Page 1

Chico State’s Independent Student Newspaper since 1975

A SHOP OF HORROR

COFFEE POT COOKING

“Little Shop of Horrors” comes to life at The Harlen Adams Theatre as Seymour Krelborn tries to tame his blood thirsty, exotic plant. Story C2

Food columnist Taylor Western explains how to make Thai noodle salad in a coffee maker. Story D4 ideo theorion.com/multimedia VOLUME 67 ISSUE 9

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

FIRST COPY FREE

news all week at theorion.com

additional copies 50¢

Faculty plan to picket over pay raises

CAMPUS >>

polling its members to test the viability of a one-day strike. “As a result of this imposition, the no-strike provision in our contract is legally suspended and we are free to take concerted action,” said Susan Green, president of the Chico State chapter of the CFA in an email obtained by The Orion that was sent to faculty. Concerted activity could be grouping together and wearing the same thing, informational picketing or even the disruption of an organization through striking, said Andy

Andre Byik A SST. NE WS EDITOR

The Chico Cabaret will be presenting its “Rocky Horror Show” for the eighth year starting on Thursday and showing through Saturday. The show is sure to be an experience and often includes audience involvement. It is suggested for mature audiences only. There is a student discount available. Source: Artoberfest.org

Faculty, after an impasse in salary negotiations with the California State University, are planning informational picketing next month to persuade the administration to settle on pay raises. The planned picket on Nov. 9 will precede “concerted action” at Cal State East Bay and Cal State Dominguez Hills Nov. 17. The California Faculty Association is also currently

GREEK WEEK

Merrifield, chair of the CFA bargaining team during a webcast Sept. 28. The picketing at Chico State may occur on Nov. 9, Green said in the email. “We’re also asking CFA members to vote to authorize the CFA board to call a one-day strike on one or more campuses,” she said. Raises for faculty were halted in the 20082009 and 2009-2010 years due to massive cuts to the CSU, said Erik Fallis, a spokesman for the CSU Chancellor’s Office in an interview >> please see CFA | A9

Fees to rise if plan gets OK Kenny Lindberg NE WS EDITOR

An initiative requiring students to pay a fee toward student government representation passed a significant hurdle Friday as student representatives decided to move forward with the proposal. The plan could raise the overall California State Student Association budget by more than 60 percent if implemented. Currently, the association gets its money from two primary sources, CSSA executive director Miles Nevin said. The first is via membership dues from the individual 23 CSU schools, while the second comes from a grant from the CSU system. The new proposal, part of the CSSA’s 2015 Stability Plan, would have students pay a fee instead, thereby eliminating funds from the CSU system and from the association schools, he said. “Our goal is to not rely on them at all,” >> please see FEE | A8

Laxson Auditorium will be featuring Haitian singing group Creole Choir of Cuba at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. The performance will include native beats, songs and dance. Tickets are available at the University Box Office. Source: Student Announcements

Gate causes cost concern Sam Kelly STAFF WRITER

For those wanting to teach abroad or learn about opportunities, information meetings and workshops will be held Monday and Thursday. The meetings will be from 1 to 2 p.m. Monday and 11 a.m. to noon Thursday in the Student Services Center Room 466. Source: Campus Announcements

THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

REACHING FOR GLORY Rich Storelee, a senior business administration major, competes in the tugof-war competition during the Greek Olympics held Friday at Lassen lawn. In order to ensure a good competitive battle, the rules stipulated that students could not wear cleated shoes.

Occupiers keep cause sleepless Andre Byik A SST. NE WS EDITOR

Check out the Open Studios Tour put on by the Chico Art Center. The event will showcase 101 local artists who open up their studios to the public and show their work ranging from painting and photography to stained glass. The tour kicks off Saturday and ends Oct. 30. Tickets can be purchased at the Chico Art Center. Source:Chicoevents.com

In the early morning hours on Sunday, two Occupy Chico demonstrators are holding down the fort at City Plaza as a light sprinkle begins to fall. Chico’s nighttime occupiers are on duty at 3 a.m., set up on Broadway Street across from Bank of America, which has been a consistent target in the rhetoric of discontented protesters. They quickly shuffle to bring signs, tables and personal belongings under an overhang. There are people sleeping on a sidewalk nearby. “It’s been a goddamn learning experience,” said Kyle Goodman, who is a former Chico State student on planned educational leave. The night owl demonstrators, who pledge to keep Chico occupied day and night in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street protests across the U.S., were once in violation of Chico’s municipal code, which states City Plaza is closed from 2 a.m. to 5 a.m. A park ranger ordered the >> please see OCCUPY | A9

INDEX >>

INSIDE >>

World News

A2

Service Directory

B4

Weather

A2

Arts

C1

Police Blotter

A4

Daily Dose

C5

Features

D1

Opinion

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

NIGHT OWLS Protesters Kyle Goodman [LEFT] and a man who wants to be called Agueous [RIGHT] remain at their post at Chico’s City Plaza alongside Broadway Street at night. Occupy Demonstrators have vowed to keep the city occupied all day and night.

A new gate, built to limit use of a driveway used by Associated Students vehicles and delivery trucks, has generated student concern about the cost. The gate, which has already been installed on West Second Street where Hazel Street intersects campus between the Bell Memorial Union and the Student Services Center, will cost about $25,000 to $28,000, said David Buckley, executive director for Associated Students in an email. The total will factor in hardware, design and labor costs. Buckley is waiting on a final bill from Facilities Management and Services to determine the exact cost, he said. The money comes from the student union fund, Buckley said. The Wildcat Store and Dining Services may be asked to pick up part of the bill as well. The student union fund is made up of a $362 fee students pay each semester, according to Chico State’s fund definitions. Facilities Management and Services is installing a support arm for the gate, and access cards became available this week. It is hoped that the gate will be fully operational in a couple of weeks, Buckley said. The West Second Street gate is unrelated to the gate recently installed by Sutter Hall on Legion Avenue. That gate was funded by University Housing. The driving forces behind installing the gate were bringing safety and efficiency to a driveway that sees 50 to 60 deliveries per week, Buckley said. It is a “challenging” intersection to negotiate. Some students disagree that the gate provides additional safety, saying the gate may actually cause more safety concerns. “It’s useless to have it there,” said Jake Weber, a sophomore economics major. “It is only going to cause even more traffic problems.” It is much more difficult to cross West Second Street as there are no traffic lights or any way to notify oncoming traffic of intent to cross the road, Weber said. The gate is going to slow down people coming in and out of the driveway. >> please see GATE | A9

A10

Sports

TODAY

77 51

high low

Men’s soccer wins two on the road and are now on the hunt for post season action. StoryB2

Features Students participate in autism awareness programs on and off campus. Story D5

Opinion Learn how and why birth control is crashing your sex drive. Story A10


A2 |

NATION >>

news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

WEATHER >> today | sunny

thursday | sunny

777 511

friday | sunny

saturday | party cloudy

80 50

80 50

80 50

sunday | sunny

monday | sunny

79 50

tuesday | sunny

78 52

76 49

WORLD NEWS >>

A protest was held in Athens, Alabama in opposition of the state’s strict new immigration law. More than 200 people gathered. Supporters of the law claim it is necessary to protect American jobs, while opponents say it is racial profiling. The protest was peaceful, according to Athens police. Another rally is planned for later in the month.

Rome, Italy — The Occupy Wall Street protests against corporate power and government cuts have gone global. A demonstration in Rome that hosted thousands resulted in 70 injured people, 40 of which were police officers, from a Molotov cocktail thrown near a building. Police said those responsible for the violence were anarchists known as the “Black Bloc” who had moved in on the protest. Source: CNN

Harare, Zimbabwe — Three women have been charged with 17 counts of aggravated indecent assault against male hitchhikers. Seventeen men positively identified the three women as having raped them and most said the women offered them a drink laced with tranquilizers or forced them at gunpoint. The women were arrested after their car was involved in an accident. Police searched the car and found 33 condoms containing semen. Source: CNN

Sanaa, Yemen — At least 12 protesters were killed and 80 wounded during a protest against President Ali Abdullah Saleh at the capital in the city center. The Republican Guard Force, loyal to the president, used live rounds, tear gas and a water cannon against the protestrs who refused to leave. The street protests against the president have been going on for eight months. Source: BBC

Kenya — Medecins Sans Frontieres has reduced aid to Somalia in response to abductions of two aid workers. The abducted workers are Spanish women, thought to have been taken to Somalia by police. Although water, food and medical services are continuing, all other non-life-saving activities have been suspended. Two tourists have also been recently taken from Kenyan coastal resorts to the border of Somalia. Source: BBC

Havana, Cuba — Ladies in White leader Laura Pollan died Friday after a brief illness. The anti-government group has gained momentum over the years and vows to continue their work in Pollan’s memory. The group has defied government pressures by holding silent marches every Sunday on one of Havana’s main avenues, demanding the release of their loved ones. Each march ends with the group shouting “libertad,” or freedom. Source: Reuters

Source: CNN

Dream Act gets DREAM Act signed, remains hotly contested The California

According to Texas law enforcement, Mexican drug cartels have resorted to recruiting children as young as 11. There is evidence that more than six Mexican drugs gangs have recruiting centers in Texas. As a result, the state of Texas has joined the U.S. customs program “Operation Detour.” The program involves law enforcement meeting with families in schools and community centers and warning them about the dangers of working with cartels. Source: MSNBC

CALIFORNIA >>

More than two-dozen weapons were stolen Thursday from a Los Angeles SWAT training center. The weapons were being held in a rundown former factory building, which is in proximity to the SWAT headquarters. The 15 MP-5 submachine guns and 15 Colt .45-caliber handguns were specialized and require specialized parts to be used at all. The burglary is currently under investigation by forensics experts and police detectives. Source: Associated Press

AB130

Allows undocumented students, who have attended a California high school for three of more years and have graduated or the equivalent, to be exempt from paying non resident tuition. The student must also be enrolled in an institution of higher education.

AB131

Allows eligible undocumented students to receive Cal Grants, UC Grants and other types of financial aid

Griffin Rogers A SST. NE WS EDITOR

A bill that allows undocumented college students access to public financial aid continues to stir controversy even after it received Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature Oct. 8. The second part of the California Dream Act, Assembly Bill 131, will allow students who are living in the state illegally to receive Cal Grants, UC Grants and other types of financial aid. The law will go into effect Jan. 1, 2013. The first part of the Dream Act, AB 130, was signed by Brown July 25. Following the bill’s signing, Brown released a statement detailing his decision to allow financial aid to undocumented college students who are on their way to citizenship. “Going to college is a dream that promises intellectual excitement and creative thinking,” he said. “The Dream Act benefits us all by giving top students a chance to improve their lives and the lives of all of us.” The pool of eligible students under AB 131 will be limited, and will differ from current law, which allows undocumented students to pay resident tuition fees if they are in the process of obtaining citizenship or have graduated from a California high school. Gilbert Cedillo, the author of the Dream Act, released a statement following the bill’s passage through Senate Appropriations saying the students who will be eligible under AB 131 are highly qualified. “They are the ones who we look to the future for,” Cedillo said. “Their leadership and their productivity in our economy and our society.” But opponents to the bill say legal citizens won’t see the benefits of sending undocumented students through college because illegal students won’t be able to work legally in California after they graduate. Sabrina Lockhart, press secretary for the California State Assembly Republican Caucus, said the philosophy of higher education is for taxpayers to invest in other taxpayers to get better jobs. “It’s a promise for taxpayers to receive a return on their investment and education,” she said. Members of the Republican caucus voted against the Dream Act for two main reasons, Lockhart said. The first is that California hasn’t made immigration a priority, and second, the state is running low on resources. “Higher education is already on the chopping block,” she said. The reason for pushing back AB 131’s effective

2,500

undocumented students will qualify for AB131

1 percent

of Cal Grant funds will be impacted by AB131

75

percent of undocumented students come from Mexico and Latin American countries

25 percent

come from Asia, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean and the Middle East THE ORION • TERCIUS BUFETE

DEBATE Opponents of the Dream Act legislation signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown on Oct. 8 say that legal citizens won’t see the benefits of sending undocumented students though the college system, because once they graduate they won’t be allowed to legally work in California anyway. date to 2013 has to do with Brown’s concerns for the bill’s costs, as well as its timing during statewide tuition hikes, Lockhart said. The California Department of Finance estimates AB 131 would qualify 2,500 undocumented students for Cal Grants at a cost of $14.5 million, Brown said. During the bill’s trip through the Legislature, Assembly Member Tim Donnelly posted a referendum message on his website urging Californians to oppose the bill. “This measure will use your tax dollars to give Cal Grants to illegal immigrant students, at the same time as we are cutting classes and raising tuition for citizens,” Donnelly said. Chico State students have mixed opinions of the bill. Mahmoud Abed, a freshman geology major, said he can understand how an undocumented student must feel trying to obtain his or her education in another country. Abed is a foreign exchange student who has had his own struggles with receiving financial aid from Saudi Arabia’s government, he said. But he sees good points on both sides of the AB

131 argument. From an undocumented student’s perspective, Abed would want the financial aid to get a good job and make more money, he said. However, he doesn’t understand how the bill will decrease the number of people immigrating to California illegally. “Sounds like a green card to me,” he said. Korina Saavedra, a freshman social work major, has friends who are undocumented in her hometown, Hamilton City. Her friends came to California when they were sophomores in high school and are excited about the opportunity to afford an education, Saavedra said. Saavedra’s friends have been trying to obtain citizenship, but the process is slow because so many illegal residents are trying to apply, she said. Still, Saavedra is happy the Dream Act was passed, she said. “Most of the people that don’t have papers seem to have more drive,” she said. Griffin Rogers can be reached at grogers@theorion.com

Source: Sacramento Bee

Opinion Editor

Benjamin Mullin Sports Editor

Allie Colosky Arts Editor

Leila Rodriguez Features Editor

Ally Dukkers Photo Editor

Samantha Youngman Video Editor

Ashley Nakano

Business 530.898.4237 businessmanager@theorion.com Editorial 530.898.5627 editorinchief@theorion.com Fax 530.898.4799 www.theorion.com

Chief Copy Editor

Kacey Gardner Copy Editors

Melissa Hahn Alexandra Coltman Jenna Valdespino Sarah Brown Lauryn Baxley Amber Whiteside

Art Director

Liam Turner Editorial Design Manager

Features Designer

Lindsay Smith Ad Design Manager

Business Manager

Keaton Bass Asst. Business Manager

Lindsay Smith

Mark Rojas

News Designer

Advertising Designers

Account Executive

Tercius Bufete

Casey Burke Andrea Sitton Ashleigh Speaker Ashley Viegas Cory Young

Jonathan Bohlander

Advisers

Opinion Designer/illustrator

Dave Waddell Lewis Brockus

Chelsea Ross Sports Designer

Jamie Hazelton Arts Designer

Eric Rossicone

Kelsy Jehle

Ad Sales Representatives

Brett Baird Stephanie Burke Alex Cahn Jesse Duhamel

BUSINESS

Kenny Lindberg

Gerardo Rocha Jr.

BUSINESS

News Editor

College of Communication & Education | California State University, Chico | Chico, Ca 95929-0600

Online Editor

DESIGN

Almendra Carpizo

DESIGN

California holds the most solar jobs in the nation, according to a new report. The closest competing state in solar jobs is Colorado. More than 25,000 people are employed by manufacturers, distributors and other solar energy companies. The jobs represent a quarter of direct solar jobs in the nation. Even more growth in this field is expected.

Editor In Chief

EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL

C h i c o S tat e’s I n d e p e n d e n t S t u d e n t N e w s pa p e r , s i n c e 1975

Ad Sales Representatives

Brian Kay Elias Luevano Lauren McCarthy Nicole Shuba Jinghao Xu

,


news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

A3

condenƟal, compassionate and nonjudgmental

FREE Birth Control

Women’s Health Specialists *FREE ReproducƟve Health Care for Students!

pregnancy tests, birth control, HIV tesƟng, annual exams emergency contracepƟon, STI tesƟng/treatment, breast and cervical cancer screenings and much more! scan

barcode

530.891.1911 1469 Humboldt Road, Suite 200 Chico, CA 95928

to like

Loc al He us! alth Center | Close to Camp

cawhs.org

*Call to see if you qualify

Anatomy of a section in The Orion BSUT

"354

$ƃ]8&%/&4%": 0$5Ĥĝ ƃţĤĤ

ë

BMPPLBUVQDPNJOHEJTUSBDUJPOT

$PNQJMFECZ.BSL3PKBT

i#BUNBO"SLIBN$JUZw "WBJMBCMFOPX GPS14BOE 9#09

ëëëëĐ 5IF%BSL,OJHIUSFUVSOTUP

(SBQIJDEFTJHOTUVEFOUCBLFT  EFDPSBUFTDBLFTUPQBZGPSTDIPPM

#BUNBOJTTUBMLJOHUISPVHIUIF EBSLOFTTUPUBLFEPXOUIFDSJNJ OBMTUIBUSVMF"SLIBN$JUZ5IF DPNCBUJOUIJTHBNFJTTJNQMFZFU JOWJUJOH5IFSFBSFQMFOUZPGDPN

45"''83*5&3

4FMGEFTDSJCFE iSFHHBFNFUBMw CBOE -FJMB 5IF &YQFOEBCMFTIBTCFFOBTUBQMFJOUIF$IJDPDPO 3PESJHVF[ " 3 5 4& % * 5 0 3 DFSUTDFOFTJODFUIFJSGPSNBUJPOJO5IFCBOE XJMMCFUFBSJOHVQUIF4FOBUPS5IFBUSF4BUVSEBZ 5IF 0SJPO SFDFOUMZ HPU B DIBODF UP UBML UP MFBE TJOHFS(FPî8FFSTXIJMFIFFOKPZFEBSBSFRVJFU NPNFOUJOIJT4BOUB$SV[IPNF (JSMXJUIUIFnPXFS "MCVNTWT4JOHMFT 5IF0SJPO4P(FPî  XIPEPZPVmOEIBTJOnV 5IFMBTUUJNF*CPVHIU$%T FODFEZPVSNVTJDUIFNPTUPWFSUIFZFBST XBTMBTUZFBSBOEUIFZXFSF  (FPè 8FFST 4P NBOZ QFPQMF IBWF 4VCMJNF CMBOL$%T5IFMBTUUJNF*SFBMMZ BOE#PC.BSMFZBOETIJUMJLFUIBU#VUPUIFSUIBO FOKPZFEBOFOUJSFBMCVNXBT UIBU  * UIJOL'FJTUTi5IF3FNJOEFSwJO XF BMM CSJOH PVS PXO JOnVFODFT UP UIFUBCMF BOE*DBOUFWFOSFDBMMUIFOBNF

PGUIFMBTU$%*CPVHIUBUBTUPSF 5IF 0SJPO )BWF ZPV GPVOE OFXFS JOnVFODFT /PXBEBZTJUTFFNTBSUJTUT PWFSUIFZFBST PSEPFTJUBMMQSFUUZNVDIHPCBDL BSFOUQVUUJOHPVUFOUJSFMZHSFBU XPSLXIJMFMPPLJOHGPSUIFCFTU UPUIFPSJHJOBMT BMCVNTCVUJOTUFBETFUUMJOHGPS GUFS TQFOEJOH IPVST QFSGFDUJOH UIF *--6453"5*0/4#:t$)&-4&"3044 TQPUUPHFUUIFESPQPOUIFQSJTPO 8FFST:FBI UPUBMMZ UPUBMMZ/FXFSCBOETTVDI BGFXHPPETPOHTUIBUXJMMHFU MPPL BOE UBTUF PG B DBLF  FBUJOH JU DBO UIVHT.BSLi-VLF4LZXBMLFSw BT VI *KVTUTBXUIF'MBNJOH-JQT5IFZSFBNB[ QMFOUZPGSBEJPQMBZ CFCJUUFSTXFFU )BNJMHJWFTHSFBUMJGFUPUIF+PLFS JOH +VTU XBUDIJOH POF TIPX JOnVFODFE NF B 1FPQMFBSFOUCVZJOH BOEUIJTHBNFGFFMTMJLFBSFBMMZ CVODI*UTIBSEUPTBZKVTUMJLFPOFTQFDJm BMCVNTBOZNPSF‰JUTB DCBOE  i$VUUJOH JOUP POF PG NZ DBLFT IVSUT BU MPOHJOUFSBDUJWFNPWJFUIBUZPV ZPVLOPX TJOHMFTXPSMEOPX GJSTU CFDBVTF * XPSL TP IBSE PO UIFN w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mOJUFMZ TPOHT UIBU GBMM PVUTJEF UIBU  TP XFWF "NJEUIFEJHJUBMBHFXIJSM %FDPSBUJOH DBLFTDPMMFDUPSTFEJUJPODPOUBJOTBEPQF JT B TLJMM 4JNPO IBT TUBUVFUIBUNBLFTUIFHBSHPZMFPO DPOTUBOUMZCFFOFYQFSJNFOUJOH CVU*EPOUUIJOL XJOE QFPQMFBSFPVUTPVSDJOH DSBGUFETJODFTIFXBTZFBSTPME CFHJOOJOH UIF4UVEFOU4FSWJDFT$FOUFSMPPL XFWFHPOFUPPGBSPî PGPVSSFHHBFNFUBMTPSUPG PUIFSNFEJVNTGPSUIFJSNVTJD XJUI B QJ[[BJNJUBUFE DBLF GPS IFS CSPUIFST NPSFTJMMZ‰JGUIBUTQPTTJCMF TPVOE8FWFEFm OJUFMZUSJFEUPCFPVUUIFSFXJUI *UTFBTJFSOPXUPKVTUEPXOMPBE CJSUIEBZQBSUZ BDPVQMFPGTPOHT XIJDIJTGVOGPSVT BDFSUBJOTPOHPíBOBMCVNBOE "GUFS BUUFNQUT  GBJMT BOE TVDDFTTFT 

/JDPMF8BMLFS 45"''83*5&3

"

WJEFPHBNFDPOTPMFTFWFSZXIFSF

#SPPLF)FTQFMFS

CPTUPUISPX#BUNBOFMCPXTGPS

EBZT1SBDUJDFZPVSCFTUEFUFDUJWF

TBWFUIFFYUSBNPOFZBOEUJNF 5IF0SJPO%FTDSJCFZPVSTPOHXSJUJOHQSPDFTT TQFOUTLJQQJOHPWFSUSBDLTUIBU 8FFST*UTUBSUTVTVBMMZXIFOTPNFCPEZCSJOHT BSFOPUXPSUIIFBSJOH JOBXIPMFTPOH QBSUPGBTPOH BSJî  BESVNCFBU  i#FDBVTFPGUIFESPQPG$% PSTPNFMZSJDT XIBUFWFS UIFOXFTPSUPGXSJUFPVS TBMFT QFPQMFBSFMPPLJOHBU #"#:$",&4 PXOQBSUTBSPVOEJU8FUSZJUPOTUBHF QMBZXJUI BSUJTUTBOEHFUUJOHBDIBODFUP 4JNPOJTOBUVSBMMZDSFBUJWF  UP CBLF BOE GPVS BEEJUJPOBM .FHIBO "WBJMBCMFOPX CVU NBLJOH DBLFT JT BMTP IPVST UP EFDPSBUFJUBOETFFJGJUXPSLT JU  CVU TBNQMFOFXNBUFSJBM wTBJE1BVM 4JNPOXPSLT TUSFTTGVM GPS B mSTUUJNF EFQFOEJOH PO UIF EFUBJM 'SJFEMBOEFS QSPGFTTPSPGNVTJD GSPNIPNF 0SJPO )PX EP ZPV HVZT MJLF UIF JOEVTUSZBOESPDLIJTUPSZ DPMMFHF TUVEFOU XIP USJFT UP SFRVJSFE UIJT DPVME5IF UBLF QSFQBSJOH $IJDPTDFOF ,BUZ1FSSZTi5FFOBHF ëëëĐĐ GPDVTPOIFSTUVEJFT TFWFSBMEBZT 4JNPOTBJE BDBSFGVMMZ JT EFmOJUFMZ B QMBDF XIFSF XF %SFBNwBMCVNEFCVUFEBU/P "MUIPVHI  UIF CVTJOFTT PG "GUFS GSFF[JOH UIF8FFST DBLF $IJDP DSBGUFEUXP XPVMEHPXIFOXFXFSFm STUUSZJOHUPCSBODIPVU *OUIFTPOHi4QPUMJHIU /FX TFMMJOH DBLFT EJE IFMQ IFS PWFSOJHIU GPS NPJTUVSF  TIF BOETUBZFEUIFSFGPSXFFLT UFBSFEDBLF mOBODF UXP USJQT UP3FHSFUT w1BUSJDL4UVNQ MFBE &VSPQF UIFO DBSWFT UIF JO$BMJGPSOJB*O$IJDP XFECFBCMFUPTUPQBOE DBLF JO 5IF$%QSPEVDFEmWFIJUDIBSU BDUVBMMZIBWFQFPQMFXBOUUPDPNFUPPVSQBSUJFT BOE IFS DPMMFHF TJOHFSPG'BMM0VU#PZ QSPDMBJNT UVJUJPO  PSEFS UP FWFO UIF MBZFST PVU TJOHMFT UIFPOMZPUIFSBMCVN OJUFMZCFFOUIFSFGPSVT i:PVDBOCFZPVSPXOTQPUMJHIU w TIFTBJE BOE NBLF UIFN UIFBOETIPXT$IJDPIBTEFm TJ[F TIF UPEPTPTJODF.JDIBFM+BDL TPXFSFBMMZMJLFUPDPNFCBDL BOEIFQSPWFTJUJOUIJTOFXBMCVN *O 4JNPOT IPNFUPXO PG OFFET 5IFO TIF SPMMT PVU UIF TPOTi#BEwBMCVNJO CVU 8IZMFUPUIFSTHFUJOUIFXBZ 7JTBMJB  TIF XPVME NBLF BOE GPOEBOU  QMBDFT JU PWFS UIF 1FSSZTBMCVNBTBXIPMFJTOPU 5IF 0SJPO 8IBUT UIF TUSBOHFTU UIJOH UIBUT PGZPVSDSFBUJWJUZ 4UVNQJT UIBUJNQSFTTJWF*BNHVJMUZPG TFMM IFS DBLFT UP GBNJMZ BOE TFQBSBUF QJFDFT PG DBLF BOE  IBQQFOFEEVSJOHPOFPGZPVSDPODFSUT NBLJOHIJTXBZEPXOTPMPBOE GSJFOET 1SJDJOH XPVME WBSZ EFQFOEJOH PO XIBU TIF JT POMZEPXOMPBEJOHUIFTPOHT* 8FFST 4USBOHF  6I  JUT OPU UIBU TUSBOHF CVU HJWJOHTPMPBXIPMFOFXNFBO EFQFOEJOH PO IPX NVDI UIF NBLJOH  NPMET BOE DBSWFT JU FOKPZFEGSPNi5FFOBHF%SFBNw TPNFUJNFT PVS HVJUBS QMBZFS QFFT JO B HBSCBHF JOH4UVNQXSPUF QSPEVDFEBOE CFDBVTFCVZJOHUIFSFDPSE NBUFSJBMTDPTUBOEIPXNVDI UPMPPLMJLFUIFTLFUDI DBOPOTUBHFCFDBVTFUIFSFTOPXIFSFFMTFUPHP MBCPSXBTQVUJOUPJU QFSGPSNFEFWFSZUIJOHPOUIJT 8JUI UIF MPOH QSPDFTT BOE EJEOUTFFNXPSUINZNPOFZ 'SPN CJSUIEBZTBMCVN BVOJRVFGFBUUIBUIF BOE BEEFE TUSFTT PG DPNQMFUJOH B JG*XPVMEPOMZMJTUFOUPBGFX 5)&03*0/t,&7*/-&& 0SJPO 8FMM UIFO 8IBUT UIF TUSBOHFTU FYFDVUFTQFSGFDUMZ TFMFDUFETPOHT FOHBHFNFOUTUPCBCZTIPXFST DBLF  4JNPO EFCBUFT 5IF UBLJOH i4PVM1VOLwIBTTPNFGVOL 5IJTNJOETFUJTQSFUUZ BOE HSBEVBUJPOT  TIF QMFBTFT IFSBCJMJUJFTGVSUIFS UIJOHUIBUIBTJOTQJSFEPOFPGZPVSTPOHT BOEXBOUTUPTIBSFJUXJUIZPV IFS DVTUPNFST PO UIFJS 8IFO TIF CFHBO CBLJOH BQQBSFOUXIFOJUDPNFTUP i5IJT$JUZwJTIJTBUUFNQUBU TQFDJBM EBZ CZ GPMMPXJOH DBLFT TIFEFDJEFETIFXBOUFE SFDPSETBMFT #FGPSF/BQTUFSXBT XIBUFWFS UIFNF UIFZNBLJOHBOBOUIFNGPSIPNFUPXO DIPPTF  DBLFDSFBUJPOUPCFIFSDBSFFS  *UTHJWFO QSJEF -VQF'JBTDPHVFTUTBOE 4JNPOTBJE VOUJMTIFSFBMJ[FEIPXTUSFTTGVM MBVODIFEJO UIFSFDPSE NF 4JNPO CFHBO UP TQJUTUSVUICPNCTPOUIJTUIVNC UFTU IFS JU DBO CF  4JNPO TBJE 3JHIU JOEVTUSZXBTBMSFBEZGBDJOH BOPUIFS TOBQQJOHUVOF DBLF EFTJHOJOH TLJMMT BGUFS OPX  4JNPO IBT IFS NJOE TFU BEFDMJOFJOTBMFT-BTUZFBS XBZUP CFJOH JOTQJSFE CZ UIF TIPX PO DPNQVUFS BOJNBUJPO PS SFDPSETBMFTESPQQFEQFS i"DF PG $BLFTw 5IF DIFG BEWFSUJTJOH EFTJHO  CVU TIF DFOU BDDPSEJOHUP#JMMCPBSE FYQSFTT CJ[3FDPSETTBMFTSFWFOVFIBT BOE PXOFS PG $IBSN $JUZ TUJMMLFFQTBOPQFONJOE NZTFMG $BLFT JO #BMUJNPSF  .E  4JNPOT NPUIFS  ,ISJTUB GBMMFOCZOFBSMZQFSDFOUGPS BOECF %Ví (PMENBO  BUUFNQUT UP #BYUFS  GVMMZ TVQQPSUT 4JNPO GPVSZFBSTJOBSPX/PPOFT i+PIOOZ&OHMJTI3FCPSOw DSFBUF FMBCPSBUF DBLFT XJUI JG TIF XBOUT UP HP UP DVMJOBSZ CVZJOHXIPMFBMCVNT DSFBUJWF 8JUIGSFFXFCTJUFTMJLF IJTUFBNPGEFDPSBUPSTXFFLMZ TDIPPM BOE PQFO B CBLFSZ  1BOEPSB NVTJDMPWFSTBSF GPSDMJFOUT #BYUFSTBJE .&()"/4*.0/ 8JUIPVUFWFSUBLJOHBDMBTT   *OUIFBUFST i* XBOU UP TBZ * XBT FYQPTFEUPOFXTPVOETBU TFOJPSHSBQIJDEFTJHO 'SJEBZ 4JNPO MFBSOFE UIF NBKPSJUZ TVSQSJTFE XIFO TIF CFHBO UIFJSmOHFSUJQT NBKPS 'SFFTUSFBNJOHJTTPNFUIJOH PG IFS DBLF EFDPSBUJOH CBLJOH BOE EFDPSBUJOH DBLFT  LOPXMFEHFGSPNUIFTIPX TIF CVU * TIPVMEOU IBWF CFFO w POEFNBOEBOEUIFDBUBMZTUGPS ëĐĐĐĐ TBJE "OE XIBU TIF EPFTOU #BYUFS TBJE i4IF IBT BMXBZT BTIJGUGSPNBMCVNTUPTJOHMFT  'SJFEMBOEFSTBJE LOPX TIF(PPHMFT CFFOBSUJTUJDBMMZESJWFOw "SUJTUTBSFDPODFSOFE 5IF QSPDFTT PG EFTJHOJOH .BOIBTHPOFUISPVHINBOZB XJUISFDPHOJUJPOBOECFJOH BOE CSJOHJOH BO JEFB UP MJGF /JDPMF8BMLFSDBOCFSFBDIFEBU 1)050$0635&4:0't+&//*&+"$0#4 SFOBJTTBODF&WFO4VQFSNBOXBT QBJEGPSDSFBUJOHBDPMMFD IPVST OXBMLFS!UIFPSJPODPN 1*&$&0'$",&.FHIBO4JNPOTmOJTIFEDBLFGPSBGSJFOETCJSIUEBZ UBLFT 4JNPO BCPVU UXP SFCPSO CVUTPNFUIJOHTTIPVME UJWFTPVOE CVUFYQPTVSF  KVTUTUBZEFBE3PXBO"ULJOTPOT XIFUIFSTPNFPOFQBJEGPS +PIOOZ&OHMJTIJTKVTUBOPUIFSPOF JUPSOPU HJWFTNPSFMJTUFO PGUIPTFUIJOHTXFEPOUVOEFS FSTBDIBODFUPEFDJEFXIBU TUBOE BOEXFJNNFEJBUFMZCSVTI UIFZMJLF BXBZ&OHMJTIDPNFEJFTCFDBVTFPG 5IFEJHJUBMSFWPMVUJPOJT JU&OHMJTIJTQSFUUZNVDIBCVN TIPVME FODPVSBHF NPSF DPNNVOJUZ TVQQPSU  EJTBCMFE BDUPST UP mOE XPSL BOE XIZ UIFZ XFSF QJPOFFSJOHUIFXBZBSUJTUT +FO.PSFOP CMJOH#POEJOUIJTTFRVFMUIBUT QSPEVDFBOETIBSFUIFJS 8FTUPOTBJE EFQJDUFEVOGBJSMZ 45"''83*5&3 CFUUFSUIBOUIFm STUCVUUIBUTMJLF .PWJFHPFST DBNF BOE XFOU UISPVHIPVU UIF 'JOEJOH JOTQJSBUJPO BGUFS TQFOEJOH UJNF XJUI TPVOE BOEBUUIFTBNFUJNF  TBZJOHB% JTCFUUFSUIBOBO' MJTUFOFSTBSFDIBOHJOHUIF 5IFDVSUBJOSPTFPOUIFTFWFOUIBOOVBM'0$64 EBZ XJUI B GFX BVEJFODF NFNCFST TUBZJOH GPS IJTOJFDFXIPVTFTBXIFFMDIBJS  XBZUIFZDPOTVNF EJSFDUPS PG i*NHBJOBSZ $JSDVN .03&0/ 'JMN 'FTUJWBM QVUUJOH UIF TQPUMJHIU PO  mMNT FWFSZPOFPGUIFmMNT *UIBTOPXCFDPNFUIFJEFB 3PCJO ,FFIO  FYFDVUJWF EJSFDUPS PG UIF "SFB TUBODFT w"OUIPOZ8FFLTGPVOE '0$64'*-. EFBMJOHXJUIBWBSJFUZPGEJTBCJMJUJFT CPUIQIZTJ PGPXOJOHTPNFUIJOHWFSTVT ** %FWFMPQNFOUBM %JTBCJMJUJFT #PBSE  XBT POF UIBU NBOZ WJEFPT EJEOU TIPX '&45*7"DBMBOENFOUBM UIFJEFBPGVTJOHTPNFUIJOH  DIJMESFO JO XIFFMDIBJST )F 5IF GFTUJWBM PQFOFE 8FEOFTEBZ UP B DSPXEFE PGUIFN 'SJFEMBOEFSTBJE i5IF XIPMF FWFOU LFQU SFJOGPSDJOH BHBJO XPOEFSFE XIBU IBE IBQQFOFE 4FF$GPS IPVTF BU UIF 4JFSSB /FWBEB #JH 3PPN XJUI UIF 1FPQMFXBOUPOFPSUXP BVUIFOUJD SFQSFTFOUBUJPO NPWJFTGSPN mMNi8SFUDIFT+BCCFSFST wBUBMFPGUXPBVUJT BOE BHBJO IPX XFSF BMM QFPQMF mSTU w ,FFIO UP UIFi1JSBUFTPG5IF$BSSJCCFBO0O UIFGFTUJWBM 4USBOHFS5JEFTw TPOHT TPBSUJTUTBSFQVUUJOH MN UJDNJEEMFBHFENFOUSBWFMJOHBSPVOEUIFXPSME TBJE i%JTBCJMJUZ JT KVTU BOPUIFS GPSN PG EJWFS PO57BOEm PVUMFTTNBUFSJBMTFUUJOH TJUZ BOE UIF XPSME JT CFUUFS Pí CFDBVTF 8FFLT XBT FODPVSBHFE UP "MTPTFF%GPS UPSBJTFBXBSFOFTTBCPVUBVUJTN UIFSFDPSEJOEVTUSZCBDL TVCNJU IJT mMN GPS UIF GFTUJWBM BOFXBVUJTN 'BNJMJFT BOE TVQQPSUFST TBU FMCPXUPFMCPX UIFSFTEJíFSFODFTw ZFBSTUPXBSETJOHMFTPOHT 4UBSSJOH "mMNNBLFSTDPNQFUJUJPOXBTIFMEEVSJOHUIF BGUFSIFXPOBTUVEFOUBDBEFNZ BOEXBUDIFEFOUIVTJBTUJDBMMZ BXBSFOFTT +VBO.FKJB *QSFGFSTQFOEJOHNPOFZ i*U JTOU BCPVU UBMLJOH UP QFPQMF XJUI EJTBCJMJ BMMEBZFWFOU XIJDIBMMPXFEBVEJFODFNFNCFST BXBSEGPSJU IFTBJE +PIOOZ%FQQ QSPHSBN 45"''83*5&3 POBMJWFTIPXBOEEPXO i* XBT UISJMMFE UP CF IFSF BT UJFTBCPVUUIFJSEJTBCJMJUJFTBTNVDIBTJUJTHFUUJOH UPWPUFPOGPVSTIPSUmMNT BOE1FOFMPQF MPBEJOHGSFFNVTJD4IBSJOH 8PSLFSTBUUIFFWFOURVJDLMZDPVOUFEUIFWPUFT B mMNNBLFS w 8FFLT$SV[ TBJE i*UT UIFDPNNVOJUZUPVOEFSTUBOEmSTUIBOEUISPVHI "T FBDI TDFOF QSPHSFTTFE  UIF NZTUFSJPVT BOESFWFBMFEBUJF#PUIEJSFDUPSTXFSFQSFTFOUUP SFBMMZ HSFBU UP CF JO TVDI XPOEFSGVM CMPPEUIJSTUZNBOFBUJOHQMBOUHSFXJOUIFTFUPG DPNQBOZ NVTJDIBTCFDPNFTPFBTZ mMN wGFTUJWBMEJSFDUPS.BSZ"OO8FTUPOTBJE ëëĐĐĐ UIBUDBSSZJOHBUBOHJCMF 5IF&M3FZ5IFBUSFIPTUFEUIFGFTUJWBMUIFGPM BDDFQUUIFJSBXBSETBOEUIFZNJOHMFEBNPOHUIF XJUIPUIFSmMNNBLFSTXIPBSFQBZJOHBUUFOUJPO BMJUUMFTIPQCSJOHJOHIPSSPSUPUIPTFVOMVDLZUP TPVOEJTKVTUFYUSBXFJHIU UPEJTBCJMJUZJTTVFTw MPXJOHEBZGPSUIFSFNBJOJOHmMNT BDIBOHF DSPXEEVSJOHUIFSFDFQUJPOUIBUGPMMPXFE XPSLPOTLJESPX 5PRVPUF.JDIBFM#PMUPO i5IJT 0OF PG UIF XJOOJOH mMNT XBT i*NBHJOBSZ GSPNQSFWJPVTZFBST XIFOUIFmMNTXFSFTIPXO $IJDP 4UBUFT 4DIPPM PG UIF "SUT CSPVHIU B JTUIFUBMFPG$BQU+BDL4QBS $JSDVNTUBODFT wXIJDIEFBMUXJUIBDUPSTXJUIEJT +FO.PSFOPDBOCFSFBDIFEBU BUUIF#FMM.FNPSJBM6OJPO NPEFSO MPPL-FJMB3PESJHVF[DBOCFSFBDIFEBU BU UIF DMBTTJD NVTJDBM QMBZ i-JUUMF SPX QJSBUFTPCSBWFPOUIFTFWFO $IBOHJOH UIF TJUF UP B NPSF DFOUSBM MPDBUJPO BCJMJUJFTJO)PMMZXPPE BOEXIZJUXBTIBSEFSGPS KNPSFOP!UIFPSJPODPN BSUTFEJUPS!UIFPSJPODPN TFBTw+VTUMJLF#PMUPOTMZSJDTEJE 4IPQ PG )PSSPSTw UP UIF )BSMFO "EBNT 5IFBUSF OPUmUUPUIFUIFNFPGUIF-POFMZ UIFQBTUUXPXFFLFOET *TMBOETPOH i0O4USBOHFS5JEFTw 8JUI UIF FOE PG FBDI NVTJDBM OVNCFS  UIF JTBCJUPVUPGTZODXJUIUIFTFSJFT DSPXETDMBQQJOHBOEDIFFSJOHUPPLPWFSUIFUIF *UTBGBTUQBDFEBEWFOUVSFXJUI BUFSBTFBDITFUBOEXBSESPCFDIBOHFQMBOUFEB ÷ūƽƇřĝDžǬ i,BUZ1FSSZ&51BSPEZ i4UFWF,BSEZOBM,BUZ1FSSZQMFOUZPGEBOHFSTMJLFNFSNBJET TFFEPGVOFBTJOFTTJOUIFBVEJFODF $IBSMJF4IFFO2VPUFT w 1FBDPDLw XIPEPOUQMBZOJDFBOEUIF 1SFQBSJOH GPS UIF TIPX BOE UJNJOH FBDI :PV5VCF FYUSFNF DPODFOUSBUJPO :PV5VCF ESFBEFEQJSBUF#MBDLCFBSEQSF TFRVFODF SFRVJSFT WFOUJOH+BDLGSPNHFUUJOHUPUIF BOE QSBDUJDF "DUPST IBWF UP TUPNQ PVU UIFJS 5IJTTUSBOHFWJEFPVTFT i%POUMPPLCBDL 4UFWF,BSEZOBMTIPXTNBOZ GPVOUBJOPGZPVUI OFSWFT BOE FMPRVFOUMZ UJNF UIF QBDF PG UIFJS PGIJTNPWFTUPTVSQSJTFE$IBU 1FOFMPQF$SV[QMBZTBMPOHTJEF BMMZPVMMFWFSHFU DIPSFPHSBQIZ $IBSMJF4IFFOTRVPUFTUP UIFUVOFPG,BUZ1FSSZT 3PVMFUUFHVFTUTBTIFMJQTZODT JTUIFEVTUGSPN %FQQBTBTXBTICVDLJOHTBJMPS  i* VTVBMMZ IBWF BO FOFSHZ ESJOL CFGPSF FBDI i&5wTPOH BOETIJNNJFTUP,BUZ1FSSZT (FPèSFZ3VTISFUVSOTBT#BSCPTB UIFTUFQTCFGPSFw TIPX wTBJETPQIPNPSF"MFY(FSJOHFS BNVTJDBM i1FBDPDLw ‰OPXXJUIQFHMFH‰BOE*BO UIFBUSF NBKPS XIP QMBZFE $JOOBNPO i* MJLF UP 4IF)JN .D4IBOFQSFNJFSFTBTUIFMFH UVSONZCVUUFSnJFTJOUPFOFSHZ PODF*NPOUIBU i%POU-PPL#BDLw FOEBSZ#MBDLCFBSE TUBHFUIFOFSWFTHPBXBZw  i-JUUMF4IPQPG)PSSPSTwJTEJîFSFOUCFDBVTFJU VTFT QVQQFUSZ  SFRVJSJOH TPNFPOF UP CF JOTJEF 4JNPO GPVOE B QBTTJPO GPS UIF BSU PG EFDPSBUJOHDBLFT i*UT HJWFO NF BOPUIFS XBZ UP FYQSFTT NZTFMGBOECFDSFBUJWF wTIFTBJE 1BUSJDL4UVNQi4PVM1VOLw

i i

"354

$ŏ]8&%/&4%": 0$5Ħğ ƃŦĦĦ 8&%/&4%": 0$5Ĥĝ ƃţĤĤ]$ł

"406/%4"-7"5*0/

8FCTJUFJHOJUFT NVTJDFBSNBSL JO64OFUXPSL

46313*4& 'MBSFT <ŖƺDZòòŦ 5IFTF EBSL EFOJN nBSFT GSPN 0ME /BWZ BSF Ťěǭŏò> TMJHIUMZ IJHIXBJTUFE BOE BEE3BVM#JBODIJ BO FYUSB WJOUBHF POHVJUBS  GFFM UP UIF BMSFBEZ SFUSP nBSFE MFH 8FBS UIFTF 3ZBO%F.BST KFBOT XJUI B DPMPSGVM UPQ 5IJT PSBOHF DPMPSFE POCBTTBOE GSJMMOFDLCMPVTFBEETKVTUUIFSJHIUBVUVNODPMPS WPDBMT "EBN UP UIF MPPL 8JUI UIF XFBUIFS XBSNJOH VQ UIJT 1BUUFSTPOPO QBTUXFFL JUT0,UPBEETIPSUTMFFWFTUPZPVSGBMM ESVNTBOE XBSESPCF*GJUHFUTBMJUUMFDPMEBGUFSZPVSFWFOJOH WPDBMTBOE DMBTTFT  UISPX PO B TJNQMF CMBDL DBSEJHBO (FPè 8FFST PWFS UIJTCSJHIUUPQ POHVJUBS 'PS ZPVS GFFU  UIJT QBJS PG GPMEFE XFEHF CPP BOEWPDBMT NBLFVQ5IF UJFTGSPN'PSFWFSBSFDPNGPSUBCMFFOPVHIUPHFU &YQFOEBCMFT GSPNDMBTTUPDMBTTBOEEFmOJUFMZDVUFFOPVHIGPS BEBZUPOJHIUMPPL"EEBQBJSPGPSBOHFBOEHPME PSJHBNJFBSSJOHTBOEUIFMPPLJTDPNQMFUF

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nPXZ TUZMF FTQFDJBMMZBU$IJDP4UBUF 8JUI UIF SFDFOU MFHBMJ[BUJPO PG 4QPUJGZ JO UIF DPMPSFE DIJîPO CMPVTF UPQ MJLF UIJT DJOOBNPO EFOJN 4PNF QSFGFS nBSFT  TLJOOZ 6OJUFE4UBUFT UIFSFJTBOFBTZXBZUPTIBSFNVTJD GSPN0ME/BWZ 1BJSUIFTFKFBOTXJUIUIJT"[UFDJOTQJSFEQPO KFBOT PS B CPPU DVU QBJS  CVU XJUIZPVS'BDFCPPLGSJFOET *ESFDPNNFOEBMPPTFUPQGPSBMMTLJOOZKFBOT DIPUIBUXJMMLFFQZPVXBSNGPSUIBUXJOEZCJLF OP NBUUFS ZPVS QSFGFSFODF JT SBJO B 4XFEJTIGPVOEFE NVTJD TUSFBN SJEF IPNF 5VDL UIF KFBOT4QPUJGZ JOUP ZPVS CPPUT TJODFJUQSPWJEFTUIFSJHIUDPOUSBTUGSPNUJHIUBOLMF *WF DSFBUFE UISFF MPPLT GPS JOH TFSWJDF UIBUPSMBVODIFE UP UIF QVCMJD 0DUPCFS MJLF UIJT DSFNF DPMPSFE QBJS GSPN "MEP MFBWF UPMPPTFNJETFDUJPO1BJSUIFNXJUIUIJTFEHZWFM B TDIPPM EBZ PS B EPXOUPXO  CVUJUUPPLZFBSTPGOFHPUJBUJPOCFUXFFOUIF UIF CPPUT IJEEFO VOEFSOFBUI 5IF WFSTBUJMJUZ JT WFUFFO DVî GSPN 'PSFWFS  BOE UIFTF BEPSBCMF $IJDPFWFOJOH DPNQBOZ BOE NBKPS SFDPSE MBCFM FYFDVUJWFT GPS MFPQBSEQSJOUn BUTGSPN8FU4FBM'SPNZPVSMBTU UIFCFTUQBSU5JFJUUPHFUIFSXJUIUIJTQBJSPGFBS 4QPUJGZUPMBVODIJOUIF645IF"NFSJDBONVTJD DMBTTPGUIFEBZUPBMVODIEBUFXJUIZPVSGBWPSJUF SJOHTGSPN1BD4VOUIBUXJMMHJWFUIFMPPLBUPVDI #SJUUBOZ$PNBTDBOCFSFBDIFEBU MBCFMT FYQSFTTFE DPODFSOTMBEJFT UIJTMPPLJTDIJDFOPVHIGPSBMMPDDBTJPOT UIBU UIF GSFF PîFSJOH PGHMBN CDPNBT!UIFPSJPODPN TFSWJDFEFWBMVFTNVTJDBOEGBJMTUPNBLFTJHOJG JDBOUSFWFOVF CVUFWFOUVBMMZBOBHSFFNFOUXBT 5011-"$&450#6:+&"/4 SFBDIFE BOEUIFBQQMJDBUJPOCFDBNFBWBJMBCMFJO UIF6OJUFE4UBUFTPO+VMZ (BQ(BQKFBOTDPNFJOBMMEJèFS FOUTJ[FTBOEXBTIFT5IFZFWFO i5IF 4QPUJGZ TFSWJDF DBO CF BDDFTTFE BT BO IBWFTIPSUBOEUBMMTJ[FTTPZPV BETVQQPSUFE GSFFUPUIFVTFS TFSWJDF IBWJOH OP EPOUIBWFUPmOEBTFBNTUSFTTUP NPOUIMZDBQPOMJTUFOJOHIPVSTPSBDBQPOOVN IFNUIFN5IFRVBMJUZPGUIFEFOJN CFSPGQMBZTPGBVOJRVFUSBDLEVSJOHUIFmSTUTJY JTMPOHMBTUJOHBOEUIFZBSFTPDPN NPOUITGPMMPXJOHDSFBUJOHPGZPVS4QPUJGZBDDPVOU GPSUBCMF ZPVDBOXFBSUIFNBMMEBZ CVU UIFSFBGUFS B DBQ PG  MJTUFOJOH IPVST QFS MPOH NPOUIBOEBDBQPGmWFQMBZTQFSVOJRVFUSBDL w BDDPSEJOHUPJUTNPTUSFDFOUTPGUXBSFBHSFFNFOU  ,PIMT5IJTTUPSFIPMETBMPUPG EJèFSFOUCSBOETGSPN-BVSFO$PO FîFDUJWF0DU SBETDMPUIJOHMJOFUP7FSB8BOHT  8IFO4QPUJGZJOUFHSBUFEXJUI'BDFCPPL VTFST BOEJUTBHVBSBOUFFEQMBDFUPmOE XIPDPOOFDUFEXJUIUIFTFSWJDFDPVMEUIFOTIBSF BHSFBUOFXQBJSPGKFBOT'SPN 1)050$0635&4:0't5)&&91&/%"#-&4 UIFJSNVTJDDMPVEXJUIFWFSZPOFUIFZTIBSFJOGPS KVOJPSTTJ[FTUPQMVTTJ[FE UIFSFTB NBUJPOXJUIPO'BDFCPPL 8FFST *UT LJOEB DSFFQZ 5IFSFT UIJT HVZ XF 5IF0SJPO"OZQMBOTUPTUBSUXPSLPOBOPUIFS DVUFQBJSGPSFWFSZPOFBOEBSFBMMZ *OJUJBMMZ UIJTMFEUPNVDIOFHBUJWFQVCMJDJUZGPS MJWFE XJUI UIBU XBT LJOEB TIBEZ " MPU PG TUVî BMCVNZFU TUBSUFEUPEJTBQQFBS8FOFWFSSFBMMZDBVHIUIJN 4QPUJGZ CFDBVTF SFRVJSJOH QFPQMF UP MPH JO XJUI 8FFST8FSFQVUUJOHUPHFUIFSTPNFBDPVT 0ME/BWZ4JNJMBSUPUIF(BQ 0ME EPJOH JU CVU JU DPVMEOU CF BOZCPEZ FMTF *UPSEBCMF XBT UJD TUVGG  EPJOH B DPVQMF OFX TPOHT  USZJOH JU 'BDFCPPLDVUTPVUBOZPOFXIPEPFTOPUXBOUUP /BWZIPVTFTTJNQMFBOEBè KVTULJOEBUIJTTLFUDIZTJUVBUJPO TPXFWFHPUUIJT TIBSFBOEUIPTFXIPEPOPUVTF'BDFCPPL5IJT EFOJN'SPNUIFTLJOOZKFBOUPUIF PVU JO UIF OFYU GFX XFFLT  UIFO NPWJOH GPS TPOHDBMMFEi#SJEHFT#VSOFEw5IBUTBCPVUUIBU nBSF UIFSFTBWBSJBUJPOPOBMMTUZMFTXBSEGSPNUIFSF MFEUP4QPUJGZCFJOHGPSDFEUPJOUSPEVDFOFXQSJ TPTIPQQFSTDBOmOEUIFSJHIUmUGPS WBDZGFBUVSFTUPUIFJSTPGUXBSF UIFN5IFZFWFOIBWFDPNGPSUBCMF 5IF0SJPO8IBUDBOXFFYQFDUBUUIFQFSGPS 5IF0SJPO8IBUEPZPVUIJOLBCPVUTIBSJOHB .JDIBFM$IPVJOBSE BNVTJDJOEVTUSZHSBEVBUF  KFHHJOHTGPSFWFSZEBZXFBSMN CBOEOBNFXJUIBSFDFOUCMPDLCVTUFSBDUJPOm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mMNNBLFSTPGBMMUJNF/P *NLJEEJOH#VU GPSTPNFPOFXIPXBOUTUPCFDPNFBQSPGFT  B[UFDQSJOUQPODIPGSPN i5IF CJHHFTU CFOFmU JT EFmOJUFMZ DPNCBUJOH JOH EFBE BT GBNJMJFT GSFFMZ BHSFBUTFMFDUJPOPG-FWJTKFBOT  FBSSJOHTGSPNBTPTDPN TUZMFTGPSMFTTDPN JULJOEBTVDLFEXIFOJUm STUDBNFPVUCFDBVTFXF TJPOBMNVTJDJBO QJSBDZPGNVTJD w$IPVJOBSETBJEBOJNBMLOPUGBVYTVFEFn SPBNFE UIF 7BMFOF - 4NJUI GSPNUIFDMBTTJDTUSBJHIUMFHUP BUGSPNXFUTFBMDPN  0ME/BWZXPNFOTIJSJTFSFUSPn BSF HPULOPDLFEPîUIFGSPOUQBHFPG(PPHMF/PXBOE 8FFST%Fm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è POCMPVTF KFBOTDPMMFHFCVEHFUGSJFOEMZ  .JEPSBOHFMBZFSGSJMMUPQGSPNPBTJTTUPSFTDPN  SJOHTGSPNQBDTVODPN CFUUFSUIBOZPV/FWFSTUPQMFBSOJOH DBVTFJUTB 4QPUJGZJTNBLJOHVTFPGBWFSZQPQVMBSUZQFPG  GSPNPMEOBWZHBQDPN EFMPT.VFSUPT 5IF0SJPO(VJMUZQMFBTVSFBSUJTUBMCVN EJİ DVMUMJGFTUZMF mMFTIBSJOH NPTUDPNNPOMZSFGFSSFEUPBT iDMPVE 5IF DPNNVOJUZ XBT XFM 8FFST#SJUOFZ4QFBST *HVFTT*QVUIFSPOB DPNQVUJOHw5IFJEFBJTUIBUUIF8FCDBOIPMEUIF DPNFE UP TQFOE TPNF UJNF MPU5IFSFTBTPOHDBMMFEi4FBMJU8JUIB,JTTwPO 5IF0SJPO"OZUIJOHFMTFZPVEMJLFUPTBZ mMF BOE UIF VTFS DBO UIFO BDDFTT JU CZ TUSFBN GPS UIF DSBGUJOH PG QBQFS IFSOFXFTUBMCVN*UIJOLJUTBSFBMMZDPPMTPOH UP0SJPOSFBEFST JOH SBUIFSUIBOEPXOMPBEJOH0UIFSDMPVECBTFE TLVMMT  QJOT BOE QBQFS 8FFST $PNF PVU UP UIF TIPX 8F MPWF TFSWJDFT JODMVEF "QQMFT J$MPVE  (PPHMF BOE NBDIF GMPXFST XIJMF FOKPZ 5IF 0SJPO *G ZPV XFSFOU JO B CBOE SJHIU $IJDP  TP JUT HPOOB CF HPPE UP DPNF CBDL "NB[PO JOH IPU DIPDPMBUF BOE iQBO NPTU TPDJBM FYQF NBKPS OPX XIBUEPZPVUIJOLZPVXPVMECFEPJOH -JLFPVS'BDFCPPLQBHFBOETBZIJ DPOWFSTF *IBWF4QPUJGZPONZDPNQVUFSBOEUIFBQQPO EF NVFSUPw BOE GPS UIF NPSF #SJUUBOZ$PNBT SJFODFT UIBU * XFOU i:PV HP GSPN 8FFST*EPOULOPX USZJOHUPCFJOBCBOE  XJUIVT 45"''83*5&3 NZJ1IPOF*DBOXJSFMFTTMZTZODUPmMFTUIBU*QFS BEWFOUVSPVTPOFT UIFSFXBT UISPVHI w TBJE +BEF MJLF QNXIFO 8PSLJOHBUTPNFTIJUUZKPC)POFTUMZ*EQSPC TPOBMMZPXOBOEVTFUSBDLT4QPUJGZIPTUTUPNBLF TLVMMGBDFQBJOUJOH *O+BQBO LBSBPLFXBT UIF USBJO TUPQT i* 8JMM 4VSWJWFw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mSTU USBJO TFMFDUJPO MJLF i:VNF OP /BLB IFw NBKPS i*UT B XFFLMZ UJWFUPJMMFHBMMZEPXOMPBEJOHNVTJD5IFJODSFBTFE PG MBUF GBNJMZ NFNCFST EFD UISPVHI TUBSUTSVOOJOHw XBT IFBSE FDIPJOH UISPVHIPVU 5SJO UIJOHQFPQMFEPUPHFU TIBSJOHPGNVTJDJOUIJTDMPVECBTFEQSPHSBNJT PSBUFE XJUI B CBNCPP BSDI '&&%.& DMPTFS UP FBDI PUIFS  *CBSSB QSFGFST JUZ)BMM QSPNPUJPOBM GPS UIF BSUJTUT BOE QSPWJEFT B HSFBU UIBU TFSWFT BT B QBUIXBZ GPS 4FZNPVS  +BQBOFTF LBSBPLF *O+BQBO LBSBPLFJTNPSFUIBOKVTU UP TJOH  UP SFMBY  UP FYQFSJFODFGPSUIFGBOT UIF TQJSJUT UP DPNF DFMFCSBUF +"%&3&&% XIPXBT UP "NFSJDBO LBSB BESVOLFOFTDBQBEFTIPXDBTJOHPOFT ESJOLw BQQMJFEDPNQVUFS *GQFPQMFEPXBOUUPDPOUJOVFUIFVOSFTUSJDUFE MJGFXJUIUIFJSGBNJMJFT QMBZFECZ .PTUCBSTEPLBSB PLF IFTBJE WPDBM UBMFOUT ‰ JUT B DVMUVSBM BOE HSBQIJDTBOE"TJBO /PBI4OZEFS  BOE BEGSFF WFSTJPO PG 4QPUJGZ  UIFZ XJMM FWFOUV 8JUI DPMPSFE QFODJMT  i*U NBLFT ZPV TPDJBM BDUJWJUZ UIBU IBT CFFO BSPVOE PLF BOE /PNJIPEBJ  TUVEJFTNBKPS <ŖƺDZò>QMBOTUP BMMZIBWFUPQBZGPSJU#VU GPSOPX BOZPOFDBO NBSLFST  TDJTTPST BOE JNBH XIJDINFBOTiBMMZPV SFBMMZ OFSWPVT TJODFUIFT GFFEIJNTFMG BDDFTTJUGPSGSFF JOBUJPO IBOE  UP TJOH CZ ZPVSTFMG CVUJO ZPVSF XJUIQBSFOUT ,JNJIJLP/PNVSB QSPGFTTPSPG+BQ DBOESJOLwJO+BQBOFTF TIFTBJE UPIJTCMPPE BOE LJET DSBGUFE BOE DPO i+BQBO JT B QMBZ IBSE  XPSL IBSE B HSPVQ PG GSJFOET w *CBSSB TBJE i4P BOFTF IFMEBLBSBPLFFWFOU5IVSTEBZ UIJSTUZQMBOU  WFSUFEUIFXIJUFQBQFSTLVMMT &MJ(JCCTDBOCFSFBDIFEBU IBMGUIFUJNFZPVSFOPUTJOHJOHBMPOF JO 5SJOJUZ )BMM /VNFSPVT TUVEFOUT TPDJFUZ TPLBSBPLFUIFSFXBTMJLF UIF "VESFZ** JOUP DPMPSGVM QJFDFT PG BSU FHJCCT!UIFPSJPODPN <Ťěǭŏò> JO GPSN PG SFMFBTF w 3FFE TBJE BOZXBZ ZPVSFBMMTJOHJOHUPHFUIFSw GSPNUIFGPSFJHOMBOHVBHFBOETUVEZ VMUJNBUF

 

FWFOUTBMMXFFL!UIFPSJPODPN

5 0%":

5IF.BLJOH PGB.FEJFWBM .BTUFSQJFDF

QN !1FSGPSNJOH"SUT $FOUFS3PPN 'SFF 5JN5BUUPO#SPXO BO "SDIBFPMPHJDBM$PO TVMUBOUUP4BMJTCVSZ $BUIFESBM MFDUVSFT PONFEJFWBMNBTUFS QJFDFTGSPN 

5 ) 6 3 4%":

i'FFEJOH$IJOBT -JUUMF&NQFSPST JOUIF"HFPG (MPCBMJ[BUJPOw

QN !)VNBOJUJFT$FOUFS (BMMFSZJO5SJOJUZ)BMM 'SFF %S$IVOZBO4POH XJMMTQFBLBCPVUIFS SFDFOUSFTFBSDIJO $IJOBPODIJMEGFFE JOHQSBDUJDFT

1"*/5*5#-"$, "MFKBOESB 3FTFOEJ[ <ūǃǮŕó>TJUT QBUJFOUMZ XIJMF/BEJB $MBJSF<ŝƾDzó> QBJOUTIFS GBDFUP DFMFCSBUFUIF VQDPNJOH %JBEF-PT .VFSUPT  B.FYJDBO DFMFCSBUJPO GPS 4"5 6 3 %": ' 3 * % SFNFNCFSJOH ": UIFEFBE  BUUIF 5IF$IJDP .VTFVNPG 5IF&YQFOEBCMFT $PNFEZ"MM4UBST "OUISPQPMPHZQN



QN !#MVF3PPN5IFBUSF &OKPZTPNFMBVHIT BU#VTUPMJOJT DPNFEZTIPXXJUI MPDBMUBMFOU

'PML.VTJD 'SJEBZT

UPQN !"VHJFT'JOF$PèFF 5FB$BGF (FUGPMLZBU"VHJFT FWFSZ'SJEBZ







EBJMZEPTF BSUTBMMXFFL!UIFPSJPODPN

"'30."/

!4FOBUPS5IFBUSF BEWBODF

5IF&YQFOEBCMFT QFSGPSNXJUI.ZTUJD 3PPUT

5IF"VUVNO 5BCMF'PPEGPS UIF4PVM QN !(BMMFSZ 

"354

$å]8&%/&4%": 0$5Ĥĝ ƃţĤĤ

8&%/&4%": 0$5ħĠ ƃŦħħ]$Ď

OFDFTTJUJFT

 46 / %":

8PNFO#FIJOE UIF8BMMT QN !$IJDP8PNFOT $MVC 

1PFUJD+VTUJDF1SPK FDUQSFTFOUT$MBJSF #SB[7BMFOUJOFT QMBZTIPXDBTJOH JNQSPWBUJPOTPGUIF $IPXDIJMMBQSJTPO  UIFMBSHFTUXPNFOT QSJTPOJOUIFXPSME

$PNFTBNQMFEFMJ DJPVT TFBTPOBM  MPDBMMZHSPXOCJUFT  BOEXBSNZPVSTPVM XJUINVTJDCZ%PVH 4IFFIZ

.0/ %":

$PMMFDUPST $IPJDF+BNFT 4OJEMF

BNUPQN !6OJWFSTJUZ"SU (BMMFSZ‰5BZMPS)BMM 3PPN 'SFF 3FHJPOBMMZBOE OBUJPOBMMZLOPXO BSUJTUTTVDIBT3PCFSU "SOFTPO %BWJE)PDL OFZ 5POZ/BUTPVMBT BOE8BZOF5IJFCBVE  GSPNUIFDPMMFDUJPOPG +BNFT4OJEMF

5 6 & 4%":

7PJDFTPG)PQF $PODFSU

QN!5#" %POBUJPOTXFMDPNFE

*OTQJSF)JHI 4DIPPMDIPJSUFBNT XJUI$IJDP4UBUF TUVEFOUTUPSBJTF BXBSFOFTTGPS DPVOUSJFTBGGFDUFE CZHFOPDJEF

5)&03*0/t,&7*/-&&

$FMFCSBUJPOMFBWFTNBOZAEFBEGBDFE

,BSBPLFMFDUVSFHFUTTUVEFOUTPONJD

i i

$IJDP4UBUFT BCSPBEQSPHSBNTXFSFJOBUUFOEBODF i-JUUMF4IPQ /PNVSB TUBSUFE Pî CZ TBZJOH B PG)PSSPSTw GFX XPSET BCPVU UIF CSJFG IJTUPSZ PG NVTJDBMBU LBSBPLF )BSMFO"EBNT )F UIFO DSBOLFE VQ UIF WPMVNF 5IFBUSF PO UIF NBDIJOF BOE IBOEFE NJDSP QIPOFTUPQFPQMFJOUIFBVEJFODF5XP XPNFOJNNFEJBUFMZTUPPEVQUPTJOH i:FTUFSEBZw CZ 5IF #FBUMFT /PNVSB QBSUJDJQBUFEBTXFMM "OPUIFSQBSUJDJQBOUHPUVQUPTQFBL BCPVU IFS FYQFSJFODFT JO +BQBO EVS 5)&03*0/t#3&5&%8"3%4 563/*/(+"1"/&4&,JNJIJLP/PNVSB IPTUPGLBSBPLFMFDUVSFBOE JOHIFSGBMMTUVEZBCSPBE i*O+BQBO LBSBPLFXBTPOFPGUIF $IJDPQSPGFTTPSPG+BQBOFTF IBEMJUUMFUPTBZCVUQMFOUZUPTJOH

'FTUJWBMTIPXDBTFTGJMNTBCPVUEJTBCJMJUJFT

13&7*&8

i*UFOBCMFENFUPLJOEPGHBJODVMUVSBM 1FPQMF CFDBNF NPSF DPVSBHFPVT SFTQFDUJOUIFGBDUUIBU*XBTUSZJOHUP BGUFS IFBSJOH BCPVU 3FFE BOE *CBS MFBSOUIFJSMBOHVBHFBOEDVMUVSFw SBT LBSBPLF FYQFSJFODFT BOE TPPO "GUFS3FFETCSJFGTQFFDI TIFUPPL UIFSPPNKPJOFEJOPO2VFFOTi#PIF UIF NJDSPQIPOF UP TJOH i:VNF OP NJBO3IBQTPEZw /BLB IF w B QPQVMBS +BQBOFTF LBSB /PNVSBT LBSBPLF FWFOU IBE WFSZ PLF TPOH UIBU USBOTMBUFT UP i*OUP UIF GFXQFPQMFJOBUUFOEBODF CVUJUQSP '0$64*/( %SFBNw WJEFE BO JOUJNBUF TFUUJOH GPS UIF 0/5)& 'PMMPXJOH 3FFET QFSGPSNBODF  FYQFSJFODFETJOHFSTBOEUIFUJNJE '*-.4 BOPUIFS TUVEFOU UBMLFE UP UIF BVEJ -JLFQSPGFTTPS/PNVSBTBJE i,BSB 5IF TJNQMF TUBHF TFUUJOH 5IFGPMMPXJOH FODFBCPVUIJTFYQFSJFODFTJO5PLZP PLFJTBMMBCPVUIBWJOHGVOw ,BZMB8PIMGPSE mMNTXFSF 0O UIF XFFLFOET JO 5PLZP  ZPVBMMPXFEGPSUIFNVTJDUPQSFWBJM UISFFPGUIF 45"''83*5&3 BT UIF NVTJDJBOT TIPXFE UIFSF DBO EP LBSBPLF BMM OJHIU  TBJE "OHFM #SJUUBOZ$PNBTDBOCFSFBDIFEBU TIPXOEVSJOH PG FYQFSJFODF XJUI EJG $IJDPBOT QBDLFE UIF 3PX *CBSSB  B IJTUPSZ BOE "TJBO TUVEJFTXFBMUI CDPNBT!UIFPSJPODPN UIFUXPEBZ MBOE5BZMPS 3FDJUBM )BMM GFSFOUNVTJDBMUFDIOJRVFT '0$64'JMN #BVOF TBU EPXO IFS CPX 4BUVSEBZ OJHIU BT UIF /PSUI 'FTUJWBM 4UBUF 4ZNQIPOZ QVU PO JUT BU POF QPJOU BOE QMVDLFE BU "MMPGUIF mMNTBJNFE GJSTUDIBNCFSNVTJDSFDJUBMPG UIF TUSJOHT PG UIF WJPMJO XIJMF UPFEVDBUF 5VUVOPWQPVOEFEPOUIFQJBOP UIFTFBTPO BCPVU 5IFSFDJUBM DBMMFEi5IF$PO LFZTTFOEJOHPVUXBWFTPGFOFS EJTBCJMJUJFT DFSUNBTUFS wXBTBQFSGPSNBODF HFUJDTFHNFOUT CVUNPSF 5IF QBJS DPNQMFNFOUFE EVP PG WJPMJOJTU 5FSSJF #BVOF JNQPSUBOUMZ BOEQJBOJTU"MFYBOEFS5VUVOPW FBDI PUIFS XFMM BT UIF IBSNP TIPXUIBU "TJEFGSPNCFJOHBDPODFSUNBT OJFTPGUIFJOTUSVNFOUTXPSLFE EJTBCMFE UFSPGUIF/PSUI4UBUF4ZNQIPOZ  UPHFUIFS UP DSFBUF TUSPOH PVU QFPQMFBSFOP #BVOFBMTPUBLFTQBSUJOTFWFSBM CVSTUT PG DMBTTJDBM NVTJD EJèFSFOUUIBO PUIFSQSPKFDUTBOEJTBGSFFMBODF #BVOFT mOHFST TXBZFE BDSPTT BOZPOFFMTF NVTJDJBO 5VUVOPW DVSSFOUMZ UIFWJPMJOTUSJOHTXIJMFUIFCPX UFBDIFTQJBOPBU4PVUIFSO0SF TMPXMZNPWFEVQBOEEPXODSF HPO 6OJWFSTJUZ BOE QFSGPSNT BUJOHBXIJNTJDBMTPVOE i*UTBHSFBUGFFMJOHXIFOZPV BSPVOEUIFXPSMEBTBSFDJUBMJTU DBO GFFM UIF DPNQPTFS JO UIF BOEPSDIFTUSBTPMPJTU i*UTBXPOEFSGVMUSFBUUPCF NVTJD w#BVOFTBJE 5IF NVTJDJBOT QMBZFE IFSF w 5VUVOPW TBJE i* XBOU UP NBLF TVSF UIF GBOT IBWF QJFDFT CZ TPNF PG UIFJS BO FOKPZBCMF BOE XPOEFSGVM GBWPSJUF DPNQPTFST JODMVE JOH "OUPOJO %WPSBL  -JMJ FWFOJOHw "TUIFMJHIUTEJNNFEPOUIF #PVMBOHFSBOE%NJUSJ4IPTUB UXP QFSGPSNFST BOE UIFZ XFOU LPWJDI5IFZQSPWJEFEBHSFBU UISPVHI FBDI QJFDF  UIF SFDJUBM WBSJFUZ PG DPOUFOU JODMVEJOH FYVEFEDIJMMJOHDMBTTJDBMUVOFT VQCFBU ESBNBUJDNVTJDBOE 5IF NJYUVSF PG 'SFODI  3VT TVCUMF HFOUMFOPUFT i5IF TFDPOE IBMG PG UIF TJBOBOE(FSNBODPNQPTJUJPOT DSFBUFE B WBSJFUZ GPS DMBTTJDBM TIPX XBT NPSF ESBNBUJD w 5VUVOPWTBJE NVTJDFOUIVTJBTUT 1)050$0635&4:0't.&()"/4*.0/ 5IF DSPXE XBT TJMFOU BT 8IJMF QFSGPSNJOH "SJB CZ *#&-*&7&*OTQJSF4DIPPMPG"SUTBOE4DJFODFTDIPJSQSBDUJDFTTPOHTGPSJUT5VFTEBZ0DU -FW "CFMJPWJDI  #BVOFT WJP UIF NVTJDJBOT TIBSFE UIFJS QFSGPSNBODF XIJDIXJMMTIFEMJHIUPODVMUVSFTBOEDPVOUSJFTBGGFDUFECZHFOPDJEF MJO XPSL XBT SBEJBUJOH BT TIF LOPXMFEHFPGDMBTTJDBMNVTJD (SPTTDVQ TBJETXJUDIFEGSPNBMPXIBVOUJOH i#FDBVTF XIFO ZPV TJOH GPSUIFDIPJSBTXFMMBTGPSUIFBVEJFODFw BGUFSFBDIQJFDF UIFJS TPOHT ZPVTPVOE BVUPNBUJDBMMZ FYQFSJFODF XJMM CF UIF BDDFQUFE BU UIF EPPS 5IFZ FOEFE DPODFSU UP B QJFSDJOH CVU TMPX %POBUJPOT UIFTBNFKPZUIFZGFMUw UIF 4UVEFOU "OUJ(FOPDJEF $PBMJUJPO  B TUSPOH NVTJDBM DPN SFTPOBODF 5VUVOPW QMBZFEGPS XJUI #ZCSJOHJOHBSUUPUIFUPQJDPGHFOPDJEF  3JHIUT 8BUDI BOE )FJGFS 1SPKFDU QPTJUJPOCZ+PIBOOFT#SBINT QPXFSGVMMZ RVJFU QJBOP UPOFT)VNBO -JN IPQFT UP IBWF FNPUJPOBM BOEQMBZFEBRVJDLFODPSFCZ UIBU BO BDDFOUFE UIF JNQBDU QJFDF BOE*OUFSOBUJPOBM UIBUXJMMSBJTFBXBSFOFTT TIFTBJE DSFBUFEBCMFOEPGTUJNVMBUJOH BQQMBVTFPGUIFDSPXE i4P KVTU IVNBOMZ PVSBVEJFODF IFBSUT GFMU BSFUIF-FJMB3PESJHVF[DBOCFSFBDIFEBU OPUFT 5IF UPVDIFE w -JN DPNQFMMJOH TBJE i5IBUT XIBU * XBOU BSUTFEJUPS!UIFPSJPODPN SFOEJUJPO BT UIFZ ,BZMB8PIMGPSEDBOCFSFBDIFEBU

SVOOJOHUISPVHIPVUUIFQFSGPSNBODFEJT QMBZJOH QIPUPT BMPOH XJUI JOGPSNBUJPOBM OBSSBUJPOBOEQPFUSZSFBEJOHT -JNTFBSDIFE:PV5VCFBOEDIPSBMNVTJD *U UPPL  EBZT UP LJMM   QFPQMF JO 3XBOEB XJUI NBDIFUFT ‰ UIBUT   XFCTJUFTGPSTPOHTSFMBUJOHUPIPQFBOEMJGF JO EFTQFSBUF QMBDFT UIBU XPVME FNQIBTJT QFPQMFNVSEFSFEBEBZ 0O 5VFTEBZ 0DU    TUVEFOUT GSPN UIFXFJHIUPGXIBUUIFJSDPODFSUJTBCPVU UIFEFWJMJTIQMBOUBUBMMUJNFTJOPSEFSUPPQFSBUF XJMMPGUIFQMBOU 5IF DPODFSU XJMM GFBUVSF TPOHT MJLF *OTQJSF 4DIPPM PG "SUT BOE 4DJFODFT IJHI FBDITUBHFPGUIFQMBOUTHSPXUI TIFTBJE i* QMBZ 4FZNPVS XIP JT TVCTFSWJFOU UP .S i3VTTJBO 1JDOJD w i#JSE 4POHw BOE i"OJ TDIPPMXJMMHJWFWPJDFUPUIPTFMJWFTMPTU 5IF FMBCPSBUF EFUBJM PG UIF TFU QSPWJEFE GFS .VTIOJL BOE MFBSO WFSZ RVJDLMZ UIBU UIF QMBOU #JEXFMM 1SFTCZUFSJBO $IVSDI XJMM SFT .BBNJO w B )FCSFX TPOH +FXJTI QFPQMF UJMFHSPVOEJOXIJDIUIFIPSSJCMFQMBOUi"VESFZ TVSWJWFTPOCMPPE wTBJE/PBI4OZEFS BTFOJPS POBUF XJUI TPOHT GSPN DVMUVSFT BOE TBOHXIJMFXBMLJOHUPUIFJSEFBUIBU/B[J **wDPVMEEFWFMPQBOEXJUIFBDIUSBOTGPSNBUJPO  EPVCMF NBKPS JO UIFBUSF BSUT BOE QPMJUJDBM DPVOUSJFT BîFDUFE CZ HFOPDJEF GPS UIF DBNQT*UUSBOTMBUFTJOUPi*#FMJFWFw CFDPNFIVOHSJFSGPSIVNBOnFTI TDJFODF 4PQIPNPSF *OTQJSF TUVEFOU "MJDF $PSO 7PJDFTGPS)PQFDPODFSU 4UBSUJOH PVU BT BO PEEMPPLJOH NZTUFSZ  UIF i8F UPPL B QVQQFU UIBU XF XFSFOU TVSF XBT "QSPKFDUUIBUTUBSUFEBTBOJEFBCFUXFFO XFMM JT FYDJUFE UP CF QBSUJDJQBUJOH JO UIF QMBOU NPSQIT VQPO FBDI GFFEJOH PG IVNBO HPJOHUPXPSLPSIPXBOEJOUXPXFFLTXFHPU $BSPM &EFMNBO  QSPGFTTPS PG QTZDIPMPHZ  DPODFSU  $PSOXFMM TBJE 4JODF UIF FJHIUI CMPPE  TQBSLJOH JOUP TPOH BOE EBODF  QFSTVBE JUSVOOJOHBOEJOTZOD wIFTBJEi8FQSBDUJDFE BOE UIF *OTQJSF TDIPPMT DIPSBM EJSFDUPS HSBEF  $PSOXFMM IBT CFFO TUVEZJOH HFOP JOH JUT PXOFS  4FZNPVS  UP mOE EFTQFSBUF XBZT UJNFBOEUJNFBHBJOBOEXFBSFWFSZIBQQZXJUI .BSZ-PV-JNJO"VHVTUJTDPNJOHUPMJGF DJEF  XIJDI TQBSLFE BO JOUFSFTU JO 8PSME UPGFFEJU UIFSFTVMUTw 8BS**NPWJFTBOEUIF)PMPDBVTU UISPVHI&EFMNBOT4PDJPMPHZDMBTT i-BTUTFNFTUFS*UPPLBQVQQFUSZDMBTTIFSFBU 5IFDPNNVOJUZTVQQPSUIBTCFFOTUFBEZ i* GFFM MJLF *WF CFFO XBJUJOH GPS UIJT "TBDMBTTQSPKFDU IFSTUVEFOUTTQMJUJOUP $IJDP4UBUFBOEXBTBTLFEUPCFPOFPGUIFQVQ )BWJOH NPSF UIBO IBMG PG UIF UIFBUSF GVMM  SPMFTGPSUIFFWFOUUPUFBDIVOEFSDMBTTNFO DPODFSUGPSMJLFUISFFZFBSTOPX wTIFTBJE QFUFFST wTBJETFOJPS;BDIBSZ#VSDI POFPGUIF TPNFUJNFT FWFO OFBS DBQBDJUZ JT WFSZ FYDJUJOH  i'JOBMMZ*DBOFYQSFTTNZTFMGBOEXFDBO BCPVUHFOPDJEFJOUPEBZTTPDJFUZ QMBOUTPQFSBUPST BOE JUT OJDF UP TFF QFPQMF DPNF PVU UP TVQQPSU 5IF TPOHT SFnFDU DVMUVSFT UIBU IBWF NBLFBUSJCVUFUPUIBUw 5IFQMBZXBTTQMJUJOUPUXPBDUT IBWJOHBEJG TUVEFOUT 4OZEFSTBJE "O JOTUSVDUPS DBNF JOUP UIF DMBTT BOE FYQFSJFODFEHFOPDJEFPWFSUJNF GFSFOU QVQQFUFFS GPS FBDI CFDBVTF CFJOH JOTJEF i*N B NVTJDBM UIFBUSF OFSE XIP KVTU IBQ i8IFO QFPQMF UIJOL BCPVU CBE UIJOHT FYQMBJOFE UIF NFBOJOH BOE QISBTJOH PG UIFDPTUVNFJTESBJOJOHBOEIPUVOEFSUIFTUBHF QFOFE UP HFU DBTU BT B MFBE PO B NVTJDBM w IF UIBU IBQQFO JO UIF XPSME  NPTU QFPQMF BMM UIF NVMUJDVMUVSBM UVOFT UIF TUVEFOUT MJHIUT IFTBJE TBJEi*UTBWFSZJOUFSFTUJOHQSPDFTTCVU*SFBMMZ EPOU UIJOL BCPVU HFOPDJEF w TBJE /JD XFSFMFBSOJOH i* DBOU TFF UIF HVZ XIP EPFT UIF WPJDF GPS FOKPZNZTFMGw 0ODF UIF NFBOJOH XBT JO QMBDF  UIF ,FJUI  B KVOJPS DPOTUSVDUJPO NBOBHFNFOU UIFQMBOU *IBEUPMFBSOUIFNVTJDBOEUIFMJOFT 5IFOFYUFOEFBWPSGPSUIF$IJDP4UBUF4DIPPM NBKPS BOE HSPVQ MFBEFS GPS 7PJDFT GPS TPOHTDBNFFBTJFSUPUIFTUVEFOUTBOEUIF SFBMMZXFMM MJTUFOUPIJNBOEUSZUPNJNJDXIBU PGUIF"SUTJOQSPWJEJOHMJWFBDUJPOQFSGPSNBODFT NVTJD IJHIMJHIUFE UIF IVNBOJUZ CFIJOE )PQF UPTBZ w#VSDITBJEi*UTSFBMMZJNQPSUBOUUIBU* UP$IJDPXJMMCFi3FWFOHFST5SBHFEZwDPNJOHJO *U XBT JNQPSUBOU GPS UIF QSPKFDU UP CF UIF TUBUJTUJDT  TBJE ,SJTUB 8VSMJU[FS  DIPJS VOEFSTUBOEUIFNVTJDGPSBQMBZMJLFUIJTw /PWFNCFS NFBOJOHGVM BOE OPU KVTU BCPVU MFBSOJOH QSFTJEFOUBUUIF*OTQJSFTDIPPM 5IFJOUFSBDUJPOTCFUXFFOUIFMFBEDIBSBDUFST  i*U NBLFT UIF QFPQMF UIBU XFSF UBML TPOHTGPSBTIPX -JNTBJE i#FOwBOEi"VESFZwESJWFUIFSPNBOUJDUFOTJPO +VBO.FKJBDBOCFSFBDIFEBU 1PXFS1PJOU QSFTFOUBUJPOT XJMM CF JOH BCPVU IVNBO w DIPJS TJOHFS $PPQFS JOUPUIFDMJNBYXIFOFWFSZPOFTVDDVNCTUPUIF KNFKJB!UIFPSJPODPN -FJMB3PESJHVF[

5)&03*0/t$)&-4&"#&*()54

"354&%*503

The

ARTS pages 6 with section has

articles

13

written with

7

words,

photos

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i"T XF MJWF  UIF NPSF XF FNCSBDF BOE EP OPU GFBS EFBUI  XF MJWF PVS MJGF NPSF GVMMZ w4DPUUTBJE 'PS IFS  UIF NFBOJOH PG %JB EF MPT .VFSUPT JT UP DFM FCSBUF GBNJMZ BOE BODFTUPST BOE BMTP UP SFTQFDU UIF QBTU PG BODFTUPST BOE JOWJUF UIFN CBDL UP UIF GBNJMZT IFBSU

BOENFNPSJFT 8IBUT JNQPSUBOU JT HFU UJOH QFPQMF BDRVBJOUFE XJUI UIF JEFB CFIJOE UIF DFMFCSB UJPO  BOE  OPU KVTU UIJOLJOH JUT UIF .FYJDBO )BMMPXFFO  TIFTBJE 5IF FWFOU XBT OPU EJTBQ QPJOUJOH GPS ZFBSPME "MFY ,VZLFOEBMM PG $IJDP  XIP XBT IBWJOH GVO DPMPSJOH NBTLT BOE BXBJUJOH IJT UVSO GPSTPNFGBDFQBJOU i.BTLTBSFSFBMMZDPPM wIF TBJE )F XBT BMTP MPPLJOH GPS XBSE UP TPNF QBJOU PO IJT GBDF i*UT GVO UP IBWF UIF GBDF QBJOUFE wIFTBJE )PXFWFS ZFBSPME4JNPO .ZFST QSFGFSSFE LFFQJOH UIF DPMPS PO IJT NBTL JOTUFBE PG IJTGBDF i* EPOU MJLF NZ GBDF HFU UJOH QBJOUFE w IF TBJE BT IF DPMPSFEIJTTLVMM 5IPVHIGBDFQBJOUJOHJTOPU BUSBEJUJPOBMQBSUPGUIFDFMF CSBUJPO JO .FYJDP  4DPUU DBO TFF NPSF .FYJDBO"NFSJDBO HSPVQT JODPSQPSBUJOH B GBDF QBJOUJOHBTQFDUUPUIFFWFOU 

TIFTBJE $ISJTUJBO (VUJFSSF[  B QVCMJD SFMBUJPOT NBKPS BOE TQFDJBM FWFOU DPPSEJOBUPS GPS UIF NVTFVN  TBJE UIF FWFOU BJNFEUPFYQPTFLJETUPPUIFS DVMUVSFTJOBGVOXBZ i*UT SFBDIJOH UIF HBQ UP CSJOH UPHFUIFS GBNJMZ BOE TUVEFOUT w(VUJFSSF[TBJE 'PS ZFBSPME $ISJTUJOB "MWBSF[  B QPMJUJDBM TDJFODF NBKPS  %JB EF MPT .VFSUPT JT BEBZUPDFMFCSBUFBOEBQQSF DJBUF MJGF BU B NPSF QFSTPOBM MFWFM %FBUI JT OPUIJOH UP GFBS  TIFTBJE5IFFWFOUBMTPIFMQT VOJGZ UIF -BUJOP DVMUVSF BU $IJDP4UBUF CSJOHBXBSFOFTT BCPVU UIF EJWFSTF DVMUVSF BOE FYQPTF LJET UP BOPUIFS DVMUVSF %FBUI JT TPNFUIJOH UIBU JTOU BMXBZT TBE  XIJDI FYQMBJOTXIZUIFTLVMMNBTLT BMXBZT IBWF B IBQQZ GBDF  "MWBSF[TBJE i%FBUIJTKVTUQBSUPGMJGF w TIFTBJE .JHVFM3PDIBDBOCFSFBDIFEBU NSPDIB!UIFPSJPODPN

3FDJUBMFNCPEJFTBO "GFX'0$64GFBUVSFEmMNTUPTIBSF FWFOJOHXJUIANBTUFST

$IPJSAJOTQJSFTDPNNVOJUZGPSHFOPDJEFBXBSFOFTTDPODFSU

4IPXDIPNQTVQMBVHIT BQQMBVTF

7*3"-7*%&04

"354

#FTUEFNJOMPPLTGPSBMMTIBQFT PDDBTJPOT

BSUTBMMXFFLBUUIFPSJPODPN

8&%/&4%": 0$5 

BSUTBMMXFFL!UIFPSJPODPN

# #&&413&55:-*55-&5)*/(4

"406/%4"-7"5*0/$ %"*-:%04&$

SBU JOH

BSUTBMMXFFL!UIFPSJPODPN

$ &YQFOEBCMFTTFUTHFBSTGPS$IJDPTIPX 456%:#3&",$ 13&7*&8

i-JUUMF4IPQPG)PSSPSTw QMBZTBUUIF)BSMFO "EBNT5IFBUSF 4UPSZ$

DIFFSFEJOBQQSPWBM

LXPIMGPSE!UIFPSJPODPN

i-JCSBSZPG%VTUw 4IPSUmMN 

i.BSZBOE.BYw $MBZNBUJPOGFBUVSF 

PQUJPOT 50%":

0SMB'BMMPO 'PSNFSMZPG$FMUJD 8PNBO

i$PEZw %PDVNFOUBSZ 

5 ) 6 3 4%":

"GSPNBO

' 3 * %":

.JDLFZ"WBMPO

.JDLFZ"WBMPO *--6453"5*0/#:&3*$3044*$0/&

4"5 6 3 %":

$IPSBM$PODFSU

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i.BSZ BOE 4POJD(SBWJUZ .BYw FYQMPSFT /PU DPNQMFUFMZ VOEFSTUBOE FYQMPSFUISPVHITPOH NBUFE SFNBJOT PG QBUJFOUT 4BMTB$MBTTFT QN UIF GSJFOETIJQ PG UXP QFO JOHXIBUIBEDBVTFEJUPSXIZ EBUJOHCBDLUPBTFBSMZBTUIF UIFXPSETPGTFWFSBM QN QN !(BMMFSZ QBMT PWFS UIF!DPVSTF PG UXP JU IBQQFOFE  6OTFS CFHBO GBNPVT QPFUT JODMVEJOH T %JTDPWFSFE BMNPTU CZ 0OF $BGF $VMUVSF !4UVEJP EPXOUPXO

BDDJEFOU  UIF DPQQFS NBLF TIJGUVSOTIBWFFOEVSFEZFBST PG OFHMFDU BOE XBUFS EBNBHF UIBU DBVTFE UIF DBOT UP DPS SPEF JO EJTUJODU XBZT  FBDI POF EJèFSFOU GSPN UIF OFYU 0SJHJOBMMZ OVNCFSFE GSPN [FSPUP  UIFSFBSF  DBOJTUFST ‰ POF GPS FBDI PG UIF VODMBJNFE QBUJFOUT "T UIFQJDUVSFTBOETUPSZCFIJOE UIFDPQQFSDBOTCSFBL OBUJPO XJEF GBNJMJFT CFHJO UP DPNF GPSXBSE UP DMBJN MPOH MPTU SFMBUJWFT BOE mOBMMZ HJWF UIF VSOTUIFJSQSPQFSQMBDFBNPOH UIFJS GBNJMJFT 5P EBUF   IBWF CFFO DMBJNFE BOE UIF OBNFT PG UIPTF UIBU SFNBJO BSF MJTUFE PO UIF IPTQJUBMT XFCTJUFJOIPQFTPGCFJOHSFD PHOJ[FEBOEDMBJNFE i-JCSBSZ PG %VTUw XBT POF PG UXP TIPSU mMNT UIBU XFSF DIPTFO BT GBWPSJUFT BNPOH B UPUBMPGGPVSTIPSUmMNTTIPXO BT FOUSJFT GPS UIF 'PDVT 'JMN'FTUJWBM

DPOUJOFOUT BOE  ZFBST "O "VTUSBMJBO OBUJWF  ZFBSPME .BSZ %JOLMF  JT DVSJPVT BCPVU XIFSFCBCJFTJO"NFSJDBDPNF GSPNBOEEFDJEFTUPSBOEPNMZ TFMFDU TPNFPOF GSPN UIF QIPOFCPPLTIFDBOXSJUFBMFU UFS UP BOE BTL 5IF SFDJQJFOU PG UIBU MFUUFS JT .BY )PSPX JU[ B+FXJTINJEEMFBHFENBO MJWJOH JO /FX :PSL XIP IBT "TQFSHFST TZOESPNF .BSZ BOE .BY DPOUJOVF UP XSJUF CBDLBOEGPSUI UP FBDI PUIFS UISPVHIPVU UIF OFYU  ZFBST BT UIFJS GSJFOETIJQ  UIF POMZ POFFBDIIBT HSPXTTUSPOHFS /PUPQJDJTUBCPPGPSUIFEVPBT UIFZUBMLBCPVUGFFMJOHT DIPD PMBUF IPU EPHT  UBYJEFSNZ  BMDPIPMJTN MPOFMJOFTT LMFQUP NBOJB BDDFQUBODF TXFFUFOFE DPOEFOTFE NJML  QFUT BOE  PG DPVSTF  XIFSF CBCJFT DPNF GSPN 5IPVHI UIF mMN IBT JUT IVNPSPVT NPNFOUT  JU UPVDIFTPOUIFTFSJPVTOFTTPG NFOUBMEJTBCJMJUJFTBOEEFBUI

UP GJOE XBZT UP SBJTF CPUI NPOFZ BOE BXBSFOFTT BCPVU UIJTVODPNNPO CVUOPUSBSF  DPOEJUJPO "GUFS EJTDPWFS JOH UIBU IFS QBSBMZTJT EJEOU NBUUFS VOEFS UIF XBUFS BOE UIBU TDVCB EJWJOH XBT TUJMM WFSZ NVDI BO PQUJPO  6OTFS TUBSUFE CSJOHJOH PUIFS QFP QMF XIP IBE MPTU FJUIFS UIFJS MJNCT PS UIF MPTT PG UIFJS MJNCT PVU UP UIF XBUFS BT XFMM  FWFOUVBMMZ MFBEJOH UP 6OTFST (SFBU 4DVCB "EWFO UVSF 5IF GJMN GPMMPXT 6OTFS JO IFS FWFSZEBZ MJGF BT BO VOEFSHSBEVBUF TUVEFOU BU UIF 6OJWFSTJUZ PG 3FEMBOET JO 4BO #FSOBEJOP %BZ BGUFS EBZ  6OTFS FOTVSFT UIBU TIF JT OPU EFGJOFE CZ IFS EJT BCJMJUZ BOE IBT DSFBUFE IFS PXO NBKPS JO CJPQPMJUJDT UP GVSUIFSVOEFSTUBOEUIFJOGMV FODFPGQPMJUJDTPOCJPMPHJDBM BEWBODFT o$PNQJMFECZ+FO.PSFOP

46 / %":

%BODF$IVSDI

BNUPQN !$BGF$VMUVSF  $PNFUP$BGF$VMUVSF XJUIBTLJQJOZPVS TUFQBOEQSBJTFJO ZPVSIFBSUGPSUIF NJOE CPEZBOETPVM FYFSDJTFTXJUI%BWJE 8JOHMJGUFS

.0/ %":

#FBS&0LF

QN !.BEJTPO#FBS(BSEFO $BMMJOHBMMKVLFCPY IFSPFTo5IF#FBS IPTUTBLBSBPLFOJHIU FWFSZ.POEBZVOUJM DMPTJOHUJNF

5 6 & 4%":

$SFPMF$IPJSPG $VCB

QN !-BYTPO"VEJUPSJVN TUVEFOU "FVQIPSJDTIPXGVMM PGVQMJGUJOHNVTJDBOE JOTQJSBUJPOBMKPZ UIF $SFPMF$IPJSPG$VCB BSFEFTDFOEBOUTPG )BJUJBOTXIPNBEF UIF KPVSOFZ GSPN POF

BSUTBMMXFFL!UIFPSJPODPN


A4 |

news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

POLICE BLOTTER

FRANKY’S Fights at the establishment spiked during a recent three week period, but has died down for now, Franky’s bouncer Clint Norman said.

Information cited directly from Chico Police Department or University Police Department. University Police Thursday, 1:09 p.m.: Animal reported at Student Health Center patient parking. “Kitten possible under hood of vehicle.” Friday, 2:13 a.m.: Welfare check reported at Modoc Hall area. “Reporting party observed female adult climbing out of creek near physical science. Last seen crossing bridge heading towards Modoc.” Friday, 2:24 a.m.: Medical aid — alcohol related reported in front of Whitney Hall. “Female has been drinking. Believed to be subject from earlier welfare check call for report of a female in the creek.”

Vehicle through the wall and into the kitchen. Seventeenyear-old grandson driver. Appears no injuries Landlord en route.

SATURDAY, 10:49 P.M. Chico police records

Friday, 3:29 a.m.: Welfare check reported at Esken Hall. “Mother requesting welfare check on son. Son pocket dialed mother and mother believes he is severely intoxicated. Subject had been drinking earlier, but is fine. Mother advised.” Saturday, 11:16 a.m.: Vandalism reported at Hazel Street lot by dispenser on electrical box. “Black spray paint with a possible ‘B’ similar to the one in ‘A’ lot on the dispenser and blue phone taken yesterday.” Sunday, 12:04 a.m.: Medical aid — alcohol related reported at bleachers behind stadium on roadway. “Subject passed out. Medics on scene. Subject transported to Enloe.”

Chico Police Thursday, 5:56 p.m.: Residential burglary reported on the 1900 block of Spruce Avenue. “Reporting party advising someone broke into his house last night. Unknown what time. Made entry through an unlocked window by pulling a screen off. Loss of $1,500 coin collection and jewelry.” Friday, 2:25 a.m.: Suspicious subject reported on the 800 block of Rio Chico Way. “On call back. Reporting party called back stating there is a male following females. Suspect last seen around the CSUC Rec Center. Suspect had followed reporting party, then started following another female. Suspect chased off by reporting party’s friends. Suspect didn’t say anything to anyone. CSUC advised.” Friday, 9:53 p.m.: Domestic dispute reported on East 16th Street. “Partner is throwing out all of reporting party’s clothing wanting reporting party to move out. Subjects in a verbal/baby crying in the background. Reporting party states her partner is hitting her, then stated she is threatening to hit her.” Saturday, 12:23 a.m.: Disturbance reported on the 600 block of West Eighth Street. “Group of subjects gathering in the roadway. It appears they might be getting ready to fight. Possibly from a party that just broke up. Subjects are starting to yell and take off shirts. Large group of about 70 plus.” Saturday, 10:49 p.m.: Accident reported on the 1100 block of North Cedar Street. “Vehicle through the wall into the kitchen. Seventeenyear-old grandson driver. Appears no injuries. Landlord en route. Reporting party has already shut off the water to the apartment. No alcohol.” –Compiled by Andre Byik

THE ORION • JOSH ZACK

Local bar sees brawls on rise Juniper Rose STAFF WRITER

An increase in the number of fights at Franky’s and in the surrounding parking lot has caused interest and concern among Chico State students. There is no apparent reason for the increasing number of fights, said Clint Norman, a bouncer at Franky’s and a senior construction management major. “There’s no linking factor between the fights,” Norman said. “They’re just all kind of separate occurrences that revolve around drunkenness.” While there haven’t been many fights in the past couple weeks, prior to that there was a three-week period when fights “spiked,” he said. “It might have to do with midterms,” Norman said. “Maybe you have a midterm and then you go out and rage for like a week or so after that because you are tired of studying.” The pizza line gets the younger crowds that are often harder to deal with but less likely to cause fights, he said. “They have more sass but they don’t have anything to back it up,” Norman said. “They are just trying to be a pain because they have nothing better to do and when they start to linger that’s when stuff starts to go down.” Holidays often see a spike in

at trying to regulate,” Abello said. “But there’s always a lot of traffic right there.” Fights occur outside Franky’s because it is the only place in the area where groups of people can stand outside, Denike said. Because it is such a common place for students to go, people often see people they know and don’t necessarily like, which can lead to fights, she said. “I’ve seen a lot of fights and I’ve gotten into a fight with my boyfriend right there,” Abello said. “I saw friends and gave them a hug or whatever, and me and my boyfriend got into a really big argument because of it.” The owner of Franky’s, Nick Andrew, said the bar does what it can to keep problems from happening in the parking lot. “We’ve been here for 19 years and that’s basically what we do — try to make it safe for everybody, and we’re pretty successful at it,” Andrew said. The doormen outside are there to keep people moving on, he said. “If we ever have a problem with an individual we will ask them to move on down the street so that they don’t mingle with the 99.9 percent of the good people that are here,” Andrew said. Juniper Rose can be reached at jrose@theorion.com

FreePregnancyTests

530.809.0270

24-hour hotline (530) 897-6100 Women’s Resource Clinic Walk-Ins Welcome!

10% Off

when you bring in this ad

$25 Piercings

fights, Norman said. “The people that come visit never care at all,” he said. “They just come, have fun, start fights and then leave.” Students say that the fights taking place downtown can often be attributed to people visiting from out of the area. “They just come up here for the weekend and party and get drunk and they don’t respect our community or our campus,” said Gavin Denike, a senior business administration major. Police, however, are always quick to assist during fights, Norman said. “Whenever there’s a situation, they’re there within a few seconds,” he said “They always have someone in the area and they are always 110 percent.” The location is busy all the time, said Chico police Sgt. Rob Merrifield. However, there has not necessarily been any more fights recently than in the past. “There is always fights either right in front of Franky’s or right next door because of the fact that it stays open so late for pizza and all,” Merrifield said. “Anywhere drunk people congregate late at night there’s going to be fights.” Combined efforts from Franky’s bouncers and Chico police attempt to keep people from accumulating in the parking lot, said Crystal Abello, a senior psychology major. “I think they do really good

$60/hr Tattoos

Address: 115 W. 2nd Ave (2nd & Esplanade) Open: Mon-Thur, 10am-5pm & Fri, 10am-1pm All Services are Free & Confidential

S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N C R E DE N T I A L PROGR A M s$EADLINEFOR3PRING-ULTIPLE3INGLE3UBJECT #REDENTIAL0ROGRAMS!PPLICATIONS/CTOBER APPLY NOW!

BE A T E ACH ER s(IGH1UALITY4EACHER#REDENTIAL 0ROGRAMS sYEARSOFTEACHEREDUCATION experience s'RADUATESSOUGHTBYHUNDREDSOF school districts statewide Download the School of Education Application at www.csuchico.edu/educ Visit the School of Education in Tehama 101 or call 898.6241 to meet with an advisor.


news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

Greek Olympics unites chapters Sam Kelly STAFF WRITER

An inflated obstacle course, burlap sacks, hanging sodas, water balloons, rope and liability waivers were some of the pieces brought together to form Friday’s Greek Olympics. The event lasted from 2 to 4 p.m. on the lawn between Shasta and Lassen halls and was a battle between five teams, each consisting of a combination of fraternities and sororities. Keeping with the “Greekelodeon” theme, the teams were, The Wild Thornberrys, Are You Afraid of the Dark?, Legends of the Hidden Temple, Rugrats and Rocket Power. The Greek Olympics location near the dorms also allowed the Greek system to expose itself to prospective undergraduate students, who could be seen peeking out of dorm windows and stopping by to watch. “It’s a good overview of all the different frats and a good chance to see what I want to rush next semester,” said William Lenhart, a freshman business administration major. Lenhart attended with his sister, Amanda Lenhart, an Alpha Gamma Delta member and junior construction management major. “I thought everyone did a great job,” she said. “It promotes Greek life and friendly competition between all of us.” With more than 100 students in attendance, the event made for a competitive, spirited atmosphere giving Greeks the opportunity to meet members from fraternities and sororities they otherwise may not have had the chance to. The event is a good way to dispel some of the rumors about Greek life and show it in a positive light, said Sigma Chi member Pat Rodriggs, a senior outdoor education major and Greek Olympics organizer. That is also why a no-alcohol policy is enforced for Greek Week events. “I had to tell my guys who were drunk to leave,” he said. “We are fighting the party stigma and we enforce sobriety at these events.” The first event was double elimination tug-of-war with the rules barring any cleated shoes to prevent an unfair

traction advantage. Although the event was competitive, coaching and cheering was all done with good sportsmanship, and walking through the crowds, no negativity was heard toward the other fraternities and sororities in attendance. The next event involved was a sack race, which left a lasting impression on the lawn as the contestants nearly hopped out of their burlap sacks jumping toward the finish line. What followed was a water bucket race in which participants had to transport water from a bucket at one end of the grass to an empty bucket on the other side, leaving a trail of mush and mud behind. Creativity was on full display in the ways contestants conquered a variety of obstacles during the various events. Awareness was also a virtue, as a few last minute saves were needed to prevent any wardrobe malfunctions as result of friction with the obstacles. Spectators, like Ben Del Fante, a junior criminal justice major, who stopped to watch the event, were entertained. “It’s a good event and they can show pride for their fraternity or sorority,” he said. “It’s cool, but I am comfortable as a spectator.” The Wild Thornberrys won the Greek Olympics, but it was Are You Afraid of the Dark? that was the champion of Greek Week. The Wild Thornberry’s were made up of members from the Alpha Gamma Delta, Gamma Zeta Alpha, Theta Chi chapters, while Are you Afraid of the Dark was made up by Sigma Kappa, Alpha Sigma Phi, Sigma Pi and Upsilon Kappa Delta members. A lot of money for Habitat for Humanity and the Boys and Girls Club is raised, Rodriggs said. Working together toward a common goal brings Greeks together and above some of the grudges and animosity between different fraternities and sororities on campus. “We are all here to help each other,” he said. Sam Kelly can be reached at skelly@theorion.com

A5

SACK RACE Rick Melgar, a senior animal science major from Gamma Zeta Alpha, competes in the sack races at the Greek Olympics.

PHOTOS BY • AARON DRAPER

WINNERS [from left to right] Theta Chi members Corey Gilbert, a junior communications major, and Ricky Rosario, a junior business major, celebrate their tug-ofwar victory along with Alpha Gamma Delta member Lauren Keifer, a junior communication sciences and disorder major.


A6 |

news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

Awareness key to fight suicide major and president of the Chico State club Active Minds, hopes STAFF WRITER the walk will raise awareness Eight years ago, 19-year- about suicide and depression in old Suzy Gonzales took her the community. “It’s to bring suicide out of the own life. On Saturday, her parents darkness and shed light on this Mike and Mary Gonzales sensitive subject,” Ellis said. “I think the No. 1 way to prejoined hundreds of other suicide survivors, or people who vent suicide is to educate and have lost loved ones to suicide, create awareness about the in Bidwell Park for the second warning signs, and what you annual Out of the Darkness should do if you think someone is suicidal.” community walk. Adam Berg, a junior Family members, communications friends and supportmajor, joined the walk ers gathered at the One in remembrance of his Mile Recreation Area to best friend. participate in the event, Berg, the intern which was funded by People coordinator for the the American Founare here Psychological Coundation for Suicide to support seling and Wellness Prevention. them in Center, thinks events Participants raised like Saturday’s commoney for the cause their munity walk can help and completed either a times of prevent suicides. three or five mile walk need. “I hope that it will through Lower Bidwell change their attitude Park. Many wore shirts about wanting to take with a photo of a loved their own life after one lost to suicide to ADAM BERG seeing the effects that show who they comJunior it has on their friends,” pleted the walk for. Communications Berg said. A planning comMajor The Wellness Cenmittee formed, which ter was present, along included Mike Gonzawith many other les, and brought the event to Chico. Until last year, organizations from surroundthe nearest Out Of The Dark- ing counties, to promote the ness community walk was held services they offer to students. “We wanted our presence in Sacramento. The walk has seen an to be known and that stuincreased number of partici- dents can find us on campus,” pants and community support Berg said. “People are here to support them in their times this year, Gonzales said. “We are building on the of need.” This year the event saw momentum from last year,” 356 walkers and raised he said. Gonzales’ daughter Suzy almost $12,000. Fifty volmoved from their home in Red unteers helped run the Bluff to attend Arizona State on community walk. The money raised will go to a full-ride scholarship, he said. While there she fell into a support American Foundation severe depression, and through for Suicide Prevention prothe encouragement of an online grams including research and education programs to presuicide group, ended her life. “Just talking about it can vent suicide, increase national help stop someone from mov- awareness about depression ing towards it,” Gonzales said. and suicide and assist survi“Depression is recoverable, if vors of suicide loss, according you don’t keep it in and seek the to the foundation’s website. Event organizers plan right help.” Ariel Ellis, who serves on to continue to raise money the planning committee for toward the cause, with fundthe walk, said suicide preven- raising continuing throughout tion became a personal subject the year. when her close friend committed suicide in high school. Molly Rose Livingston can be reached at Ellis, a junior psychology mlivingston@theorion.com

OPEN DISCUSSION Senior English major Chris Trudell, education grad student Kile Taylor and senior Ted Rodrigues, a philosophy major, gather at Selvester’s Cafe-by-theCreek Oct. 11 to listen to journalist Ted Cox talk about his experiences during a Christian “straight camp.”

Molly Rose Livingston

“ “

THE ORION • MICHELLE REINMUTH

Journalist tells of ‘ex-gay’ camp Michaela Boggan Ally Dukkers THE ORION

Back home in Feather Falls, Joe Rogers, a junior sociology major, never felt like he could be himself. After a trip to San Francisco, he returned to school with the courage to come out and wear a T-shirt that said “nobody knows I’m gay.” Rogers is an openly gay student who is an activist in the LGBTQ community on campus. He is a part of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and growing up in this conservative religion, he often felt isolated. He continues to practice his religion and has found a way to accept who he is within his church. Chico State celebrated its fourth annual Queer Week Oct. 10-14, and the Office of Diversity invited journalist Ted Cox to present his undercover experience at an “ex-gay” camp. Rogers decided to go to Cox’s presentation on Oct. 11 because he was curious to see what Cox was going to say about homosexuality and religion. Cox posed as a gay man for several months at two churches in California and participated in a two-day camp at a ranch in Arizona called “Journey into Manhood.” He shared his experience about how these camps try to change gay men’s sexual orientation by encouraging the idea that homosexuality is a lifestyle choice and a symptom of an unhealthy childhood. He vividly explained a “therapy” exercise where he watched a man act out a scenario from his childhood, and the counselor instructed him to beat a punching bag with a baseball bat, pretending it was his father.

Like Rogers, Cox was raised Mormon, and after taking a biology class in college, his faith was challenged when he learned about the theory of evolution. Part of the Mormon church for the majority of his life, Cox was taught that homosexuality was wrong, he said. Now an atheist, he feels obligated to stand up against the church in support for the gay movement.

You can’t change your orientation, you can only change what you do with it.

JOE ROGERS Junior Sociology Major

Tray Robinson, diversity coordinator, was pleased that Cox’s presentation covered the religious influences of the “ex-gay” camps, he said. Robinson frequently receives emails about diversity awareness opportunities and Cox’s story caught his eye. “It’s important to continue to bring awareness to issues on diversity and gay equality,” Robinson said. Cox’s presentation brought up topics that many people don’t have much knowledge on, Robinson said. Not many people know about the camps that try to turn gay people straight, or that these types of “therapies” use extreme methods such as electric shock therapy. Robinson has done research on

programs such as this, but Cox discussed some things that Robinson was not aware of, he said. He was interested to learn that 90 percent of the members of the camps are male, he said. He was also surprised to hear that the majority of the leaders of these programs have been involved in same-sex sexual acts themselves. The diversity department has received nothing but positive feedback about Cox’s performance and hopes that he will return to Chico State, Robinson said. For Queer Week, the Gender and Sexuality Equity Center hosted several events to bring awareness of the LGBTQ community to Chico. GSEC hosted Queer Week for the last four years to bring a sense of pride to the LGBTQ community, said Abby Teicheira, a senior Spanish major and GSEC’s LGBTQ program coordinator. “It was necessary then, it is definitely necessary now and a conversation that needs to happen,” she said. There was a great response and community involvement with all the events, Teicheira said. “I saw new faces, which means we are reaching out to new people.” For Rogers, the events of Queer Week are really important, he said. The younger generation, especially in California, has a tolerance for homosexuality, which is not as evident in other parts of the country. “You can’t change your orientation, you can only change what you do with it,” he said. Michaela Boggan can be reached at mboggan@theorion.com Ally Dukkers can be reached at featureseditor@theorion.com

Dispensaries shutter after crackdown Dani Anguiano STAFF WRITER

The battle between state and national government is taking place yet again, this time in the medical marijuana industry. While harvest season is afoot, the federal government is cracking down on dispensaries across California. Despite campaign promises made by the Obama administration to protect state law, the federal government has intensified its war on medical marijuana dispensaries. The federal crackdowns have impacted dispensaries statewide, including legal ones. Robert Galia, the CEO of North Valley Holistic Health, a Chico dispensary, has seen a grave impact on his dispensary, he said. The landlord evicted his business after the federal government

threatened to have him forfeit his property. As a result, his dispensary is being forced to closed down. The crackdowns will be detrimental to the economy and will have no benefit, Galia said. “This is going to do nothing, it will solve nothing,” he said. “It will raise prices for the sick and poor and turn them into criminals.” The impact will be especially devastating now that it’s harvest time, Galia said. The main conflict of this issue lies in the position of the state and federal governments. California legalized the medical use of marijuana in 1996, in Proposition 215. But under federal law, use and sale of marijuana is still illegal. The issue is dependent on the 10th Amendment, which grants states power, and the Commerce Clause, which allows the federal

government to regulate commerce between states, according to Dane Cameron, a professor of political science who has worked on relevant cases. Barrett Whitaker, a criminal justice major, doesn’t question the benefits of medicinal use and feels it should become legal federally. While many support the legalization, some are against it. “To me it seems like they hurt the economy,” junior Genevive Macaraeg said. “I don’t see the benefit. Too many people I know use it for fun.” Senior Chadid Conley is a strong supporter of the industry. “The federal government is imposing its power on the states, hurting the local government and economies,” Conley said. THE ORION • ORION STAFF

Dani Anguiano can be reached at danguiano@theorion.com

NUG California legalized the use of medical marijuana in 1996 but it’s illegal under federal law, leading to some tricky situations.

College radio station safe from pulling plug after intensified promotion, internships

We are 99 percent confident. There is always that 1 percent chance though.

ERICA MARKHAM KCSC Promotional Coordinator

Raquel Royers STAFF WRITER

KCSC, Chico State’s online radio station, is off the list. And that’s right where it wants to be. For the past few years KCSC has faced the prospect of shut down due to budget cuts, but for the time being, the student-run station is secure in its spot on campus, and off the list of jeopardized college radio stations. Many colleges, including the University of San Francisco and Texas Tech University, have resorted to selling their student-run radio stations to non-student organizations because of lack

of participation and funds, according to an article in USA Today. Last year was the fi rst time KCSC didn’t have the discussion of possibly having to shut down, said Erica Markham, promotional coordinator at KCSC and a senior communication design major. “We are 99 percent confident,” Markham said. “There is always that 1 percent chance though.” Previously, KCSC was on that list almost every year, she said. Markham thinks the change from the previous years is due to the amount of promotion the radio station does on campus.

“The more people know about something and the more they are eager to participate in something, the more successful it will be,” Markham said. It has been KCSC’s goal to make its name known on campus. Being involved with other Associated Students programs, talking to classes and having tables on campus has made the station a popular organization. Getting three units of internship credit for being involved doesn’t hurt either. Using the radio program on campus as an internship resource for students could help other colleges keep it alive and successful, Markham said. The

school is less likely to cut a program if they see there is student interest. “It’s important to have a radio station on campus because it’s music for the students by the students,” Markham said. Fellow member Carly Friedman, promotional director and a senior graphic design major, thinks that having a student-run campus radio station is extremely important for the student voice, she said. KCSC offers a fun environment for students, but more importantly, a way to learn the business of running a radio station, Friedman said. It’s essential for a studentrun college radio station like

KCSC to exist because it allows those who want to go into the field to experience what it would be like working in a similar environment after college, said Tori Pizinger, a senior recreation administration major. Other students think the most vital aspect is that of representing a student voice, which a non-student organization could not represent if they were to take over. “The whole point of having a student-run organization is for the students to run it,” said Sam Lawrence, a senior recreation major. “It’s all about the student voice.” Raquel Royers can be reached at rroyers@theorion.com


news all week @ theorion.com

Pregnant? Need Help?

NEWS

We are here. We can help.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

A9

 

     #"! ##    

FREE PREGNANCY TESTS people who care

530-345-9711 800-550-4900

     


opinion A10 |

Thumbs Up to the Occupy Chico protesters still camped out downtown. That takes a certain kind of crazy. Story A1

Thumbs Down to The Beach’s floor for being so slippery. We paid for a dance floor, not a beach-themed Slip ’n Slide.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

Thumbs Up to Siri, the voice-controlled iPhone 4S assistant. We’ll never have to move our thumbs again.

opinions all week @ theorion.com

EDITORIAL >>

Gate blocks funds from serious safety issues Corinne Knapp was driving toward the 27-foot gap between the Bell Memorial Union and the Student Services Center when she saw an unmarked vehicle “whipping around” West Second Street, into the loading dock behind the BMU. No one was injured by the vehicle, which came and went without incident, said Knapp, the Associated Students Dining Services Retail Manager. In order to deter non-A.S. employees from using the BMU loading dock, A.S. money collected from student union fees was used to install a $25,000-28,000 gate to cover the gap between the BMU loading dock and the Student Services Center. Traffic to the loading dock RELATED has increased since the opening of the Student SerFor more on the vices Center, which opened gate, see A1. summer 2008, Knapp said. “We’ve been lucky in the past two years that we haven’t seen anyone get hurt,” she said. Though the Orion fully endorses A.S. efforts to protect student safety, we do not believe installing a $25,000 automatic gate was the best solution. Rather than spending several semesters worth of student money, A.S. could have spent student union fees on keeping the bike path well-lit at 2 a.m., when vulnerable students are walking home. It could have spent $25,000 on promoting the now-defunct Chico Safe Rides program, which delivered an average of 10 students safely to their doorstep every night. It could have used that money to hold rape aggression defense classes, fixing hazardous sidewalks or used to hire a student safety monitor part time. Two Chico State students were have been pepper sprayed near campus this semester, and A.S. has chosen to promote student safety by installing a gate to regulate an area where no one has any memory of anyone being injured in the last 20 years. When The Orion sent a reporter out to observe the traffic by the inactive gate for 10 minutes, a total of 13 cyclists and pedestrians walked and biked across the space between the Student Services Center and the Bell Memorial Union. Two unmarked cars also used the space to pick pedestrians up, one of which idled in the fire lane by the Student Services Center for several minutes. But neither of the cars was anywhere near colliding with any pedestrians or cyclists. Knapp said she spends at least an hour and a half per week trying to get cars parked in loading dock out so one of 10 A.S. vehicles can use that area. There used to be a large white painted sign made of several two by fours reading “Do not enter, unauthorized vehicles will be towed,” Parenti said. The barrier in the road was “completely destroyed,” by people who picked it up, and dropped it out of the way of their vehicles, she said. A.S. would have had to keep constructing new barriers if they wanted to leave a barrier in the road, Parenti said. Rather than sending thousands of dollars of student money on a mechanical gate, A.S. should have constructed, painted and installed another moveable wooden barrier to obstruct the loading dock. The truck drivers who need to use the loading dock area could have moved that barrier and replaced it after they leave to ensure no unauthorized vehicles use that space. Instead, Chico State is left with a gate constructed at the expense of the student body, which represents more than a barrier to cars and pedestrians. It is a barrier to creative problem solving, an attitude that endorses throwing plentiful student money at a problem rather thinking hard and coming up with a more elegant solution.

ILLUSTRATION BY CHELSEA ROSS

[left to right] Male condoms, “The Patch,” oral contra ceptives, intrauterine devices, injectable contraceptive, diaphragm, abstinance ring and spermicide. Female oral contraceptives and interuterine devices have been known to cause nausea, mood swings and a decrease in libido, which has prompted some to seek alternative methods of birth control, such as a vasectomy.

Birth control crashes sex drive Cassidy Gooding OPINION COLUMNIST

It’s not always easy to be female. Sure, men hold doors open for us, our average life spans are longer and many of us can flirt our way into free meals or club entrances. We usually smell nice and get to wear dresses. But there are downsides to being a member of the fairer sex. Looking forward to making 80 cents to the man’s dollar aside, I’ve recently stumbled upon the most frustrating catch-22 of my life. Birth control kills my sex drive. It took 10 months for me to realize, but the NuvaRing I’d heralded as my best friend has turned against me. And my contraceptive isn’t the only one that inhibits libido, according to a 2010 study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. Women regularly taking one of the more than 100 varieties of oral contraceptives on the market today were found to have the lowest sexual desire in the study’s sample. In her article “Get Your Libido Back” for Women’s Health magazine, Lauren Russel Griffin explores the problem in depth. Basically, the inflation of the body’s level of estrogen contraceptives blocks production and usage of testosterone, a key component to a healthy sex drive. “After you take each pill, your liver starts pumping out a protein called sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG),” Griffin reported. SHBG then traps most of a woman’s testosterone, leaving very low levels of it free to incite any raunchy urges. A range of 10 to 40 percent of women that have talked to their physicians about

Birth control has been known to decrease libido by causing a drop in testosterone levels.

their sex drives while on hormonal contraceptives have experienced this mean turn of events, according to the article. I guess I’m in the unfortunate minority. However, the contraceptives we take to be sexually safe often have even scarier side effects. In 2009, after Bayer’s Yaz was touted on TV commercials as the hip new pill to take, complaints started to pour in after hundreds of women experienced serious reactions, according to injurylawsuitnews. com. More than 6,000 lawsuits have been filed against the Bayer corporation as a result of these reactions. One of those plaintiffs is Carissa Ubersox, a nurse who went blind as a result of clots in her legs caused by the pill, according to the Daily Mail. In less tragic cases, even the lowest hormone pills can cause weight gain, nausea, weakened immunity and mood swings. The stronger a pill’s hormone level, the more likely a woman is to see these effects. And as the nature of the pill is to change a body’s hormonal behavior, women often have to switch to higher hormone dosages as time goes by and their systems adapt. When I was 17, long before sex was even on my radar, my general physician suggested I start the pill during an appointment I had made for a sprained ankle. She was confused when I declined, and spent the next few minutes trying to talk me into it. Had I started with the lowest level pill then, I may have had to change pills one or two times by now. This means I’d have been at risk of the minor drawbacks, as well as blood clots, high blood pressure and abdominal pain, to name a few. The monthly NuvaRing patch and the longer-term Depo-Provera shot manipulate the same hormones the pill does, and share the associated side effects. Intrauterine devices, or IUDs, are not

only more expensive than the average college student can afford, ranging from $500 to $1,000, but also work with dubious science. Planned Parenthood and Web MD both have said that doctors aren’t exactly sure why the little hooks that are inserted into the uterus for up to five years work. The negative effects of IUDs have a similar range as hormonal methods, from not so serious to horribly painful and dangerous. Basically, just as we’ve all been told since fifth grade, the safest way to prevent pregnancy is abstinence. A woman wanting to take her sexuality into her own hands and protect herself with female contraceptives delves into a field fraught with disappointment and danger. It is true that many are lucky to choose one of these methods and never see any side effects. Many fight the weight gain by clocking in a few more hours at the gym each week and shrug off the mood swings as regular hormonal behavior. Others remain frustrated in a pit of sexual disinterest, and a few very fortunate even find that the pill helps life between the sheets. I just find it ironic that 50 years after the FDA cleared the first pill for the market, modern medicine hasn’t been able to bang out the bugs. Why should thousands of other women like myself who use contraceptives have to choose between feeling normal and being safe? It’s unfair that a man far past his prime can sustain an erection for four hours using Viagra, but women can’t find a pill that will prevent pregnancy without subjecting our bodies to a varied collection of calamities. Until we can, I’m hanging up the hormones. Cassidy Gooding can be reached at cgooding@theorion.com

Demulen, Desogen, Mircette, Yasmin and Zovia are all pills that cause mood swings.

There have been no studies that prove birth control is responsible for weight gain.

Taking birth control pills near bedtime can sometimes combat the feelings of nausea they cause.

Sources: Planned Parenthood, about.com, Los Angeles Times, Time Magazine

to the

Letters Editor

Read the guidelines below for information on how to submit your own Letters to the Editor Editorial Board The opinion editor can be reached at

opinioneditor@theorion.com

Christine Connerly STUDENT LEARNING CENTER COORDINATOR

I am writing in response to your recent article “Learning styles theory still debated by some.” The article mentions a recent Student Learning Center workshop dealing with learning styles. The Student Learning Center is in the process of adapting our programs to the new research on learning styles. We invited The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

Professor Martin Van Den Berg as a guest speaker at out recent tutor training, and I attended the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching workshop on learning styles presented by Van Den Berg on Oct. 5. We are moving away from the concept of learning styles and toward an approach of making learning active, engaging and reflective. As mentioned in the article, the

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

• Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

study skills workshop advocated using many different modalities to process information to keep the brain stimulated while studying. Our goal with all of the Student Learning Center study skills workshops is to give students tools and strategies for actively engaging with information presented in class and textbooks. As mentioned in the article, many students don’t know how to study and could benefit from study tips.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

Editor in Chief

Opinion Editor

Arts Editor

Photo Editor

Online Editor

News Editor

Sports Editor

Features Editor

Video Editor

Chief Copy Editor

Almendra Carpizo Kenny Lindberg

Benjamin Mullin Allie Colosky

Leila Rodriguez Ally Dukkers

Samantha Youngman Ashley Nakano

Gerardo Rocha

Kacey Gardner

• The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff. Art Director

Liam Turner


Thumbs Down to realizing you still need thumbs to turn the iPhone 4S on.

Thumbs Down to the first world problem of having too many plates full of food to carry to your table at Sutter Dining.

Thumbs Up to the train of yellow cabs in front of LaSalles Friday nights. It’s like living in Manhattan one night every week.

opinions all week @ theorion.com

Thumbs Up to Sue Sylvester’s campaign for congress. If she wins, maybe she’ll leave the New Directions alone. Right.

OPINION

Thumbs Down to the knowing smile alumni give you when you tell them you go to Chico State.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

Media ‘unoccupied’ with protests

A11

Taylor Taynton K A P PA S I G M A PRESIDENT

GREEK SPEAK >> JJake Buffenbarger

Editors note: Every week, Greek Speak will feature a different voice from a member of Chico State’s Greek community.

OPINION COLUMNIST

Protesters all over the country have risen up in noble effort to bring attention to the financial inequality that plagues this great nation. The Protesters of the Occupy Wall Street movement are standing up to our corrupt financial institutions, which allow the rich to get richer due to their complete control of public policy and perception. However, media outlets like ABC, Fox and MSNBC choose to portray these demonstrators as ignorant, unorganized, unclear and without a concrete demand. These “news” outlets are negatively framing the issue because they are controlled by the same corporations that stand to lose RELATED money if our For more on the financial movement, see A1. institutions are reformed. If you turn off cable news and look at the protestor’s signs, the message is crystal clear. Corporations are unjustly manipulating America’s financial and political systems, as well as the citizens who want to

Forward,” Tyler McKinney expresses an idea to make the world a better place doing good deeds for others. On numerous occasions people have tried to reinvent this plan and claim that they have failed. But this idea of paying it forward was not a failure because whenever we attempt to do a good deed we are changing the world, it just may not appear as dramatic. We are making a difference just by existing, no matter how small the gesture, and we may not even realize it at the time. I expected a loathsome trudging climb up the Esken stairs ending in an arduous descent onto my bed after a night at the hospital. Instead I found decorated signs, cards and a blown up Facebook full of get well wishes. Receiving the posters and the rap in my honor made me feel a little less sick. These gifts also made me ponder differences that we can make in each others lives with a simple gesture.

I was upset, to say the least. I’m a Paul Simon fan and I am not gay — not that there’s anything wrong with that. Ever since elementary school, I’ve been interested in less macho activities than some of my male peers, and I’ve been ridiculed for it. When everyone was playing on a Game Boy, I was reading the newspaper. When my friends got excited for Green Day’s “American Idiot” tour, I was stoked to see Simon and Garfunkel back together on their “Old Friends” tour. Because I didn’t fit in with the norm, I was labeled as different, and sometimes different meant gay. Labeling is part of being human. We all have a label, and we belong to a certain group. But we shouldn’t be patronized because of it. In September, 14-year-old James Rodemeyer committed suicide after repeatedly being teased for being gay. On Sept. 9, just a few weeks before killing himself, he posted the following message to his blog, according to the Daily Mail. “I always say how bullied I am, but no one listens,” he wrote. “What do I have to do so people will listen to me?” Gay teenagers and adults alike are suffering as a result of bullying — but they’re not the only ones who have to deal with labels. Anyone, regardless of orientation, can be bullied like I was. We have to stop the bullying by choosing not to use derogatory names to put people down for being different. This month — Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History Month — is a great opportunity to take a stand against the pejorative labeling and name calling we all see and tolerate every day. Just last weekend, I went to a Fleetwood Mac concert and held the hand of Stevie Nicks, one of the most offbeat, gifted songwriters in music history — but I was hesitant to tell people who didn’t know me, for fear of being labeled as effeminate, or gay. The unspoken cultural stereotypes we adhere to every day are preventing us from sharing our true identities with the world. Whether you’re playing football, video games or practicing your triple lutz while listening to the Village People, you shouldn’t be afraid to be yourself. There’s not anything wrong with that. Seriously.

Three weeks ago, 15 members from our chapter were asked to travel up to the University of Oregon to help install a new Kappa Sigma chapter. When you get a group of guys together in five or six cars, things can get a little crazy. If we participated on the “Amazing Race” we’d probably fail hardcore. Once we got to the hotel in Eugene, Ore., we did what any normal college student would do — flips on the hotel beds. You would think sharing six hours in a car or two nights in a hotel bed with someone would make you want to strangle them. But with these guys, it was just the opposite. Despite the fact that I ran into a hotel door and threw my brother’s bag into the hallway, I kind of wished that the road trip didn’t end. But if you had asked me my freshman year if I would rush a fraternity, I would’ve said “Absolutely not.” I eventually decided to do so on a whim, prompted by the rumor of free food. When I ended up rushing my sophomore year, Kappa Sigma just stood out, because it was clear its members really cared about who showed up to its rush events. Since that day, I’ve made sure that this is the case at all of our rush events, and during Greek Week, which ended a few days ago. This year, Greek Week involved so many different competitions — the Greek Olympics, dodgeball, a talent show and the Parade of Lights. It’s one of the most fun and stressful weeks for all Greeks, including Kappa Sigma, that helps define our brotherhood. Brotherhood is what happens when you bond over a bowl of frozen yogurt, watching “Bridesmaids” or kicking back and rewinding “Thor” for the umpteenth time. Brotherhood is the act of trying to avenge your brother by finding the freshman who stole his laundry basket and getting it back. Brotherhood is traveling to other colleges, learning what other chapters from different universities in different states are like. Did you know that there’s no sales tax in Oregon and they fill up your tank for you? It’s basically Narnia. As a leader of this fraternity, I am proud to lead such a great group of guys. Kappa Sigma has such a unique range of brothers nationwide. Every day there is something ridiculous going on, something you just couldn’t explain to someone outside of the Greek system. After three years of being a member of this fraternity, I can honestly say that this was the greatest decision I made in my college life. I don’t know where I’d be if it weren’t for these people in my life. I have found many lifelong friends in this fraternity, and I know years down the line, long after we’ve graduated from college, they will still be my brothers.

Quinn Western can be reached at

Marty Salgado can be reached at

Taylor Taynton can be reached at

qwestern@theorion.com

msalgado@theorion.com

roxaylt@gmail.com

ILLUSTRATION BY CHELSEA ROSS

reign in control of their country. This is not some crazy conspiracy theory either. It’s simply capitalists doing what capitalists do best: making a profit. Armed with billions of dollars, corporations have infiltrated our government though lobbyists that further their agendas in Washington D.C. Even more horrifying, the Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that the First Amendment protects corporate funding of political broadcasts in candidate elections. In layman’s terms, this allows corporations to drown out the

reasoned critique of elected officials with a flood of corporatefunded advertisements. The mainstream media tell us protesters have no clear vision or plan. They fail to admit that this is the very thing that the Occupy Wall Street movement is about. Average people have no realistic course of action when they are overshadowed by the cooperate world. In a environment where politics, the economy and the media are controlled by corporations that intend to keep the public unaware of their actions, it’s nearly impossible for an individual to

effect change. The media will continue to feed the public lies that attempt to keep America’s masses in the dark. They are so good at manipulation of public opinion that a great number of misguided Americans will spout tired talking points and defend the institutions that leave them jobless, powerless and penniless. As French poet Charles Baudelaire once said, “It is the greatest art of the devil to convince us he does not exist.” Jake Buffenbarger can be reached at jbuffenbarger@theorion.com

ILLUSTRATION BY CHELSEA ROSS

Social cues separate sexuality Marty Salgado OPINION COLUMNIST

ILLUSTRATION BY CHELSEA ROSS

Make change; pay it forward Quinn Western OPINION COLUMNIST

I sat in my friend’s dorm room feeling as though I had been punched in the stomach by Mike Tyson. It hurt just to chuckle, but I couldn’t help but roll to the edge of the bed laughing as my friend finished his rap about my recently removed appendix. “So we all hope you feeling fine, healing won’t take much time,” he said. “I know my rapping sucks, but for your happiness, Quinn, I’ll try to rhyme. Get better soon G.” It may seem strange how a mediocre rap scribbled on a small piece of paper can be so meaningful to one individual. Whether they’re intentional or not, simple gestures can become the heart of our attitudes — that’s what makes us human. Sometimes it’s these good deeds that turn our days around, but there are also many cases where it can turn a life around. The classic example is the

short story “A Simple Gesture” by John Schlatter from “Chicken Soup for the Soul” published in 1993. It rewrote itself as an Internet sensation quickly popping up in every forward email, teasers on the side of web pages and the ohso-popular chained posts on social networking sites. The two main characters develop a special bond because one of them helps the other to pick up his books and befriends him, preventing him from committing suicide with a simple gesture. But this isn’t just a story — it is actually very real. These occurrences happen in everyday life and are a constant reminder that we were once in a tough part of our lives and sometimes just need someone to help us pick up our books. Doing good should be at the front of our minds even when bolting from class to class, or cramming for a midterm five minutes before the test. It doesn’t take much effort to hold the elevator, spot someone a dollar or tell them they look great. In the 2000 film “Pay it

PIECE OF MIND >> What girly/manly behaviors do men and women get made fun of for? “This guy tans, spends hella time on his hair, blowdries it, it’s ridiculous.”

Sam Howard

junior | political science

I feel like there’s nothing that girls do that’s guyish, but I feel it works the other way around.”

Jordan Navratil

senior | child development

“When guys go tanning. I like it au natural.”

Vanessa Princi senior | health science

“It should be your life, and no one’s business but yours.”

Tatum Megli

senior | recreation administration


A12 |

RESERVE NOW FOR FALL 2011! APARTMENTS/TOWNHOUSES/DUPLEXES Location Bd./Ba. Rent 803 W. 2nd Ave #6 4/2 $775 939 W. East Ave #6, 12 1/1 $585 521 2nd St. #B (Orland) Studio/1 $375 527 Cherry Duplex #1-A 2/1 $650 684 E. 12th St. #5 1/1 $550 540 W. 4th #A 1/1 $600 1163 Olive #6 3/2 $750 2135 Elm St. #9 1/1 $400 1149 Olive #12 2/1 $650 2338 Brown St. #1 1/1 $450

Dep. $875 $685 $475 $750 $650 $700 $850 $500 $750 $550

Location Bd./Ba. Rent 2/1 $615 5523 Paloma (Paradise) 1245 Esplanade #8 2/1 $650 1256 Warner #C 4/2 $750 1144 Hobart St. #2 4/2 $950 925 Chestnut #3 2/1 $575 2420 Cactus Ave. 2/2 $900 2338 Brown St. #5 (Durham) 1/1 $500 540 W. 4th St. #A 1/1 $595 1161 Citrus Ave. #H 1/1 $500 925 Chestnut #1 1/1 $450 1163 Olive St. #3 2/1 $700

BEST DEAL IN TOWN! 742 W. 6th Street #B 2/1 $575 633 Hazel 3/2 $1,000

Dep. $715 $750 $850 $1050 $675 $1000 $600 $695 $600 $550 $800

Location Bd./Ba. 710 Hickory 3/2 3834 Keefer Rd. 4/2 1965 Sycamore Ln. (Durham) 2/1 36 Wrangler Ct. 2/2 1339 Magnolia 2/1 1375 Humboldt Ave. 3/1 979 Azalea 4/2 14141 Citadel (Magalia) 3/2 9895 Jones Ave. (Durham) 3/2 1012 Poppy 3/1

RELIABLE

Info subject to change. Please do not disturb tenants. We will schedule the appointment.

Rent $1,050 $1,750 $895 $950 $800 $1,000 $1300 $900 $1,300 $850

Spy Cameras

Spy Gear

Security Cameras

mini wireless cameras wireless hidden cameras fake security cameras

bug detectors micro/pinhole/hidden cameras night vision cameras

night vision cameras wireless cameras dvr recorders

Anti Spy Gear

GPS Tracking Devices

Remote Video Monitoring

GPS loggers GPS trackers mini GPS trackers/loggers

IP cameras PTZ (pan/tilt remote view) cameras

microwave detectors wireless camera detectors RF detectors

Security Alarms Personal Security window alarms door alarms motion activated alarms

$675 $1,100

Dep. $1,150 $1,850 $995 $1,050 $900 $1,100 $1,400 $1,000 $1,400 $950

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico (530) 895-1733 www.reliableproperty.com

highest voltage legal stun guns pepper spray CD/DVD destroyers

We provide installation of all products we sell. We also will repair or upgrade your existing system. We offer free onsite security diagnosis/analysis and offer the most competitive quote, guaranteed.

NOW HIRING! mputer

HOUSES

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

news all week @ theorion.com

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

rsons w/ co Installers & Sales Pe nizational skills knowledge and orga

Coming Soon SecurityDepot.com wholesale online store

1415 Mangrove Ave - Chico, CA store 530.899.0323 - mobile 530.737.3767 toll free 855.SPY.SECURITY - fax 866.611.2055


sports

Volleyball lost both home matches against Humboldt State and Sonoma State Story B4

STAT ’CAT B2 WILDCAT OF THE WEEK B2 GAMES SCHEDULE B5

B

sports all week at theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

Allie Colosky SPORTS EDITOR

Stay on your feet

lisa webster:

netting records MAKING HISTORY:

Ranked ninth in the program’s history with 19 career goals .

Sarah Goad

I

STAFF WRITER

n 2009, the women’s soccer team made it past the first round of the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s tournament for the first time in school history. Senior forward Lisa Webster described this moment as one “where everything just paid off.” She still feels the excitement of that moment every time she takes the field, she said. Webster is in her fifth year at Chico State, and after sitting out as a red-shirt freshman she has put up some impressive numbers. She led the ’Cats with eight goals and 19 points last season and earned All-California Collegiate Athletic Association Honorable Mention. She came into the season with 14 career goals and 14 assists. Webster is currently ninth in Chico State history for career goals scored with 19, seventh in assists with 16 and seventh in career points with 55. While it is exciting to be to be reaching these milestones, Webster knows that she couldn’t have gotten to this point without her team, she said. “You win and lose as a team, and I couldn’t do it without them,” she said. So far this season, Webster has four goals and 11 points with four games left in the regular season. She has become the team’s go-to forward, head coach Kim Sutton said. Sutton described Webster as a “positive, perky person” and said that Webster has become the player that the other teams mark as someone to watch. Webster’s dad, Steve Webster, said that over the years her speed has been one of her biggest

Ranked seventh on the women’s soccer program in assists with 16. Ranked seventh in the program’s history with 55 career points.

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

SPINNING HER WEB Senior forward Lisa Webster leads the Chico

State women’s soccer team with five goals so far this season. She continues her climb up the program’s record books.

attributes in the game. Webster began playing soccer when she was 5 years old and has not stopped since. “She was exciting to watch,” Steve Webster said. “It was like a pack of bumblebees chasing the ball.” In her second year playing soccer, Webster’s dad coached her team. He remembered a game where she had scored so he decided to switch her to play goalie, he said. “She cried and cried,” Steve Webster said. The atmosphere and the people she gets to play with are still the most rewarding parts of the game, Webster said. “Surrounding myself with such a great group of people that have the same passion and drive as me is really rewarding I think,” she said. The people, atmosphere and competitive nature of the game are what made her fall in love with soccer, she said. Webster knew she wanted to play Division II soccer, because she wanted to play soccer but also have a full college experience. After visiting campus and meeting women on the team, Webster fell in love with Chico State and knew she wanted to play here. “It was kind of a feeling,” Webster said. “I knew I had to go here.” Webster’s intensity, passion and drive help

her to be successful, her dad said. She has steadily improved in passing and crossing as well as scoring during her time at Chico State, Sutton said. Webster scored both goals for Chico in the team’s win over Sonoma State Oct. 8. Over the last four years Webster’s leadership has grown in “leaps and bounds,” Sutton said. “She leads a lot by example, by her work ethic and drive,” Sutton said. Webster’s leadership and her ability to put her teammates before herself have improved remarkably during her time with the ’Cats, Sutton said. She is a consistent and balanced leader off the field as well, Sutton said. With the last home game for Chico State coming up quickly, Webster’s family knows it is going to be an emotional day, Steve Webster said. “Her mom and I are very proud,” Steve Webster said. After Chico State, Webster hopes to go to Europe to travel and play soccer in a summer league. Webster has four regular season games left with the ’Cats and hopes to have that same feeling this season as she had in 2009. Sarah Goad can be reached at sgoad@theorion.com

Water polo sinks in championships Andrew Delgado STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

AIMING HIGH Antonio Dominguez, a senior business administration major, takes aim at the goal during practice at the Wildcat Recreation Center. The men’s water polo team lost 6-5 against UC Santa Cruz in the championship game over the weekend. Chico State missed out on a bid to nationals.

’Cat’ Fights? W H AT S CO M IN G U P Both men’s and women’s soccer teams host Cal State Monterey Bay for their last home games of the season. Women’s Senior Day starts at 11:30 a.m. with the men’s kicking off at 2 p.m.

The excitement a home crowd brings is all but a fantasy as the men’s water polo team has gone 7-1 this season – all without playing a match in Chico. The club team has been on campus since 1985 and has seen its fan base and interest fluctuate. Coming off a perfect 8-0 season, the team has been growing stronger and has harnessed its hard work to become a threat in the Sierra Pacific Division. Senior attacker and captain Peter Jacobs would like to play in front of a home crowd, >> please see WATER POLO | B4

TO DAY I N

sports

oct. 19, 1919 The Cincinnati Reds beat the White Sox five games to three in the World Series. Eight White Sox players threw the series in what was later known as the Black Sox Scandal.

A part of something bigger “Participating in sports may lead to a lucrative career.” That’s what my fortune cookie read a couple of weeks ago. As a journalist with my fingers crossed to land somewhere in the sports industry, I was jazzed. Participating in sports doesn’t necessarily mean I am on the field. Shabby knees took that away from me years ago. But if you take away everything except the players on the field or court, it’s going to be a very sad day for sports. If you think otherwise, realizing your own ignorance is inevitable. You start with the players – obvious participants – and you mix in coaches, referees and other support staff. They are all technically on the field so they must be participating. There’s Luke Reid sitting at the scorer’s table at a Chico State soccer game. He doesn’t play sports, but I think he is included as “participating in sports.” Same could be said for Athletic Director Anita Barker and head trainer Scott Barker. After the star player scores the game-winner, I don’t think an empty gym is as fun to celebrate with as the hundreds of fans screaming in the stands. Alumni don’t technically “play” either. In the aftermath of the exhilarating win or the devastating loss, reporters and photographers record the moment that will be clipped out of the newspaper and hung on walls for years to come. This is why my biased brain thinks reporters more than participate in sports. Sports go beyond the athlete and the game. In “El Clásico: More than a Game,” Chico State students traveled to Spain to document the culture and history behind the famed fútbol game between Real Madrid C.F. and FC Barcelona. The documentary, which premiered at the El Rey Theatre Friday night, brought to life the politically charged culture and how these two teams divide a country. To say that only the players participate in this sport is a joke. Chico State students Hillary Fay and eight others traveled to Spain in spring 2010. They created a documentary that proves that sports are about much more than the athletes on the field. To an entire country, fútbol is the deciding factor for superiority in a Spanish culture that bleeds for its teams. Dressed in the jerseys of Cristiano Ronaldo or Carles Puyol, every man, woman and child stands with their scarves held high over their heads. Would El Clásico be the same without those die-hard fans? For more on the El Clásico premiere, check out Gerardo Rocha’s story on B2. While we may not have the blazing fanaticism for soccer that they do in Europe, to discredit all the different legs of the sports industry would be an insult. No, participating in sports includes a vast majority of people whose first love is still the game they grew up with. Take away your support systems, the legacy in the community and all positions filled to make sure athletics are smooth sailing – well, have fun with that. Allie Colosky can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com

[ jock talk ] There’s more you can do in a bigger place.” -Dwight Howard The Orlando Magic center on his indecisiveness about whether to stay in Florida or move on when he becomes a free agent next summer.


B2 |

sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

SPORTS SHORTS >>

NAME IN LIGHTS Chico State alumnus Zac Fernandez, who helped make the documentary, stands in front of the growing crowd outside the El Rey Theatre before the premiere of “El Clásico: More than a Game.”

Recap of Chico State Athletics

Both the men’s and women’s cross-country teams finished outside the top 10 in the Bronco Invitational in Sunnyvale. The men finished in 17th while the women placed 18th. Freshman Jeremy Brummitt took 69th place in the men’s 8K with a 25 minutes, 25.8 seconds time and Tiffany Heflin finished 72nd in the women’s 5K with a 18:23.7 time. The crosscountry team will compete Saturday in the California Collegiate Athletic Association Championship in Santa Rosa. source: chicowildcats.com

El Clásico travels to Chico THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

Gerardo Rocha ONLINE EDITOR

After participating in the annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s earlier in the month, head coach Angel Shamblin and the Chico State softball team will be involved in the “Making Strides Against Breast Cancer” walk hosted by the American Cancer Society. The event will take place at 9 a.m. Sunday at Bidwell Park. Source: theorion.com

The women’s golf team placed 10th at the Viking Invitational in Bellingham, Wash. The ’Cats finished with an overall score of 78-over 654. Sophomore Sarah McComish had the best finish for Chico State tying for 29th with a score of 17-over 161. The men’s golf team hosted the Lindsay Olive Wildcat Classic on Monday and Tuesday at Sevillano Links in Corning. Source: chicowildcats.com

The crowd roared. Shouts of “viva España!” were heard and Real Madrid and Barcelona jerseys could be seen worn by the attendees — except this wasn’t a soccer match. It was the premiere of the documentary “El Clásico: More than a Game.” El Clásico follows the intense rivalry between Spain’s two most popular soccer teams, Real Madrid C.F. and FC Barcelona, and explores Spanish history, and the cultural and regional identity in both Madrid and Barcelona. The documentary premiered Friday night at the El Rey Theatre to a sold-out crowd. The origin of the project came from Kelly Candaele, an adjunct professor for the department of communication design and producer of several documentaries including “A League of Their Own,” about his mother’s career as a professional baseball player. Candaele knew something about the rivalry but was never much of a soccer fan, she said. “I was looking around for a good topic for a film that went beyond sports,” Candaele said. “It made me love soccer. It gave me a deeper appreciation of the complexities of Spanish history.” The film was the group effort of nine Chico State students who traveled to Spain in April 2010. Translator and interviewer Devin Collins realized a long time dream that most people could never achieve — to be face-to-face with superstars like Cristiano Ronaldo, Carles Puyol and Thierry Henry. “Just being around the players, I never imagined being there with those guys, hanging out,” Collins said. “But I had to become a professional and not a hooligan. We were there working and

our goal was to educate.” Not only did they educate the sold-out crowd at the El Rey, but most of the crew changed their point of view during the trip and developed a certain appreciation for Spanish history, culture and the soccer teams. “It totally changed my point of view,” Collins said. “I was always a Barca fan the whole time, but the stuff you hear is not always true. They’re just trying to make the rivalry more intense.” After you hear the historical facts, it’s not as black and white as people make it seem, Collins said. The film explores the similarities that the average fan doesn’t know about Real Madrid and Barcelona. For example, Catalans originally founded Real Madrid, and the Barcelona administration requested the blueprints used to create the Estadio Santiago Bernabeu as an inspiration for the Nou Camp. In the producer’s seat was Catherine Growdon, producer of the documentary film “When Hope and History Rhymed” about the peace process in Northern Ireland. Growden was in charge of making the project happen. “Early on, we discussed the subject and we decided on soccer,” Growden said. “There were already a number of books detailing this and it’s interesting to look at the culture through the lens of soccer. I did a lot of the prep work. Contact had been made and being there face to face is valuable. It moves things faster.” Although the documentary relied a lot on imagery, music wasn’t forgotten. Fernando Macias-Jimenez was in charge of composing an original score for the fi lm, which took him a month to compose and two weeks to record. “It was pretty cool, the actual writing and recording of the music,” Macias-Jimenez said.

“There was a bunch of prep time and it gave me time to research music from Catalonia and music from Madrid. I was trying to reflect each team musically, so there’s one theme for Barca and one theme for Madrid.” In the end, they couldn’t have been happier with the result and the amount of people who attended the premiere, Robertson said. “I can’t believe the turnout, getting up there, looking out and seeing the crowd made everything worth it,” Robertson said. “The thousands of dollars spent, the hours editing and breaking up with my girlfriend of three years. I’ve just never seen anything like this.” The opportunities they had were once in a lifetime. Getting to be in the VIP box at the Estadio Santiago Bernabeu is just one of those experiences that Robertson will never forget, he said. Aiding Robertson with the project was Hillary Fay, who acted as an associate producer, writer, translator and interviewer. Fay enjoyed every single aspect of the venture including the educating, she said. “If you’re not a soccer lover, it will make you fall in love with it, or some other aspect of it,” Fay said. After a successful screening in Chico, the team is heading to Santa Monica to present its movie to the Southern California crowd. Even though there are no definite cities, there are talks of showing the movie in San Francisco and Seattle, Robertson said. The documentary proved to be a great experience and showed just what Chico State students are capable of. Gerardo Rocha can be reached at onlineeditor@theorion.com

SOCCER

Men’s soccer scratches out 2 wins on road, return home GAME 1

Andrew Delgado STAFF WRITER

Wildcat of the Week

Ferid Celosmanovic men’s soccer

Leading the Chico State men’s soccer team with eight goals this season, the senior forward tallied two more goals this weekend. Both were game winners against San Francisco State and Cal Poly Pomona. The 2010 All-American and First Team All-West Region selection has recorded 21 goals since transferring from West Valley College before last season. The men’s soccer team plays its last two home games this weekend. Wildcat of the Week is a regular feature meant to acknowledge the contributions made by individuals to the team. Winners are chosen by The Orion sports staff from nominations taken from all sports. To nominate: sportseditor@theorion.com

The Chico State men’s soccer team swept its weekend on the road, bringing it one step closer to a bid to the California Collegiate Athletic Association championship tournament. Friday brought the Wildcats to the Bay Area as they took on the Gators of San Francisco State. The Gators came into the match on a four-game losing streak and an overall record of 4-6-2. The ’Cats, coming off a disheartening loss from a last-minute goal last weekend, needed the win to move up in the standings to secure a spot in the playoffs. Entering the weekend, the ’Cats sat in third place with 17 points on the season, just two points behind first. Head coach Felipe Restrepo is excited to be in the playoff hunt and wants to get as many points as possible, he said. Confident going into the match, Restrepo quickly had to change up the plan of attack due to the field conditions, he said. “We played different,” he said. “The field was wet, and it became difficult to pass.” Junior midfielder Tyson Crim knew the field would be hard to play on and that the ’Cats would have to play in the air, he said. “We had to dump the ball a lot and play through the midfield,” Crim said. With a new plan, the ’Cats were able to get the first shot on goal in the 10th minute from senior midfielder Nick Tedrow. Gator goalkeeper Eric Scolman was able to get in front of it and stop the ’Cats’ early strike. Although the ’Cats were outshot seven to five at the half, and for the game 13 to 11, sophomore goalkeeper Sam Evans was able to keep a clean sheet. Adjusting to the conditions, the ’Cats were

Chico State

1

San Francisco State

0

GAME 2

FILE PHOTO • JOSH ZACK

SEASON SAVER Sophomore goalkeeper Sam Evans snags one in the air in during the Wildcats home match against Sonoma State earlier in the season. Evans has earned five shutouts this season. able to garner a corner kick in the second half with 30 minutes to play. Senior forward Ferid Celosmanovic took the kick and curved it past the goalie for his seventh goal of the season, putting the ’Cats up 1-0. The Gators created multiple chances but couldn’t tally a goal, and 1-0 was enough to

Chico State

1

Cal Poly Pomona

0

gain three points for the ’Cats. The ’Cats traveled to Kellogg Field Sunday to take on the Broncos of Cal Poly Pomona, but playing on the road wasn’t a problem for the ’Cats, as their defense stepped up, allowing only one shot on frame for the Broncos. After a 0-0 result at the end of regulation, the match ended within the first two minutes of overtime when Tedrow found Celosmanovic, who punched it in for the win. The ’Cats gained another three points and ended the weekend tied for a spot in the CCAA championship tournament with Cal State L.A. With four games left, the ’Cats look to hold on and earn a bid for postseason. Senior midfielder Ryan Struckmeyer thinks they are ready for a late season push to the playoffs and is excited to play at home this weekend, he said. “With these wins, we just want to propel ourselves for the end of the season and try to keep the confidence level up to ensure our spot,” he said. The ’Cats are currently 8-3-3 overall and 7-3-2 in conference. They will play their final home games of the season at 7 p.m. Friday at “Pack the House” night against Cal State East Bay and at 2 p.m. Sunday for “Senior Day” against Cal State Monterey Bay. Andrew Delgado can be reached at adelgado@theorion.com

STAT ’CAT >> CHICO STATE SOCCER

2

The number of assists tallied by junior defender Danielle Leiva against San Francisco State and Cal Poly Pomona. Also the number of gamewinning goals scored by men’s soccer forward Ferid Celosmanovic over the weekend.

VOLLEYBALL

25

The number of kills hammered home by Wildcat Jessica Leek in Friday’s match against Humboldt State. Leek’s career high wasn’t enough as Chico State dropped the five-set match.

CROSS-COUNTRY

8

The number of freshmen out of 14 Chico State men’s cross-country runners who participated in the Bronco Invitational Saturday in Sunnyvale.


sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

B3

VOLLEYBALL

’Cats lose rhythm, drop 2 home games CATCH ’EM NEXT TIME The Chico State volleyball team is back in action this weekend as it heads south to take on Cal Poly Pomona Friday at 7 p.m. and San Francisco State Saturday at 7p.m.

Sarah Bohannon STAFF WRITER

Shattering its six-match winning streak, the Chico State women’s volleyball team left Acker Gym this weekend with not only its first, but also its second loss of the season. The games played against Humboldt State Friday night and Sonoma State Saturday night may have muddied the team’s at home record, but it didn’t touch its California Collegiate Athletic Association standing. Coming into the weekend ranked third in the CCAA, the ’Cats managed to leave in the same place, but are now tied with San Diego State. Chico State came out confident against Humboldt State, winning the first set Friday night 25-17. But after rallying with 11 tying points, then losing the second, they knew the Lumberjacks weren’t going to pack up quickly. Tied 2-2, Chico was up 14-11 in the fifth set when Humboldt began an attack that never ceased. Raking in three kills, the Lumberjacks quickly tied the score, 14-14. After a quick timeout, a serve from Humboldt left Chico with what seemed to be a dream setup: Lauren Orozco with the dig, Sable Villaescusa with the set and Makenzie Snyder with her sights on a kill. Whirling toward the top left of the net, Snyder’s ball was blocked by Humboldt. It began to fall back onto Chico’s side of the court. Rushing to the net, Snyder dropped to her knees in an attempt to save the ball. Sliding toward the ball and eventually under the net, she barely made the connection. The ball went sailing to the

GAME 1

Chico State

2

Humboldt State

3

GAME 2

Chico State

0

Sonoma State

3

right and out of bounds leaving Chico down 15-14. Another serve from Humboldt left Chico with the same Orozco-Sable setup, but this time Jessica Leek was behind the attack. Jumping up, back arched and hand cocked back, Leek hammered the ball across the net, placing it at the back right edge of the court. Blowing the whistle and raising the red flag, the referee called the kill wide. Now 16-14, Humboldt took the point and the win. Sweeping the Lumberjacks at their home court earlier in the season, Chico’s outside/ opposite hitter Alex Shurtz said that underestimation is what led the ’Cats to defeat Friday night. “The first time we played them we handled them easily,” Shurtz said. “Yeah, we underestimated them. They played better than they have in the past.” Twelve total service errors by Chico also contributed to the ’Cats’ loss, Shurtz said. “We let them off the hook, we missed a lot of serves,” Shurtz said. “It’s frustrating when you feel like you have a team and you let them get away with the win.” The ’Cats knew coming into the game that powerhouse Sonoma State would be a different story. After losing 26-24 in the first set, Chico put up a tough battle in the second. Sonoma never led by more than two points until the score was 20-17. The ’Cats never caught up to

SMACK THAT Junior outside hitter Makenzie Snyder goes up for the kill against two blockers from Sonoma State. Snyder recorded only five kills against the Seawolves and the Wildcats dropped the contest in three sets.

THE ORION • JOSH ZACK

Sonoma State in the third. Trailing right when they started, both of the ’Cats’ points at 8-2 came from errors by Sonoma State until Jacqueline Johnson popped up on the front right of the net to hammer the ball down for a kill that left Chico at 8-3. Followed later in the game by Johnson, Leek, Quigley, Snyder and freshman Ellie Larronde, the ’Cats finally began to move their score. After another kill by Johnson, the ’Cats were behind 24-17 during the Seawolves’ game point. Leek went for the serve and sent the ball into the net. Falling to her knees, her

hands on her head, it was the end of a tough battle, as well as a long weekend for the ’Cats. Johnson, Chico’s middle hitter and leader in kills Saturday night, said her team just couldn’t get into a rhythm during either game over the weekend. “Last night it was the same thing,” Johnson said about the Humboldt game. “We had the game going and we just let them get on a 6-0 run and they took six points away from us before we could even get the side out.” Head coach Cody Hein said he could tell in warm-ups that his team had walked into Saturday’s game with no confidence after their loss to Humboldt on

monday tuesday ORIONday thursday friday

Friday, he said. “I think they looked at it like, ‘Holy smokes, we didn’t take care of 1-9 and we’ve got a powerhouse coming in tomorrow night,’” Hein said. Comparing his team to a wounded dog after losing Friday’s game, Hein said the team will get back into their groove come Friday and Saturday. “I mean heck, we were 14-3 before these two nights,” Hein said. “The season is going great, we’ll get it back. It was just an odd time to lose our confidence.” Sarah Bohannon can be reached at sbohannon@theorion.com


B4 |

sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

SOCCER

FILE PHOTO • FRANK REBELO

ANOTHER THRILLER Freshman defender Alyx Williams challenges the ball against a player from UC San Diego in a game earlier this season. The Wildcats season continues in a roller coaster fashion after a loss and a win on the road.

Thrilling matches earn ’Cats split results away GAME 1

Allie Colosky SPORTS EDITOR

THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

PLAYING WITH AN EDGE Women’s soccer player Blake Lopes said she has always looked up to U.S. Women’s National Team forward Mia Hamm because she admires how Hamm carried herself on and off the field.

Many Chico State athletes find inspiration in professionals Dariush Dias Azmoudeh A SST. SPORTS EDITOR

Growing up, many children dream of becoming famous athletes like the ones they see on TV. Some Chico State student athletes still look to professionals as role models in the sports they play today. The role models to choose from in soccer are numerous. The most popular current players are Barcelona’s Lionel Messi or Real Madrid’s Cristiano Ronaldo, and it’s sometimes hard not to follow players who are known for their goal scoring. But the Wildcats sophomore goalkeeper, Sam Evans, relates more to American goalkeeper Kasey Keller, a model of the player he wants to be. “Watching him command his box and order people around has been something I really needed to work on,” Evans said. “I think he did that really well, so that helped me grow.” While American players are not usually as recognized worldwide in soccer, one player that always stood out for the United States was U.S. Women’s National Team forward Mia Hamm. “The way she carries herself on and off the team was so respectable,” senior midfielder Blake Lopes said. “She was a good player but never showboated about it. She did everything the right way.” Soccer isn’t the only sport inspiring Wildcats. Many student athletes find their role models in the NBA. One athlete that can’t be overlooked in basketball is considered by some to be the best of all time: Michael Jordan. “He never disappointed,” sophomore forward Amir Carraway said. Jordan always came ready to play, Carraway said. He always put the weight on his shoulder and carried the game. Jordan’s determination to better himself has

influenced Carraway, who goes out to practice to improve his game on the court. “Coming out of high school I wasn’t a shooter, and coming out of college Michael Jordan wasn’t,” Carraway said. “He just spent countless hours in the gym, getting up shots and that’s what I’ve done to get better.” While some role models were praised for their performance on the court, others looked beyond game time. “My role model is Steve Nash for the way he carries himself on and off the court,” freshman guard Connor McGrath said. “You never hear about him getting in trouble with drinking, legal problems or anything like that. I really looked up at him as an individual to model myself as.” Being a fan of the Phoenix Suns guard since eighth grade, McGrath said he studied how Nash got to an NBA playing level and the hard work he put into it to the NBA despite coming from a small school. Along with professional players, student athletes also look to their parents and coaches as role models. “My dad played basketball growing up, so I was just shooting baskets with him,” freshman forward Jordan Barton said. “He taught me the game and coached me growing up.” Through YouTube, student athletes nowadays have easier access to watching highlights and learning moves from those videos, men’s basketball coach Greg Clink said. A former student athlete at Chico himself, Clink grew up idolizing Magic Johnson and Larry Bird, as well as Jordan. “As a kid you try to emulate what you see and who you think is good,” Clink said. “I used to do that with VHS tapes. I’d record NBA games and play them back and try to pick up one-onone moves and how guys shot the ball.” Dariush Dias Azmoudeh can be reached at dazmoudeh@theorion.com

The Wildcats felt no sympathy handing out an overtime loss over the weekend. After dropping their fourth California Collegiate Athletic Association conference game Friday against San Francisco, a charged-up Chico State women’s soccer team clinched a win against Cal Poly Pomona in overtime. Heading into the weekend on a scoreless streak, the ’Cats were looking for a confidence boost in their chase for a playoff berth. It wouldn’t come in the Bay Area, however, as San Francisco sent the ’Cats out with another loss, setting their record back to 5-5-3 overall and 5-4-2 in the CCAA. “San Francisco plays a very direct game,” head coach Kim Sutton said. “It’s not very pretty, if you will. It takes us out of our rhythm.” Friday’s lone goal came from the back line when sophomore defender Danielle Leiva delivered a quick free kick all the way up the field to fellow defender junior Shelby Dunlap. Dunlap took a quick touch, chipping it over the goalie. “As soon as she kicked the ball, I was just thinking that I needed to make good contact with it and try to keep it on frame,” she said. Dunlap’s fi rst career goal tied the game at 1-1, but San Francisco’s Justine Hernandez’ blast from 17 feet out sealed the game for the Gators. “We had a series of breakdowns in the back,” Sutton said. “I cannot believe the saves that their goalie made on two of our corner kicks.” Offense from both sides evened out at 14 shots apiece, both with eight shots on goal. Even with four of their eight corner kicks in the fi nal five minutes – an advantage to the Gator’s five – the ’Cats were left disappointed as they continued on their road trip. It was only a matter of overtime before the ’Cats would steal their own suspenseful win. Down 1-0 in what looked to be turning into yet another loss, junior forward Denni Jo Berger denied the Broncos that pleasure. In the 89th minute, the junior found

Chico State

1

San Francisco

2

GAME 2

Chico State

2

Cal Poly Pomona

1

the end of a hard shot rebounded by Leiva and blasted it into the corner of the net, tying the game 1-1. It was Leiva’s second assist of the weekend and third of the season. Leiva red-shirted as a freshman and with more playing time this season than the rest of her collegiate career, the junior defender is fi nally settling in as a leader for the Wildcats. “Now I am more comfortable in the role I am playing, and I go out and play to the best of my ability and try not to think about it so much,” Leiva said. Leiva, Dunlap and the rest of the ’Cats headed into overtime lusting for another goal. The game-winner came off the foot of senior forward Lisa Webster when Molly Downtain’s header off the crossbar landed at her feet. Webster scored her fifth goal of the season to propel the ’Cats forward into this weekend’s final homestand. “Sunday showed we have a lot of heart and grit to come back and score two goals after being down 1-0,” Dunlap said. The season is far from over for any CCAA team as the pressure continues to mount heading into the chase for postseason action. “It’s the nature of our conference — from top to bottom it’s extremely competitive,” Sutton said. “It’s the tightest I’ve seen it in the 11 years I’ve been at Chico State.” The ’Cats have proven they aren’t going out quietly. With a 6-5-3 overall record and 6-4-2 conference record, Chico State sits at third place and doesn’t plan on giving up. It’s easy to say it’s not over till it’s over, Sutton said. “It’s one of those mantras in sports,” she said, “but to really then live it and have happen for you, it makes you believe a whole lot more.” Allie Colosky can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com

WATER POLO: Promising season comes to sad end continued from B1

but the facilities restrict them from doing so, he said. The team got adequate space for practice since the addition of the Wildcat Recreation Center, however the facility is not able to host tournaments due to its size. Without being able to hold tournaments, the team’s fan base consists mostly of close friends and parents who drive hours to see them play. Although the ’Cats travel for all of their games, their spirit and motivation to win is stronger than ever and their goal to win the division and make a push for nationals is in reach, Jacobs said. Last year the ’Cats traveled to San Jose, Santa Cruz and Davis to wrap up their perfect season. In the divisional playoffs, however, the ’Cats fell short and came in seventh overall of the eight teams.

“Going into the playoffs we expected to win and were too confident and lost to a team we beat earlier,” Jacobs said. Senior captain Nick Ballew wants to carry last season into this season and become more focused on not getting outplayed, he said. The first-year captain took the team to a 7-1 record this season with a loss to UC Berkeley, who finished the season 8-0. The ’Cats outscored their opponents 107-58 for the season and finished the 2011 season third in the nation, their highest ranking in program history. Of the top teams in the nation, seven of the top 10 schools are from California, with Chico State falling behind USC and UC Berkeley. The ’Cats would have liked to finish the season undefeated, but they are happy they lost, Jacobs said.

“It was a learning experience,” he said. “It’s a blessing in disguise. We learned how they played and will probably see them again in the championship round.” The ’Cats have been in training and regaining their focus going into the divisional playoffs over the weekend. In past divisional playoffs, the league has included 17 teams split into a north and south conference with the top four teams of both divisions getting a bid to the playoffs. This season, the north and south conference split into separate leagues and are now the Sierra Pacific and Pacific Coast. Taylor Kudell, president of the club and goalkeeper, welcomed the new format of the leagues, he said. “With every team getting a bid to the playoffs, it’s better

because we know how each team plays, because we faced them in the regular season once and so we can be better prepared,” he said. The ’Cats were able to acquire the second seed in their division taking on seventh seed Stanford in the opening match of the twoday divisional championship tournament in Santa Cruz this weekend. Easily rolling by Stanford with a 13-4 victory, the ’Cats would challenge third seed UC Davis. During the regular season, the ’Cats were able to defeat the Aggies 13-5 in regulation. Saturday night’s match would be decided in overtime. The ’Cats were able to come out on top, 11-10 with a last second goal, earning a spot in the championship match. Looking to even the score against UC Berkeley who

gave the ’Cats their only loss this season, the ’Cats were sure they would get their chance in the championship match, Jacobs said. However, fourth-seeded UC Santa Cruz upset the first-seeded Golden Bears to advance to the championship match to face Chico State. In front of their home crowd, the Banana Slugs rode their momentum and with a second overtime goal, beat the ’Cats 6-5 and earned a bid to nationals. “We wanted to not just get to the championship game, but win,” Jacobs said. “But the team has a strong rapport with UC Santa Cruz and we support them in their trip to nationals.” An overused cliche sometimes is all that can be said: better luck next year. Andrew Delgado can be reached at adelgado@theorion.com

Going into the playoffs we expected to win and were too confident and lost to a team we beat earlier.

PETER JACOBS senior captain


sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

FALL 2011

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

B5

WILDCAT SPORTS SCHEDULE

MEN’S SOCCER

WOMEN’S SOCCER

VOLLEYBALL

W 8-0

Aug. 18

@Dominican (scrimmage)

L 2-0

Aug. 27

Southern Oregon (scrimmage)

@Seattle Pacific

T 0-0

Sept. 1

@Western Washington

W 2-1

Sept. 3

Sept. 9

Sonoma State

L 2-0

Sept. 11

@Cal State Stanislaus

Sept. 16

@Cal State Dominquez Hills

Sept. 18 Sept. 23 Sept. 25

@Cal State East Bay

Sept. 30 Oct. 2

W 2-0

Sept. 2

Alaska Anchorage

L 3-2

T 1-1

Sept. 2

Western Oregon

W 3-1

@Seattle Pacific

L 1-0

Sept. 3

Dominican

W 3-0

@Western Washington

T 0-0

Sept. 3

Western Washington

W 3-0

Sept. 9

Sonoma State

W 2-1

Sept. 6

@William Jessup

W 3-0

W 2-0

Sept. 11

@Cal State Stanislaus

L 2-1

Sept. 9

@Sonoma State

W 5-0

Sept. 16

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-1

Sept. 10

@Humboldt State

W 3-0

@Cal State L.A.

T 2-2

Sept. 18

@Cal State L.A.

L 1-0

Sept. 13

Simpson

W 3-0

@Cal State Monterey Bay

L 2-1

Sept. 23

@Cal State Monterey Bay

W 3-0

Sept. 16

San Francisco State

W 3-1

W 1-0

Sept. 25

@Cal State East Bay

W 2-1

Sept. 17

Cal Poly Pomona

W 3-2

Cal State Stanislaus

T 0-0

Sept. 30

Cal State Stanislaus

T 1-1

Sept. 23

@Cal State San Bernardino

L 3-0

Humboldt State

W 2-0

Oct. 2

Humboldt State

W 1-0

Sept. 24

@UC San Diego

W 3-2

Oct. 7

UC San Diego

W 2-1

Oct. 7

UC San Diego

T 0-0

Sept. 28

@Cal State Stanislaus

W 3-0

Oct. 9

Cal State San Bernardino

L 3-1

Oct. 9

Cal State San Bernardino

L 1-0

Sept. 30

Cal State Monterey Bay

W 3-2

Oct. 14

@San Francisco State

W 1-0

Oct. 14

@San Francisco State

L 2-1

Oct. 1

Cal State East Bay

W 3-0

Oct. 16

@Cal Poly Pomona

W 1-0

Oct. 16

@ Cal Poly Pomona

W 2-1

Oct. 7

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Oct. 21

Cal State East Bay

7 p.m.

Oct. 21

Cal State East Bay

4:30 p.m.

Oct. 8

@Cal State L.A.

W 3-0

Oct. 23

Cal State Monterey Bay

2 p.m.

Oct. 23

Cal State Monterey Bay

11:30 a.m.

Oct. 14

Humboldt State

L 3-2

Oct. 28

@Humboldt State

3 p.m.

Oct. 28

@Humboldt State

12:30 p.m.

Oct. 15

Sonoma State

L 3-0

Oct. 30

@Sonoma State

11:30 a.m.

Oct. 30

@Sonoma State

2 p.m.

Oct. 21

@Cal Poly Ponoma

7 p.m.

Nov. 4

CCAA Semifinal

TBA

Nov. 4

CCAA Semifinal

TBA

OCt. 22

@San Francisco State

7 p.m.

Nov. 6

CCAA Championship

TBA

Nov. 6

CCAA Championship

TBA

Oct. 28

UC San Diego

7 p.m.

Nov. 11-13

NCAA Championship Far West Regional

TBA

Nov. 11-13

NCAA Championship Far West Regional

TBA

Oct. 29

Cal State San Bernardino

7 p.m.

Nov. 19

NCAA Championship Quarterfinal

TBA

Nov. 19

NCAA Championship Quarterfinal

TBA

Nov. 2

Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Dec. 1-3

NCAA Championship Tournament Final Four

TBA

Dec. 1-3

NCAA Championship Tournament Final Four

TBA

Nov. 4

@Cal State East Bay

7 p.m.

Nov. 5

@Cal State Monterey Bay

7 p.m.

Nov. 11

Cal State L.A.

7 p.m.

Nov. 12

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7 p.m.

Nov. 17-19

NCAA Championship Tournament Pacific Regional

TBA

Dec. 1-2

NCAA Championship Tournament Elite Eight

TBA

Aug. 17

Yuba College

Aug. 23

@UC Davis

Sept. 1 Sept. 3

L 3-1

CROSS COUNTRY Sept. 10

@Humboldt Invitational

Oct. 22

CCAA Championships

Sept. 24

@Stanford Invitational

Nov. 5

NCAA West Regional

Oct. 1

@Willamette Invitaional

Nov. 19

NCAA Championships

Oct. 15

@Santa Clara Invitational Note: Home games are in bold. Tournaments are in italics.

Service Directory Sewing Chic-O

ABC Liquor & Market 715 W 9th St. 891-8350

Get an “A” on your wardrobe

LAND OF LIQUOR

- Jean Patching

“We’ll make them like new!”

We Sell Kegs–Handles–30 Packs Coldest Beers in Town

Specials Everyday!

Open 9:00am - 5:30pm Monday - Friday located: 449 W. 9th at Chestnut

5 hours for $555

vanmancharters.com 530.520.4303

C\n`j9ifZblj ,*'%..+%*(.' gf`ekjn\jkg_fkf%Zfd

.U[OWZQ][

SZbgQ`SObWdS

call: 893-8394

Party Bus!

Gf`ekjN\jk G_fkf^iXg_p

@ Q D O < @ M > 5 0 !(

s/RIGINALHEMS s:IPPER2EPLACEMENT s"ACK0ACK2EPAIR s!LTERATIONS

TCP 24841

Fall

DXibIfaXj%lj CXleZ_`e^jffe

Check out the Nebula in the Features section for comics - D5


B6 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

SPORTS

sports all week @ theorion.com

“Like” us? You could win tickets to a concert. Check out The Orion Facebook page for a chance to win tickets to see The Expendables in concert. It’s simple. Write a caption about the band photo on our profile and whichever caption has the most “likes” wins. That’s it. You can use your smartphone or other electronic device to scan the QR code below to access The Orion Facebook page, then encourage your friends to “like” your caption. Read the show preview in the Arts section on C2 and see the Expendables live Saturday Oct. 22 at the Senator Theatre.


arts

C

STUDY BREAK C2 A SOUND SALVATION C4 DAILY DOSE C5

“Little Shop of Horrors” plays at the Harlen Adams Theatre. Story C2

arts all week at theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

Leila Rodriguez ARTS EDITOR

Girl with the flower

disabled actors to find work and why they were depicted unfairly. Finding inspiration after spending time with his niece who uses a wheelchair, director of “Imgainary Circum- MORE ON stances,” Anthony Weeks found FOCUS FILM that many videos didn’t show FESTIVAL children in wheelchairs. He wondered what had happened See C4 for to the authentic representation movies from the festival on TV and film. Weeks was encouraged to Also see D5 for submit his film for the festival a new autism after he won a student academy awareness award for it, he said. program “I was thrilled to be here as a filmmaker,” Weeks said. “It’s really great to be in such wonderful company with other filmmakers who are paying attention to disability issues.”

Albums vs. Singles The last time I bought CDs was last year and they were blank CDs. The last time I really enjoyed an entire album was Feist’s “The Reminder” in 2007 and I can’t even recall the name of the last CD I bought at a store. Nowadays it seems artists aren’t putting out entirely great albums but instead settling for a few good songs that will get plenty of radio play. People aren’t buying albums anymore — it’s a singles world now. In the ’60s, The Beatles changed the way music was sold. They made more money for the record industry by selling albums instead of just releasing a single. Amid the digital age whirlwind, people are outsourcing other mediums for their music. It’s easier now to just download a certain song off an album and save the extra money and time spent skipping over tracks that are not worth hearing. “Because of the drop of CD sales, people are looking at artists and getting a chance to sample new material,” said Paul Friedlander, professor of music industry and rock history. Katy Perry’s 2010 “Teenage Dream” album debuted at No. 1 and stayed there for 52 weeks. The CD produced five hit chart singles, the only other album to do so since Michael Jackson’s “Bad” album in 1987, but Perry’s album as a whole is not that impressive. I am guilty of only downloading the songs I enjoyed from “Teenage Dream” because buying the record didn’t seem worth my money if I would only listen to a few selected songs. This mindset is pretty apparent when it comes to record sales. Before Napster was launched in 2006, the record industry was already facing a decline in sales. Last year record sales dropped 12.8 percent, according to Billboard. biz. Records sales revenue has fallen by nearly 20 percent for four years in a row. No one’s buying whole albums. With free websites like Pandora, music lovers are exposed to new sounds at their fingertips. Free streaming is something on demand and the catalyst for a shift from albums to singles, Friedlander said. Artists are concerned with recognition and being paid for creating a collective sound, but exposure, whether someone paid for it or not, gives more listeners a chance to decide what they like. The digital revolution is pioneering the way artists produce and share their sound, and at the same time, listeners are changing the way they consume. It has now become the idea of owning something versus the idea of using something, Friedlander said. People want one or two songs, so artists are putting out less material setting the record industry back 50 years toward single songs. I prefer spending money on a live show and downloading free music. Sharing music has become so easy that carrying a tangible sound is just extra weight.

Jen Moreno can be reached at

Leila Rodriguez can be reached at

jmoreno@theorion.com

artseditor@theorion.com

Graphic design student bakes, decorates cakes to pay for school Nicole Walker STAFF WRITER

A

fter spending hours perfecting the look and taste of a cake, eating it can be bittersweet.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY • CHELSEA ROSS

“Cutting into one of my cakes hurts at first because I work so hard on them,” said Meghan Simon, a freshman graphic design major. It’s one thing for a cake to look pretty, but another for it to taste good as well, she said. When someone compliments the taste, it is a reminder that the cake is for eating. Decorating cakes is a skill Simon has crafted since she was 13 years old, beginning with a pizza-imitated cake for her brother’s birthday party. After attempts, fails and successes, Simon found a passion for the art of decorating cakes. “It’s given me another way to express myself and be creative,” she said. BABY CAKES Meghan Simon works from home preparing a carefully crafted twoteared cake.

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

It’s given me another way to express myself and be creative.

MEGHAN SIMON senior graphic design major

PHOTO COURTESY OF • JENNIE JACOBS

PIECE OF CAKE Meghan Simon’s finished cake for a friend’s birhtday.

Simon is naturally creative, but making cakes is also stressful for a fi rst-time college student who tries to focus on her studies. Although, the business of selling cakes did help her fi nance two trips to Europe and her college tuition, she said. In Simon’s hometown of Visalia, she would make and sell her cakes to family and friends. Pricing would vary depending on how much the materials cost and how much labor was put into it. From birthdays and engagements to baby showers and graduations, she pleases her customers on their special day by following whatever theme they choose, Simon said. Simon began to test her cake designing skills after being inspired by the show “Ace of Cakes.” The chef and owner of Charm City Cakes in Baltimore, Md., Duff Goldman, attempts to create elaborate cakes with his team of decorators weekly for clients. Without ever taking a class, Simon learned the majority of her cake decorating knowledge from the show, she said. And what she doesn’t know, she Googles. The process of designing and bringing an idea to life takes Simon about two hours

to bake and four additional hours to decorate it, but depending on the detail required this could take several days, Simon said. After freezing the cake overnight for moisture, she then carves the cake in order to even the layers out and make them the size she needs. Then she rolls out the fondant, places it over the separate pieces of cake and, depending on what she is making, molds and carves it to look like the sketch. With the long process and added stress of completing a cake, Simon debates taking her abilities further. When she began baking cakes, she decided she wanted cake creation to be her career, until she realized how stressful it can be, Simon said. Right now, Simon has her mind set on computer animation or advertising design, but she still keeps an open mind. Simon’s mother, Khrista Baxter, fully supports Simon if she wants to go to culinary school and open a bakery, Baxter said. “I want to say I was surprised when she began baking and decorating cakes, but I shouldn’t have been,” Baxter said. “She has always been artistically driven.” Nicole Walker can be reached at nwalker@theorion.com

Festival showcases films about disabilities Jen Moreno STAFF WRITER

The curtain rose on the seventh annual FOCUS Film Festival putting the spotlight on 11 films dealing with a variety of disabilities, both physical and mental. The festival opened Wednesday to a crowded house at the Sierra Nevada Big Room with the film “Wretches & Jabberers,” a tale of two autistic middle-aged men traveling around the world to raise awareness about autism. Families and supporters sat elbow-to-elbow and watched enthusiastically. “It isn’t about talking to people with disabilities about their disabilities as much as it is getting the community to understand first hand through film,” festival director Mary Ann Weston said. The El Rey Theatre hosted the festival the following day for the remaining 10 films, a change from previous years, when the films were shown at the Bell Memorial Union. Changing the site to a more central location

should encourage more community support, Weston said. Movie-goers came and went throughout the day with a few audience members staying for every one of the films. Robin Keehn, executive director of the Area II Developmental Disabilities Board, was one of them. “The whole event kept reinforcing again and again how we’re all people first,” Keehn said. “Disability is just another form of diversity and the world is better off because there’s differences.” A filmmaker’s competition was held during the all-day event, which allowed audience members to vote on four short films. Workers at the event quickly counted the votes and revealed a tie. Both directors were present to accept their awards and they mingled among the crowd during the reception that followed. One of the winning films was “Imaginary Circumstances,” which dealt with actors with disabilities in Hollywood, and why it was harder for

VIRAL VIDEOS >> speaking

“Steve Kardynal - Katy Perry Peacock ” YouTube

“Katy Perry - E.T. - Parody (Charlie Sheen Quotes) ” YouTube

“Don’t look back all you’ll ever get is the dust from the steps before.”

Steve Kardynal shows many of his moves to surprised Chat Roulette guests as he lip syncs and shimmies to Katy Perry’s “Peacock.”

This strange video uses Charlie Sheen’s quotes to the tune of Katy Perry’s “E.T.” song.

She & Him “Don’t Look Back” 2010


C2 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

PREVIEW

●=

rati

ng

a look at upcoming distractions

> Compiled by Mark Rojas

“Batman: Arkham City” -Available now for PS3 and XBOX 360

●●●●○ The Dark Knight returns to video game consoles everywhere. Batman is stalking through the darkness to take down the criminals that rule Arkham City. The combat in this game is simple yet

Expendables sets gears for Chico show SURPRISE [left to right] Raul Bianchi on guitar, Ryan DeMars on bass and vocals, Adam Patterson on drums and vocals and Geoff Weers on guitar and vocals make up The Expendables.

Brooke Hespeler STAFF WRITER

Self-described “reggae-metal” band The Expendables has been a staple in the Chico concert scene since their formation in 1997. The band will be tearing up the Senator Theatre Saturday. The Orion recently got a chance to talk to lead singer Geoff Weers while he enjoyed a rare quiet moment in his Santa Cruz home. The Orion: So Geoff, who do you find has influenced your music the most over the years? Geoff Weers: So many people have: Sublime and Bob Marley and shit like that. But other than that, I think we all bring our own influences to the table.

inviting. There are plenty of combos to throw Batman elbows for days. Practice your best detective work while looking for the best spot to get the drop on the prison thugs. Mark “Luke Skywalker” Hamil gives great life to the Joker and this game feels like a really long interactive movie that you

The Orion: Have you found newer influences over the years, or does it all pretty much go back to the originals? Weers: Yeah, totally, totally. Newer bands such as, uh, I just saw the Flaming Lips. They’re amazing. Just watching one show influenced me a bunch. It’s hard to say just like one specific band, you know?

cannot get enough of. A bunch of extras and upgrades are key to Arkham City’s replayability with bonus modes featuring Catwoman and Robin. Really love Batman? The collector’s edition contains a dope statue that makes the gargoyle on the Student Services Center look more silly — if that’s possible.

Patrick Stump “Soul Punk” - Available now

●●●○○ In the song “Spotlight (New Regrets),” Patrick Stump, lead singer of Fall Out Boy, proclaims “You can be your own spotlight,” and he proves it in this new album.

The Orion: How do you feel your sound has changed over the years? Weers: I think it hasn’t really changed too much. We’ve kinda stuck to the reggae-metal sort of vibe. I think on each of our albums there’s definitely songs that fall outside that, so we’ve constantly been experimenting, but I don’t think we’ve gone too far off of our reggae-metal sort of sound. We’ve definitely tried to be out there with a couple of songs, which is fun for us. The Orion: Describe your song-writing process. Weers: It starts usually when somebody brings in a whole song, part of a song, a riff, a drumbeat, or some lyrics, whatever, then we sort of write our own parts around it. We try it onstage, play with it and see if it works. The Orion: How do you guys like the Chico scene? Weers: Chico is definitely a place where we would go when we were first trying to branch out in California. In Chico, we’d be able to stop and actually have people want to come to our parties and shows. Chico has definitely been there for us so we really like to come back.

Why let others get in the way of your creativity? Stump is making his way down solo and giving solo a whole new meaning. Stump wrote, produced and performed everything on this

The Orion: What’s the strangest thing that’s happened during one of your concerts? Weers: Strange? Uh, it’s not that strange but sometimes our guitar player pees in a garbage can onstage because there’s nowhere else to go.

album, a unique feat that he executes perfectly. “Soul Punk” has some funk

The Orion: Well then. What’s the strangest thing that has inspired one of your songs?

PHOTO COURTESY OF • THE EXPENDABLES

Weers: It’s kinda creepy. There’s this guy we lived with that was kinda shady. A lot of stuff started to disappear. We never really caught him doing it but it couldn’t be anybody else. It was just kinda this sketchy situation, so we’ve got this song called “Bridges Burned.” That’s about that.

The Orion: Any plans to start work on another album yet? Weers: We’re putting together some acoustic stuff, doing a couple new songs, trying it out in the next few weeks, then moving forward from there.

The Orion: What do you think about sharing a band name with a recent blockbuster action film? Weers: You should be asking them what it’s like to share a name with us. But you know, I really think that Sylvester Stallone is one of the best filmmakers of all time. No, I’m kidding. But it kinda sucked when it first came out because we got knocked off the front page of Google. Now and again we get weird tweets from fans of the movie, but it’s all good now.

The Orion: What can we expect at the performance on Saturday? Weers: Straight-up rocking.

The Orion: Guilty pleasure artist/album? Weers: Britney Spears, I guess. I put her on a lot. There’s a song called “Seal it With a Kiss” on her newest album. I think it’s a really cool song. The Orion: If you weren’t in a band right now, what do you think you would be doing? Weers: I don’t know, trying to be in a band? Working at some shitty job. Honestly I’d probably start doing drugs or something like that. I’d be a completely different person.

The Orion: Is there any advice you have for someone who wants to become a professional musician? Weers: Definitely keep doing what you’re trying to do. Keep working, don’t ever think you’re the shit, there’s always going to be someone that’s better than you. Never stop learning, ’cause it’s a difficult lifestyle. The Orion: Anything else you’d like to say to Orion readers? Weers: Come out to the show. We love Chico, so it’s gonna be good to come back. Like our Facebook page and say hi, converse with us. Brooke Hespeler can be reached at bhespeler@theorion.com

and wants to share it with you. “This City” is his attempt at making an anthem for hometown

FEED ME Seymour, who was played by Noah Snyder, [left] plans to feed himself to his blood thirsty plant, Audrey II [right], in Chico State’s “Little Shop of Horrors” musical at Harlen Adams Theatre.

pride, Lupe Fiasco guests and spits truth bombs on this thumb snapping tune.

“Johnny English Reborn”

-In theaters Friday

●○○○○ Man has gone through many a renaissance. Even Superman was reborn, but some things should just stay dead. Rowan Atkinson’s Johnny English is just another one of those things we don’t understand, and we immediately brush away English comedies because of it. English is pretty much a bumbling Bond in this sequel that’s better than the first but that’s like saying a D+ is better than an F.

THE ORION • CHELSEA BEIGHTS

“Pirates of The Carribbean: On Stranger Tides”

-Starring Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz

●●○○○ To quote Michael Bolton, “This is the tale of Capt. Jack Sparrow, pirate so brave on the seven seas.” Just like Bolton’s lyrics did not fit to the theme of the Lonely Island song, “On Stranger Tides” is a bit out of sync with the series. It’s a fast paced adventure with plenty of dangers like mermaids who don’t play nice and the dreaded pirate Blackbeard preventing Jack from getting to the fountain of youth. Penelope Cruz plays alongside Depp as a swashbucking sailor, Geoff rey Rush returns as Barbosa — now with peg-leg — and Ian McShane premieres as the legendary Blackbeard.

Show chomps up laughs, applause Juan Mejia STAFF WRITER

As each scene progressed, the mysterious bloodthirsty man-eating plant grew in the set of a little shop bringing horror to those unlucky to work on skid row. Chico State’s School of the Arts brought a modern look at the classic musical play “Little Shop of Horrors” to the Harlen Adams Theatre the past two weekends. With the end of each musical number, the crowd’s clapping and cheering took over the theater as each set and wardrobe change planted a seed of uneasiness in the audience. Preparing for the show and timing each sequence requires extreme concentration and practice. Actors have to stomp out their nerves and eloquently time the pace of their choreography. “I usually have an energy drink before each show,” said sophomore Alex Geringer, a musical theatre major who played Cinnamon. “I like to turn my butterflies into energy, once I’m on that stage the nerves go away.” “Little Shop of Horrors” is different because it uses puppetry, requiring someone to be inside

the devilish plant at all times in order to operate each stage of the plant’s growth, she said. The elaborate detail of the set provided fertile ground in which the horrible plant “Audrey II” could develop and with each transformation, become hungrier for human flesh. Starting out as an odd-looking mystery, the plant morphs upon each feeding of human blood, sparking into song and dance, persuading its owner, Seymour, to find desperate ways to feed it. “Last semester I took a puppetry class here at Chico State and was asked to be one of the puppeteers,” said senior Zachary Burch, one of the plant’s operators. The play was split into two acts, having a different puppeteer for each because being inside the costume is draining and hot under the stage lights, he said. “I can’t see the guy who does the voice for the plant, I had to learn the music and the lines really well, listen to him and try to mimic what to say,” Burch said. “It’s really important that I understand the music for a play like this.” The interactions between the lead characters, “Ben” and “Audrey” drive the romantic tension into the climax when everyone succumbs to the

will of the plant. “I play Seymour who is subservient to Mr. Mushnik and learn very quickly that the plant survives on blood,” said Noah Snyder, a senior double major in theatre arts and political science. “We took a puppet that we weren’t sure was going to work or how and in two weeks we got it running and in sync,” he said. “We practiced time and time again and we are very happy with the results.” The community support has been steady. Having more than half of the theatre full, sometimes even near capacity is very exciting, and it’s nice to see people come out to support students, Snyder said. “I’m a musical theatre nerd who just happened to get cast as a lead on a musical,” he said. “It’s a very interesting process but I really enjoy myself.” The next endeavor for the Chico State School of the Arts in providing live action performances to Chico will be “Revenger’s Tragedy” coming in November. Juan Mejia can be reached at jmejia@theorion.com


arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

C3

BBEE’S PRETTY LITTLE THINGS

Best demin looks for all shapes, occasions Brittany Comas Br STAFF WRITER

Denim jeans are always in style, especially at Chico State. Some prefer flares, skinny jeans or a boot cut pair, but no matter your preference I’ve created three looks for a school day or a downtown Chico evening. Brittany Comas can be reached at bcomas@theorion.com

Flares These dark denim flares from Old Navy are slightly high-waisted and add an extra vintage feel to the already retro flared leg. Wear these jeans with a colorful top. This orange colored frill neck blouse adds just the right autumn color to the look. With the weather warming up this past week, it’s OK to add short sleeves to your fall wardrobe. If it gets a little cold after your evening classes, throw on a simple black cardigan over this bright top. For your feet, this pair of folded wedge booties from Forever 21 are comfortable enough to get from class to class and definitely cute enough for a day-to-night look. Add a pair of orange and gold origami earrings and the look is complete.

Boot cut Boot cut jeans are a classic for women of all ages. Fall denim looks better in a dark wash and the darker hue will make them easier to wear with just about anything. This pair from Kohl’s has a nice stretch that gives you a little leeway from the waist through the leg. Comfort is always key with denim. Pair these jeans with this Aztec-inspired poncho that will keep you warm for that windy bike ride home. Tuck the jeans into your rain boots like this creme colored pair from Aldo or leave the boots hidden underneath. The versatility is the best part. Tie it together with this pair of earrings from Pac Sun that will give the look a touch of glam.

Skinny These jeans will most likely never go out of style. They’re as versatile as leggings but not as casual. You can rock these jeans with anything from a chunky knit sweater and boots to platform heels and a halter-top. These skinny jeans by ELLE for Kohl’s will pair amazingly with a flowy top like this cinnamon colored chiffon blouse from Old Navy. I’d recommend a loose top for all skinny jeans since it provides the right contrast from tight ankle to loose midsection. Pair them with this edgy velveteen cuff from Forever 21 and these adorable leopard print flats from Wet Seal. From your last class of the day to a lunch date with your favorite ladies, this look is chic enough for all occasions.

TOP PLACES TO BUY JEANS Gap - Gap jeans come in all different sizes and washes. They even have short and tall sizes so you don’t have to find a seamstress to hem them. The quality of the denim is long lasting and they are so comfortable, you can wear them all day long. Kohl’s - This store holds a lot of different brands from Lauren Conrad’s clothing line to Vera Wang’s, and it’s a guaranteed place to find a great new pair of jeans. From juniors sizes to plus sized, there’s a cute pair for everyone and a really.

$ 95

$

96

$103

Old Navy - Similar to the Gap, Old Navy houses simple and affordable denim. From the skinny jean to the flare, there’s a variation on all styles so shoppers can find the right fit for them. They even have comfortable jeggings for everyday wear. J.C. Penney Co. - A classic pair of Levi’s is a must in a denim-lover’s closet. JCPenney.com has a great selection of Levi’s jeans from the classic straight leg to the new Curve ID line. Not to mention, there’s almost always a sale on denim and it makes these jeans college budget friendly.

$13 $37 $28 $17

Asos origami pleated deco clip on earrings from asos.com

$17

aztec print poncho from stylesforless.com

Old Navy women’s hirise retro flare jean from oldnavy.gap.com

$32 $45 $9

apt. 9 bootcut jeans from kohls.com

Folded suedette wedges from forever21.com Mid orange layer frill top from oasis-stores.com

ELLE skinny jeans from kohls.com

smerkar rain boot from aldoshoes.com

$ 33 $15 $13

mixed metal dangle earrings from pacsun.com

$35

old navy tie-neck chiffon blouse from oldnavygap.com

animal knot faux suede flat from wetseal.com embellished velveteen bracelet from forever21.com

Karaoke lecture gets students on mic Brittany Comas STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • BRET EDWARDS

TURNING JAPANESE Kimihiko Nomura, host of karaoke lecture and Chico professor of Japanese, had little to say but plenty to sing.

“I Will Survive” can be heard on karaoke nights all around Chico, but an even more popular karaoke song selection like “Yume no Naka he” was heard echoing throughout Trinity Hall. In Japan, karaoke is more than just a drunken escapade showcasing one’s vocal talents — it’s a cultural and social activity that has been around since the ’70s. Kimihiko Nomura, professor of Japanese, held a karaoke event Thursday in Trinity Hall. Numerous students from the foreign language and study abroad programs were in attendance. Nomura started off by saying a few words about the brief history of karaoke. He then cranked up the volume on the machine and handed microphones to people in the audience. Two women immediately stood up to sing “Yesterday” by The Beatles. Nomura participated as well. Another participant got up to speak about her experiences in Japan during her fall 2010 study abroad. “In Japan, karaoke was one of the

most social expemajor. riences that I went “You go from through,” said Jade like, 11 p.m. when In Japan, karaoke was Reed, an applied the train stops computer graphics running, to 5 in one of the most social and Asian studies experiences that I went the morning when major. “It’s a weekly the first train through. thing people do to get starts running.” closer to each other, Ibarra prefers to sing, to relax, to Japanese karaoke JADE REED drink.” to American karaapplied computer Most bars do karaoke, he said. graphics and Asian oke and Nomihodai, “It makes you studies major which means “all you really nervous can drink” in Japanese, she said. to sing by yourself but you’re with “Japan is a play hard, work hard a group of friends,” Ibarra said. “So society, so karaoke there was like, the half the time you’re not singing alone ultimate form of release,” Reed said. anyway, you’re all singing together.” “It enabled me to kind of gain cultural People became more courageous respect in the fact that I was trying to after hearing about Reed and Ibarlearn their language and culture.” ra’s karaoke experiences and soon After Reed’s brief speech, she took the room joined in on Queen’s “Bohethe microphone to sing “Yume no mian Rhapsody.” Naka he,” a popular Japanese karaNomura’s karaoke event had very oke song that translates to “Into the few people in attendance, but it proDream.” vided an intimate setting for the Following Reed’s performance, experienced singers and the timid. another student talked to the audiLike professor Nomura said, “Karaence about his experiences in Tokyo. oke is all about having fun.” On the weekends in Tokyo, you can do karaoke all night, said Angel Brittany Comas can be reached at Ibarra, a history and Asian studies bcomas@theorion.com

PREVIEW

Choir ‘inspires’ community for genocide awareness concert Leila Rodriguez ARTS EDITOR

It took 100 days to kill 800,000 people in Rwanda with machetes — that’s 8,000 people murdered a day. On Tuesday Oct. 25, 37 students from Inspire School of Arts and Sciences high school will give voice to those lives lost. Bidwell Presbyterian Church will resonate with songs from cultures and countries affected by genocide for the Voices for Hope concert. A project that started as an idea between Carol Edelman, professor of psychology, and the Inspire school’s choral director Mary Lou Lim in August is coming to life through Edelman’s Sociology 256 class. As a class project, her students split into roles for the event to teach underclassmen about genocide in today’s society. The songs reflect cultures that have experienced genocide over time. “When people think about bad things that happen in the world, most people don’t think about genocide,” said Nic Keith, a junior construction management major and group leader for Voices for Hope. It was important for the project to be meaningful and not just about learning songs for a show, Lim said. PowerPoint presentations will be

running throughout the performance displaying photos along with informational narration and poetry readings. Lim searched YouTube and choral music websites for songs relating to hope and life in desperate places that would emphasis the weight of what their concert is about. The concert will feature songs like “Russian Picnic,” “Bird Song” and “Ani Ma’amin,” a Hebrew song Jewish people sang while walking to their death at Nazi camps. It translates into “I Believe.” Sophomore Inspire student Alice Cornwell is excited to be participating in the concert, Cornwell said. Since the eighth grade, Cornwell has been studying genocide, which sparked an interest in World War II movies and the Holocaust. “I feel like I’ve been waiting for this concert for like three years now,” she said. “Finally I can express myself and we can make a tribute to that.” An instructor came into the class and explained the meaning and phrasing of all the multicultural tunes the students were learning. Once the meaning was in place, the songs came easier to the students and the music highlighted the humanity behind the statistics, said Krista Wurlitzer, choir president at the Inspire school. “It makes the people that we’re talking about human,” choir singer Cooper

PHOTO COURTESY OF • MEGHAN SIMON

I BELIEVE Inspire School of Arts and Sciences choir practices songs for its Tuesday Oct. 25 performance, which will shed light on cultures and countries affected by genocide. Grosscup said. “Because when you sing their songs you automatically experience the same joy they felt.” By bringing art to the topic of genocide, Lim hopes to have an emotional impact that will raise awareness, she said. “So just humanly our hearts are touched,” Lim said. “That’s what I want

for the choir as well as for the audience.” Donations will be accepted at the door for the Student Anti-Genocide Coalition, Human Rights Watch and Heifer Project International. Leila Rodriguez can be reached at artseditor@theorion.com


C4 |

arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

A SOUND SALVATION

PAINT IT BLACK Alejandra Resendiz [right] sits patiently while Nadia Claire [left] paints her face to celebrate the upcoming Dia de Los Muertos, a Mexican celebration for remembering the dead, at the Museum of Anthropology.

Website ignites music earmark in U.S. network Eli Gibbs STAFF WRITER

With the recent legalization of Spotify in the United States, there is an easy way to share music with your Facebook friends. Spotify is a Swedish-founded music streaming service that launched to the public October 2008, but it took years of negotiation between the company and major record label executives for Spotify to launch in the U.S. The American music labels expressed concerns that the free offering service devalues music and fails to make significant revenue, but eventually an agreement was reached, and the application became available in the United States on July 14. “The Spotify service can be accessed as an ad-supported free-to-the-user service having no monthly cap on listening hours or a cap on number of plays of a unique track during the first six months following creating of your Spotify account but thereafter a cap of 10 listening hours per month and a cap of five plays per unique track,” according to its most recent software agreement, effective Oct. 14. When Spotify integrated with Facebook, users who connected with the service could then share their music cloud with everyone they share information with on Facebook. Initially, this led to much negative publicity for Spotify because requiring people to log in with Facebook cuts out anyone who does not want to share and those who do not use Facebook. This led to Spotify being forced to introduce new privacy features to their software. Michael Chouinard, a music industry graduate, currently shares 31 playlists with his Facebook connections. These playlists vary as some are compilations while others are just albums that he feels others will enjoy. “The biggest benefit is definitely combating piracy of music,” Chouinard said. It is also great as a way of discovering music, which is accomplished mostly through the social aspect that Facebook provides, he said. Spotify is making use of a very popular type of file sharing, most commonly referred to as, “cloud computing.” The idea is that the Web can hold the file and the user can then access it by streaming, rather than downloading. Other cloud-based services include Apple’s iCloud, Google and Amazon. I have Spotify on my computer and the app on my iPhone. I can wirelessly sync to files that I personally own and use tracks Spotify hosts to make playlists in the cloud that my friends can access as well. Overall, Spotify provides a convenient alternative to illegally downloading music. The increased sharing of music in this cloud-based program is promotional for the artists and provides a great experience for the fans. If people do want to continue the unrestricted and ad-free version of Spotify, they will eventually have to pay for it. But, for now, anyone can access it for free. Eli Gibbs can be reached at egibbs@theorion.com

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

Celebration leaves many ‘dead-faced’ Miguel Rocha STAFF WRITER

It was a day of the walking dead as families freely roamed the Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology with skull-painted faces Saturday in celebration for Dia de los Muertos. The community was welcomed to spend some time for the crafting of paper skulls, pins and paper mache flowers while enjoying hot chocolate and “pan de muerto” and for the more adventurous ones, there was skull face painting. A three level altar stood in front of the room with artificial flowers and pictures of late family members decorated with a bamboo arch that serves as a pathway for the spirits to come celebrate life with their families. With colored pencils, markers, scissors and imagination in hand, parents and kids crafted and converted the white paper skulls into colorful pieces of art.

Outside, face painters were busy as a crowd gathered for a little colorful make-up. The event was designed to be fun while educating the community about the meaning of Dia de los Muertos and raising awareness about the growing Latino culture at Chico State, said Adrienne Scott, curator of the Museum of Anthropology at Chico State. The event was able to happen with the help of Oscar Mendoza, campus organizations and multicultural Greek organizations. Scott was looking to promote cultural awareness, so students, families and the community would come and learn about other cultures. “As we live, the more we embrace and do not fear death, we live our life more fully,” Scott said. For her, the meaning of Dia de los Muertos is to celebrate family and ancestors and also to respect the past of ancestors and invite them back to the family’s heart

and memories. What’s important is getting people acquainted with the idea behind the celebration, and not just thinking it’s the Mexican Halloween, she said. The event was not disappointing for 5-year-old Alex Kuykendall of Chico, who was having fun coloring masks and awaiting his turn for some face paint. “Masks are really cool,” he said. He was also looking forward to some paint on his face. “It’s fun to have the face painted,” he said. However, 9-year-old Simon Myers preferred keeping the color on his mask instead of his face. “I don’t like my face getting painted,” he said as he colored his skull. Though face painting is not a traditional part of the celebration in Mexico, Scott can see more Mexican-American groups incorporating a face painting aspect to the event,

she said. Christian Gutierrez, a public relations major and special event coordinator for the museum, said the event aimed to expose kids to other cultures in a fun way. “It’s reaching the gap to bring together family and students,” Gutierrez said. For 23-year-old Christina Alvarez, a political science major, Dia de los Muertos is a day to celebrate and appreciate life at a more personal level. Death is nothing to fear, she said. The event also helps unify the Latino culture at Chico State, bring awareness about the diverse culture and expose kids to another culture. Death is something that isn’t always sad, which explains why the skull masks always have a happy face, Alvarez said. “Death is just part of life,” she said. Miguel Rocha can be reached at mrocha@theorion.com

Recital embodies an A few FOCUS featured films to share evening with ‘masters’ FOCUSING ON THE FILMS

Kayla Wohlford STAFF WRITER

Chicoans packed the Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall Saturday night as the North State Symphony put on its first chamber music recital of the season. The recital, called “The Concertmaster,” was a performance duo of violinist Terrie Baune and pianist Alexander Tutunov. Aside from being a concertmaster of the North State Symphony, Baune also takes part in several other projects and is a freelance musician. Tutunov currently teaches piano at Southern Oregon University and performs around the world as a recitalist and orchestra soloist. “It’s a wonderful treat to be here,” Tutunov said. “I want to make sure the fans have an enjoyable and wonderful evening.” As the lights dimmed on the two performers and they went through each piece, the recital exuded chilling classical tunes. The mixture of French, Russian and German compositions created a variety for classical music enthusiasts. While performing Aria by Lev Abeliovich, Baune’s violin work was radiating as she switched from a low haunting sound to a piercing but slow resonance. Tutunov played powerfully quiet piano tones that accented the piece and created a blend of stimulating notes. The audience felt the compelling rendition as they cheered in approval.

The simple stage setting allowed for the music to prevail as the musicians showed there wealth of experience with different musical techniques. Baune sat down her bow at one point and plucked at the strings of the violin while Tutunov pounded on the piano keys sending out waves of energetic segments. The pair complemented each other well as the harmonies of the instruments worked together to create strong outbursts of classical music. Baune’s fingers swayed across the violin strings while the bow slowly moved up and down creating a whimsical sound. “It’s a great feeling when you can feel the composer in the music,” Baune said. The musicians played pieces by some of their favorite composers including Antonin Dvorak, Lili Boulanger and Dmitri Shostakovich. They provided a great variety of content including up-beat, dramatic music and subtle, gentle notes. “The second half of the show was more dramatic,” Tutunov said. The crowd was silent as the musicians shared their knowledge of classical music after each piece. They ended the concert with a strong musical composition by Johannes Brahms and played a quick encore by applause of the crowd. Kayla Wohlford can be reached at kwohlford@theorion.com

The following films were three of the 11 shown during the two-day FOCUS Film Festival. All of the films aimed to educate about disabilities but more importantly show that disabled people are no different than anyone else.

“Library of Dust” Short film, 2011

Behind the walls of the Oregon State Hospital lie hundreds of unclaimed, cremated remains of patients dating back to as early as the 1800s. Discovered almost by accident, the copper makeshift urns have endured years of neglect and water damage that caused the cans to corrode in distinct ways, each one different from the next. Originally numbered from zero to 5,000, there are 3,600 canisters — one for each of the unclaimed patients. As the pictures and story behind the copper cans break, nationwide families begin to come forward to claim long lost relatives and finally give the urns their proper place among their families. To date, 120 have been claimed and the names of those that remain are listed on the hospital’s website in hopes of being recognized and claimed. “Library of Dust” was one of two short films that were chosen as favorites among a total of four short films shown as entries for the Focus Film Festival.

“Mary and Max” Claymation feature, 2009

“Mary and Max” explores the friendship of two pen pals over the course of two continents and 20 years. An Australian native, 8-year-old Mary Dinkle, is curious about where babies in America come from and decides to randomly select someone from the phonebook she can write a letter to and ask. The recipient of that letter is Max Horowitz, a Jewish middle-aged man living in New York who has Asperger’s syndrome. Mary and Max continue to write back-and-forth to each other throughout the next 20 years as their friendship, the only one each has, grows stronger. No topic is taboo for the duo as they talk about feelings, chocolate hot dogs, taxidermy, alcoholism, loneliness, kleptomania, acceptance, sweetened condensed milk, pets and, of course, where babies come from. Though the film has its humorous moments, it touches on the seriousness of mental disabilities and death.

“Cody” Documentary, 2009

At the young age of 12, Cody Unser was suddenly struck with transverse myelitis, a neurologic syndrome, during a basketball game, leaving her completely paralyzed from the waist down. Not completely understanding what had caused it or why it happened, Unser began to find ways to raise both money and awareness about this uncommon, but not rare, condition. After discovering that her paralysis didn’t matter under the water and that scuba diving was still very much an option, Unser started bringing other people who had lost either their limbs or the loss of their limbs out to the water as well, eventually leading to Unser’s Great Scuba Adventure. The film follows Unser in her everyday life as an undergraduate student at the University of Redlands in San Bernadino. Day after day, Unser ensures that she is not defined by her disability and has created her own major in bio-politics to further understand the influence of politics on biological advances. – Compiled by Jen Moreno


daily dose events all week @ theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

<< T ODAY

The Making of a Medieval Masterpiece

7 p.m. @Performing Arts Center Room 134 Free Tim Tatton-Brown, an Archaeological Consultant to Salisbury Cathedral, lectures on medieval master pieces from 12201258.

T H U R SDAY

F R I DAY

SAT U R DAY

“Feeding China’s Little Emperors in the Age of Globalization”

The Chico Comedy All-Stars 2011

The Expendables

4 p.m. @ Humanities Center Gallery in Trinity Hall Free Dr. Chunyan Song will speak about her recent research in China on child feeding practices.

7:30 p.m. @ Blue Room Theatre Enjoy some laughs at Bustolini’s comedy show with local talent.

Folk Music Fridays

2 to 5 p.m. @ Augie’s Fine Coffee & Tea Cafe Get folky at Augie’s every Friday.

AFROMAN

Orla Fallon: Formerly of Celtic Woman

7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium Traditional Irish music of jigs, reels and love songs.

Salsa Classes

7 p.m. @Studio One downtown $5-$10 L.A. style salsa. Learn basics, styling and musicality taught by Maria Espino.

The Expendables perform with Mystic Roots.

The Autumn Table: Food for the Soul 7 p.m. @1078Gallery $15

Women Behind the Walls 2 p.m. @ Chico Women’s Club $12

Poetic Justice Project presents Claire Braz-Valentine’s play showcasing improvations of the Chowchilla prison, the largest women’s prison in the world.

Come sample delicious, seasonal, locally grown bites, and warm your soul with music by Doug Sheehy.

necessities MON DAY

T U E SDAY

Collector’s Choice: James Snidle

Voices of Hope Concert

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. @ University Art Gallery — Taylor Hall Room 111 Free Regionally and nationally known artists such as Robert Arneson, David Hockney, Tony Natsoulas and Wayne Thiebaud, from the collection of James Snidle.

7 p.m. @ TBA Donations welcomed

Inspire High School choir teams with Chico State students to raise awareness for countries affected by genocide.

Mickey Avalon ILLUSTRATION BY ERIC ROSSICONE

options >> TODAY

7:30 p.m. @ Senator Theatre $14 advance

SU N DAY

| C5

T H U R SDAY

F R I DAY

Mickey Avalon

Afroman

7 p.m. @ Senator Theatre $15 advance

8 p.m. @ El Rey Theatre $18 advance

Afroman performs with NorKal and Clout Cartel at the Senator Theatre.

Mickey Avalon returns to Chico for a performance at the El Rey Theatre.

Bronze Monsters

Sonic Gravity

8 p.m. @ 1078 Gallery $5

6:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture

Chill out at Cafe Culture for an evening of R&B.

Bronze Monsters from Oakland, perform with Bran Crown, The Mountain Ears and Fera at the 1078 Gallery.

SAT U R DAY

Choral Concert: Music, When Soft Voices Die

7: 30p.m. @Harlen Adams Theatre $15 University Chorus, A Cappella Choir and Chamber Singers explore through song the words of several famous poets, including Robert Frost, Langston Hughes and Emily Dickinson.

SU N DAY

Dance Church

10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture $8 Come to Cafe Culture with a skip in your step and praise in your heart for the mind, body and soul exercises with David Winglifter.

The World Famous Popovich Comedy Pet Theater 4: 30 p.m. & 7: 30 p.m. @ El Rey Theatre A blend of the unique comedy and juggling skills of Gregory Popovich, and the extraordinary talents of his pets.

MON DAY

Bear-E-Oke

9 p.m. @ Madison Bear Garden Calling all jukebox heroes – The Bear hosts a karaoke night every Monday until closing time.

T U E SDAY

Creole Choir of Cuba

7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium $21 student A euphoric show full of uplifting music and inspirational joy, the Creole Choir of Cuba are descendants of Haitians who made the journey from one island to the other.

Dance Sanctuary 6:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture

Swing on by Cafe Culture for an evening with Five Rhythms Dance Wave.

STAFF FAVORITES >> FLOWER “Rose” — Roses have always been my favorite flower. I love the way they smell, they stay in bloom longer than most flowers and symbolically have many meanings. My parents let me choose my little sister’s middle name, and I picked Rose.

>> Ally Dukkers Features Editor

“Cherry Blossom” — Japan’s national flower symbolizes the fleeting nature of life. The pale pink blossoms are a reminder that life is short so enjoy every moment.

>>Ashley Nakano Video Editor

“Sunflower” — Sunflowers are just overwhelming beautiful in numbers, they seek and orient themselves toward the sun and they’re fiery blossoms that resemble the sun.

>> Chelsea Ross Opinion Designer


C6 |

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

ARTS

arts all week @ theorion.com


features WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19 , 2011

class of

SEX COLUMN D2 WORD OF MOUTH D2 LOOKING BACK D3 FOOD COLUMN D4 THE NEBULA D5

Students participate in autism awareness programs. Story D5

golden

features all week at theorion.com

Ally Dukkers F E AT U R E S E D I T O R

‘61 GRADS

The Ally Way

Christina Rafael can be reached at

Ally Dukkers can be reached at

editorinchief@theorion.com

featureseditor@theorion.com

OT

OS

BY

•A

AR

ON

DR

AP

ER

a smile. The team is currently practicing for multicultural night, which will be held Nov. 14 on campus, Kronenberg said. Envy often gets calls from school entities and teams for performance requests. The dancers rely on word-ofmouth to promote Envy and are often present on campus. They participated at Wrectacular earlier in the semester. The team wants to compete and increase its membership in future years, Kronenberg said. With members having backgrounds in everything from Mexican folk dancing to cheerleading, Envy brings a new kind of dance to the stage — one that has attracted more than 175 likes on the team’s Facebook page. If people don’t notice the team now, they will, Kronenberg said.

Occupy change Growing up my parents took to the streets to protest against the government on issues like war and the death penalty. When I was 10 years old, my mom told me I wasn’t allowed to cut my hair. I drew up signs saying, “It’s my hair, you shouldn’t care” and began to picket in our kitchen thinking this was the means to get my way and to stand up for what I believed in. My parents grew up in the ’60s, a decade of protests and social revolution. This freedom of speech belief taught me at an early age that if you want to make a change, you have to speak up and express your opinions. What started as a small protest known as the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York has grown into a massive demonstration taking place in 70 major cities, according to The Guardian. It has led to worldwide rallies and even a protest in Chico. The goal of the protest is to bring nationwide attention to the economic gap that keeps growing and continues to divide the rich from the poor, and to put the wealthy lobbyists funding representatives in Washington under scrutiny. These protests target the top 1 percent of wealthy Americans and demand a change. The demonstrations have started to make an impact on our country, as President Barack Obama has begun to propose laws that bring money to the remaining 99 percent of the population with acts such as the “Buffett Rule.” This law was named after millionaire investor Warren Buffett and would make it so all Americans who earn more than $1 million per year pay a higher income tax than the remainder of the country. The purpose of a protest is to make a statement and get attention to influence change. Some may argue that protests serve no purpose and are more of a hassle than good. I don’t believe it’s a hassle, because when a crowd comes together, the message is so strong that people can’t ignore it. There are many things you can do to influence change and support democracy. Organize a rally like the bike rally against the parking structure held last month or write a letter to the government. Many of the protesters in the Occupy demonstrations are young citizens trying to push change. This is important to my generation, because we are the ones who will be affected by the lack of jobs and poor economy. This is our ’60s movement to stop economic inequality, corporate greed and the influence wealthy people have on our government. It’s important to stand up for what you believe in. If a big enough statement is made, change will be made.

RE W ilm W TUR sp I N ea P a Pa LDC ING A k Gr the s ick rke T du re r a as d Go ri ll sh Reu ld ng T wh he a e h nio en ic W co ol n st na h w ild py o ds ud m a ca f en e o s t t, t f h in pa the e 19 pe 61 r .

PH

W GO ilm LD cl Pi a P EN G as ck a IR r L lo ok gr s of rell ker ad 19 , a s a th u 6 sh fro yea rou ate 1 , r Ch e at m w bo gh ic te he ok o nd n St e at d e.

in

1961: Minimum wage $1.15/hour Cost of new car $2,849 Popular Films “The Parent Trap” “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” “The Hustler” Estimated world population 4 billion March 1 President John F. Kennedy establishes the Peace Corps March 9 First animal returns from space, a dog named Blackie aboard Sputnik 9

Time capsule opened after 50 years Katherine Deaton STAFF WRITER

Looking back, Wilma Parker Pickrell wouldn’t change a thing. Pickrell and other alumni came back to Chico on Friday for the Golden Grad Reunion and celebration of the class of 1961 in the Bell Memorial Union. During the Golden Grad Reunion, Pickrell, a class of 1961 graduate and a speaker at the graduation ceremony, recalled the sweet memories of her college days at Chico State and the lifelong friends she’s gained over the years. Golden Grads are alumni who graduated at least 50 years ago, and the reunion includes a time capsule ceremony. Although

the Golden Grad reunions were held during Pioneer Week in years past, this is the second year the event has been part of the Chico Experience Week, said Shari Maurseth, coordinator of alumni engagement. Next year will mark Chico State’s 125th anniversary, and the reunion is planned to be much larger, Maurseth said. The time capsule ceremony was facilitated by Richard Ellison, vice president for University Advancement, who reminisced with the audience, chuckling over “Mister Ed” and swooning over “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” Ellison asked Pickrell to first share some items she brought before revealing the items hidden in the time capsule. Pickrell brought a 1961 copy of

the student newspaper, which was called The Wildcat at the time. Ellison then asked Anthony Edler, a Phi Kappa Tau alumnus, to take part in the time capsule’s unveiling. The items included a yearbook and the May 25, 1961, edition of The Wildcat. There was also a baccalaureate service pamphlet dated Friday, June 9, 1961, with a 1961 penny taped to it, as well as the signatures of graduating seniors who were at least 40 years old in 1961. There were nine or 10 signatures, Ellison said. Edler’s fraternity brother and now published author Michael Oliver was also in attendance. Oliver’s first book, “Through the Headlights: An >> please see GRADUATES| D5

You knew everybody’s face and they were all your friends.

WILMA PARKER PICKRELL 1961 Graduate

BLAST FROM THE PAST Uncovering of the 1961 time capsule in front of Kendall Hall.

March 11 Barbie gets a boyfriend when the Ken doll is introduced source: Golden Grad Reunion Memory book Chico State Alumni Association

PHOTOS COURTESY OF • SUSAN ANDERSON

ENVY dance team undergoes changes in management, style Christina Rafael CONTRIBUTING WRITER

With the lingo of a professional, Paul Manansala, a freshman chemistry major, choreographs routines for the Envy Hip-Hop Dance Club at Chico State. Although Manansala is new to the team, he has three years of experience in break dancing, hiphop and studio dancing. As the dancers try to keep up, Manansala tells them to stay focused as he continues teaching an eight-count again and again, until everyone has it memorized. The dancers, who practice two days a week, perform anywhere they can, including basketball games, events on campus and at local eateries. Envy has been an active dance club for six years and has undergone many changes through the years. Most notably, leadership changes affect the dance style and work ethic of each

semester’s team. Last semester Envy was run by senior Talia Callari, a health science major. Callari took a semester off the team this fall to study abroad in Italy, leaving the responsibility to co-captains Sara Kronenberg, a senior anthropology major, and Raechelle Villarreal, a senior psychology major. Before then Envy had continuous leadership for three semesters. With few returning dancers, the members remained optimistic during the semester’s tryouts, which garnered 30 applicants, Kronenberg said. Those applicants were whittled down to a team of 14 with various dance backgrounds. The team typically loses a few members during the course of the semester, Kronenberg said. But this year, the team remains intact and united, making things more close-knit. “I definitely think that we’ve

made a name for ourselves in the past two years,” she said. Kronenberg credits the new choreographer, Manansala, for the change. Prior to the new recruits, the team’s dance style consisted of loose hip-hop and freestyle movements. With Manansala’s direction, Envy has begun to incorporate more ground work and stiff pop and lock moves. Despite the serious changes and concentration it takes for the dancers to grasp the challenging moves, they stay friendly and often joke at practice. Rocio Ramirez, a sophomore health science major, joined the team this semester with her boyfriend, Manansala. “Paul likes to drop his pants in the middle of practice,” Ramirez said. Others are quick to add to the list of practical jokes as Manansala sits quietly with

FASHION >> Men in plaid

Compiled by Chelsea Beights

DICTIONARY

TRDMC

[t • r

• d • m • c]

Acronym for “tears running down my cheeks.” Used when someone messages you something so funny that it makes you cry. “Carly: I had to leave the party after clogging the toilet. Chris: TRDMC” source: urbandicionary.com

“shek-o” “My cousin bought me this shirt, because she said I needed to attempt to be

“This was the first

“I’m from Los Ange-

thing I found in

les and people

my closet that

wear a lot of plaid

looked comfy and

down there, so

perfect for this

I’m just used to it

weather.”

being part of my wardrobe.”

fashionable. I guess it’s working.”

Albert Guidice

junior | civil engineering

D

Ricky Grossmann

senior | sustainable manufacturing

Ryan Hall

freshman | biology


features WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19 , 2011

class of

SEX COLUMN D2 WORD OF MOUTH D2 LOOKING BACK D3 FOOD COLUMN D4 THE NEBULA D5

Students participate in autism awareness programs. Story D5

golden

features all week at theorion.co

Ally Dukk

F E AT U R E S E D

‘61 GRADS

The Ally Way

Christina Rafael can be reached at

Ally Dukkers can be reached at

editorinchief@theorion.com

featureseditor@theorion.com

OT

OS

BY

•A

AR

ON

DR

AP

ER

a smile. The team is currently practicing for multicultural night, which will be held Nov. 14 on campus, Kronenberg said. Envy often gets calls from school entities and teams for performance requests. The dancers rely on word-ofmouth to promote Envy and are often present on campus. They participated at Wrectacular earlier in the semester. The team wants to compete and increase its membership in future years, Kronenberg said. With members having backgrounds in everything from Mexican folk dancing to cheerleading, Envy brings a new kind of dance to the stage — one that has attracted more than 175 likes on the team’s Facebook page. If people don’t notice the team now, they will, Kronenberg said.

Occupy change Growing up my parent took to the streets to prot against the government on issues like war and th death penalty. When I was 10 years o my mom told me I wasn’ allowed to cut my hair. I drew up signs saying, “It my hair, you shouldn’t ca and began to picket in ou kitchen thinking this wa the means to get my way and to stand up for what believed in. My parents grew up in the ’60s, a decade of protests and social revolution. This freedo of speech belief taught at an early age that if y want to make a change you have to speak up a express your opinions. What started as a sma protest known as the Occ Wall Street movement in New York has grown into massive demonstration t ing place in 70 major citi according to The Guardia It has led to worldwi rallies and even a prot in Chico. The goal of the protest to bring nationwide atten tion to the economic gap that keeps growing and continues to divide the r from the poor, and to pu wealthy lobbyists fundin representatives in Washi ton under scrutiny. Thes protests target the top 1 p cent of wealthy America and demand a change. The demonstrations h started to make an impac on our country, as Presid Barack Obama has begu to propose laws that brin money to the remaining 99 percent of the popula tion with acts such as the “Buffett Rule.” This law w named after millionaire investor Warren Buffett and would make it so all Americans who earn mo than $1 million per year a higher income tax than remainder of the country The purpose of a pro is to make a statement get attention to influen change. Some may argue that protests serve no purpos and are more of a hassle than good. I don’t believ it’s a hassle, because wh a crowd comes together, message is so strong that people can’t ignore it. There are many thing you can do to influence change and support dem racy. Organize a rally lik the bike rally against th parking structure held l month or write a letter to the government. Many of the protesters the Occupy demonstratio are young citizens trying to push change. This is important to my generat because we are the ones will be affected by the la of jobs and poor econom This is our ’60s movem to stop economic inequa ity, corporate greed and influence wealthy people have on our government It’s important to stand for what you believe in. I a big enough statement i made, change will be ma

RE W ilm W TUR sp I N ea P a Pa LDC ING A k r Gr the s ick ke T d as ad Go uri rell r sh Reu ld ng wh The a e h nio en ic W co ol n st na h w ild py o ds ud m a ca f en e o s t t, t f h in pa the e 19 pe 61 r .

PH

W GO ilm LD cl Pi a P EN G as ck a IR r L lo ok gr s of rell ker ad 19 , a s a th u 6 sh fro yea rou ate 1 , r Ch e at m w bo gh ic te he ok o nd n St e at d e.

in

1961: Minimum wage $1.15/hour Cost of new car $2,849 Popular Films “The Parent Trap” “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” “The Hustler” Estimated world population 4 billion March 1 President John F. Kennedy establishes the Peace Corps March 9 First animal returns from space, a dog named Blackie aboard Sputnik 9

Time capsule opened after 50 years Katherine Deaton STAFF WRITER

Looking back, Wilma Parker Pickrell wouldn’t change a thing. Pickrell and other alumni came back to Chico on Friday for the Golden Grad Reunion and celebration of the class of 1961 in the Bell Memorial Union. During the Golden Grad Reunion, Pickrell, a class of 1961 graduate and a speaker at the graduation ceremony, recalled the sweet memories of her college days at Chico State and the lifelong friends she’s gained over the years. Golden Grads are alumni who graduated at least 50 years ago, and the reunion includes a time capsule ceremony. Although

the Golden Grad reunions were held during Pioneer Week in years past, this is the second year the event has been part of the Chico Experience Week, said Shari Maurseth, coordinator of alumni engagement. Next year will mark Chico State’s 125th anniversary, and the reunion is planned to be much larger, Maurseth said. The time capsule ceremony was facilitated by Richard Ellison, vice president for University Advancement, who reminisced with the audience, chuckling over “Mister Ed” and swooning over “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” Ellison asked Pickrell to first share some items she brought before revealing the items hidden in the time capsule. Pickrell brought a 1961 copy of

the student newspaper, which was called The Wildcat at the time. Ellison then asked Anthony Edler, a Phi Kappa Tau alumnus, to take part in the time capsule’s unveiling. The items included a yearbook and the May 25, 1961, edition of The Wildcat. There was also a baccalaureate service pamphlet dated Friday, June 9, 1961, with a 1961 penny taped to it, as well as the signatures of graduating seniors who were at least 40 years old in 1961. There were nine or 10 signatures, Ellison said. Edler’s fraternity brother and now published author Michael Oliver was also in attendance. Oliver’s first book, “Through the Headlights: An >> please see GRADUATES| D5

You knew everybody’s face and they were all your friends.

WILMA PARKER PICKRELL 1961 Graduate

BLAST FROM THE PAST Uncovering of the 1961 time capsule in front of Kendall Hall.

March 11 Barbie gets a boyfriend when the Ken doll is introduced source: Golden Grad Reunion Memory book Chico State Alumni Association

PHOTOS COURTESY OF • SUSAN ANDERSON

ENVY dance team undergoes changes in management, style Christina Rafael CONTRIBUTING WRITER

With the lingo of a professional, Paul Manansala, a freshman chemistry major, choreographs routines for the Envy Hip-Hop Dance Club at Chico State. Although Manansala is new to the team, he has three years of experience in break dancing, hiphop and studio dancing. As the dancers try to keep up, Manansala tells them to stay focused as he continues teaching an eight-count again and again, until everyone has it memorized. The dancers, who practice two days a week, perform anywhere they can, including basketball games, events on campus and at local eateries. Envy has been an active dance club for six years and has undergone many changes through the years. Most notably, leadership changes affect the dance style and work ethic of each

semester’s team. Last semester Envy was run by senior Talia Callari, a health science major. Callari took a semester off the team this fall to study abroad in Italy, leaving the responsibility to co-captains Sara Kronenberg, a senior anthropology major, and Raechelle Villarreal, a senior psychology major. Before then Envy had continuous leadership for three semesters. With few returning dancers, the members remained optimistic during the semester’s tryouts, which garnered 30 applicants, Kronenberg said. Those applicants were whittled down to a team of 14 with various dance backgrounds. The team typically loses a few members during the course of the semester, Kronenberg said. But this year, the team remains intact and united, making things more close-knit. “I definitely think that we’ve

made a name for ourselves in the past two years,” she said. Kronenberg credits the new choreographer, Manansala, for the change. Prior to the new recruits, the team’s dance style consisted of loose hip-hop and freestyle movements. With Manansala’s direction, Envy has begun to incorporate more ground work and stiff pop and lock moves. Despite the serious changes and concentration it takes for the dancers to grasp the challenging moves, they stay friendly and often joke at practice. Rocio Ramirez, a sophomore health science major, joined the team this semester with her boyfriend, Manansala. “Paul likes to drop his pants in the middle of practice,” Ramirez said. Others are quick to add to the list of practical jokes as Manansala sits quietly with

FASHION >> Men in plaid

Compiled by Chelsea Beigh

DICTIONARY

TRDMC

[t • r

• d • m • c]

Acronym for “tears running down my cheeks.” Used when someone messages you something so funny that it makes you cry. “Carly: I had to leave the party after clogging the toilet. Chris: TRDMC”

“shek-o” “My cousin bought me this shirt, because she said I needed to attempt to be

“This was the first

“I’m from Los Ange-

thing I found in

les and people

my closet that

wear a lot of plaid

looked comfy and

down there, so

perfect for this

I’m just used to it

weather.”

being part of my wardrobe.”

fashionable. I guess it’s working.”

Albert Guidice

junior | civil engineering

D

Ricky Grossmann

senior | sustainable manufacturing

Ryan Hall

freshman | biology


D

features all week @ theorion.com

LOOKING BACK >>

c. 1975

c. 1980

kers

DITOR

c. 1980

ts test

he

t’s care” ur as y tI

om t me you e, and . all cupy n oa takies, an. ide test

t is np

ich ut the ng ingse perans

have act dent un ng

ahe was

l ore pay n the y. otest t and nce

se

ve hen , the at

c. 1981

WEDNESDAY, OCT.19, 2011 |

2004 | Bathroom graffiti still leaving its imprint THEN

om

old, ’t

FEATURES

“Bathroom writings draw complaints” vol. 53 issue 9, Oct. 20, 2004 In 2004, jokes, artwork and messages adorned bathroom stalls on campus, costing an estimated $40 an hour and $280 dollars per week for cleanup. Graffiti in bathrooms made extra work for custodians and cost the university money. What cleaning chemicals couldn’t remove had to be covered up by painters. On top of drawings and writings, gang messages were found by Facilities Management and Services employees. The messages were reported for pictures and documentation to University Police, who kept all gang-related graffiti in a scrapbook. University Police

Sgt. Robyn Hearne discussed how the graffiti cost money and was a destruction of state property. “We all have to pay for it,” she said. Unlike other campuses, Chico State did not offer an outlet to avoid vandalism. Somer Flaherty, a San Francisco State student, said the humanities building bathrooms had chalkboards. While political opinions and love stories were told, disrespectful messages and business advertisements also made their way onto the boards, she said. With funny, interesting and even thoughtful messages written in Chico State’s bathrooms, there are also the vulgar and obscene at a cost to the university and ultimately, to the students. LAVATORY CONFESSIONS Graffitti marks up the stalls of the bathrooms in Meriam Library.

c. 1983

c. 1985

PHOTO BY • ORION STAFF

c. 1986

c. 1988

c. 1988

c. 1995

NOW “This too shall pass … ” can be seen in Taylor Hall’s first floor women’s bathroom showing how graffiti continues to plague Chico State’s bathrooms on campus. Removal costs the university money and personally affects custodians who take pride in keeping the campus clean. Custodians have specific work areas and take offense when their building’s bathrooms are defaced, said Steve Lininger, Facilities Management and Services night custodial shift manager. “It’s like a slap in the face to them,” Lininger said. A wrinkle-finish paint has been used recently and has had better results in warding off graffiti. Spray cans and sharpies are the main utensils used, but almost anything that can be put on walls, including human waste, has been

seen, said Dennis Jones, co-manager of the night custodial shift. Hate crime-related messages and gang-related tags are found and photographed to be kept in an updated computer database by University Police. Artwork and messages written on walls may be appealing to the person bored in a bathroom who wrote, “The wise and meek write on bathroom stalls, the daring and brave choose the walls.” But the vandalism is a state of California offense and an expense to remove, Jones said. University students should have the common sense and maturity to avoid such behavior, he said. -Compiled by Stephanie Geske

D3

Campus Spotlight: Student starts clothing line to sell at Trucker THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

Fight the Stereotype is a local clothing brand created in 2010 by Dan Orloff, a senior marketing major. The clothing is created with a heat press and decals ordered online that can be a blend of images and colors. Fight the Stereotype clothing is sold at Trucker downtown, as well as online at www.ftsthreads.com. The Orion: Where did the idea to start a clothing line come from? Orloff: I was influenced by the clothing in the marketplace today. It all takes time and stuff. I was actually going to go to LRG, and I wanted to work for them but then they were kind of like, maybe you could start in the factory or something, and it kind of inspired me to start on my own and see what happens. The Orion: How did you start making the clothes and cover the fi nancial aspect? Orloff: The fi rst thing I did was a shirt in high school with a steam press. I had to make a shirt for a senior project, and then I had the resources to make the shirt from the guy who helped me. Money-wise starting up, I fi refight during the summer so I pulled a few grand and started it up that way. The Orion: How did you get the word out? Orloff: Mostly through Facebook and some people I met I’d give out free shirts or tell them about it. It was kind of random at fi rst, just handing them stickers and stuff for promotion.

STYLIN’ THREADS Creator of Fight the Stereotype Dan Orloff, a senior marketing major, now sells his clothing at Trucker. The Orion: How did Trucker end up buying your clothes? Orloff: At first when I started making the shirts, I had one shirt with five different color schemes, and I gave them a pitch, like “I have a clothing company in Chico, I do all my work in Chico. Is there any way to work out a consignment or anything like that?” At first he didn’t want to, because he wanted more variety and on the third time, he put it out there. The Orion: What future plans do you have for yourself? Orloff: I want to actually do this full time and expand it to different colleges and develop different connections and be in bigger retail stores, like Zumiez or PacSun. Maybe my own little store downtown of a big town. The Orion: Do you feel like Chico has helped you in your business? Orloff: Oh, yeah, for sure, definitely. Just because I feel like Chico is perfect, because everyone gets along with everyone. It’s easy to relate to the clothing through that, and it’s a college town, so everyone knows everyone and the word can get around faster. So, it helps in both of those situations. -Compiled by Stephanie Geske

Excuse me America, this is tissue.

gs

mocke he last o

s in ons g

tion, who ack my. ment althe e t. d up If is ade.

t

m

hts

This is not.

In fact, an unborn baby’s heart begins to beat at 18 days. At 40 days she has measurable brain waves. An unborn baby shouldn’t be thrown away like a piece of tissue.

pregnant? need help? you have options: www.pregnancycenters.org | 800.395.help

interested in the pro-life movement? visit www.liveaction.org Authorized by National Right to Life


D4 |

features all week @ theorion.com

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

Taylor Western FOOD COLUMNIST

Many people just see the coffee maker as a way to make an instant beverage to boost energy when they’re too broke to afford Starbucks. You may be shocked to know that you can also use your coffee pot to cook a filling meal. For this week’s recipe, I wanted to show students a few fun ways to make delicious recipes while using only a simple coffee maker. I’ve really gotten into the habit of going to the Chico Farmers Market at 11 a.m. on Saturday mornings, because this is when my favorite stand offers a deal in which they will fill a bag of vegetables for $5 and then drop the price as time goes on. I recommend doing this whenever you can, because this can provide fresh produce that will

Coffee pot cooking: Thai noodle salad, coffee float dessert last several meals. Ever since I started doing this I have been making recipes that contain a lot of vegetables. When a friend wanted me to do coffee pot recipe this week, I decided to do a Thai noodle salad because of the many vegetables required. I also thought that it would be a good way for students to still have a healthy meal even if they are living in the dorms or in an apartment with an ill-equipped kitchen. You don’t have to buy all the vegetables that I used, since it may be cheaper to use others that you already have instead. Although $3.98 might seem pretty pricy for

stir-fry veggies, it’s actually a great deal, because it contains all that you really need for this recipe and you’ll most likely use only half of the two-pound bag. Don’t freak out if you didn’t have time to make it to the Chico Farmers Market and couldn’t get peanuts, cucumber or a bell pepper. You can easily use just the bag of stir-fry vegetables and the recipe will be just fine. This was the big reason why I wanted to do a salad, because it is a flexible recipe in which students can substitute different ingredients. If you have a meat other than chicken such as pork, beef, shrimp or even tofu,

don’t be afraid to use that instead. This is one of my absolute favorite things about cooking, because unlike baking, you don’t have to follow the recipe exactly and you have the ability to experiment. I also included a great dessert or drink that serves as a reminder that the holiday season is just around the corner. This dessert can be made in a coffee maker as well. I highly recommend the coffee float recipe for the students struggling to stay awake studying for midterms and in need of an energy boost that is cheaper than Starbucks and tastes better than any energy drink.

What to do with remaining stirfry veggies: While this week’s theme involves a coffee pot, I thought I should provide a stir-fry recipe, because I had a lot of vegetables left over. I recommend drizzling olive oil at the bottom of the pan to saute garlic and onion. Add remainder of your stir-fry vegetables, a chili pepper and any others you have. Add rice wine vinegar, hoisin sauce, soy sauce and orange juice if you have it. Taylor Western can be reached at foodcolumnist@theorion.com

COFFEE POT THAI NOODLE SALAD

30 minutes

serves 8

Ingredients

Directions

4 packages of original ramen noodles, 26 cents each WinCo 1 cup creamy peanut butter, $2.05 Big Lots or $1 Dollar Tree 1/2 bag stir-fry mix, $3.98 WinCo 1 chili pepper, 3 cents WinCo or the fill-a-bag deal at the Chico Farmers Market 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce (or to preference), $1.50 Big Lots 4 tablespoons honey (or to preference), $1 Dollar Tree 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar, $1.88 WinCo 4 tablespoons soy sauce (or to preference), $1.61 WinCo 4 tablespoons vegetable oil or other substitute oil, $1.38 Big Lots 1/2 pound precooked chicken (optional), $3.12 WinCo 1 carrot, $1 Chico Farmers Market 1 onion, $1.38 for a whole bag WinCo 3 cloves garlic, 36 cents 2 tablespoons parsley, $1 or fill-a-bag deal Chico Farmers Market 1 cucumber, based per pound WinCo 1 bell pepper, 3 for $1 or fill-a-bag deal Chico Farmers Market 1/4 cup peanuts, $1.20 Big Lots

Add the maximum amount of water that your coffee pot can hold. Turn off coffee maker and allow water to heat up. Add noodles. Meanwhile, chop up cucumber, bell pepper, onion, garlic, chili pepper and parsley. Place in bowl and set a side. Place peanut butter in bowl. Add vinegar, honey, soy sauce and one package of ramen seasoning. Beat peanut butter until smooth. Add soy sauce, hoisin sauce, honey and vinegar until you get the flavor you want. Add noodles to veggies and peanuts. Toss in peanut sauce. THE ORION • LARRY POCINO

COFFEE POT SALAD Thai noodle salad can be made in a coffee pot in 30 minutes.

PEPPERMINT COFFEE FLOAT

10 minutes

DRINK DESSERT Peppermint coffee float combines ice cream, hot chocolate mix, milk, coffee beans, chocolate syrup and whipped cream.

serves 1

Ingredients

Directions

2 scoops peppermint ice cream, $4.48 WinCo You can also experiment with other ice cream flavors you might already have in your freezer such as coffee, mint chip, vanilla, chocolate or even cookie dough. 1 cup coffee, based per pound WinCo 1 individual package of mint hot chocolate mix, 43 cents WinCo Splash of milk (or to preference), varies depending on milk preference 1/2 teaspoon crushed chocolate-covered coffee beans, based per pound WinCo 1/2 tablespoon chocolate syrup, $1.10 Big Lots Whipped cream or whipped topping (optional), $1 WinCo

Prepare coffee as usual in coffee maker. As coffee is made, chop up chocolatecovered espresso beans. Drizzle chocolate sauce in a tall glass. Once coffee is ready, pour into glass and top with two scoops of peppermint ice cream. Top with whipped cream if using and sprinkle with espresso beans. Drizzle with chocolate syrup. RECOMMENDATION: Although this drink is amazing, I recommend not drinking late at night unless you’re trying to stay up to finish a paper. In that case, it’s perfect because of the caffeine. THE ORION • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

Multicultural event encourages community cohesion Students in Song’s sociology class presented projects at the festival on social justice issues concerning people locally More than 100 people attended the third and around the globe. “My students talked about what they annual Multicultural Community Collaboration Festival hosted by local and student learned in class and personally and organizations at Selvester’s Cafe-by-the- presented their own solutions to those situations,” she said. Creek on Thursday. Jessica Beckford, a senior social From noon to 5 p.m. guests were work major, helped at the festiserved ethnic foods sponsored val by greeting and giving name by local businesses and learned tags and raffle tickets to guests, about the values and issues of she said. different cultures, presented by Song called her a week before students and the organizations. It’s about the festival, knowing of her There was also a raffle in which guests won gift cards, shirts and unity and involvement with The Prayer supporting House, also present at the festihats from businesses. Controversial issues such as everyone, val, Beckford said. “It’s important to get involved child slavery, sex trafficking and not to be with the community,” Beckford transgendered people among difdivided. said. “It’s about unity and supportferent cultures were discussed, ing everyone, not to be divided.” said Kui-Hee Song, associate The festival had a large impact professor in the department of with the community being social work and coordinator of the festival. JESSICA BECKFORD involved, Song said. senior social work “It’s not my individual project, The goal of the festival was major and people that help with the same to enhance interconnectivity mindset make this festival possiamong ethnic minority commuble,” she said. “We all contribute. We all nities, she said. Strengthening minority partnerships want unity.” Brittany Turner, a senior psychology and leaderships of these communities is a major part of the festival, Song said. major, attended the festival and enjoyed the joining of local and student communiIncreasing awareness is important. Love Chapman Town, a community ties, she said. Turner appreciated that not only Chico group, partnered with Sipho’s Restaurant and Cafe, who brought jerk chicken, rice State but also the community was trying to create cultural awareness, she said. It and peas, Song said. The Chapman group deals with con- shows that they care and are concerned cerns and issues surrounding the area, with the issues different cultures face. she said. They want to make an impact by uplifting the community and offering ser- Tasha Clark can be reached at vices that residents may need. tclark@theorion.com

MULTICULTURAL EVENT [left to right] Kirsten Melin, Lexi Lardner, Jordan Navratiland, senior child development majors, and Ariel Aizenstadt, a senior mass communication design major, speak at the Multicultural Festival.

Tasha Clark STAFF WRITER

“ “

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO


features all week @ theorion.com

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011 |

D5

GRADUATES: Alumni return, notice changes

PLAY TIME Nine-yearold Zachery Williams plays on a swing during the adapted P.E. program at the Sensory and Motor Autism Clinic.

continued from D1

THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

Organization to increase autism awareness Stephanie Geske STAFF WRITER

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects the brain’s development of social and communication skills. It is also a disability that affects one in 110 children in America, said Teri Todd, professor of kiniseology. This makes it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Because autism is such a fast-growing disability, it is important for people to know how to effectively work with children who have autism, Todd said. Certain practices are more effective, and it’s good for people to understand the core deficits of autism. There are resources on campus and around Chico that allow people to work with individuals diagnosed with autism. Autism Speaks, a national organization with college chapters, has also begun on campus, national program manager Sarah Caminker said. Autism Speaks aims to promote awareness, fundraising and advocacy efforts on college campuses through student ambassadors by setting up programs called Autism Speaks U, she said. The chapters at the college level makes it the only autism organization created and run by students. Students who start chapters fundraise, host events or become campus ambassadors, she said. Those who don’t have as much time to dedicate can become campus ambassadors, who recruit students to start events and an on-campus chapter. One student helping set up Chico State’s chapter of Autism Speaks is Kevin Schiffmacher, a junior anthropology major. “I want to build a bridge for the next generation of volunteers,” he said. A member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, he added that being a member of the

Greek system on campus gives him access $100,000 a year. to more than a 1,000 student work-force as There are on-campus opportunities to a resource. learn to work with children with autism Each IFC and Panhellenic fraternity and like the Interdisciplinary Autism Clinic sorority has provided the Chico chapter of class, Todd said. The kinesiology class Autism Speaks U with two volunteers to meets in Yolo Hall and attracts majors share information to students in front of such as child development, communicathe BMU, Schiff macher said. They hand tion disorders and recreation therapy. out fact sheets about the disorTo get involved without taking der to spread awareness about the a class, Little Red Hen is a Chico AUTISM FILM impacts autism has on the public. non-profit organization that There are plans to try and bring always accepts volunteers, said together the several independent FOCUS film Shannon Pope, the Children’s festival showgroups in the Chico community Programming Supervisor. cased films that work with people who have about disabiliLittle Red Hen is a Chico nonautism, he said. By using the ties including profit organization that serves Greek system as a resource there autism see C1 children and adults with developcould hopefully be an annual mental disabilities and is always event similar to Up ’til Dawn. accepting volunteers, Pope said. Autism Speaks was founded The program was started 15 years in 2005 by a couple who had a ago by an autistic boy’s mother, grandchild with autism, according to who wanted to bring the community its website. The organization has grown together and raise awareness for chilinto the nation’s largest autism science dren with disabilities. and advocacy organization and recently Lil’ Sprouts is an early intervention announced it gave nearly $1.8 million program for children ages 4 to 8 years in autism treatment study grants for 10 old with autism, according to their webresearch projects. site. They work one-on-one to develop No two children with autism are play skills, socialization, behavioral and alike, but there are some similar signs, communication skills. according to autismspeaks.org. Autism The first program created was a plant may be recognizable as early as one’s nursery that employed adults with distoddler years. abilities, which later expanded to include Autistic children have difficulty relat- programs like a gift shop, kitchen store ing to others and in some cases hardly and groups for children, teens, young speak. They usually don’t keep eye con- adults and adults, Pope said. tact and are prone to repetitive behaviors, Little Red Hen has a summer camp like certain movements or the repetition they call socialization training, she said. of the same phrase over and over again. It’s put on in Yolo Hall as a three-week Challenges for these children include program for autistic children. Volunteers the inability to read social cues, but par- can’t work in the children’s programs, ents of children with autism also have but there are paid positions within them new challenges, including the costs of that can be applied for. behavioral analysis therapy. The therapy teaches autistic children to speak or Stephanie Geske can be reached at perform simple tasks and can cost up to sgeske@theorion.com

nebula CROSSWORD CHALLENGE >>

CROSSWORD COURTESY OF BESTCROSSWORDS.COM

COMICS >>

UNDERSTANDWICH by Cody Sevedge

BEAR JAIL! by Devon McMindes

JANK HANK by Griffon Lyles

Across 1- Pillar 5- Wimp 9- Actress Anouk 14- “The Time Machine” race 15- Actor Estrada 16- Stylish 17- Denomination 18- New Orleans is The Big ___ 19- Feudal estate 20- Capital of Estonia 22- Divert 23- Facial expression used by Elvis Presley 24- Surmise 28- Crimson 34- Deficient in pigmentation 38- Coal scuttle 39- Consumer 40- Post 41- Christian festival 43- Don of talk radio 44- Russian fighter 47- Thespians 48- Magical incantation 51- Olds model 52- Extent 57- Israeli desert 61- Lee side 63- ___ there yet? 64- Monogram ltr. 66- Work like ___

67- Type of sanctum 68- The sacred scriptures of Hinduism 69- Travel on 70- Get to know 71- Farm females 72- 24 hour periods Down 1- Nuisances 2- New York city 3- Plinth 4- Name 5- “Pure Guava” band 6- Pertaining to a rare element 7- Bro’s counterpart 8- What’s up 9- Capital of Eritrea 10- Muslim elder and prayerleader 11- Hindu lawgiver 12- Archer of myth 13- French 101 verb 21- One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” 25- Slangy denial 26- To and ___ 27- Make beloved 29- Usual 30- Finely powdered earth 31- Analogy words 32- Not e’en once 33- Blows it 34- Capital city of Western Samoa

THE ANSWERS!

Find this week’s answers online at theorion.com under the features tab.

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION

THAT MONKEY TUNE by Michael A. Kandalaft

35- Leg or arm 36- Make indistinct 37- Ingrid’s “Casablanca” role 42- Without ___ in the world 45- Chemical ending 46- Needlefish 49- Bat abode 50- Fireball 53- Give merit 54- Gymnast Comaneci 55- Sleazy 56- Borders 57- Arrest 58- Fish-eating eagle 59- Actress Rowlands 60- Large jug or pitcher 62- Greek letters 64- “___ had it!” 65- Fresh

GUY WITH A PHONE by Larry Pocino

Auto-Biography,” reveals his life in the driver’s seat of all 34 cars he’s owned and will include Edler within the pages, he said. Oliver and his wife Barbara are also planning to co-author a book titled, “He Said, She Said,” in which the couple will travel to Paris and separately interpret the artwork they see in museums, Oliver said. The goal is to see how two different people will look at the same work of art and see two different things. “It’s going to be interesting,” Oliver said. The two have been married more than 30 years and met after Barbara earned her bachelor’s degree at Stanford University, she said. Robert Main, another Stanford University graduate with Chico State roots, was also in attendance. Main earned his master’s degree in communication studies at Stanford University and previously taught at Chico State for 35 years, he said. After serving as a military officer for 22 years, including two terms in the Pentagon as a speechwriter, Main retired and returned to school to become a professor. Once he earned his Ph.D. at University of Maryland, he was recruited to teach by Chico State’s George Arnovick in 1976, Main said. Main also developed an instructional technology program and served as the head of the budget committee at Chico State. Main is currently a peer leader for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Main has seen a lot of growth on Chico State’s campus, but the grads from 1961 knew an even smaller college community. There were only 3,000 students at that point, while there are now roughly 16,000, Ellison said. Despite the growth and change over the years, Chico State’s friendly atmosphere has remained. The same welcoming Chico environment that exists today was also intact for Pickrell and her classmates from 1961. “You could greet everybody you saw,” Pickrell said. “You knew everybody’s face, and they were all your friends.” Katherine Deaton can be reached at kdeaton@theorion.com


D6 |

features all week @ theorion.com

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19, 2011

;`[Xj_fik[i`m\_fd\]ifdk_\ YXijklie`ekfX;L@e`^_kdXi\6

DUI King ZXe_\cg

Dfi\k_Xe*,P\Xijf]<og\i`\eZ\ K_\;L@B`e^_Xj_\cg\[k_fljXe[jf]:_`ZfJkXk\jkl[\ekj aljkc`b\pflXmf`[cfe^aX`ck`d\j#Zfddle`kpj\im`Z\Xe[ \oki\d\Ôe\j%;L@B`e^_Xjk_\k`d\Xe[\og\i`\eZ\kf_\cg pflk_ifl^_pflic\^Xc`jjl\j%

=i\\@e]fidXk`fe

Af\ MXe;\imffik

>\f]] ;lc\Yf_e

(`eXccf]9lkk\Xe[ >c\eeZflek`\j

0%,iXk`e^fe8MMF%Zfd )`eXccf]9lkk\ :flekp

IXk\[('&('Yp8MMF%ZfdÇÈJlg\iYÉ

), Jkl[

;`jZ \ek f l ek DUI King 

N_Xkpfle\\[i\^Xi[`e^;L@#;DM#Zfej\hl\eZ\j# gifZ\[li\jXe[[\]\ej\jXe[n_Xkpfle\\[kf befnXYflkXkkfie\pj#Xe[n_ppflj_flc[efk i\gi\j\ekpflij\c]fi_Xm\XglYc`Z[\]\e[\i%

NXie`e^ @]pfli\Z\`m\X;L@#pfl]fi]\`kpflic`Z\ej\X]k\i('[Xpj%! !@]pflfipflicXnp\i[fefkXjbk_\;DM`eJXZiXd\ekf]fiX_\Xi`e^%

),JKL;<EK;@J:FLEK =I<<:FEJLCK8K@FE

DUI King

**'NXccJki\\k#Jl`k\('#:_`Zf#:80,0)/

,*'$*+)$)/,/ nnn%[l`b`e^%Zfd

:_\Zbflkk_\e\nn\Yj`k\kf[Xp ;L@:Xj\j ›D`j[\d\Xefi=\cfep;L@j ›;DM?\Xi`e^ $I\jki`Zk`fej $Jljg\ej`fej $I\mfZXk`fej ›;L@@ealip?fd`Z`[\:Xj\j ›@cc\^Xc;il^;L@ $D\k_Xdg_\kXd`e\ $DXi`alXeX $?XcclZ`ef^\ej ›Gi\jZi`gk`fe;il^j;L@ $8[lck&Alm\e`c\:Xj\j

8cc;il^:_Xi^\j ›=\cfe`\j $Gfjj\jj`fe $Gfjj\jj`fe]fiJXc\j $DXel]XZkli`e^;il^j $:lck`mXk`fe&KiXejgfikXk`fe ›D`j[\d\Xefij $Gfjj\jj`fe $Le[\ik_\@e]cl\eZ\ ›;L@;DM:Xj\j $I\Zbc\jj;i`m`e^ $D`efi`eGfjj\jj`fef] XcZf_fcfi[il^j

The Orion - Fall 2011, Issue 9  

Chico State's independent newspaper

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you