Page 5

5

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 9

News United Way’s annual campaign hits TRU Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

The local United Way fundraising campaign at TRU has seen professors get pies to the face – but it’s not over yet. From Oct. 20 to Nov. 2, students will be able to support the Thompson Nicola Cariboo United Way’s campaign by buying a cup of soup at the Culinary Arts cafeteria and going to the basketball game against the University of Northern B.C. Timberwolves Nov. 2. The campaign was launched Oct. 22. On Oct. 24, students could, for a fee, pay to shove a cream pie in the face of TRU professors and administration. On Oct. 25, students could talk to 13 local charities at a non-profit information fair in Old Main. “The main purpose of the United Way, first off, is to fundraise for local non-profits,” said United Way resource development staffer Geralyn Beaton. The United Way generally doesn’t provide front-line services. Instead, it distributes grants to organizations like the Kamloops Brain Injury Association and the Elizabeth Fry Society, which provides housing and legal support. Last year, the United Way’s campaign at the university raised $57,000 from students, faculty

and staff. Most of that came for voluntary payroll deductions, Beaton said. “All of the money that is raised during the campaign, which was almost $2 million (for the Kamloops Area) last year, all that money stays in the community,” she said. This year, the goal is $60,000. Beaton said she was pleased how the campaign has been doing so far. While students might not have a lot of money to donate, there are other ways to help the United Way. “I think that, obviously, they may not be in the position right now to donate, but at the same time there’s a lot of ways to get involved,” she said. “Participation, no matter how that actually looks, is the thing we are pushing the most and we’d love for people to get involved whether it is through donating, through volunteering, or just through supporting the organizations that are in the community.” One way to do just that can be found right on campus. “We actually have a youth club on campus that really provides volunteer and leadership opportunities for students to get involved with.” Those interested in donating or getting more involved can go to http://www.unitedwaytnc.ca or contact the youth club at youth@ unitedwaytnc.ca.

International Intonation

Computerized ski goggles, a really old language, and bomb sniffing mice Mark Hendricks Ω Contributor

New ski goggles will change the way you look at a mountain

Deciphering the oldest mystery in writing Crowd sourcing could be at the heart of understanding the oldest untranslated writing system in the world. The written language, known as proto-elamite, is 5,000 years old

system, which uses 76 separate photographic lights to record the tablets. The result from this process is an extremely clear digital image of the tablet that can be rotated and viewed from every angle. The images will be made publically available online with the intent of using the widespread academic audience to help crack this 5,000 year old code.

The new Air wave ski goggles by Oakley give you instant infor mation of the mountain and your r un via a built-in heads-up display (HUD). The Air wave goggles Where you can find out use what Oakley is callmore: www.bbc.co.uk ing “prism” technology to give you a wide range of Genetically modified infor mation that will show bomb detectors up in the bottom left-hand cor ner on a small screen. Laboratory mice are being The screen will look as genetically modified to be large as looking at a 14able to search out TNT-based inch screen at f ive feet. explosives. A built in wrist conScientists in New York troller will allow you to City have modified mice to manipulate the infor mahave a sense of smell that is tion you’re receiving. 500 times more susceptible to The screen will show you DNT, a closely-related chemia map of the mountain cal to TNT. The mice will along with the r uns on then have a microchip imit and the location of all planted under their skin that your friends cur rently on will wirelessly report back to the mountain. — IMAGE COURTESY CHRISTIAN FISCHER a computer. The goggles will also WIKIMEDIA COMMONS The idea of having mice contain infor mation on searching out explosives to your speed, both maxisave human lives is not new. mum and time for r uns, air time and height for jumps and belonged to a Middle Eastern A Belgian company has already and comparisons on all these society based in southwest Iran. trained giant African pouched Proto-elamite is believed to have rats to search out landmines. metrics to your previous r uns. The advantage these new mice The goggles also links to your been inspired by the Mesopotasmar tphone so you can manage mian language but the symbols bring is an inherent super-sensitivity to DNT, thanks to genetic your music and texts via the have all been changed. The key to unlocking this mys- modification. Combined with the wrist controller. The goggles go on sale Oct. tery is the new way in that these ease of breeding mice this could stone tablets, which the writing result in large quantities of easily 31. is on, are being photographed. trainable, tiny, bomb detectors. For a full breakdown go to: These tablets are being placed Where you can find out more: inside a device called the ref lecnews.cnet.com tance transformation imaging www.huffingtonpost.com

The BCLIP is an educational six-month opportunity for Canadian university graduates to work in British Columbia’s parliamentary system. Your academic training will be enhanced by exposure to public policy-making and the legislative process by working in the executive and legislative branches of the provincial government at the Parliament Buildings in Victoria.

Russell Currie, TRU’s dean of business and economics, prepares to shove more cream pies in Dennis Olson, associate dean of faculty, students and research, and Tony Bell, accounting professor.

B.C. residents are eligible to apply if they have received their first Bachelor’s Degree from a Canadian university within two years of the start date of the 2014 program.

—PHOTO BY SAMANTHA GARVEY

Puzzle of the Week #8 – The New Job Apply online at

Degree proudly in hand, you have just landed a job. There are two ways you can get paid. Plan A is that you start at $40,000 per year with raises of $4,000 per year every year. Plan B is that you start at $40,000 per year with raises of $2,000 per year every six months. Does it matter which plan you select? If so, which is the better deal for you? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

www.leg.bc.ca/bclip Deadline

2014 PROGRAM DIRECTOR Karen L. Aitken Legislative Assembly of B.C. BCLIP@leg.bc.ca ACADEMIC DIRECTOR Dr. Patrick J. Smith Simon Fraser University psmith@sfu.ca

January 31, 2013 Location: Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Term: January 6 to June 27, 2014 Remuneration: $21,997 for six months

October 31, 2012  

The October 31, 2012 edition of The Omega

October 31, 2012  

The October 31, 2012 edition of The Omega

Advertisement