he said. “I always have my firearm — I’m ready.” Juniper Rose can be reached at jrose@theorion.com

OCCUPY: Movement gains steam as demonstrators take anger to streets continued from A1

manager for the tattoo parlor. While Tyler acknowledged intentions, but many of them the right to assemble and demlack the necessary education onstrate, the Occupy Chico to actually make a difference, movement has been affecting said Juan Moreno, a Chico small businesses around the resident. “The problem is not the corWhether demonstrations, he said. Tyler and his associates, porations,” Moreno said. “This people upset after days of protests, world runs on corporations and we need them. The problem is realize it or created their own sign readnot, if you ing, “We are the 1 percent, we have the wrong people runhonk if you’re 1 percent.” ning these corporations.” are not The parlor, which doesn’t When 1 percent of the poppart of the set appointments for Saturulation controls 40 percent 1 percent, days because of a usual stream of the wealth, it is bad for the you are of walk-in customers, saw zero economy, said David Waldron, a senior finance major at Chico one of us. walk-ins about 12:30 p.m., an oddity especially coupled with State. favorable weather, Tyler said. “A rising economic inequalDAVID WALDRON Tyler asked a passer-by for ity has been going on for the Senior finance major thoughts on the protest and last 40 years,” Waldron said. “I received a response, “I lived don’t know how we are going in Chico in the ’60s. This is to fix this, but the constitution took a few years to write so I don’t think nothing.” This is an opportunity for everyone we are going to get this done today.” The Occupy Together movement has to be part of a movement that can make been labeled as liberal and democratic, a change, said Hannah Johnston, who but the movement is for everyone, Wal- just moved to Chico from Texas. “We had a guy that protested the dron said. “We are in the 99 percent,” he said. Vietnam War standing with us at City “Whether people realize it or not, if you Hall,” Johnston said. “He was part of a are not part of the 1 percent, you are one generation that stopped a war, and he was supporting what we are doing. For of us.” Across the street from Chase, and in me, that was a big moment.” earshot of the demonstrators’ chants, were employees of Lucky’s Tattoo & Andre Byik can be reached at Boutique. abyik@theorion.com “Most people don’t even know what Juniper Rose can be reached at they’re talking about,” said Peter Tyler, jrose@theorion.com

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>

opinion A8 |

Thumbs Up to the question “Do you want whipped cream with that?” Perfect for almost any scenario.

Thumbs Down to sticky asphalt under Chico’s pine trees. It’s like walking on a huge velcro mat.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

EDITORIAL >>

Consolidation of colleges stands as example to state, other universities Since July 12, when the California State University realized it was facing a $650 million budget cut from Gov. Jerry Brown’s office, the clarion call from every student, faculty member and special interest group, was the same: Cut from the top. We all agreed — the presidents, deans and other executives could afford to take a pay cut. The integrity of our education and the value of a college degree had to be maintained at any cost — and so much the better if that cost was to people who could afford it. But now that the uniMORE ON versity is trying to reduce FEWER administrative costs by COLLEGES closing down a dean’s Story A4 office and streamlining our college structure, we’ve suddenly gotten wary of the very same cuts we so strongly supported. If Chico State’s administration follows through with its vision for the college consolidation, professors in the merged departments will keep their jobs, classes will remain open and departments will stay intact. To do any less would be a thinly veiled cut to the quality of our education in the guise of a harmless reorganization. The decision to reduce the number of colleges is exactly the kind of spending decrease this university needs. It’s a victimless cut that saves $500,000 on a redundant administrative office, freeing that money to be spent in a packed lecture hall, on a university stage or in the lab. With the money saved by eliminating just one college dean’s office, the university could use half a million dollars to hire new lecturers, keep more class sections open and offer better educational opportunities for the students who choose Chico State. And it’s the students who have a chance to decide how the colleges are restructured. Beginning Friday, every Chico State student, faculty and staff member can submit his or her own proposal for how the colleges should be reorganized. The final decision will be made in February. The Orion fully endorses the decision made by the university to make cuts that eliminate administrative waste and redundancies. This frugality should stand as an example to the rest of the CSU system — and to the state — that education can be preserved at any cost, the least of which is administrative.

Thumbs Up to Halloween. We’ve already started buying our reporter costumes.

opinions all week @ theorion.com

Awareness key to treat bipolar disorder Anthony Siino GUEST COLUMNIST

I am mentally disabled. That’s what the therapist suggested, the symptoms indicated, the doctors confirmed, and after a long period of doubt, it’s what I know to be true. Sometimes simple tasks like going to class or writing an article take all of my effort thanks to baseless feelings of shame, guilt and longing that last an entire week or more. In that time, death looks more like an old friend instead of something to fear. The next few days, I feel like a god, completing my tasks with utmost excellence, buying dinner for all my friends and viciously destroying anything and anyone foolish enough to stand in my way. There are few in-betweens for me. It can’t be authoritatively tested for, but it’s all too obvious: I have bipolar disorder. Instead of admitting that I have a mental malfunction, it would be much easier to think that I’m still in control but just weak and unwilling to control my emotions. In fact, that’s exactly the way society wants people to think about bipolar disorder and other mental illnesses — and that stigma is why nobody comes forward to look for help. There’s more to bipolar disorder than most know. It doesn’t mean that sufferers are just making excuses for being moody, said Lana McKnight, a Chico State staff psychologist who has 15 years experience in helping bipolar patients. The symptoms differ in each case but generally include “extreme mood changes, distractibility, severe depression, grandiose thinking, decreased need for sleep, rapid speech, impulsive behaviors such as overspending, and suicidal thoughts,” McKnight said in an email interview. About a month after I admitted I needed help, I’m still learning that it’s going to take more than a month to fix me. When I sought cures for these symptoms, Chico State provided therapy at the Counseling and Wellness Center, along with appointments with a physician and a psychiatrist at the Student Health Center after I

ILLUSTRATION BY • CHELSEA ROSS

discovered I didn’t have health insurance. Our student fees make these treatments available at little to no extra cost to us. For anybody who wonders why we pay these fees, here’s your answer: We’re saving lives. Bipolar disorder isn’t a joke, as 10 to 15 percent of people with bipolar eventually kill themselves, McKnight said. Leaving

SUPPORT IS AVAILABLE The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance meets from 6 to 8 p.m. every Tuesday at First Christian Church Room 6 Chico State’s Counseling and Wellness Center is open from 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Student Services Center Room 430

it untreated can make this possibility into an eventuality. The most important therapy involves building a support network for the patient, and free support for bipolar disorder in Chico doesn’t stop with Chico State. A great resource is the Chico chapter of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, and the stories told between its members show the impossibility

of treating bipolar disorder on your own. One man in the small group listed problems his imbalances put him through: alcoholism, gambling addiction, a neardivorce, hundreds of dollars in medications and more than 15 impulse car purchases, to name a few. The president of the group, 53-year-old Ken Snyder, lists his occupation as disabled thanks to the illness. His right hand visibly shakes as a side effect of his medications, but it’s obvious he’s much more willing to tremble rather than live without treatment. Snyder’s made three suicide attempts, the first of which he only survived because he forgot to disable the airbag in the car he intentionally crashed. He told the story with almost a laugh. “I was very disappointed,” Snyder said. “But as it worked out, it worked out for the best that I’m still here.” The worst part about having bipolar disorder isn’t coping with depressive or manic phases, Snyder said. It’s the vicious swings between. He once was asked by a professor to write down what he wanted most, and in response his paper simply read “stability.” Another member who met with me again afterward spoke

on his view, agreeing that bipolar disorder certainly disables people, but he emphasized that not all cases keep sufferers from living a normal life. “You don’t have to let it cripple you,” he said. Walking away from these strong, tortured men talking about how they lived their lives in the face of mental instability, one thing wouldn’t let me go. They know fully well that they are not just hindered by bipolar disorder — they are disabled. I always considered my emotional instability as natural or as something that made me soft and weak, not as an illness that chained me down. After realizing how it afflicts others and how badly I needed help a month ago, I know that they are right and that I can still live a successful and rich life. This isn’t just my problem or their problem, however. Many of you face the same devastating mood swings and struggle to work them out on your own, the same way I have for more than a decade. The truth is that no matter how well you compose yourself, it can’t be done alone. We are disabled and we need help. Thankfully, help is here right now — you just have to be strong enough to ask for it. Anthony Siino can be reached at ajsiino@gmail.com

College lives help students learn, evolve beyond home lives Quinn Western OPINION COLUMNIST

Some of the most difficult experiences we go through in our lives can turn out to be the most positive changes in ourselves. I expected the four-hour drive home to Fresno to be a sentimental occasion to reunite with friends and family for a few days. I soon realized how such a short time from home changes a person. While seeing my family was a joy I can’t describe, I couldn’t help but feel like an awkward presence. I changed so much internally and externally since I was away and was unsure whether those changes were positive or negative.

Most students experience this “stranger in your own home” syndrome, with symptoms that include awkwardness, changes in behavior and, in some cases, depression. Since I moved to Chico State, I have not been to church one single Sunday. I went to a Catholic high school and was involved as a confirmation leader on campus and eucharistic minister at my church. I went almost every Sunday — even without my family. While I was raised Catholic, my family didn’t pressure me into going to church every Sunday. They put me through the sacraments and called it a done deal. It wasn’t until my sophomore year of high school that I began to explore and discover that I even had faith. It was that faith that pulled me out of the rough patches in

ILLUSTRATION BY • CHELSEA ROSS

my life — a wrist injury that kept me from doing the day-to-day activities I loved, a cancer scare in the family and a long night where I contemplated suicide — all over one summer. If this faith was such a big part of my life, why would I lose it in college? The biggest leap in my life should have taken the

Editorial Board Arts Editor

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Almendra Carpizo

Leila Rodriguez

Gerardo Rocha

News Editor

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Chief Copy Editor

Kenny Lindberg

Ally Dukkers

Kacey Gardner

Opinion Editor

Photo Editor

Art Director

Benjamin Mullin

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Liam Turner

Sports Editor

Allie Colosky

Video Editor

Ashley Nakano The opinion editor can be reached at

opinioneditor@theorion.com

Letters Editor

to the

Editor in Chief

most faith. We are supposed to experiment in college and try new things, which I have. In seven short weeks, I’ve decorated my friend’s apartment with toilet paper, orchestrated an attempted kidnapping and broke into two apartments during the same night.

The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

But I want to know if exchanging the person I was for the person I’ve become is good or bad. I have to draw a line between what changes to make throughout life and what is always going to be a part of me. I now see the absence of organized religion in my life as an experiment — just like everything else in college — that helps me figure out who I am as a person and where God is in my life. Change is good. We are supposed to grow throughout our lives into whatever it is we are supposed to be. But we can’t lose our essential selves, the person we knew in the beginning of our lives. If we don’t hold on to the person we once were, we have nowhere to begin and no one to go back to. Quinn Western can be reached at qwestern@theorion.com

Read the guidelines below for information on how to submit your own Letters to the Editor • Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

• The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.


Thumbs Down to the massive acorns that Chico State’s passiveaggressive squirrel population keeps dropping on our heads.

Thumbs Up to the word “petrichor.” Seriously. Look it up.

Thumbs Down to the “waffles are ready” siren in Sutter Dining. We’re coming, you don’t have to shout.

opinions all week @ theorion.com

Thumbs Up to Chico State’s women’s soccer team for tying UC San Diego, the No. 2 ranked Division II team.

OPINION

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011 |

Traditional dancing cures dip in intimacy Marty Salgado OPINION COLUMNIST

ILLUSTRATION BY • CHELSEA ROSS

complete innocence. The rest of us were called up one by one. Each officer gave exhaustively descriptive accounts of the incident, and each defendant tried to give the judge some sob story as to why they had broken the law. The first woman didn’t have her seat belt on because she was “too distraught after a funeral to think about it.” A man going 91 mph in the commuter lane said he was only doing so to avoid another car that tried to swerve into him. One man even accused the officer that had given him a ticket for going 50 mph with his high beams on in the fast lane on the freeway of being racist. Bottom line: If the defendant could not prove that they had not broken the law, they were found guilty. However, two cases were dropped and one woman’s fine was lowered because the officer was ruled mistaken. Once all the officers were finished, three of us were left seated. When I was called up, the judge dismissed me. My officer wasn’t there after all. I was handed my paperwork at 6:36 p.m. and left the courtroom elated. In all, 11 of 18 defendants that appeared were dismissed. These odds are too good to pass up. I would strongly urge anyone cited to make a date with the officer and fight his or her judgment. He or she may be too busy writing frivolous tickets to show up.

Last semester I decided to try the ballroom class offered on campus. The class had a rule — if someone asked you to dance you couldn’t say no. You can imagine how perked up the guys were. We all lined up, men in one line and women in another, and we danced with whoever was in front of us. Because of this rule I got to dance with every woman, and every woman danced with every man. The class was set up so that everyone could communicate with each other and dance while doing it. “It can be such a personable thing, and it’s easy to be yourself,” said Marrissa Allen, a senior and president of the Ballroom Dance Club. “I met my boyfriend through ballroom.” One of the most intimate ways to socialize is through dances. But in Chico, a typical get together consists of alcohol induced bumping and grinding, which doesn’t lend itself to getting to know one another. I have never been a real fan of “bump and grind” dancing. If I just met the woman I’m dancing with, I don’t think she will appreciate dancing in a compromising position. In other words I feel like I’m assaulting her. “It’s an excuse to touch each other,” Allen said. Students have experienced this at high school dances, and in college nothing much has changed except the addition of alcohol. Although, for some, that may not be a new thing. There’s dirty dancing as Patrick Swayze showed us and then there’s “Damn! I don’t think they’re dancing anymore” dancing. Knowing how a woman thinks is just as important as knowing how she moves — but I can’t conduct a conversation when I’m riding her caboose. “That’s the way people socialize today, and in ballroom we set up a safe environment for people to meet each other” Allen said. There are many types of dancing to satisfy your happy feet. There is free form or interpretive dance, which I usually take part in since my dancing looks like a rhythmic grandpa mixed in with a leprechaun’s arm swinging. Next time you’re walking down the hallway, check out the fliers pinned up on the bulletin boards. You can get a taste of West African, salsa or ballroom dancing on campus. “Here at ballroom you have a conversation, and sometimes the dance is a conversation.” Allen said.

Cassidy Gooding can be reached at

Marty Salgado can be reached at

cgooding@theorion.com

msalgado@theorion.com

Ticket fight saves cash Cassidy Gooding Ca OPINION COLUMNIST

With the wrinkled copy of my citation clutched in one hand and my knees weak with nerves, I took a glance up at the forbidding government building, guilt oozing from my pores. I sat outside the courtroom waiting with a handful of other people that seemed as nervous as I felt. Hands were wrung, and I swear the man farthest from me was quietly murmuring prayers to himself. Oh, the things you see in traffic court. In September 2010, five days before my 21st birthday and two weeks after writing a column about talking your way out of speeding tickets, I got clocked going 65 in a 45 mph zone. The California Highway Patrol officer handed me a flimsy yellow copy of my ticket and wished me a pleasant day with amused irony. An infringement of this magnitude costs on average more than $200 to rectify. In addition to the raise in insurance rates the ticket could cause, my fine was $340, not including traffic school — a hefty chunk of cash. When I went down to the courthouse a week later to ask if I could set up a payment plan, the man at the window suggested I set a date to appear in court and fight it. The fine wouldn’t increase if I lost, and I’d win my case automatically if the cop didn’t appear, he said. So, more than a year later, I

arrived early at the city courthouse in Richmond. When the officers arrived, somehow more intimidating in suits with ties, the tension in the room multiplied considerably. Like sharks, they traveled in a pack and stood with their arms crossed, confident in their power to make the tickets stick. Most tickets, especially those given in speed traps where the officer hides somewhere with a radar gun, are less about safety and more about revenue, attorney Mel Leiding said in his instructional book, “How to Fight Your Traffic Ticket and Win.” He goes on to say that many people pay the highest possible fine and suffer negative marks on their insurance policies because they don’t believe they can fight a ticket once it’s issued. The people surrounding me, however, thought they’d try their hand at fighting these costly punishments. And luckily, there were five police officers and 18 of us. Once we filed in, the judge called the court to order. The proceedings he described were simple. Each person was called to stand alongside the officer that cited them. After the officer gave his or her testimony, the defendant had a chance to ask questions before presenting any witnesses or evidence of his or her own. After the defendant’s testimony, the judge made his ruling. The judge called 10 names in succession and dismissed each of them because their officers didn’t show up, offering them

ry a r b s i L y n Laz fessio Con

er g r a enbMNIST f f u B U Jake INION COL

Meriam Library’s third floor is a sanctuary of study, a lost land of learning amid a sea of red cups and mini skirts. It is the Mecca of mental focus. However, there are those who seek to defile the nurturing atmosphere with cell phone conversations and bubble gum. Don’t get me wrong, a majority of my visits to the third floor are tranquil, but this only lulls me into a false sense of security making a sudden surprise all the more disruptive. It’s hard to determine if the variety of noisy nuisances comes from ignorance of the library’s rules or a simple lack of empathy for the people that frequent it. People who eat chips loudly and blast mp3 players might be unaware of the disturbance it causes in the otherwise silent study area, but it irks me when a person plays music so loudly it is audible to everyone within a 20-foot radius. How they can focus with death metal at full blast boggles the mind. Those who talk and make no attempt to lower their voice are simply disrespectful. I take it as a personal insult when people choose not to respect the various courtesies expected in polite society — like opening the door for old ladies and shutting up in the library. Further, people think that being in one of the group study rooms excuses them from conversing at a reasonable volume. They aren’t military bunkers — screams and laughter still cause a disturbance to

Thumbs Down to the 40-person chains that snake across Chico’s busy intersections.

those sitting in the study areas adjacent. It is also inconsiderate to use those rooms alone, as the sign near the front of every door says “Rooms to only be used by two or more students.” Phones are another large concentration detractor. I jump every time a phone vibrates on the wood sending a strong shock wave to everyone connected. Some heathens will have the audacity to answer their phones when they get a call as if the sign right above their head didn’t exist. Maybe it’s because the signs are light blue. If they were bright red people would definitely take notice. These people never learned respect in fourth grade and need library staff to follow them around with fingers over their lips, yelling, “Shhhhhhh.” Some individuals will read this and write me off as the quintessential nerd, reminding them of their grandpa who yells, “Turn off that damned music television!” But the man or woman who opens his mouth at the library closes his ears and shuts his eyes to the needs of others. Virtually everywhere else on campus has no noise restrictions. If people refuse to respect the sanctity of my neural training ground, they should not expect, nor will they receive, respect from anyone else. Jake Buffenbarger can be reached at jbuffenbarger@theorion.com

A9

Lauren McLane PA N H E L L E N I C PRESIDENT ALPHA PHI

GREEK SPEAK >> I would not be the person I am today without the million little opportunities that Greek life has given me. Greek life has showed me how powerful I can be as a force for creating change, personally as well as part of a greater whole. One of the experiences that I will never forget is the Butte Charter School graduation party that the United Greek Council helped put on in spring 2011. Members of all chapters danced the night away in ’80s attire with home schooled children who were — to put it lightly — a little apprehensive. By the end of the night all of the kids were off the wall, on the dance floor and having the time of their lives. Their laughter and the looks on their faces were priceless. In that moment, I truly felt that I made a difference. It is amazing to see how the Greeks come together for the common good regardless of which chapter they belong to. Chico State Greeks are about community, not letters. The connections I have made within my chapter and throughout the Greek system will stay with me forever. My littles — the sorority sisters I mentor — will be my bridesmaids someday. I will always have best friends from five different chapters, and I know my Panhellenic adviser will always be a phone call away when I have “just one question” for her. The Chico State Greek system has completely changed my life, and I am so lucky to be a part of it. Lauren Mclane can be reached at csucpanhellenicpresident@gmail.com

Austin Churchill PRESIDENT S I GM N A N U

GREEK SPEAK >>

Prior to college, I never considered myself a leader, mainly because I never knew how or where to start. My brother, who is two years older than me, was in a fraternity at Sonoma State during my freshman year. He strongly encouraged me to check out the Greek system at Chico and see if it was right for me. In the spring, I decided to participate in rush week with my neighbor. Everyone was nice and inviting, but Sigma Nu stood out for its principals of love, truth and honor. I learned an immense amount about myself during the pledging process. At Sigma Nu, not only did my confidence and communication improve, but I was finally able to find a sense of leadership in myself and discover what I was capable of achieving. My junior year I took the office of rush chairman where I was able to organize and manage a series of week-long events for students who were interested in our fraternity. This was the first time I was able to put to use the skills I acquired during pledging. At the beginning of my senior year, I was interested in running for president of Sigma Nu after our former two-term president led us to become the top fraternity in the University Cup Awards. I won the election and intend to push Sigma Nu to strive for even greater accomplishments.

OP

ILLUS

T R AT

Y•C ION B

HE L S

E A RO

Austin Churchill can be reached at

SS

achurchill@mail.csuchico.edu

PIECE OF MIND >> What library behavior bothers you? “One time we had a fire drill, but that was about it.”

“If I’m in the quiet area, I’d like it to be quiet, you know?”

“There was an instance where I was in one of the quiet rooms and there was this group of girls who were laughing really loud.”

“When people are texting in the library and every 10 seconds you can hear it vibrate.”

Chance Borders

Kaila Young

Rob Morton

Sarah Tilton

junior | business management

sophomore | psychology

junior | civil engineering

freshman | business


A10 |

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sports

Women’s soccer took a brutal loss in the 88th minute to Cal State San Bernardino. Story B3

STAT ’CAT B2 WILDCAT OF THE WEEK B2 GAMES SCHEDULE B5

sports orts all week at theorion.com theor

Y OCT. 12, 2011 WEDNESDAY,

Confident ’Cats

Allie Colosky

CONFERENCE TITLE

CRAVE

STICKS UP Freshman Curtis Bowden leads the attack in Sunday’s match against Simon Fraiser University

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

Sarah Bohannon STAFF WRITER

“We will win the league this year,” said Charlie Jackson, head coach of the Chico State men’s lacrosse team Friday night, two days before the team’s first preseason game. “I want that in big, bold letters.” Sunday, the team found it was in a good place to start. Battling, many times point for point, against Simon Frasier University from Canada, a team ranked 16th in the country last season, Sunday’s final 8-9 score left the ’Cats low in points but high in spirit. “We’re at the bottom of the top,” said Danny Metoyer, the team’s newest assistant coach. “We’ve got a lot of stuff to work on obviously, but I think we’re in a good spot.” Starting the game a little slow offensively, it wasn’t even the second quarter before the ’Cats began their attack and had the bright red and white jerseys of the Clan darting around quickly to recover the ball. With Graham Nichols and Josh Roden both contributing goals in the first half, the ’Cats entered the second trailing 2-4. Increased speed, good defense from the ’Cats combined with multiple goals, made by Nichols and Bryce Tavano, ended the third quarter with Chico in a 7-6 lead. Grady Van Boxtel propelled the fourth quarter by coming from the back of the net to hurl

one in for Chico, giving the ’Cats a more comfortable score of 8-6. But Simon Frasier was quickly back at it. Scoring one, then two goals, the Clan quickly tied the game 8-8. It was a score Chico couldn’t surpass. As aggression rose, Chico’s Connor Patrick battled through a group of slashing sticks and hurled the ball toward the net. Hitting the outside of the netting, eight goals are all Chico would score Sunday. With one more point scored by Simon Frasier, the Clan took the lead and the win. “I feel great, no one’s hanging their heads low,” said Nichols, Sunday’s top scorer. “We really held our own. We had a lot of young guys out there. We’re putting new defenses and offenses in, it really seemed to be working out.” With the results and level of play that Chico State is currently at, it foreshadows the remainder of the season, Nichols said. Van Boxtel agreed. “Definitely in years past it hasn’t been this good,” Van Boxtel said. “This is by far the best first game we’ve ever had as a team at Chico State.” With 32 incoming freshmen, 24 recruits from all over the country, and a strong group of returners, Jackson said this is the most excited he has been in a long time about Chico State lacrosse. “I think this is the team to beat this year,”

HOW TO PLAY:

Jackson said. Returning four of its top defensive players, Chico also brings back strong midfielders, fi fth-year seniors Tavano and Roden. The team also touts two of the top five scorers in the West Coast Lacrosse League, Nichols and Trevor Stotka. With about 10 preseason competitions, and the season not starting until February, this fi rst game was really a predictor off the team’s current standing. “Athletically I think we were right there with them,” Metoyer said about Simon Frasier. “It’s just knowing what to do and when really.” Although Metoyer’s new team isn’t quite to the standard he has set for them, they are more than half way, he said. Coming in from Chapman University and having won a national title in coaching, Metoyer said the reason he came to Chico was because of the team’s potential. “Chico seems to be there in that phase of turning the corner,” Metoyer said. If by “turning the corner” Metoyer means winning the West Coast Lacrosse League, Jackson and his ’Cats are on board. “It’s always been our big goal for a long time to take league,” Nichols said. “This year it’s defi nitely going to happen.” Sarah Bohannon can be reached at sbohannon@theorion.com

START:

LACROSSE

x10

x4

Play begins with a faceoff in the center faceoff square or circle. The two players start on their hands and feet with their sticks laying along the center line. The ball is placed between the heads of the sticks.

RULES: Offensive players cannot enter the crease area that surrounds the goal.

wing

Offensive players cannot go into their own crease, either, unless they gain possession while in the crease they can take the ball out.

midfield

When a ball goes out of bounds, the team closest to the line where the ball went out has possession.

60yds

After a score there is a faceoff.

crease area

In the final two minutes of the game, the leading team must stay in the attack zone. If not, possession will be transferred to the losing team.

defense area

attack area

TIMING The goalie has four seconds to take the ball out of the crease or possession is awarded to the opponent.

110yds

The offensive team has 20 seconds to cross midfield from the defense area. Once passed midfield, the team has 10 seconds to enter the attack area. ILLUSTRATION BY • JAMIE HAZELTON

Wildcat setter becomes quarterback on court QUIET LEADER Junior setter Sable Villaescusa didn’t always know she wanted to play volleyball or if she had the vocal chops to lead. She now has a dominant hand in the Wildcats current .824 winning percentage.

Andrew Delgado STAFF WRITER

ILLUSTRATIVE PHOTO • FRANK REBELO

’Cat’ Fights? W H AT S CO M IN G U P

Chico State volleyball will host “Pack the House” night Friday at 7 p.m. On Saturday, the Wildcats will “Dig for a Cure” against Sonoma State as a fundraiser for breast cancer awareness.

B

On the court, setter Sable Villaescusa hasn’t been scoring the points for the women’s volleyball team, yet she’s had a hand in about 80 percent of the Wildcats’ points this season. The junior leads the Chico State volleyball team with 544 assists of the ’Cats’ total 685. Averaging 10.67 assists per set so far this season, Villaescusa has put MORE herself in second place in the VOLLEYBALL California Collegiate Athletic Story B2 Association leaders in assists. Last season, Villaescusa finished second in the CCAA in assists with 1,098. Seventy assists came in one match against UC San Diego early last season and she hasn’t slowed down since. Villaescusa was selected to the 2010 Second Team All-CCAA and is ranked fifth overall in career assists in the program’s history. Despite her impact at Chico State, volleyball wasn’t always on Villaescusa’s radar. “I got into volleyball at random,” she said. “A family friend said I should try out and that is >> please see VILLAESCUSA | B4

TO DAY I N

sports

oct. 12, 1979 Boston Celtics guard Chris Ford hit the first three-pointer in NBA history. The game against the Houston Rockets was also the professional debut of Larry Bird.

SPORTS EDITOR

Stay on your feet Falling short It’s a common feeling. The hype and the butterflies and the confidence that has you planning that postgame party before the pregame show has even wrapped. And then comes the fumble, and the gut-wrenching feeling that leaves you second-guessing your priorities. This year has brought some of the biggest sports collapses. Some are my favorites to remember – Miami Heat, anyone – while others left me just as shocked as the rest of the nation. I know, Red Sox fans, I hate rain delays, too. 2004 New York Yankees The 2004 World Series is remembered as the year the Red Sox broke the curse. You can call it an upset, but the Yankees collapsed faster than a house of cards. Up three games to none and leading the Red Sox 4-3 in the bottom of the ninth inning of the American League Championship Series, New York had all but sealed a playoff berth. They only needed three outs, but Boston wouldn’t let up, winning in 12 innings then sweeping the next three games. Good upset. Better collapse. 2007 New England Patriots In 2007, Tom Brady and the New England Patriots went down in history as the first team in NFL history to complete an undefeated 16-game season. They were the definition of a perfect season. But Brady didn’t get his fairytale ending. After easily reaching the Super Bowl, the Patriots dropped the biggest game of the season 17-14 to the New York Giants. If a perfect season doesn’t give you the confidence in the end, I don’t know what will. 2011 Miami Heat The next collapse is my favorite to remember. Earlier this year, Lebron James, Dwayne Wade and the Miami Heat lit up the national stage with talk of a sure thing. Maybe I should have included Chris Bosh, the other leg of the “Big 3,” because James sure as hell didn’t show up in the fourth quarter. I can take the heat for the Lakers’ pathetic attempt at a playoff run, but Miami fans will have to hear about the 2011 finals for years to come. 2011 Boston Red Sox Boston sports writer Dan Shaughnessy should have known better than to bet against the Great Bambino. During the rain delay in the seventh inning of the Red Sox and Orioles game, Shaughnessy discounted any comeback for the Rays that would steal the wild card from his beloved Boston. Silly Shaughnessy, you are a Red Sox fan. Does another collapse come as a surprise? I guess Red Sox fans across the country will have to wait another 86 years to bring home another World Series title. Chico State Wildcats This weekend brought that gut-wrenching feeling closer to home. Both of Chico State’s men’s and women’s soccer teams watched Cal State San Bernardino steal the win in the final minutes of the match. Talk about a day-ruiner. Lucky for the Wildcats, it’s not yet time for the big dance. It’s only October, ’Cats. I’m still counting on that after party. It could happen. Allie Colosky can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com

[ jock talk ]

The gap is so significant that we can’t bridge it at this time.” -David Stern The NBA commissionor canceled the first two weeks of the season after no agreements were made Monday between players and owners.


B2 |

SPORTS SHORTS >> Recap of sports at Chico State

sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

SOCCER

Men’s soccer drops from first in final minute GETTNG AHEAD Junior midfielder Tyson Crim helped control the possession during Friday’s matchup against UC San Diego. The Wildcats took possession of first place with their 2-1 win against the Tritons.

Dariush Dias Azmoudeh STAFF WRITER

The Wildcats closely trail first place in the CCAA in both men’s and women’s soccer and volleyball. With a tie and a loss during the weekend, the women’s soccer team fell out of first place and trails Sonoma State by two points. The men’s soccer team also trails by two points to Sonoma and Cal State Stanislaus. Women’s volleyball sits in third place with two wins behind undefeated Cal State San Bernardino. source: goccaa.org

THE ORION • JOSH ZACK

The Chico State men’s golf team beat out 19 other teams to win the Grand Canyon University Fall Invitational on Oct. 4 in Litchfield Park, Ariz. The Wildcats won the tournament with a total of 859, one stroke in front of the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. Senior Kyle Souza took the individual first place of the tournament with a 7-under par and a 209 total and senior Eric Frazzetta finished tied for seventh with 1-under par. Source: chicowildcats.com

A documentary created by Chico State students highlighting the intense soccer rivalry between Spain’s two most famous clubs, Real Madrid and F.C. Barcelona, will premiere at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the El Rey Theatre. Tickets for “El Clásico: More than a Game” will be $5 and $2 for Chico State students. Source: chicowildcats.com

Wildcat of the Week

Brianna Furner women’s soccer In one of the most energydriven weekends for Chico State women’s soccer, Brianna Furner stood solid between the pipes for the Wildcats. The freshman goalkeeper shutout UC San Diego in the ’Cats 0-0 tie with a season high eight blocked shots. She outdid herself again Sunday when she blocked 12 of the 13 shots she faced in the 1-0 loss against Cal State San Bernardino. Wildcat of the Week is a regular feature meant to acknowledge the contributions made by individuals to the team. Winners are chosen by The Orion sports staff from nominations taken from all sports. To nominate: sportseditor@theorion.com

The Chico State men’s soccer team ended a bittersweet weekend with a win on Friday followed by a devastating loss on Sunday. In the two home games this weekend, the Wildcats took the 2-1 victory against UC San Diego with a game-winning goal by senior midfielder Chris Akwaja, but lost 3-2 to Cal State San Bernardino on a goal in the 89th minute. The ’Cats bombarded the Tritons with shot after shot during Friday’s game. The Chico offense showed power by notching 12 shots and 11 corner kicks just in the fi rst half. “UC San Diego is a very good team,” coach Felipe Restrepo said. “We took some pressure, but we gave a lot of pressure.” The Tritons’ defense held the ’Cats until the 32nd minute when true freshman forward Octavio Guzman knocked one in to put Chico up 1-0. The goal followed two corners and escaped from the crowded box to the feet of Guzman, who shot it from the edge of the box deflecting off a San Diego defender and into the goal. “It’s normal for us to have 12 shots,” Akwaja said. “All we just hope is for two or three to go in.” Chico continued to apply offensive pressure against the Tritons. At the other end, the ’Cats defense was doing its part keeping San Diego away from the goal. The Tritons tied the game in the 59th minute, when Triton sophomore forward Sam Ball tried to pass the ball in front of the goal, and the ball deflected off ’Cats sophomore midfielder Luke Palmer. “It was just unfortunate,” said Sam Evans, the ’Cats sophomore goalkeeper. “Luke was trying to get around his defender. He just slide tackled and took a bad touch, but it’s not really his fault. It just happens sometimes.” Akwaja gave back the lead to the ’Cats on a shot from outside the box and away from the Triton goalkeeper’s grasp. “I saw the keeper already off his line, so the right side of the keeper was wide open,” Akwaja said. “So I hit the fi nesse shot.” The ’Cats faced a dangerous play when a foul was called in their own box. With the entire Chico team on the goal line, they blocked the indirect free kick by the Tritons to save the game. “We’ve been playing very good team defense in the last couple of games,” Evans said. “We’ve been pressing teams high and forcing them to make mistakes, and they’ve

THE ORION • BRETT EDWARDS

GAME 1

GAME 2

Chico State

2

Chico State

2

UC San Diego

1

Cal State San Bernardino

3

been turning the ball over a lot.” With the win, the ’Cats took first place in the California Collegiate Athletic Association North Region. Their triumph was short-lived, however, when Cal State San Bernardino came into town and robbed the ’Cats of a game that fans had already penciled in as a win. Chico fought back twice to tie the game against Cal State San Bernardino. Unfortunately for the ’Cats, when it looked like the game was going into overtime, the Coyotes shot the game-winning goal in the 89th minute. Coyotes junior forward Derek Taddei dribbled along the goal line and shot it in for his second goal of the game. His fi rst goal gave the 1-0 lead to the

Coyotes off a chip shot over the ’Cats keeper in the 22nd minute. The two goals from Chico came off sophomore defenders Elliot Plummer, in the 26th minute, and Mike Janjigian, at the 73rd minute. Both were started by crosses and were tapped into the net from up close. The ’Cats fell to third place in the CCAA North Division with 5-3-2 record, 6-3-3 overall. They look to bounce back from the loss to the Coyotes and take sole possession of fi rst place when they play away against San Francisco State at 12:30 p.m. Friday and Cal Poly Pomona at 11:30 a.m. Sunday. Dariush Dias Azmoudeh can be reached at dazmoudeh@theorion.com

VOLLEYBALL

’Cats extend win streak to 6, reach top 25 GAME 1

Sarah Goad STAFF WRITER

Chico State’s volleyball team swept away the competition this weekend on the road against Cal State Dominguez Hills and Cal State L.A. The ’Cats moved up into the top 25 ranked teams among Division II schools last week. They are currently ranked 24th in the nation. “We’ve been playing really well, so we expected to do well,” Head coach Cody Hein said. The team was pumped about being nationally ranked and was excited to put it on display, Hein said. It is great recognition for the team and it was definitely something the team earned, junior outside hitter Makenzie Snyder said. It was a weekend of successes for Chico State with Dominguez Hills first up for the ’Cats on Friday. Chico dominated that match with a clean sweep 25-18, 25-15 and 28-18. The Wildcats’ win paired with a loss by UC San Diego gives Chico State a two-game lead over fourth place UC San Diego in the California Collegiate Athletic Association. Junior setter Sable Villaescusa had a match-high 35 assists in the game against the Toros. Freshman outside hitter Ellie Larronde pounded down five kills in only eight attempts. Junior opposite hitter Jessica Leek hit .400 and had 13 kills in the game. Snyder led the team with 14 kills and freshman defensive specialist Lauren Orozco led the team in digs with 16. As a team, the ’Cats hit an outstanding .330 against Cal State Dominguez Hills. The ’Cats swept all three matches against Cal State L.A. on Saturday,

Chico State

3

Dominguez Hills

0

GAME 2

FILE PHOTO • MICHELLE REINMUTH

INTO THE RECORD BOOKS [right to left] Jessica Leek, Alex Shurtz and Jacqueline Johnson set up for a play against Cal State Monterey Bay Sept. 30. The Wildcats are on pace to make history with a .824 winning percentage. bringing their overall record to 14-3. This game was the sixth straight win for the ’Cats, which brings their CCAA record to 9-2 at the halfway point in the conference season. “We’ve been doing a really good job of not letting up,” said junior defensive specialist Jessica Simms.

Snyder etched herself a spot in the Chico State record books as she collected the 1,000th kill of her career. “It was a cool feeling,” Snyder said, who didn’t even know she had reached the milestone until a teammate told her after the game. Snyder was six kills shy of the

Chico State

3

Cal State L.A.

0

record coming into the game on Saturday and became only the sixth player in Chico State history to reach the mark. Lindsay Macias, who played for Chico 2005-2008, currently holds the all-time record for kills with 1,475, and Hein said he is sure Snyder will be able to pass Macias’ record next season. “When you have someone that good on the team it’s easy to have confidence,” Hein said about Snyder. Snyder ended the game with nine kills as well as 12 digs. Orozco collected 10 digs and Simms had eight. Simms and Orozco were accurate with passing and digs, which was huge for the team, Hein said. The team has been playing well because they haven’t had too many weaknesses. “I think we are playing amazing together,” Snyder said. The team just needs to keep doing what it’s been doing and not lose sight of its goals, Simms said. Friday is “Pack the House” night against Humboldt State where the team hopes to fill every seat in Acker Gym, and Saturday the team takes on Sonoma State in “Dig for a Cure” night to support breast cancer research. With a win over Sonoma, the ’Cats would move into second place in the CCAA. Both games start at 7 p.m. in Acker Gym. Sarah Goad can be reached at sgoad@theorion.com

STAT ’CAT >> VOLLEYBALL

6

The number of kills junior outside hitter Makenzie Snyder needed to become only the sixth Wildcat to join the program’s 1000th kill club. Also the number of games the ’Cats have won in their current winning streak.

CHICO STATE ATHLETICS

4

The number of Wildcat athletes that were named California Collegiate Athletic Association Player of the Week last week that included: Amy Schnittger, Kyle Souza, Isaac Chavez, and Kasey Wall.

MEN’S SOCCER

12

The number of first half shots by the men’s soccer team in the Wildcats’ 2-1 win against UC San Diego Friday. The win put the ’Cats in first place until they lost 3-2 to Cal State San Bernardino.


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SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011 |

B3

SOCCER

Women’s soccer stuck scoreless at home Andrew Delgado STAFF WRITER

One goal, one double overtime match, one tie and one loss. The Wildcats of women’s soccer played the maximum minutes and were shut out this weekend by UC San Diego on Friday before Cal State San Bernardino stole the win in the 88th minute Sunday. Friday, the ’Cats took on the Tritons of UC San Diego on the University Soccer Stadium’s “Think Pink” night. Coming into the match, the Tritons were ranked second in the nation and sat atop the south division in the California Collegiate Athletic Association. With an 8-0-2 overall record, the Tritons were favorites going into the match. The Tritons had control from the start, having possession for the first 15 minutes. Senior midfielder Lisa Webster was able to break the Tritons dominance of possession and set up a scoring opportunity for the ’Cats, taking on three defenders while on her way up for a shot. But she lost control of the ball after beating the last defender. In the 28th minute the ’Cats had an open look at the net after a corner kick was played short and was placed perfectly for freshman midfielder Halima Abdelshife only yards out, but the ball was kicked high and over the crossbar. The half would end with an open look for the Tritons but not enough power behind the shot to get past Wildcat goalkeeper Brianna Furner. The end of the half and the rest of the game saw what might have changed the dynamics of play. The referee had a couple questionable calls for both sides. With 14 minutes left in the half, a free kick opportunity arose for the Tritons. The referee wasn’t sure about the placement of the ball and would eventually move the ball 20 yards closer to goal just outside the 18-yard box. The ’Cats bench got up and

NO LUCK Senior forward Lisa Webster and the Wildcats couldn’t find the back of the net this weekend despite firing off 25 shots combined against UC San Diego and Cal State San Bernardino. The ’Cats head out of town to face San Francisco State Friday and Cal Poly Pomona Sunday.

GAME 1 Chico State

0

UC San Diego

0

GAME 2 Chico State

0

San Bernardino

1

was frantic about the call and kept telling the ref about the time that was being wasted. After about a minute of contemplation, the kick was given a final spot and the kick was taken. No goal was to come of the free kick, but time was wasted. Sophomore defender Carly Singer and senior midfielder Blake Lopes took notice of the referee’s calls that were incorrect about possession issues. Despite the referee, the ’Cats regrouped during halftime and focused on offense and bringing the ball to the outsides for more space, Singer said. “We made adjustments during the half and tried not to play frantic like we did in the first half,” Lopes said. Three minutes into the second half, the changes paid off for the ’Cats, when Webster crossed the ball into the front of the goal finding freshman defender Alyx Williams. Williams headed it to the far post, only to have Triton goalkeeper Kristin Armstrong just get enough on the ball directing it just wide of the net. The match became more physical as it progressed. A series of tackles from both teams found players on the floor, when Webster was able to control the ball and have a shot hit the post and crossbar and pop out for the goalkeeper to grab and save. The ’Cats now were in control of the ball and shots kept pouring in, but none were able to tally a goal. The intensity of the game continued to mount as the clock ticked on. In the first half the ’Cats were outshot five to two, while in the second half the ’Cats outshot the Tritons 11 to five. Goalkeepers from both teams were on top of their game not

30

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

allowing a goal the whole night, taking the match into double overtime and bringing the game to a 0-0 draw. The ’Cats take this tie as a motivation builder, Lopes said. The Tritons are a really good team and the tie builds the team’s confidence, which they wanted to take into Sunday’s match where the ’Cats would face the Coyotes of Cal State San Bernardino. Head coach Kim Sutton wanted the team to play with the intensity they did against San Diego, she said. “The team that played Friday night wasn’t the same team that showed up,” she said after Sunday’s match.

Throughout the game the ’Cats weren’t able to get anything going in their favor. Passes were intercepted or short, and the Coyotes were faster to get to loose balls and more in sync than the ’Cats. The first half, the ’Cats were able to muster up three shots to the Coyotes’ eight. The second half the ’Cats had opportunities but weren’t able to convert. “There was about 10 minutes of momentum, but we couldn’t hold on to it,” Sutton said. The ’Cats seemed to be heading for another overtime match with only two minutes in regulation left, until a Coyote was able to beat a defender to get into the six-yard box and found an open

player who drilled a shot past Furner. With only 1 minute and 34 seconds left to play, the ’Cats stormed down the field gaining a corner but would not be able to find the equalizer. “Being consistent is hard, at any level,” Sutton said. With six games left on the schedule, the ’Cats look to finish out strong and make a push in the conference, she said. The ’Cats start their push for the playoffs back on the road as they face San Francisco State at 3 p.m. Friday and Cal Poly Pomona at 2 p.m. Sunday. Andrew Delgado can be reached at adelgado@theorion.com

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B4 |

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SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

Chico State women’s club soccer team finds formation Sarah Bohannon STAFF WRITER

Opening the season Oct. 1 with a loss to UC Berkeley, the women’s club soccer team remains confident about the rest of its short season. “The tough part about club soccer is the season is so quick,” head coach Brandon Masai said. Having only played one game, the team is scheduled to play only two more before the West Coast Soccer Association Regionals take place at the end of the month. The catch – they have to win both games to qualify. Returning only six starters, this season’s team is one powered by new legs and a new attitude. “We’re a younger team than last year, but we’re looking strong,” said Ally Renshaw, one of the team’s starting returners. “Once we connect, we play really well.” The UC Berkeley game proved just that. Coming out with a slow start, the team was not really communicating for about the first 10 minutes of the game, Renshaw said. But after UC Berkeley scored two goals in that first half, the young team finally connected and figured its game out, she said. “We controlled the whole game after that,” Renshaw said. In the second half, a cross in to Ailsa Smith led to a point for Chico after Smith put her head on the ball and sent it flying to the back of the net. UC Berkeley was a tough first game, but Smith said her team is looking good this season. “I wouldn’t say we have the

THE ORION • BRETT EDWARDS

GOING IN FOR THE KILL The Chico State women’s club soccer team is in prime positioning for regionals at the end of October. The Wildcats need two wins heading into their final two games against Stanford and UC Davis in order to qualify for the West Coast Soccer Association Regionals. size, but we have the skill, that’s for sure,” Smith said. Smith is excited about the fresh players on the team this season, as last year’s team kind of fell apart due to commitment issues, she said. After making it to regionals last year, only 11 members

of the team gave up their Halloween weekend and actually went. “We want to go to regionals with a full team this year,” Smith said. “Kind of show people who Chico is, and not that we’re only a party school, but that we can actually play

sports, too.” With runs through Bidwell Park, even during the rain, and practice three times a week, this year’s team has the dedication the returning members of the team have been hoping to rebuild. This, as well as the team’s

skill, has left coach Masai with high hopes for the season, he said. Even though the returning group may be small, it is full of key players, Masai said. With Renshaw playing stopper, Krista Winkler at center mid and Smith at striker, the team has talented, experienced athletes across the whole field, Masai said. Freshman Stephanie Vaquerano has been pinpointed as a player to keep an eye on, as she just looks like a natural goal scorer, Masai said. All of the freshmen and sophomores starting on the team have earned their spots, and starting positions are chosen by the player’s performance at that week’s practice. “It’s basically a constant battle for a starting spot for them,” Masai said. And it looks like competition is something these women better get used to. The next two games the ’Cats play are against top teams Stanford and UC Davis. Smith said no matter what, the team really wants to beat rival UC Davis this year. Since she has been on the team, Chico has only tied or lost to UC Davis, she said. With Davis beating Stanford 8-0, it looks like they are going to be a tough game this year, but luckily for the ’Cats, they get to take on Stanford first – which is a game the women are going to win, Renshaw said. “Stanford is usually pretty good,” Renshaw said, “but with the skill we have, and after the game against Berkeley, I think we have a strong chance to dominate them.”

STAFF WRITER

If you don’t put in the work, you don’t get the fish. Clearly, the Chico State Bass Club has been putting in plenty of time and effort, which has resulted in four teams attending regionals this year. In September, the club went to Clear Lake to compete against 40 other schools. “We were able to squeeze in three teams of two,” said Chris Souder, adviser for the club. “Thirty-nine teams ended up fishing. We took first, fifth and 30th by just sending three teams.” The teams got to pre-fish in Clear Lake, which gave them an advantage, Souder said. “It’s still hard to believe we won,” said Matt Wetmore, a senior construction management major who was part of the first place team at Clearlake.

Wetmore, Nick Carrico, Tony Dayton and Bo Harkins competed in the Clear Lake tournament and also qualified for regionals. Tom White. Frank Vogt, Bryce Hayes and Lucas Russell already qualified for regionals during the Shasta tournament earlier this year. The Shasta tournament was the first out of the four tournaments this season where Chico State qualified two teams for regionals. “We want more of our teams to go to regionals to up our chances versus having a stacked team and just doing it to get the money,” Wetmore said. The top five teams, one from each of the five regions in the United States, compete in the national tournament. Last year, Chico State qualified two teams for nationals. “These guys are doing it for fun,” Souder said. “It’s not about the money. We don’t party with this money. We actually need it

AILSA SMITH club soccer captain

Sarah Bohannon can be reached at sbohannon@theorion.com

Chico State fishing hook regional spot Dario Gut

I wouldn’t say we have the size, but we have the skill, that’s for sure.

HOOKED Seniors Matt Wetmore and Nick Carrico proudly display the fish that won them a spot in the Western Division Regional Championship. The next regional tournament is Nov. 17-19 at Saguaro Lake in Mesa, Ariz.

PHOTO COURTESY OF • COLLEGEFISHING.COM

Souder said. so we can keep going.” MORE ON With the everThis November, BASS CLUB increasing reputation regionals will be in of the school and the Arizona, Souder said. Information can club, Dayton, the club “We sent four be found about president and a senior people to nationals in the Bass Club at public administration Kentucky last year,” the FLW College Fishing website major, has noticed Souder said. more interest in the They are now getting or at the Chico State Bass Club club. sponsorships from Rod Facebook page. “We want the and Rio companies freshmen so we can that are always getting to “They are getting to keep the culture,” Dayton said. know students at tournaments, “The depth in this club is very important. The sport is getting Souder said. It’s always nice to be a lot bigger since college fishing recognized by sponsors, started.”

The increased number of schools competing has made Chico State a popular and competitive school to fish against. “A lot of people don’t realize there is a club on campus,” Dayton said. “I know we are small compared to the other teams, but we were ranked top 10 in the nation last year. There is no other school that has four teams in their regional tournament.” Dario Gut can be reached at dgut@theorion.com

VILLAESCUSA: The junior setter leads the ’Cats on their 6-game win streak continued from B1

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

THE PERFECT SETUP Villaescusa has only been practicing her volleyball passes since junior year of high school.The junior now has a hand in 80 percent of the Wildcats points this season.

when I found out that I was good.” Growing up in Rancho Cucamonga, Villaescusa was always around sports and always knew she wanted to be an athlete, she said. “My dad being a black belt, my mom played softball, and brother playing basketball, we were always around sports,” she said. “If we weren’t playing it, we were watching it on TV.” During her time at Alta Loma High School, Villaescusa was a part of her No. 1 sport, basketball. Being a basketball family, Villaescusa chose to play basketball as a freshman, and it wasn’t until her junior year of high school that she tried out for the volleyball team. Leaving basketball behind wasn’t a hard move for Villaescusa, and she received nothing but support from her parents, who would drive miles and even hours at times to see her play, she said. After two years of developing a passion for the game, a few Division I colleges took notice of the 5-foot-8-inch senior and offered her a scholarship. “I wanted to play volleyball in college,” she said. “I wanted to play right away and at a DI college I knew that wasn’t going to happen. Chico was going to allow me to play my first

year.” Athletics are a key component of Villaescusa’s life, but so are her family and academics. Villaescusa wanted to stay in California and Chico State was the best fit, she said. It was far away enough from home to get the college experience, but close enough to go back home if she needed to. Her decision to attend Chico State wasn’t based solely on her ability to be on the court, but the importance of time she would have for her studies, she said. “Chico being a DII school, athletics wouldn’t be the main focus as DI schools are,” she said. An English major, Villaescusa can be found studying at her desk when she’s not battling on the court. For her efforts toward a strong academic position, Villaescusa was awarded the 2010-2011 Dr. Hal Charnofsky Memorial Award. The Charnofsky Award is given to CCAA student-athletes who have distinguished themselves in the classroom and in their sport. “I am a quiet person,” she said. “When I am not doing volleyball, I am doing my schoolwork or hanging out with my roommate.” Villaescusa’s roommate, Jessica Leek, is not just a friend, but a fellow Wildcat on the court. A junior

opposite hitter, Leek came into the program with Villaescusa, and both have grown together. Leek has noticed that Villaescusa has come out of her shell and has stepped up to become the leader she was meant to be, Leek said. “She strives to push the team,” she said. “She is just a great leader.” Villaescusa came into the leadership role early as a freshman. Head coach Cody Hein recognized her leadership quality when he recruited her and has been impressed in her growth while at the college level, he said. “Being a setter, she is the quarterback on the team, the one who runs the plays and the one everyone relies on,” he said. Starting out, Villaescusa wasn’t the leader she has grown to become, she said. Lacking confidence in herself, she said it was her teammates who helped mold her into the player and leader she is on the court today. Villaescusa is a stellar person, Hein said. She is a great volleyball player, but an even better human being. “She is the little engine that could,” Hein said. “Constantly moving the team and guiding them to where they need to go. Andrew Delgado can be reached at adelgado@theorion.com


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SPORTS

FALL 2011

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011 |

B5

WILDCAT SPORTS SCHEDULE

MEN’S SOCCER

L 3-2

WOMEN’S SOCCER

W 3-1

VOLLEYBALL

W 3-0 W 3-0

W 8-0

Aug. 18

@Dominican (scrimmage)

@UC Davis

L 2-0

Aug. 27

Sept. 1

@Seattle Pacific

T 0-0

Sept. 3

@Western Washington

Sept. 9

Sonoma State

Sept. 11

W 3-0

W 2-0

Sept. 2

Alaska Anchorage

Southern Oregon (scrimmage)

T 1-1

Sept. 2

Western Oregon

Sept. 1

@Seattle Pacific

L 1-0

Sept. 3

Dominican

W 3-0

W 2-1

Sept. 3

@Western Washington

T 0-0

Sept. 3

Western Washington

W 3-0

L 2-0

Sept. 9

Sonoma State

W 2-1

Sept. 6

@William Jessup

W 3-1

@Cal State Stanislaus

W 2-0

Sept. 11

@Cal State Stanislaus

L 2-1

Sept. 9

@Sonoma State

W 3-2

Sept. 16

@Cal State Dominquez Hills

W 5-0

Sept. 16

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-1

Sept. 10

@Humboldt State

L 3-0

Sept. 18

@Cal State L.A.

T 2-2

Sept. 18

@Cal State L.A.

L 1-0

Sept. 13

Simpson

W 3-2

Sept. 23

@Cal State Monterey Bay

L 2-1

Sept. 23

@Cal State Monterey Bay

W 3-0

Sept. 16

San Francisco State

W 3-0

Sept. 25

@Cal State East Bay

W 1-0

Sept. 25

@Cal State East Bay

W 2-1

Sept. 17

Cal Poly Pomona

W 3-2

Sept. 30

Cal State Stanislaus

T 0-0

Sept. 30

Cal State Stanislaus

T 1-1

Sept. 23

@Cal State San Bernardino

W 3-0

Oct. 2

Humboldt State

W 2-0

Oct. 2

Humboldt State

W 1-0

Sept. 24

@UC San Diego

W 3-0

Oct. 7

UC San Diego

W 2-1

Oct. 7

UC San Diego

T 0-0

Sept. 28

@Cal State Stanislaus

W 3-0

Oct. 9

Cal State San Bernardino

L 3-2

Oct. 9

Cal State San Bernardino

L 1-0

Sept. 30

Cal State Monterey Bay

7 p.m.

Oct. 14

@San Francisco State

12:30 p.m.

Oct. 14

@San Francisco State

3 p.m.

Oct. 1

Cal State East Bay

7 p.m.

Oct. 16

@Cal Poly Pomona

11:30 a.m.

Oct. 16

@ Cal Poly Pomona

2 p.m.

Oct. 7

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

7 p.m.

Oct. 21

Cal State East Bay

7 p.m.

Oct. 21

Cal State East Bay

4:30 p.m.

Oct. 8

@Cal State L.A.

7 p.m.

Oct. 23

Cal State Monterey Bay

2 p.m.

Oct. 23

Cal State Monterey Bay

11:30 a.m.

Oct. 14

Humboldt State

7 p.m.

Oct. 28

@Humboldt State

3 p.m.

Oct. 28

@Humboldt State

12:30 p.m.

Oct. 15

Sonoma State

7 p.m.

Oct. 30

@Sonoma State

11:30 a.m.

Oct. 30

@Sonoma State

2 p.m.

Oct. 21

@Cal Poly Ponoma

7 p.m.

Nov. 4

CCAA Semifinal

TBA

Nov. 4

CCAA Semifinal

TBA

OCt. 22

@San Francisco State

7 p.m.

Nov. 6

CCAA Championship

TBA

Nov. 6

CCAA Championship

TBA

Oct. 28

UC San Diego

7 p.m.

Nov. 11-13

NCAA Championship Far West Regional

TBA

Nov. 11-13

NCAA Championship Far West Regional

TBA

Oct. 29

Cal State San Bernardino

7 p.m.

Nov. 19

NCAA Championship Quarterfinal

TBA

Nov. 19

NCAA Championship Quarterfinal

TBA

Nov. 2

Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Dec. 1-3

NCAA Championship Tournament Final Four

TBA

Dec. 1-3

NCAA Championship Tournament Final Four

TBA

Nov. 4

@Cal State East Bay

TBA

Nov. 5

@Cal State Monterey Bay

TBA

Nov. 11

Cal State L.A.

Nov. 12

Cal State Dominguez Hills

Nov. 17-19

NCAA Championship Tournament Pacific Regional

Dec. 1-2

NCAA Championship Tournament Elite Eight

Aug. 17

Yuba College

Aug. 23

L 3-1

CROSS COUNTRY Sept. 10

@Humboldt Invitational

Oct. 22

CCAA Championships

Sept. 24

@Stanford Invitational

Nov. 5

NCAA West Regional

Oct. 1

@Willamette Invitaional

Nov. 19

NCAA Championships

Oct. 15

@Santa Clara Invitational

Note: Home games are in bold. Tournaments are in italics.

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SPORTS

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

Leila Rodriguez ARTS EDITOR

Girl with the flower

PHOTOS BY • CHELSEA BEIGHTS

WORLD OF COLOR [above] Many gathered for the Butte County Watercolor Society’s National Juried Water Media Exhibit. [below] Henry Nice, 16 months old, held by Thomasin Saxe points out Don Harvie’s beautiful watercolor piece. [right] A viewer gazes at “Rock Narrative” by Leslie Mahon-Russo.

1078 Gallery watercolor exhibit refreshes its walls with local artists’ painted pieces Juan Mejia STAFF WRITER

With the flow of wine and taste of bread complemented by a hunger for exposure, artists drew a crowd to the 1078 Gallery to exhibit their works of water media art. Displaying 30 of the top watercolor entries ranging from cabbages, people, places and landscapes, the Butte County Watercolor Society brought forth the National Juried Water Media Exhibition. “Our goal is to let the public see the varied and diverse kinds of art that can be created with watercolor,” said Cynthia Sexton, treasurer of the Butte County Watercolor Society. Most of the exhibits held in Chico are varied art forms, and although some of them contain a few watercolor paintings, this exhibit encompasses an all-watercolor spectrum, she said. The varied works contained 18 Chico entries and were offered for sale to interested patrons. With prices ranging form $160 to $1,800, three paintings sold within the first hour. The Watercolor Society was recently branded as a nonprofit organization and forayed into the sale of watercolor art. Artists embraced the

hectic ambience as excitement what I try to bring out.” filled the room as formal awards After the awards ceremony, were presented. more than 80 people linIn second place was gered in the room talking, “Mon Petit Chou,” which sharing stories and taktranslates to “My Liting sips of their wine as tle Cabbage,” a painting they moved from painting by Carol Preble-Miles, a to painting. It’s not Chico water media artist. There are a number of easy, but “I liked the curvy galleries around town, that’s one but this is the only event shape, the colors that of the were in it, the light, all that purely celebrates things that attracted me water media. things to it,” Preble-Miles said. The jurors made their I like “It’s not easy, but that’s judgments on not just one about the aspect of originality or one of the things I like medium. about the medium.” technical proficiency, but Patrons gathered in the on an ad-hoc basis, looking gallery to appreciate the at each piece individually. diversity of topics, nar- CAROL PREBLE-MILES “Balance, craft, compoArtist ratives and stories that sition, pureness and what the aquarelles brought story it tells,” said Amber to each canvas. Talks of Palmer, president of the originality, technique and touch Butte Water Color Society. “The lingered in the room. ability of the artist as well as how Hovering around the room, one striking the painting is.” couldn’t help but land on “Nest,” Don Harvie, an artist from Stockanother local favorite. Sally Dimas ton, took home first place. The created an abstract of sorts using exhibition will be held until Oct. 22 latex, rubber cement and other at the 1078 Gallery downtown. paint-obtrusive tools to craft an “You as the viewer will have your inverted painting where the focus own feeling,” Sexton said. “We hope goes not into what is painted, but that you will be excited, inspired or rather the white nest underneath. maybe even catch the spark that the “I like to paint to music, even if artist has put in their work.” it’s just in my head,” Dimas said. “It’s so easy to miss these beauti- Juan Mejia can be reached at ful vignettes of things, and that’s jmejia@theorion.com

“ “

“50/50” Cancer is an uncomfortable subject. Most people stumble over generous comments for a cancer patient. But when a person is faced with cancer, he or she has no other option but to face the mirror with a naked head. “50/50” explores all aspects of a young person dealing with cancer. Based on a true story of screen writer Will Reiser’s rare “back cancer,” the movie stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Seth Rogen as best friends battling this awful time with lots of laughs, women and weed. From the doctor coldly announcing the patient has cancer, to the four-hour chemo sessions and the uncertainty of survival — it’s all expressed in this movie. I didn’t believe my mother when she told me she had cancer. I laughed and said, “No you don’t.” She was too calm sitting next to my father with no hint of worry in her eyes. I walked upstairs, locked the bathroom door and cried on the floor. The next two years of my family’s life were drastically different. Her first chemo session was after the cancer was removed. Her doctor was vague about she was going to face for the next four months, but the sight of different colored chemo bags for every different cancer shook her into reality. “You get a big couch and a big needle,” she said. “And that was the first time I cried about my cancer.” It’s hard to watch the strongest woman you know battle a disease. A memorable scene from the movie is the shaving of Levitt’s character’s hair. The scene eased the pain and shock of cancer, replacing it with humor. My mother had no problem when it was time to shave her mane. She wore her bald head beautifully and didn’t mind the stares that trailed her path everywhere we went. Peggy Armocido, Chico State administrative support coordinator and cancer survivor, has been involved with the Chico State Wildcats Relay For Life Team for six years now, Armocido said. No matter what the situation, when a person first hears the word “cancer” it is always the same, she said. “People hear cancer as a death sentence,” Armocido said. “Sometimes it is, but there are so many survivors.” This drama/comedy opens the conversation of cancer for our generation. “50/50” is heartfelt and honest, and Levitt’s performance brings a person into his pain and fear of cancer. “Young people beat cancer all the time,” Seth Rogen’s character said to reassure his best friend. Those words are easy to say, but it isn’t always true. I lost my grandmother and a dear friend to cancer and finding the right words for comfort is hard. For my family, wiping my mom’s tears, holding her hand during chemo, “TMZ” and lots of prayers coaxed the pain. Like the movie poster says, “It takes a pair to beat the odds.” Leila Rodriguez can be reached at artseditor@theorion.com

VIRAL VIDEOS >> speaking

“He’s got a rolled cigarette, hanging out his mouth. He’s a cowboy kid.” Foster the People “Pumped Up Kicks” 2011

“Brad Pitt!” YouTube Even little babies swoon over hot stuff Brad Pitt.

“Nicki Minaj - Super Bass By Sophia Grace Brownlee” YouTube This little diva doesn’t miss a verse or beat when rapping “Super Bass.”


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

PREVIEW ●=

rati

ng

a look at upcoming distractions

> Compiled by Mark Rojas

“Green Lantern” - Blu-Ray and DVD

Stand up comic unleashes jokes, laughs at Laxson

- Starring Ryan Reynolds

●○○○○

Funny man Steven Wright brings his dry humor to Chico as the first comedian on Chico Performances’ chart of comedy acts.

DC and Warner Brothers shattered box office records with “The Dark Knight.” Unfortunately, the

Eli Gibbs STAFF WRITER

“Green Lantern” only shattered fanboys’ dreams of an epic story of a ringbearing superhero. Ryan Reynolds, who stars as “Hal Jordan,” is no stranger to playing a superhero. He made an appearance as “Deadpool” in Hugh Jackman’s “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.” Jordan comes in possession of an energy ring of mass destruction that earns him admittance into the Green Lantern Corps., which is like an intergalactic U.N. with club rings. This film doesn’t live up to the source material and is a real let down, which makes every comic fan’s wish of a “Justice League” film more faint. “Horrible Bosses” - Blu-Ray and DVD -Available now

●●●●○ Work sucks, especially if you’ve got bosses like these. In tough economic times you may have no choice but to stick with your scumbag boss just to get by. Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis are sick and tired of being pushed around by their horrible employers. Fans of “Arrested Development” and “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” will love the performances of Bateman and Day as they try to free themselves from the oppression of their daily grind. A great supporting cast featuring Jennifer Aniston, Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx make this movie a great way to spend the afternoon between midterms.

“Footloose” -In theatres Friday

Chico State will welcome Steven Wright to the Laxson Auditorium stage Friday. Since his fi rst appearance on “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” in 1982, Wright has continued to expand his career in both comedy and fi lm. Often, when people hear him perform, they think of “K-Billy’s Super Sounds of the ’70s” in Quentin Tarantino’s “Reservoir Dogs.” His comedic reputation and unmistakable voice have gained Wright a reputation in the world of stand-up comedy. His self-described comedic MORE ON approach offers “surrealis- STEVEN tic, abstract comments about WRIGHT everyday life,” Wright said in Wright pera phone interview. Wright was inspired by forms Friday Johnny Carson, who he at the Laxson watched almost every night Auditorium: since he was 14 years old, he 7:30 p.m. said. He also drew inspiration from many other comedians $ 23 students at that time, including Robert Klein, Richard Pryor, George $30 general Carlin and Woody Allen. admission Wright recalls coming across a radio station that happened to be featuring a double album of Allen’s, he said. Inspired, Wright told jokes that were straight and to the point, yet never lacking in creativity. From the perspective of the audience, Wright felt there shouldn’t be much time lost between laughs, he said. He wants to get to the point quickly. The exaggerated simplicity of Wright’s joke delivery is what makes his observations so clear. Wright is not using enthusiasm to convey his point but, rather, allowing the wit of the joke itself to stand alone as the reason to laugh. Wright’s on-stage unenthusiastic presence was never intentional, he said. He recalls being nervous and concentrating on his next joke. “The only thing I did on purpose was write the jokes,” Wright said. Chico Performances Director Dan DeWayne attempts to get at least three comedy acts on campus per year, though that does not necessarily mean stand-up comedy. “It’s a sign of a great artist that Steven’s work can make you think on many levels,”

PHOTO COURTESY OF • JORGE RIOS

HA HA HA Steven Wright derives his material from abstract comments about everyday life, he said. DeWayne said. Because that’s what great artists do — they make you think about things. Wright’s comedy speaks across all generations. Stand-up comedy is a type of art that requires no props and no instruments. Standup comedy is just a comedian and his or her microphone, trying to move an audience with laughter. All types of art allow people to react to the world, Wright said. “But stand-up is just a man and his thoughts,” he said. Those observations on the world not only make people laugh, they also make people

think, Wright said. With 32 years of stand-up experience, it is clear that comedy is what Wright is truly passionate about, though he has made many fi lm and television appearances as well. “I think many students may recognize him as the guy on the couch in Dave Chappelle’s, ‘Half Baked,’” said Michael Mettler, a senior business administration major. “But standup comedy is how he got his start, and I think it’s important that we appreciate how great he continues to be.” Eli Gibbs can be reached at egibbs@theorion.com

●○○○○ I have some beef with this

BIG RED Little Red played by Zoe Karch [right] visits her “grandma” diguised as The Big Bad Wolf [left] played by Cambria Brown.

remake — there’s no Bacon in it. However, having Kevin Bacon make an appearance in the remake of the 1984 dance flick would not make this movie enjoyable, or worth it. Hollywood will always look for a quick and easy buck by updating a stagnant classic for a new generation instead of creating original content. “Red Dead Redemption” (Game of the year edition) - Available for PS3 now

●●●●● Rockstar games, famous for the “Grand Theft Auto” series, has created a western sandbox world full of adventure, wildlife and zombies. Follow the story of “John Marston” as he blazes a THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

trail in the American frontier with gunfights, grizzly bear knife fights and some south-of-the-border outlaw rustling. This special edition comes loaded with all the downloadable extras including “Undead Nightmare,” which puts

Children’s musical visits beloved classic fairy tales Miguel Rocha STAFF WRITER

Marston agains the invading zombie hoards. Joe Jonas “Fastlife” -Available now

●○○○○ In an attempt to absorb whatever diminishing spotlight that still shines on the Jonas name, middle sibling Joe has gone solo and changed his style. He’s traded guitars for synthesizers in this club jam’s attempt that falls strictly in the generic category. In the song “Love Slayer,” Joe proclaims he’s come to “shut this thing down.” He must be talking about his career.

Little Red Riding Hood may have left the deceiving wolf empty-stomached, but she fed the crowd with a heart warming performance. Many children and parents ventured through lush foliage and whimsical fairy tales for the “Into the Woods” musical at Laxson Auditorium Wednesday night. “Into the Woods” presented a modern take on several of the most popular children’s stories from “Cinderella” and “Little Red Riding Hood” to “Rapunzel,” including a twist that places them in forest scenery. It is an unexpected play in which Red Riding Hood was almost devoured by the wolf. Gowned in blue, pearl and violet attire — like that found in any common fairy tale — the children took the stage. The younger child actors filled smaller roles in animal-like costumes with pig noses and deer facades, presenting a fresh and innocent look. Thirty-one performers, between the ages of 6 and 18, took the stage for the third time that day to perform “Into the Woods,” with no

apparent nervousness. The play was hosted by Chico Performances, partnered with Blue Room Jr., and attracted hundreds to be delighted by a different take on children’s tales. The 21-year-old director, Loki Miller, said it was very engaging and is proud of the work the kids have done, especially in handling the violent scenes, such as when the wolf attacks Little Red Riding Hood, and the drunken scene performed by Cinderlla’s stepmom and sisters. “I’m very proud of the risk,” Miller said. “They are vulnerable to judgment and criticism.” It’s hard for kids to grasp the concept and focus from the very beginning, Miller said. Violence is not easy to do and you have to be brave. Miller, whose father was an actor and director, has directed eight shows over three years. He is enrolled at Butte College, but is not a regular student and has no major. As Miller created “Into the Woods,” kids auditioned at the Blue Room Theatre. Miller had to decide which child actors could handle the roles and the songs. “It’s hard, the responsibility with the role,” Miller said.

Once everything was set up, the chosen ones practiced three times a week. Meghan Culberson, a junior history major at Chico State, attended the show as a requirement for one of her classes, and at the end was happy she went. Her favorite scene was when they were all on the stage together, Culberson said. She also liked the music, the creative costumes and the way all the fairy tales were tied together. “Never seen any like that,” she said. It must be exhausting to perform for the third time in one day, but the actress who played Cinderella, Gia Giambalvo, said she took it as it came. “Cross any bridge as we get to it,” Giambalvo said. The 16-year-old from Chico High School said the kids performed well and she is amazed how they pulled it off. The story wasn’t written for children, referencing several scenes, but she liked how the kids are learning to express themselves and move their bodies, she said. Miguel Rocha can be reached at mrocha@theorion.com


arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011 |

C3

BEE’S PRETTY LITTLE THINGS

Cost-friendly college wardrobe

Brittany Comas STAFF WRITER

THIS WEEK’S ITEMS:

Student budgets and couture fashion don’t really go hand in hand. Well, for most of us at least. I know it can be a drag to check the latest issue of Vogue and dream about the Chanel

Marc by Marc Jacobs natasha leather bag $350 Distressed leatherette messenger bag $33

handbags and Burberry scarves so, I’ve picked out a few fall staples that are just as chic as the designer versions but way more cost effective. These three pieces are all under $100 and will remain in your fall wardrobe for years to come. Brittany Comas can be reached at bcomas@theorion.com

Burberry London Wool and cashmere-blend peacoat $795 Old Navy Women’s Cropped Woolblend Peacoat $60

Jimmy Choo Dundee over-theknee leather boots $1,395 Chinese Laundry trippin overthe-knee boot $80

$ 350

$ 795

DESIGNER

VS. DEAL

This Burberry peacoat is made with a cashmere wool blend. A cozy coat is essential in this rainy Chico weather but with a whopping $795 price tag, skip the Burberry brand and go with this Old Navy wool blend peacoat for only $60. Minus the cashmere and the designer label, this wallet friendly version is just as fabulous and comes in seven different colors. Buy a couple of these and stay warm all season.

VS.

$

$ 1395 This Marc by Marc Jacobs leather bag is a great piece to add to your handbag collection. Every woman needs a versatile bag that will hold anything from your textbooks to a tube of lipstick. With a $350 price tag, save this one for your Christmas list and choose this $33 distressed leatherette messenger bag from Forever 21. This bag has a removable/ adjustable shoulder strap and magnetic buttons. Convenient and cute.

VS.

33

SAVINGS: $735

VS.

$ 80

$

60

These leather Jimmy Choo over-the-knee boots are so dreamy. Made with black leather, these boots seem like the ideal pair but they’ll cost you up to $1,395. That’s almost half of what it costs to attend Chico State. Stay in school and opt for the Chinese Laundry pair for only $80. These comfortable flat boots can go from day to night and will look chic with leggings, tights or your favorite skinny jeans.

SAVINGS: $1,315

SAVINGS: $317 STAFF COMMENTARY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GOOGLE.COM

No final curtain in sight for theater world THE ORION • MICHELLE REINMUTH

FANCY FINGERS Matthew Lyons [above] plays at the 1078 Gallery downtown for fans of his six-stringed sound as part of the Guitar Project created by Warren Haskell.

Brooke Hespeler STAFF WRITER

Classical guitar enchants fans at intimate concert Kayla Wohlford STAFF WRITER

Local classical guitar fans were treated to an evening of wine and music Saturday as the Classical Guitar Project showcased young musician Matthew Lyons at the 1078 Gallery. Seated on a chair in a corner of the room, Lyons introduced himself and jumped right into playing acoustic guitar. Lyons, 19, started playing guitar when he was 8 years old and has competed in various guitar competitions. His experience and skill immediately caught the crowd’s attention as the soft melodic sounds filled the room. “I felt really good about it,” Lyons said. “Performing is exciting.” Throughout his set, Lyons interacted with the crowd and discussed the types of guitars he enjoys playing and what chords he would be using for the next song. He explained what song he would be transferring into and how he developed it while tuning his guitar. Once the tune began fans closed their eyes and swayed their heads to the harmonies. “Matt’s talent and taste assured me that the future of music is in good hands,” Mark Wilpolt said, a Chico State math professor and concert attendee. With a small, but engaged crowd seated facing the guitarist, the musician

performed slow classical guitar pieces. The moving sounds could be felt through Lyons’ instrumentals. The set was more intimate than a typical concert, Lyons said. “Most guitarists love to play in this type of setting,” said Warren Haskell, a well-known guitarist and creator of the Guitar Project. “It’s smaller, intensive crowds.” Created in the summer of 2007, the Guitar Project features classical guitarists and world-class concert performers. Haskell wanted to publicize the art of guitar-playing and does not think there is much of a forum for classical guitar music, Haskell said. “I just want to do what I can to keep it alive,” he said. A guitar instructor and enthusiast himself, Haskell seeks out performers, and people also contact him to play at the Guitar Project, Haskell said. He heard about Lyons when at a guitar event in Sacramento. “When you’re involved in this world you hear about performers,” he said. The guitar project features different guitarists once a month at the 1078 Gallery. Kayla Wohlford can be reached at kwohlford@theorion.com

A few years ago, my 16-year-old brother walked into my room where I was rocking out to my iPod. He raised his eyebrows and asked what I was listening to. “‘Spring Awakening,’” I said. “It’s a Broadway musical about — ” He cut me off with a snort. “Lame. You’re such an old lady.” He exited the room before I could finish my sentence. I will never understand how theater has received such an “uncool” reputation. These days it seems to take a backseat to television and movies, which look like a mere fad in comparison to the theater’s more than 2,500 years of rich history. Theater has been at the forefront of movements, often giving a voice to people who would otherwise not have a platform on which to stand and deliver their message. The musical “Show Boat” premiered in 1927 and raised the issue of race relations, a good 40 years before the civil rights movement. The song “You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught,” from the musical “South Pacific” in 1949, delivers a scathing message about xenophobia and extreme patriotism, which is still eerily apparent today. “Hair” marked the dawning of the Age of Aquarius and helped to usher in the age of flower power, the messages of the youth of the ’70s. “Angels in America,” “The Normal Heart” and “Rent” all deal with topics relating to the AIDS epidemic in the ’80s, a taboo territory very few others have dared to delve into. It is an interesting dynamic. Theater seems to be the only art form that people can dismiss entirely. We don’t ask people if they like music, art or films — we ask what their preferences and favorites are.

Why is theater a polarizing medium — one that people either like or don’t like? To shut an entire branch of the fine arts out because an English teacher forced you to read “Hamlet” when you didn’t want to or because you saw “Cats” one time and thought it was awful. “Cats” is awful, but one play shouldn’t close someone off to an entire world of ideas and expression. Chico has a rich theater community and Chico State has a thriving theater department. The university’s department heads work hard on the lineup for each season that is as educational as it is entertaining, said Cynthia Lammel, a professor of theater. With their choices of shows, they hope to give students some perspective on theater history — where it’s been, where it is and where it’s going. “In my experience it seems that students appreciate when Chico State does newer and edgier works they’re already familiar with like ‘Rent,’” she said. “Whereas with Aristophanes’ ‘The Birds’ they’re not sure what to make of it at first, but they get on board really quickly.” The faculty works very hard to make the more difficult and antiquated works accessible to as wide an audience as possible. Last weekend, the campus production of “Little Shop of Horrors” opened, treating students and community members to the experience of live theater. In November, the theater department will bring to life “The Revenger’s Tragedy,” a Jacobean piece wrought with authority defiance, murder, lust and lots of blood. So skip a night of bad reality TV and revel in the entertainment medium that’s been a favorite of Caesar, Elizabeth I and Charles Dickens — something that is definitely going to last longer than any cultural relevance Snooki or “The Situation” might have. Brooke Hespeler can be reached at bhespeler@theorion.com


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arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

CARRY US AWAY [right] Anthony Green of Circa Survive works up a sweat screaming his lyrics to a captivated audience at Senator Theatre. [below] Anthony Green joins the mob of fans while crowd surfing.

Circa Survive jumps in, rallies fans at Senator Nicole Walker STAFF WRITER

An explosion of confetti and bodies surfing the crowd highlighted by neon lights set the stage for a night of rock survival. With a high pitched voice that can move a crowd, Anthony Green, vocalist of Circa Survive, mesmerized the audience with his fierce eyes and dimensional vocals at the Senator Theatre Oct. 4. “Playing a show is like conducting an exercise, where the audience just surrenders to the sound,” Green said. This experimental, indie combination is created by Green’s voice alongside Colin Frangicetto on rhythm guitar, Brendan Ekstrom on guitar, Nick Beard on bass and Steve Clifford on drums. Coming from Doylestown, Pa., Circa Survive lit the stage with their first song “Get Out” and “Frozen Creek” from their “Blue Sky Noise” album released in 2010. They then went into playing all their songs from the “Appendage” album. The abstract lyrics and melodies can be interpreted however one perceives them, Green said. Similar to the name of the band, it draws one in, but doesn’t describe the music. The band’s name came to Frangicetto one day while with Green at a bar, Green said. Frangicetto wrote the words “City Slender” on a napkin and they started writing alliterations until they came up with Circa Survive. Inserting the word “survive” into the name was really important because they were trying to survive the music industry at that point in

time, he said. Other than that, fans can take the name and look at it however it makes sense to them, Green said. The combination of the sound and performance produced by the band is what makes their show stand out. While crowd surfing, Green managed to be supported by the audience physically and emotionally. “Jumping in the crowd is magical,” Green said. The connection made between the audience and performers while being held up by them is an interpretation of the need for one another, he said. He makes music for his fans and they support it by listening to it. However, Green wasn’t the only body being thrown into the crowd. Eric Jensen, a senior economics major, got right up there with Green. “Being up there, arm in arm, singing with Anthony on the rail was amazing,” Jensen said. Green’s voice is another characteristic that differentiates Circa Survive from other rock bands. The pitch of his voice is not what one would expect from his appearance, Jensen said. People are either drawn to Green’s style of vocals or away from it. “It is a sleazy, high pitched cringe,” Green said. Allowing the audience to be carefree and enjoy the show is a common goal while on stage, he said. People come to shows to take something away and reflect on who they really are. “I really just want people to feel alive,” Green said. “That’s it.” Nicole Walker can be reached at nwalker@theorion.com

PHOTOS BY • BRETT EDWARDS

A SOUND SALVATION

DJ’s college tour breaks records for largest show Eli Gibbs STAFF WRITER

I traveled down to UC Davis Oct. 4 to see one of the world’s top disc jockeys and producers on his College Invasion Tour. Apparently so did thousands of other people. In front of a crowd of more than 26,000 at the Home Depot Center in Carson, Tiesto made history for headlining the largest DJ event in the U.S. Porter Robinson has been opening for the entire tour, but for this special night, Tiesto added artists Dada Life and Diplo. Dada Life and Porter Robinson were the two other sets at the record-setting show. Dada Life is known for their high energy live sets, so it is fitting that they follow Robinson. Robinson, an upcoming DJ and producer, has already made quite a reputation for himself with sets all over the United States, including the Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas this past summer and Electric Zoo in New York. Even more impressive, Robinson is only 19 years old. Last week was my third time seeing one of Robinson’s live DJ sets featuring tracks he produced that he mixes with other popular tracks that fit his high energy, electro house genre. Dubstep has also been featured in his new EP, “Spitfire,” and elements of that show in his sets as well. It amazed me when I first saw him back in March. Robinson now tours with world renowned DJ Tiesto, who was named No. 1 DJ by DJ Mag three consecutive years from 2002 to 2004. Since 2005, Tiesto has never been ranked lower than No. 3. This is not the first time Tiesto has made history as a professional DJ. It adds to a large list of achievements that includes being the first DJ to play live on stage at the Olympics — 2004, in Athens, Greece. Tiesto is traditionally a trance and house artist but has begun producing heavier electro house tracks such as, “C’Mon” and “Maximal Crazy.” Fans from all over Northern California joined at UC Davis last week to see his elaborate live performance that featured visuals to accompany the music. An artist of this magnitude takes a lot of pride in his or her live performances. Watching Tiesto perform is an experience that leaves you understanding how impressive the art of mixing and producing music can be. It seems as if his hands never leave the mixer board as he is constantly manipulating aspects of the music and seamlessly providing a steady flow for the crowd with some high moments of intensity. Following this record setting event, Tiesto will be leaving the U.S. until returning to Seattle Oct. 28. He will then head to Las Vegas before going to San Francisco Oct. 30-31. You can find Tiesto’s Club Life, a podcast where you can listen to weekly mixes by Tiesto himself, on iTunes. Eli Gibbs can be reached at egibbs@theorion.com

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

HOT TUB HOTTIES Miami band Jacuzzi Boys frontman Gabriel Alcala shrieks during their performance at Duffy’s Tavern Oct. 4.

Band from Miami brings heat, beats to Duffy’s Jen Moreno STAFF WRITER

Chico may have gotten a cold night of rain Oct. 4, but the Jacuzzi Boys brought the heat. The Miami trio stopped by Duffy’s Tavern and joined Chico-based band Master Lady to please the crowd as they got out of the rain. Frontman Gabriel Alcala, 26, was surprised to get such a good turnout in a city they had never visited before. “I dig it,” Alcala said as fans threw compliments his way and shouted their thanks and appreciation for the music. “The people here are super nice.” After playing for more than 45 minutes, the crowd shouted for more, and more

is what they got, twice. Sounding a bit like ’80s punk and a bit like The White Stripes, the band cranked out songs about mermaids, baseball and walking to a girl’s house with sugar in their hair. Even more diverse than the song selection was the merchandise table. Long forgotten and tossed aside, but somehow making its way back into the music scene and up onto this table was a cassette, as in audio cassette. If that wasn’t good enough, vinyl was also available for purchase. For those loyal to technology from this decade, CDs were also readily available as well as novelty T-shirts. The ’Boys, actually men in their late 20s to 30s, have

been friends and playing for four years. They are currently in the beginning of a two-month tour of the U.S. and Canada. “A lot of people were telling us ‘Chico is going to be amazing,’” drummer Diego Brown said. “Getting here, we were a little weirded out, but it turned out awesome.” Coming to a small town, the band had no expectations of how the night would go, he said. A good turnout, fans singing along asking for more and enjoying themselves proved to leave an impression and a desire to return. The band currently has two studio albums and one live album under its belt and has considered making another, possibly late next year, bassist Danny Gonzalez said.

Master Lady opened for the Jacuzzi Boys about 10 p.m. to a half-crowded house as more patrons made their way in throughout the half-hour set. Loud music fi lled the bar while the bass reverberated everyone’s bones. The band consists of Elliot Maldonado, Brandon Smith, Rick Barnett and Kevin Berg who are all from Redding, except for Maldonado who is from Puerto Rico. They have been playing garage punk style together for more than a year. “We like to drink a lot of beer and we like to play music and just kinda get wild with it,” Smith said. Jen Moreno can be reached at jmoreno@theorion.com


daily dose events all week @ theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

<< T ODAY

T H U R SDAY

“We’re Here, We’re Queer”

FOCUS Film Festival

noon to 1 p.m. @Bell Memorial Union Room 210 Free

9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. @ El Rey Theatre $15 all day pass

Join Stonewall Alliance for their “Stonewall Riots Conversations on Diversity” where video clips and discussions will be held.

F R I DAY

Steven Wright

FOCUS Film Festival presents a variety of films about individuals living a fulfilled life with disabilities.

7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium $23 Student With 32 years of stand-up comedy experience, Steven Wright stops by to share his surrealistic, absurd and observational humor.

SAT U R DAY

SU N DAY

| C5

necessities T U E SDAY

MON DAY

Fundraiser for Open Doors Literacy Project

The David Grisman Bluegrass Experience

Collector’s Choice: James Snidle

6:30 p.m. @Cafe Culture $40

@ Sierra Nevada Big Room $28

International Dance Performances and Doin’ it Justice, is an a cappella chorus that sings songs of peace and social justice directed by Warren Haskell.

One of the true legends of acoustic string music stop by the Big Room for finger plucking fun.

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. @ University Art Gallery — Taylor Hall Room 111 Free

Northstate Public Radio’s Fall Membership Drive 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. @ KCHO 91.7 FM radio station For nine days, Northstate Public Radio (KCHO 91.7 FM, Chico & KFPR 88.9 FM, Redding) will produce its Fall Membership Drive.

Regionally and nationally known artists such as Robert Arneson, David Hockney, Tony Natsoulas and Wayne Thiebaud, from the collection of James Snidle.

LOCASH COWBOYS ILLUSTRATION BY JAMIE HAZELTON

options >> TODAY

T H U R SDAY

F R I DAY

SAT U R DAY

SU N DAY

MON DAY

The Shimmies

Rock Ridge

LoCash Cowboys

Dance Church

Bear-E-Oke

8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5

8 p.m. @ 1078 Gallery $10

8p.m. @ El Rey Theatre $10

10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture $8

9 p.m. @ Madison Bear Garden

FOCUS Film FestivalOpening Night shows a film by a film by Gerardine Wurzburg.

Join this band of brothers for a good show. MAERE, Beard & Broads and Ana Lucia share the stage with The Shimmies at Coda.

Rock Ridge is a hard driving traditional bluegrass band with some contemporary seasonings, originals and gospel music.

Chris Lucas and Preston Brust combine soul, rock, funk, pop, hiphop and gospel in a high-energy version of contemporary country.

Come to Cafe Culture with a skip in your step and praise in your heart for the mind, body and soul exercises with David Winglifter.

“A Night at the Roxbury”

YOUTH BAND SHOWCASE

Folk Music Fridays

7 p.m. @El Rey Theatre $23 advance

6:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture

2 to 5 p.m. @ Augie’s Fine Coffee & Tea Cafe

Greek week movie night at the El Rey.

Chico School of Rock Presents showcases local youth talent at Cafe Culture.

Get folky at Augie’s every Friday.

“Wretches and Jabbers” 7 p.m. @ Sierra Nevada Big Room

Boss 501 7:30 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5

Clouds On Strings

Enjoy a rocksteady evening of ska and soul with The Inciters, Francis Marion and Boss 501.

Clouds On Strings performs with ABSOLUTACRIS and Count Funkula.

7: 30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture

Calling all jukebox heroes – The Bear hosts a karaoke night every Monday until closing time.

T U E SDAY

Turner: Revisiting Japan 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. @ Janet Turner Print Gallery The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and Dr. Yoshio Kusaba display works of contemporary Japanese prints.

Dance Sanctuary 6:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture Swing on by Cafe Culture for an evening with Five Rhythms Dance Wave.

STAFF FAVORITES >> LYRIC “And when the wind does blow against the grain, you must follow your heart” — ‘Against the Grain’ by City and Colour. I like it because it is a constant remembrance of how to react when situations get tough.

>> Eli Gibbs Staff Writer

“Breathe out so I can breathe you in, hold you in” — ‘Everlong’ by the Foo Fighters. I’ve always liked the song but this lyric on its own reeks of intense passion. I’d die if someone ever told me that, in a good way of course.

>>Jen Moreno Staff Writer

“When will you realize it doesn’t pay to be smarter than teachers, smarter than most boys. So shut your mouth, start kicking the football” — ‘Lord Anthony’ by Belle and Sebastian. Those lines changed my outlook on life; They taught me that just because you are smart, doesn’t mean you are better than anyone, or above anything. >> Tercius Bufete News Designer


C6 |

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ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

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features

SEX COLUMN D2 WORD OF MOUTH D2 LOOKING BACK D3 FOOD COLUMN D4 THE NEBULA D5

Sustainable manufacturing major looks to expand. Story D4

D

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12 , 2011

Ally Dukkers F E AT U R E S E D I T O R

e t a t S o c i h C

FOR

The Ally Way

UP ’TIL PREPARE DAWN STUDENTS

Events encourage support for letter writing fundraiser Kathleen Dazzi STAFF WRITER

Hair fell onto the grass as sounds of razors and megaphones filled Trinity Commons. “Bald is Beautiful” is one of many events that kick-started fundraising efforts during Up ’til Dawn National Awareness Week Oct.3-7. Up ’til Dawn will take place Nov. 7 in Acker Gym,

THE ORION • ANDRE BYIK

BREAK IT DOWN Yeng Thao, a resident of Chico, break dances in the middle of campus with friends to show support for Up ’til Dawn.

where students will address and seal letters to family and friends in order to raise donations for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Located in Memphis, Tenn., the hospital is dedicated to cancer research and care. Chico State is a national leader in fundraising each year, and this year event organizers’ goal is to raise $200,000. Awareness efforts went nationwide last week when a photo of Sandra Torres, a junior sociology major, was featured in Times Square. The photo showed Torres with a shaved head as an example for girls at St. Jude. “Girls feel they need wigs or hair to look beautiful, but that’s not true,” Torres said. “Only society says that.” Torres was the only female of 56 volunteers at Chico State to participate last year, according to a September press release from St. Jude. Chico State has been a national champion four years in a row and has gained national recognition for raising more than $1 million since the beginning of its participation in Up ’til Dawn. Up ’til Dawn started in 1999 and has since raised more than $32 million for St. Jude. Public donations help run patient care and research at the hospital, providing more than 75 percent of the funding to cover the $1.7 million needed per day to operate the hospital, according to the St. Jude website. Families never have to pay for treatment. Making the $200,000 goal and claiming a national champion title are

THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

BUZZ CUT Wild Cuts stylist Jessica Harper shaves junior Connor Kaminski’s head at Up ’til Dawn’s Bald is Beautiful event Thursday. top priorities, said Regan FitzPatrick, Up ’til Dawn director and a recreation administration major. With adviser Larry Bassow, a Spirit of St. Jude Award recipient, unavailable the last few weeks due to health reasons, more responsibility has been placed on the students and directors to carry out fundraising goals, FitzPatrick said. FitzPatrick, Kendra Rippey and Jessica Vitorelo, also senior recreation >> please see UP ’TIL DAWN | D5

Events bring awareness to domestic violence Michaela Boggan STAFF WRITER

Getting out of an abusive relationship is not easy. Many victims of domestic violence let the memories of abuse fade and instead hang on to the good memories shared with their partner. Domestic violence is defined as any kind of abuse that happens within a current or previous intimate relationship, whether it’s emotional, physical or psychological, said Emily Martin, communication educator for Catalyst Domestic

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS ACTIVITIES “Telling Amy’s Story” — documentary and discussion

Feather River Tribal Health Oct. 25, time TBA

2 p.m. Thursday at the Culture and Community Center at Butte College.

The Ninth Annual Art Show in Recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness from 6 to 9 p.m. on Oct. 20 at Catalyst’s Administrative Office and Drop-In Center

At 5 p.m. on Tuesday at Langdon Engineering Center Room 300 Congregational Church of Chico — date and time TBA

Violence Services. In Chico, one in three families, one in three women and one in nine men will be affected by domestic violence, Martin said. During October, Catalyst

Domestic Violence Services holds a variety of public events to raise awareness of the prevalence of domestic violence in our community. Many cities in Butte County are participating

THE ORION • CHELSEA BEIGHTS

ART STORY Alexis Casillas, a sophomore social work major, stands with a display showing a personal story of a victim. in the 24th anniversary of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Catalyst Domestic

FASHION >> Snuggling up in scarves DICTIONARY

Text out [text • out] To weasel out of a prior engagement by text message. Not to be confused with text message breakup. “I can’t bear the thought of going on another blind date tonight, so I’m going to text out.” source: urbandictionary.com

o c i h C

“shek-o”

Violence Services is a nonprofit organization that was founded in 1977 and >> please see AWARENESS | D5

Binge drinking For most, the weekend starts on Thursday, while Wednesday is often associated with being wasted and Riley’s gives the excuse to go out on Tuesdays by offering dollar shots. Binge drinking is a widely celebrated college pastime for most students. This heavy drinking is a phase in most people’s lives but can turn dangerous for those who are prone to alcoholism. College is a time when the first inkling of adulthood sets in with jobs, deadlines, bills, responsibilities and the realization that your workload will increase after college. This often causes many students to drink in excessive amounts. In college towns like Chico, it is seen as socially acceptable to be hammered on a Monday night. Most parties revolve around alcohol and are sometimes even alcoholthemed, like “keggers.” My roommates and I are busy during the week while the weekends are usually reserved for partying and drinking. There are alcoholics on my dad’s side of the family, and my mom always cautions me about having these addictions in my blood. While I know my partying is temporary, I am statistically more likely than some of my friends to develop a problem. Children of alcoholic parents are four times more likely to develop a drinking problem, and children of alcoholics who were adopted into non-drinking homes have nearly the same risk of alcoholism than if they had grown up with their biological parents, according to a study relased in April by the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. A reason a lot of college students drink is to relieve stress. When you let your schoolwork pile up, a couple of tequila shots can work as a great distraction. Until you have to face your statistics homework the next day with a pounding headache, that is. Drinking is still a social activity after college, but suddenly, you’re drinking quality wine instead of plastic bottle vodka, and you are expected to maintain your balance and speak without slurring. It’s important to see college as a time where it’s acceptable to drink a lot and make mistakes but not to let these behaviors follow you after graduation. If alcoholism runs in your family, keep it in mind. Know that this is just a stage in your life, not a lifelong decision. It might take the irresponsibility, bad decisions and regret for some to learn from these behaviors. After all, college is a time for experimentation, so cheers to the responsible drinkers. Ally Dukkers can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com

Compiled by Chelsea Beights

“This is the softest

“I like this scarf

scarf I own. I

because it’s cozy

actually went out

and goes with

“I bought this scarf

and bought two

everything. I like

at the Grand

more of the same

to accessorize with

Bazaar in Turkey,

scarf in different

plain pieces like

and I just love it.”

colors.”

this.”

Bridgette Trowbridge

Courtney Chatha

Hayley Barrett

senior | anthropology

sophomore | biology

junior | journalism


D2 |

the

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FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

STAFF COMMENTARY

face SE X COLUMN>>

Lexi Brister S E X CO L U M N I S T

Public indecency The fi rst time I had sex in public could be described best in the two words “wild” and “exciting.” Getting down where you might get caught feels dangerous and naughty and can add a lot of extra excitement to sex. Plus, everybody loves a good story. To keep the law out of it you have to keep it subtle, but if you can, it’s a thrill like no other. I often hear the question, “Where’s the craziest place you’ve had sex?” The winning response came from my roommate’s fiance, who once woke up on one of his high school teacher’s couches. It wasn’t the teacher he was there for but instead someone the teacher was related to, which was scandalous enough. Doing it in a parent’s or teacher’s quarters — bed, house, wherever — is a fantasy often shared by men and women. The thought of getting my boyfriend off on a professor’s desk definitely gets me going, but I was warned by a teacher’s assistant friend to beware of inanimate objects. Apparently, having to hide a giggle fit when your boss asks if you moved her stapler isn’t as much fun as it sounds. After-hour nooky in an inappropriate place is fun, but for the truly bold, I recommend getting it on right out in the open when no one’s looking. My experience with public pleasure came when my ex-boyfriend and I were waiting for a table in a crowded restaurant bar, and I told him I wasn’t wearing underwear under my very short silk dress. The response I expected was something along the lines of what he’d do when we got home, so when he unzipped and had his way with me right there amid the elbow-to-elbow commotion, I was more than a little shocked — and turned on. It was wild and fun, but it was definitely tough to keep my composure. Thinking that no one in their right mind would do something like this, I was even more shocked when a male friend of mine told me he took his girlfriend on regular weekend trips just so that they could have sex on the train. She sits on his lap and they snuggle under a jacket, and while he said people do get uncomfortable with the apparent PDA, he doubts anyone suspects they’re doing anything other than cuddling. I know people who have tried similar tricks in movie theaters and concert halls, and from asking around I’ve learned that favorites seem to be dressing rooms and public bathrooms. Joining the famed “mile-high club” however apparently isn’t half as fun as it seems. Not a member myself, I’ve heard horror stories from people who have been caught or ended up with a head injury from turbulence. Cars, on the other hand, are a great place to get it on, especially in California where it’s legal. Just make sure you’re not parked near an area usually populated with children so you don’t become a registered sex offender. Also, whenever travel involves a road trip, a little “road head” is always fun, but watch your arms. Bumping the gear shifter or getting elbowed in the head can be mood killers. Lexi Brister can be reached at sexcolumnist@theorion.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF • KARRIE ANN SNURE

BONDING TIME [from left to right] Charise Sagent, Amy Wood, Kyle Wood and Kjerstin Wood sit together by the water as they pose for a family portrait.

Student faces discrimination for gay parent Kjerstin Wood STAFF WRITER

You know what’s gay? My mom. She “came out” to me my freshman year of high school when she started dating her partner Charise. When I found out, I was angry. Not because she was gay, but because she had been in a serious relationship for three months and hadn’t told me. Six years later, Charise and my mom are registered domestic partners and engaged. They couldn’t be happier, and my brother and I have never been in a more stable environment. For those of you who say our family isn’t normal, let me tell you this. I had a “father” for half of my life who was incredibly inconsistent, and I still barely know him to this day. I also had a drug-addicted stepfather, whose only important contribution to my life was my little brother. After my mom started dating Charise, we had family dinners, my brother and I were motivated to be involved in sports, and we weren’t allowed to watch TV until our homework was done. These are rules I never had within a “normal” family structure. My little brother is now 13 years old and facing ridicule from his peers because he has “two moms.” When I tell people my mom is gay, most reactions are either shrugging it off as nothing or the over-simplification of “Oh, that’s cool.” They don’t want to talk about it, and I can sense the discomfort my revelation has caused them. What most people don’t realize is that the only difference between “regular” families and mine is that we constantly have to defend

the people we love. People question our values and say that my brother and I are “damaged,” because we haven’t been raised in a “proper” family. I don’t see what is so wrong, because everyone in my family is healthy and happy. We all look out for each other and stand behind our beliefs. When others try to bring me down with hurtful language, I have the logic and knowledge to process why they are doing so. However, my brother has enough teenage drama going on and shouldn’t have to defend his family on a daily basis. My mom and Charise are hard-working, tax-paying individuals. They never ask for special treatment and just want to be able to express their love, like any other couple, by getting married. The idea that someone could hurt a child psychologically due to prejudices against a parent’s sexuality is simply disturbing. However, the sad truth is that it happens every day. I had people call me a dyke throughout high school, because my mom was gay. I would hide in the bathroom and cry, not knowing how to seek help and guidance from my very conservative community of Mt. Shasta. Part of the college experience is challenging your own opinions and beliefs or even just discovering that you are passionate about something. In my “Psychology of Hate, Prejudice and Violence” class, Professor Marvin Megibow discusses how outside stressors are what harm minority groups. This includes the idea of prejudice by association, meaning that even though a child may not be gay, they are prejudiced against solely because their parents are. The idea that children who are raised in families with same-sex parents are disadvantaged or damaged is antiquated and has no factual

basis. The thing that damages children of gay parents is the outside stigmas and stressors that society associates with the LGBTQ community. Society is taking steps to get closer to equality, but there is still a long road ahead. The FAIR Education Act was signed into law this year, which requires California public schools to include the contributions made to society by lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people. It also outlaws the use of discriminatory materials against the LGBTQ community in classrooms. This is a huge step, because education is the first step to eliminating intolerance. My mom is very strong-willed and always there for her children when people choose to be cruel. We don’t have any family friends who have a “gay family” like we do, so it is hard to relate to anyone else about the topic. It is legal in 20 states, including California, to marry your first cousin, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures website. However, only six states allow marriages between same sex couples, according to Stateline.org. It seems insane to me that with a divorce rate of more than 50 percent, the main concern with gay marriage is that they will “ruin the sanctity of marriage.” It seems unfair that my mom isn’t allowed to marry her partner she’s been with for six years, and Britney Spears was allowed to be married for 55 hours. As Liz Feldman, a comedian and writer, said on gaywrites.org, “It is very dear to me, the issue of gay marriage. Or as I like to call it, marriage. Cause you know, I had lunch today, not gay lunch. I parked my car, I didn’t gay park it.” Kjerstin Wood can be reached at kwood@theorion.com

Parents struggle in school as budget cuts put limits on campus childcare Stephanie Geske STAFF WRITER

With recent budget cuts to child care, lack of funds to expand the A.S. Child Development Laboratory and out-of-pocket child care costs reaching $1,200 a month, student parents are having a harder time getting their children into affordable child care. The A.S. Child Development Lab, which is set up so that students in the major can watch how kids interact, works on a sliding cost scale for children of students, faculty and staff, Director Susan Toussaint said. There is a two-year waitlist, with 140 children waiting to get in one of the three age group programs, Toussaint said. The lab’s program is one option for students with children, but even if they’re accepted, there are still obstacles for some student parents. Since it closes at 5 p.m., there’s no child care for night classes, and like most other child care facilities, they can’t care for sick children. When her son got pneumonia during her first semester at Chico State, Amy Ahl-Wright, a senior multicultural and gender studies major

whose children are cared for at the lab, had to drop out. Leaving in the middle of the semester meant her work and tuition money were gone. This wasn’t the only time she had to leave school, as the semester her daughter was born she had to drop a class and only finished six of her nine units, she said. She had to drop two courses last semester because the out-of-class work didn’t fit with her schedule. Those credits would have made her eligible for graduation. “If I only had those stupid classes,” Ahl-Wright said. One of her friend’s professors responded with a “that’s your problem” attitude when she said she was having a child and would need time off, Ahl-Wright said. Some professors consider having a child an option and students need to realize that having a child in college will affect their schooling, said Nandi S. Crosby, a professor of sociology. However, if a woman misses an exam because she goes into labor or has had a baby and isn’t allowed to make it up, that’s discrimination. Professors often use their best judgment and try to work with

THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

STUDENT TEACHER Morgan Ogilvie [LEFT], a senior child development major, plays with 2-year-old student Haruki at the Child Development Lab. the student, but it would be easier to have some guidelines for both sides to follow, Crosby said. Some people, like child development Professor Cindy Ratekin, don’t think a maternity leave rule would be a good idea, Ratekin said. Some students are going to want to come right back, and some will have complications and need more time, so it’s very individualized. “I can’t imagine faculty wouldn’t make adjustments for people,” Ratekin said. “It would

be the same thing if you had an illness.” The Child Development Lab staff is hopeful for a turnaround, Toussaint said. If they had room for more children, not only would child development students have more opportunities to learn from their observations, but more student parents would have access to a higher education. Stephanie Geske can be reached at sgeske@theorion.com

WORD OF MOUTH >> How would college be different if you had kids? “My dad had me when he was in school, and he hardly had any time for me. But he does feel like it was worth it.”

“It’d be a lot harder. My mom did it and she had a hard time being a mother and a student. Those are two of the hardest things to be in life.”

“It’d be a lot harder to find time for studying.”

Ryan Fedrizzi

Ivan Escobedo

Alisha Nelson

junior | biochemistry

freshman | business administration

graduate student | education


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FEATURES

LOOKING BACK >>

c. 1975

2001 | Humane society increases pet education THEN

c. 1980

c. 1980

c. 1981

c. 1983

August 29, 2001, vol. 47 Issue 1 “College life isn’t just for the dogs” Animals were most often left on the hot, empty streets of Chico once the school year ended and students headed home. Tracy Ross, then shelter manager at Butte Humane Society, said she didn’t know what caused the increase in animals but that animals were possibly left behind when students left town. Moving from residence halls to apartments or houses may make students feel suddenly independent even when they’re still living off money from parents. Pets, like children, require fi nancial, emotional and domestic stability, Ross said. Students need to realize that some property owners do not allow pets, and if they do, rent may be higher or an animal deposit may be required, she said.

If students consider adopting pets, they need to realize that they may still have the animal after they graduate. Yearly maintenance for a dog or cat could cost anywhere from $200 to $1,000, Ross said. Dogs and cats often flee places where there is loud music, smoke and screaming, she said. They may end up lost or injured in the streets and are lucky if the student got them registered. Butte Humane Society received between two and 20 strays a day and sometimes even more. The shelter experienced an influx of animals every May and June and had to stop accepting animals, because too many people tried to give them away. “When your roommate turns to you and says, ‘You know what this place needs? A dog,’ think long and hard about your answer,” Ross said. PET ADOPTION Lori Wells, a Butte Humane Society employee, holds one of the dogs that can be adopted at the facility.

c. 1985

c. 1986

THE ORION • JOSH ZACK

NOW c. 1988

c. 1988

c. 1995

The Butte Humane Society gets 15 to 30 animals every day, depending on the time of year and the season, said Dustin Alexander, communication and development manager for Butte Humane Society. “We about double our numbers during the summer because of the heat, and it’s kitten season and cats are breeding,” he said. Alexander doesn’t think that the increase is due to students abandoning pets. When people adopt at the humane society, they are educated about owning an animal, especially if they’re adopting a dog. A cat takes a lot less work, so the adoption process for them is easier, he said. A city law says that the Butte Humane

Society must hold found animals for five days to give owners a chance to reclaim them. After that, they become the Butte Humane Society’s property to put them up for adoption. One thing Butte Humane Society still tries to emphasize to prospective adopters is that an animal can have medical needs and expenses that can cost thousands of dollars at any time. If students can’t commit to taking care of it for years, not just in college, the animal might be better off in a more long-term home, Alexander said. The Butte Humane Society never turns away an animal, no matter how crowded they become. -Compiled by Stephanie Geske

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WEDNESDAY, OCT.12, 2011 |

D3

Campus Spotlight: Animal rights club promotes fair treatment THE ORION • CHELSEA BEIGHTS

The Chico for Animal Rights club was started in 2007 with a strict requirement that students had to be vegan, but this semester that requirement no longer exists. Daniella Galaviz, a senior double majoring in psychology and social work, is president of the club and encourages students to join. The club meets at 5 p.m. every Wednesday in the Bell Memorial Union Room 208. Growing up, Galaviz never liked meat, but when she came to college and started learning about the food industry she joined the club. She is currently a vegetarian and is trying to create an environment where all students no matter their diet preferences are welcomed. The Orion: What is C-FAR’s main goal? Galaviz: The purpose of the club is to spread awareness about where the food you’re eating comes from and how that food is being treated and prepared. A lot of students don’t know that the food industry is cruel to animals. The Orion: Who can join? Galaviz: Any student can join as long as they are willing to learn about the industry. It doesn’t matter if they choose to eat meat or not because it’s about being aware of where the meat comes from so that students can make better decisions. The Orion: What fundraiser events does the club have planned for this semester? Galaviz: Currently the club is relying on other corporations, such as People for the Ethical Treatment

ANIMALS Club President Daniella Galaviz, a senior psychology and social work major, teaches others about animal cruelty. of Animals, and Vegan Outreach for fliers and pamphlets that display information on animal cruelty. One of the fundraisers we have planned is to go door-to-door and ask people to donate or sign a petition, where they take an oath to become a vegetarian for a period of time. This period can be anywhere from one day to one month. The Orion: How is the club spreading awareness about animal cruelty? Galaviz: So far the club has passed out around 1,000 fliers in the community explaining information on how to get involved with the club. For the week of Halloween, the club is going to be making fact cards and attaching them to vegan candy because we really want to show students how easy it is to become a vegan or vegetarian. We are also planning on showing a video on the food industry to bring more awareness to the topic. The Orion: How can C-FAR make an impact? Galaviz: The club can bring awareness to the issue and provide students and the community with information on where to shop for foods that were not produced by a company that participates in animal cruelty. The club also hopes to make an impact among students by making them think about the food they’re eating every day. -Compiled by Michaela Boggan


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

Taylor Western FOOD COLUMNIST

The change in weather makes me really excited, because it seems like the ideal time to make my butternut squash soup. This soup is a perfect cold weather meal, and I started making it years ago with my dad once I was old enough to make Thanksgiving dinner with him. We have made various butternut squash soup recipes, but the big difference in this one is topping the soup with the sour cream and French onions, because it gives it a tart yet creamy taste. I got a lot of the ingredients from WinCo and some from the Chico Farmers Market on Saturday

Fall cold weather food: Butternut squash soup, baked potato mornings. What’s great about the market is that a lot of the produce is in season, and vegetables such as potatoes, onions and squash tend to be a lot cheaper here. Going to this market once the weather gets cold is a great idea, because students can get lots of vegetables for cheap and make a variety of soups. A lot of students think the only way to eat soup is from a can or a package of ramen noodles. Many would be surprised how fast and cheap making your own soup really

is, and if they did it once, they’d definitely make a habit out of it. Students can make several mixed vegetable soups, chowders or stews without all the extra sodium and with tons of fresh healthy vegetables and yummy pastas. The best part of making soup in the colder seasons is that you can make a large amount at the end of the weekend and have meals set up for the rest of the week, while even more leftovers can be frozen. Believe me, having a few meals frozen for whenever

you need them really comes in handy when you’re busy studying for finals and midterms or if you’re short on cash at the end of the month. I also added a baked potato recipe to provide a fast, easy option for the use of the extra ingredients. What to do with leftovers: Leftovers can be used to make potatoes au gratin. The 10-pound bag of potatoes for $1.98 from WinCo is a great way to get a lot for your money. For this recipe, peel

and slice five or six potatoes. Melt about a tablespoon of butter in a saucepan and add a couple of garlic cloves and the remaining half of your serrano. Add remainder of your half-and-half, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Layer sliced potatoes and sprinkle first layer with cheese. Finish layering and pour cream over. Top with cheese and French onions and bake in oven for 350 F for about an hour. Taylor Western can be reached at foodcolumnist@theorion.com

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP

45 minutes

serves 5

Ingredients

Directions

2 tablespoons peanut or olive oil $5 Big Lots 2 bags pre-cut butternut squash $1.99 per bag Trader Joe’s Half of one serrano chili 3 cents WinCo 1 onion priced per pound or 2-pound bag for $1.28 WinCo 3 cloves chopped garlic 3/$1 Chico Farmers Market, 38 cents WinCo 2-3 carrots priced per pound or 2-pound bag for 98 cents WinCo 2 cups chicken stock $ 1.90 WinCo Nutmeg to taste $1 Dollar Tree or Safeway (currently has spices for half off ) Salt and pepper to taste 1/2 teaspoon cumin $1 Dollar Tree 1/3 cup half-and-half $1.98 WinCo 1 tablespoon sour cream $1.18 WinCo 1 tablespoon French onions $2.03 WinCo

Heat oil in non-stick pan. Chop onion, carrot, pepper and garlic. Then add onion and garlic to pan and cook through. Add cumin and carrot and cook for a few minutes or until tender. Add chicken stock, squash and pepper. Bring to a boil and cook until tender. This should take about 20 minutes. Pour all squash mixture into blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Return to heat and add half-and-half. Adjust seasonings and add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Serve into bowls and top with sour cream and French onions.

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

SEASONAL SOUP Butternut squash soup can be prepared in 45 minutes and serves five people.

BAKED POTATO

1 hour

serves 1

Ingredients

Directions

1 potato 10 pounds for $1.98 WinCo 3 tablespoons cheddar cheese $5 per block or $1.98 for bag WinCo 1 tablespoon French onions $2.03 WinCo 1 tablespoon sour cream $1.18 WinCo 1 tablespoon butter $3.27 WinCo Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 375 F. Bake potato in oven for one hour or until cooked through. Add butter, cheese, salt and pepper. Top with French onions and sour cream from remaining recipe. Enjoy.

THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

YOU SAY POTATO Use some of the leftovers to make a baked potato topped with sour cream and French onions.

EQUIPMENT [from left to right] Alex Ward, Israel Ruelas and Matt Vella, senior sustainable manufacturing majors, dye gray plastic with a twin screw extruder in the lab. PHOTOS BY • AARON DRAPER

BUILD Joshua De Rush [RIGHT] and Troy Keenan, senior sustainable manufacturing majors, work a machine.

Sustainable manufacturing major improves environment, career prospects Tasha Clark STAFF WRITER

Senior Tony Arena spent the last four years majoring in mechanical engineering until a new major was created that will help him utilize his skills for his future occupation. In January, the sustainable manufacturing major became available to students at Chico State, said Daren Otten, the sustainable manufacturing program coordinator. Chico State is the only school in the nation to offer a bachelor’s degree in the major. Societal, environmental and business courses are offered, and students get to use manufacturing equipment that makes the most of recycled products. Jobs offered after graduating include process engineering, product design and technical sales. There are 14 companies in California that don’t have enough employees due to lack of education in sustainability, Otten said. Discussions on recycling need more attention, he said. Most things people

throw away can be utilized. Sustainable manufacturing majors should be able to effectively make a change by applying what’s learned in a classroom environment to a real life situation within the industry, Arena said. Students will understand how products are designed, produced and tested while meeting the business, environmental and social responsibilities associated with the production of goods, he said. There are 78 students in the program. “The more students we have to become a part of this program, the more effective it can become,” he said. Bree Russell, a freshman sustainable manufacturing major, is one of three women in the program and likes what the major offers, she said. Sustainable manufacturing involves green product design-based practices to prevent waste, compared to the recovery-based waste management process practiced today, she said. This is a practical approach to a more efficient production process. The program has received grants for

SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING MAJOR: 120 units Some courses double-count Does not require three years of calculus courses Courses taken will be based on environmental science, technology, business and society Starting salaries for graduates range from $40,000 to $70,500 Some careers offered for major: Manufacturing manager Production manager Product designers Process engineering

materials needed for the major, Arena said. The program applied for the Green Innovation Challenge Grant and received $250,000 to buy new equipment. Being the only program of its kind in the state played a major role in getting the grant, Arena said. The program uses a Haas CNC machine to create geometrical shapes from recycled items, he said. Students and organizations are using this for projects and presentations.

Students learn how to provide a solution to a problem by designing a part and programming the machine to create it, Arena said. Throughout the school year, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers will be creating a skateboard deck using composite and green materials, said Cody Leuck, a senior sustainable manufacturing major. In March, they will compete in Los Angeles at the WESTEC Manufacturing Challenge, hoping to qualify the green materials as structural elements, he said. The program is also working on creating biodegradable material, said Charlie Pooler, a senior in the major. Students are conducting active research involving e-wastes and e-scraps, he said. The program is trying to increase awareness and is looking for more students to become involved, Otten said. “Students can make a living and a difference with sustainability,” he said. “The opportunity is there.” Tasha Clark can be reached at tclark@theorion.com


features all week @ theorion.com

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011 |

D5

THE ORION • CHELSEA BEIGHTS

DISPLAY Wood cutouts in the Children’s Park at the Silent Witness campaign on Friday to represent victims.

FILE PHOTO • EMILY WALKER

LETTER CAMPAIGN Students working at last year’s Up ’til Dawn event. Participants were given envelopes and letters to send to friends and family to ask for donations to be sent to St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital. This year the fundrasing event will be Nov. 7, and organizers want to raise $200,000.

UP ’TIL DAWN: Activities attract support for charity campaign continued from D1

administration majors and directors of this year’s event, attended a leadership conference in Memphis to learn new fundraising ideas and how to run a successful event. Though the executive board may be off to a good start, the bulk of the fundraising contribution lies in dedication to the cause by students, Rippey said. “It is not up to us how much we raise, it is up to the students of Chico State, and I believe our campus has the heart and soul to get us there,” Rippey said. Students can sign up for Up ’til Dawn from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday or Thursday at the Up ’til Dawn table near Meriam Library until the day of the event. Letters, envelopes and postage are all provided, and participants need a minimum of 30 addresses

to participate. Groups or individuals can address and seal letters at any time from 4 p.m. to midnight on Nov. 7. At the event, students will receive a free T-shirt and will be entered into raffles for free spring tuition, $500 at the Wildcat Store, a laptop and for those who send letters to more than 50 addresses, an iPad. Donations help give a child a better life, Rippey said. “They dream of someday attending a university or driving a car — the things in life we take for granted,” Rippey said. “If finding a cure for cancer or raising enough money for a 5-year-old to go through chemo isn’t a good enough motivation to donate, then I don’t know what is.” Kathleen Dazzi can be reached at kdazzi@theorion.com

AWARENESS: Catalyst shelter shows violence victim support continued from D1

has continued to help victims of domestic violence in Butte County by providing intervention services and community education, Martin said. The services provided consist of free counseling to help victims deal with the long-term effects of domestic violence and temporary restraining order clinics, which offer legal advocacy for victims and prevention programs for all ages, she said. The shelter called HAVEN, or Home Away from a Violent Environment Now, holds 28 beds and provides housing and services for victims and their children for up to six months. There is also the Cottage Program, a form of transitional housing where a family can reside for 18 months so victims have the time to transition into safe, more permanent housing, Martin said. It also provides a 24-hour crisis line, as well as drop-in hours at its different locations

in Chico, Oroville and Paradise, which welcome anyone who identifies as a victim of domestic violence or has questions and concerns, she said. Catalyst Domestic Violence Services held the Silent Witness campaign at the Children’s Park last week, Martin said. The Silent Witness campaign is a public awareness event that displays freestanding, life size figures, each with a name and a story of a real person who has died as a result of domestic violence. The display encompasses families, men, women and animals that have been victims of domestic violence, Martin said. Each story that Alexis Casillas, a sophomore social work major, read made her realize that there can be many victims of domestic violence, she said. What really made her sad was that domestic violence doesn’t just affect victims but everyone within the family as well, she said. Casillas chose to major in social work, because she wants to be able to help families dealing with

nebula CROSSWORD CHALLENGE >>

COMICS >> CROSSWORD COURTESY OF BESTCROSSWORDS.COM

UNDERSTANDWICH by Cody Sevedge

BEAR JAIL! by Devon McMindes

JANK HANK by Griffon Lyles

Across 1- Ancient Palestinian 7- Embrace 10- Cereal grain 14- Fit with clothes 15- Clean air org. 16- Actress Garr 17- Evaluate 18- East Lansing sch. 19- ___ Rhythm 20- Given to vituperation 23- Word with panel or energy 26- After taxes 27- Ascends 28- I smell ___! 29- Prince Valiant’s son 30- IV units 31- Skill 33- Bingo! 34- Gasteyer of “Saturday Night Live” 37- Shoebox letters 38- Mom-and-pop org. 39- June honoree 40- Bit 41- “Treasure Island” monogram 42- Black gold 43- Aromatic herb 45- Fall from grace 46- PC monitor 47- Bedouin 48- Month of showers 51- Not for a Scot

THE ANSWERS! 52- Licorice-like flaFind this week’s answers online at voring theorion.com under the features tab. 53- Standing alone LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION 56- Needless bustle 57- Help 58- Recompense for hardship 62- Monogram ltr. 63- Hindu honorific 64- Sort of 65- Lawless character 66- Blue 67- Fashions Down 1- 7th letter of the Greek alphabet 2- Airline to Oslo 30- Graph 3- Bro’s counterpart 32- Mars 4- Lift up 33- Worshiped 5- Polite refusal 34- Pong maker 6- Formerly, formerly 35- Grannies 7- Made of cannabis 36- Maker of Photoshop 8- Overturn 44- Gangplank 9- Massive wild ox 45- Midday nap 10- Inflammation of the ear 46- Frank 11- Protection 48- Attach 12- Valuable collection 49- Dried plum 13- Locations 50- Gum 21- Fantastic 51- Currency unit in Nigeria 22- Area with coin-operated 52- Concerning games 54- Soviet news service 23- More secure 55- Coloured part of the eye 24- Bay window 59- Hole maker 25- Back streets 60- Actress Charlotte 29- Sean of “The Lord of the 61- Bad start?; Rings”

THAT MONKEY TUNE by Michael A. Kandalaft

GUY WITH A PHONE by Larry Pocino

domestic violence who are looking for a way out, she said. Sherry Gaile, a freshman social work major, decided to volunteer for Catalyst Domestic Violence Services when her social welfare institutions class required students to participate in 10 hours of community service this semester, she said. During the event, Gaile provided students with information on domestic violence, answered any questions they had and provided pamphlets about how to get help if in an abusive relationship, she said. Through her experience volunteering she has become more aware of the reasons people stay in abusive relationships and how a relationship can become abusive, Gaile said. “It is important for people to know there is help, support and services for victims who are ready to leave their violent situations or are not ready,” she said. Michaela Boggan can be reached at mboggan@theorion.com


D6 |

features all week @ theorion.com

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011

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The Orion - Fall 2011, Issue 8  

Chico State's independent newspaper

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