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Author pens wartime novels ... 3 |

NYGH opens new stroke unit

fri oct 19, 2012

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Century celebration

New roving team able to assess, treat patients faster LISA QUEEN lqueen@insidetoronto.com When North York resident Robert Ong felt sick earlier this month, he took a taxi to the emergency department of North York General Hospital. It turns out he was having a stroke. Thanks to the hospital’s new stroke unit and mobile stroke team, the 67-yearold is recuperating well in hospital. “I’ve been taken care of at this hospital,” Ong said. On Wednesday, the hospital announced its newly designated neurology and stroke unit on the fourth floor,

It also unveiled the new stroke assessment and treatment team (SATT), although, luckily for Ong, the team had been operating under a pilot project when he arrived at the emergency department. SATT is a multi-disciplinary roving team that can assess and treat stroke patients anywhere in the hospital such as the emergency room or another in-patient floor, said Wendy Cote, clinical team manager of the neurologystroke program. “What’s great about the SATT is that it comes to you,” she said. “Having a SATT means stroke patients are assessed >>>It’s, page 6

Staff photo/Nick perry

100 reasons to celebrate: Maria Internicola celebrates in advance of her 100th birthday during a party in her honour at Villa Colombo Wednesday afternoon. Internicola’s birthday is Sunday.

Getting culture on the radar in North York FANNIE SUNSHINE fsunshine@insidetoronto.com

Clinical nurse educator Tina Fernandes-Chopra, left, and nurse Sheryl Mathurin set up stroke patient Robert Ong with a Holter monitor on Wednesday at North York General Hospital’s newly designated neurology and stroke unit and stroke assessment and treatment team (SATT).

The problem isn’t finding space or generating interest from the artistic community to host events; it’s getting word out that culture exists outside of downtown and drawing people to arts events north of Bloor Street. That was the sentiment expressed by many who

attended a public consultation meeting looking into affordable and sustainable cultural spaces for not-for-profit and community groups in Ward 23 at North York Civic Centre last Thursday. “Large cultural events stop at Bloor Street or Yonge and Eglinton,” said Christine Harris, chair of the advisory committee of North York Arts. “In this area, people often

don’t know what’s happening here.” The consultant, Lord Cultural Resources, and the city are compiling a list of what’s currently available space-wise in the ward and what residents would like to see. This will help local councillors focus on where priorities are when it comes to Section 37 benefits. According to the City of

Toronto, Section 37 of the Planning Act permits the city to authorize increases in permitted height and/or density through the zoning bylaw in return for community benefits, provided there are related Official Plan policies in place. Harris, who has sat on the board of directors for Scarborough Arts, said not >>>there, page 2

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NORTH YORK MIRROR | Friday, October 19, 2012 |

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Community

‘There is no physical sense of centre in the community’ >>>from page 1 only did the average resident not know about arts-based events, they weren’t even aware of the organization. “One of the challenges is the connection with the general public,” she said. “The key thing is partnerships.” Marie Boal, museum co-ordinator at Gibson House Museum, said one of the problems the museum faces is visibility – or lack thereof – at the

Yonge Street and Park Home Avenue corner. “We are not visible,” she said. People also tend to think of heritage spaces as dusty and worn down, whereas Gibson House houses a theatre and art exhibits, she said. “Traditionally, people look downtown for the arts,” Boal said, adding a lot of the museum’s visitors reside north of Toronto. Boal noted Mel Lastman Square draws large crowds when commu-

nity and arts events are held at the Yonge Street and Sheppard Avenue site, but it isn’t seen as a traditional community gathering spot. “There is no physical sense of centre in the community,” she said. But Harris disagreed, noting if something was going to engage the community in events, it would likely be there because of foot traffic volume. It was also suggested culture

could be housed in lobbies of corporations in the form of sculptures or exhibits, giving those passing through something to look at. “City culture is Bloor Street and south,” Harris said. “I’m not interested in going into the core.” Councillor John Filion, who didn’t attend the meeting, told The Mirror there are several arts-related projects in the works for his ward, but plans aren’t ready to be announced. He credited the Cultura Festival,

which celebrated food, art, music and film at Mel Lastman Square Friday nights throughout the summer, with bringing people out to the space. “The square is much better used now than it used to be,” he said, citing Edithvale Community Centre as the best example of Section 37 benefits in his ward. Those who wish to comment can visit www.toronto.ca/culture/ cultural-spaces.htm

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Community

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Resident pens Italian wartime novel series Giancarlo Gabbrielli happy his story is out there FANNIE SUNSHINE fsunshine@insidetoronto.com

G

iancarlo Gabbrielli was just a young boy living in Florence, Italy during the rise of fascism in the Second World War, but he clearly recalls the daily bombings, house searches by the SS police and radically doctored way of life under leader Benito Mussolini. “In war, the character of people are magnified,” said the Bayview Avenue and York Mills Road resident. “A coward becomes even more of a coward, and the courageous become a hero.” An accomplished painter, sculptor and businessman, Gabbrielli wanted to share his story of growing up in fascist Italy, witnessing first hand acts of violence at the German occupied zone near the Arno River. With an abundance of material, the 75-year-old has easily filled three books chronicling his early years, with a fourth in the works. Published in 2010, The Lanzis: The Boundless Shades of Life, tells the tale of a family that moves from north of Venice to the Tuscan countryside following the First World War and the horrors of the Second World War. The book chronicles a proud family resisting the pressures of an autocratic regime. Published in Italian in 2011 and English in September 2012, Lanzis II: The Age of Consciousness follows the family as they deal with relationships, love, unforeseen circumstances and daily events. The third installment, I Lanzis III: Dreams and Illusions, follows the life of Roberto Lanzis, the

Staff photo/Irvin Mintz

Giancarlo Gabbrielli, pictured in his North York home, is an author as well as artist and businessman.

youngest member of the family, as he quits school to help support his family by working in a tannery before joining the Italian Army and travelling to the United States for training. The book, which was released in Italian in 2011 and is currently being translated, explores his life as a soldier and the experiences that follow, including finding love. The fourth book is being penned and will focus on Roberto’s arrival to the United States. “To a large extent (the books are) autobiographical,” said Gabbrielli, who based Roberto on himself. “I was very young as a child in the war. The family his-

tory was repeated often. I felt our story needed to be heard.” Gabbrielli said he wanted to share his family’s story because he believes their experiences are unique. “Compared to other people, I lived through times and events that were quite unusual,” he said. “My grandmother came from where the Great War was fought and she hated Germans. My mother had a more balanced point of view. She understood the Germans were also suffering. They were human beings, just under different disciplines. You talk about men who suffer from the war, but the Italians were firing into our house. My

father was on the African front. My mother had to look after me and we were bombed every day. The SS would knock on our door and ask if were hiding anyone. My father didn’t know what happened to us.” His father, Ricardo, was considered a socialist and worked with distilleries as a chemical engineer. A soldier, Ricardo trained in several European countries and refused to be brainwashed into a fascist way of thinking, Gabbrielli said. He recalled a time when Mussolini needed distilleries to be built to show Adolf Hitler Italy had modern developments and

high-ranking political officials paid a visit to Ricardo at home to ask if he would build them. “He said he didn’t want anything to do with politics, he was doing what he thought was necessary for the distillery,” Gabbrielli said, showing a picture of his father with Mussolini. Following in his father’s military boots, Gabbrielli joined the Italian Air Force at age 20 and was sent to the States to take missile courses. He eventually left the Air Force and opened an electronics shop in Italy. With thoughts of leaving his country, a friend suggested he try to emigrate to Canada. “The consul in Rome asked me where I wanted to go and I said, ‘Where there are no Italians,’” Gabbrielli said. “I was leaving Italy for political reasons and I wanted to learn about a new country.” He ended up settling in Winnipeg for 25 years, working for an aerospace company. Growing unhappy with his work, he and his wife, Lella, opened a giftware shop. It was then Gabbrielli discovered his artistic talent. While looking at ornaments at Sears and noting they were made in California, Gabbrielli questioned out loud why someone couldn’t create them in Canada. The store’s manager asked if he could do it. Next thing Gabbrielli knew, he bought a torch and his sculpting career was born. He eventually opened stores in Calgary and Regina before they closed in 1989. He then moved to Toronto and started up Chair Tech Inc., which he ran until it was sold several years ago. Gabbrielli currently has business interests in China, he said. “In the meantime, I have time to write,” he said. “I’m not doing this for the money. I’m just happy my story is out there.”

Small Business Week launched in North York LISA QUEEN lqueen@insidetoronto.com

When the late Gino Mellozzi started his North York family business during the middle of a recession almost 20 years ago, some people who wondered if he was investing in a pipe dream destined to fail. Today, Mellow Walk is a thriving company with about 50 employees that manufactures safety shoes on Milford Avenue near Keele Street and Lawrence Avenue. On Monday, federal International

Trade Minister Ed Fast, provincial Economic Development and Innovation Minister Brad Duguid, Canadian Federation of Independent Business president Dan Kelly and York South-Weston MPP Laura Albanese visited Mellow Walk to launch Small Business Week in Canada. “Businesses like Mellow Walk represent the entrepreneurial drive, commitment and hard work that are essential to moving our economy forward,” Fast said. “For (small and medium busi-

nesses), no workday is nine to five. Long after the business day ends, they continue to work on ensuring that their businesses remain profitable. Most likely, the books are being balanced later at home on the kitchen table. A long weekend often means working double duty for the busy days ahead. And family triumphs and failures often track pretty closely to the triumphs and failures of the family business.” Small and medium businesses make up 98 per cent of Canadian

companies and employ almost half of working Canadians, Fast said. “They are, without a doubt, the backbone of our economy,” he said. Smaller businesses understand the importance of developing global trading partners, said Fast, praising his government’s efforts to negotiate a “gold-standard” trade deal with the European Union. Duguid agreed. “Here in Ontario, trade accounts for one in five jobs. That means that 20 per cent of our employment

depends on getting access to thriving markets,” he said. Ontario is a “hotbed” for new business start-ups, Duguid said. “The GTA is now fourth in the world in business start-ups and climbing fast,” he said. Kelly urged Canadians to support Small Business Saturday on Saturday, Oct. 21, which encourages shoppers to shop at small businesses rather than at big box stores or in the United States. For more information, visit www. shopsmallbiz.ca

| NORTH YORK MIRROR | Friday, October 19, 2012

nym@insidetoronto.com


NORTH YORK MIRROR | Friday, October 19, 2012 |

4

Opinion Ian Proudfoot Marg Middleton Peter Haggert Paul Futhey Warren Elder Jamie Munoz

nym@insidetoronto.com

Your View

Publisher General Manager Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor Regional Dir. of Advertising Director of Distribution

Privatization rewards are short-lived

The North York Mirror is published every Thursday and Friday at 175 Gordon Baker Rd., Toronto, ON M2H 0A2, by Toronto Community News, a Division of Metroland Media Group Ltd.

McGuinty’s departure will mean new eyes on education issues

K

nown to some Ontarians as “the education premier”, Dalton McGuinty certainly made his mark in education over the past nine years. He restored some funding after taking over government from Mike Harris’ Progressive Conservatives. He led successful initiatives to reduce class sizes and more recently, to implement full-day kindergarten. And despite the current sticky situation with the teachers’ unions to legislate a wage-freeze, McGuinty was able to negotiate generous contracts with them during his two previous terms. But times have changed since our view McGuinty was first elected. The economy is recovering and the Leadership race province is in debt. And education policy deserves fresh eyes. will rejuvenate The next leader must understand a certain tiring of current key issues Liberal education policy and adjust the vision. Fortunately, a leadership race allows rejuvenation on key issues. Understanding these are tough economic times, any discussion about increasing funding for education must be accompanied with a frank discussion on where the money will come from. And, like in every other government department, tough decisions will have to be made by the province with direction from the next premier on how to reduce the deficit while continuing to invest in education. In the meantime, as both Toronto school boards continue to face budget challenges, the public can help in finding the solution to providing essential school programming without breaking the bank. We encourage everyone to get involved with the Toronto District School Board’s (TDSB) largest public consultation process taking place over the next six weeks to help the board shape its plans on future budget decisions including which programs should be a priority for funding. “In a world that is quickly changing, we know how important it is to have the right opportunities and supports in place to prepare students for the future,” said Chris Spence, TDSB director of education, in a statement. “Simply put, we need the right programs in the right spaces in the right places.” Under the current fiscal reality, it will take more than a legislated wage-freeze to maintain a high quality of education in this city. The tough decision to cut some programs, for the time being, will be inevitable. Providing your feedback and helping come up with a consensus on how to proceed with the financial resources available will be crucial on building a firm foundation to making public education the best it can be for the next generation. Meeting dates in your neighbourhood can be found online at www.tdsb.on.ca/shapeOURfuture Toronto Community News is a division of Metroland Media Group Ltd. The Mirror is a member of the Ontario Press Council. Visit ontpress.com newsroom

Write us The North York Mirror welcomes letters of 400 words or less. All submissions must include name, address and a daytime telephone number for verification purposes.

We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject letters. Copyright in letters remains with the author but the publisher and affiliates may freely reproduce them in

print, electronic or other forms. Letters can be sent to letters@ insidetoronto.com, or mailed to The North York Mirror, 175 Gordon Baker Rd. Toronto, ON, M2H 0A2.

To the editor: Re: ‘TTC should be privatized,’ Letters, Oct. 5 When they built the TTC tram and subway lines, it was an investment of millions of dollars of public money. Then when they built the SkyDome, it was with more public money, an investment of hundreds of millions of dollars, and then Hwy. 407, with more than a billion dollars of public money invested for Ontarians to build a road that would eventually be toll free after it was paid for. The TTC has been on life support since the Harris Tories reneged on the province’s portion of subsidies forcing greater strain on the city. Privatization should be front and centre, but not because it’s the solution. Thanks to privatization, billions of dollars in public money have been funneled to private interests and the more we push for it, the more our hard earned money will end up in their pockets. Eugene Spanier

Toronto, McGuinty had a fair bargain With a surprise resignation, a constitutional fiddle, and a warning to his successor not to break the Liberals’ winning streak, Dalton McGuinty ended his third term as Premier. For Toronto, which relies on Queen’s Park, his legacy and our prospects under a new provincial government aren’t clear. McGuinty began his government in the best of circumstances. He followed Mike Harris, who had a rural political base, a need to retrench after his predecessor Bob Rae, and a belief that smaller government is better government. McGuinty made the best of his opportunity. Queen’s Park invested in new transit projects, shared gas tax revenues, and again paid for some municipal social programs. Ever the canny politician, McGuinty squeezed the greatest advantage from every cent, at times infuriating Toronto

Beyond the headlines

david soknacki

City Hall and then carefully doling out just enough subsidy. There was also the creation of the City of Toronto Act. On the other hand, McGuinty left in place the huge ongoing costs for the city in transit and social housing. Instead of taking back direct responsibility, he instead offered a series of special payments or cost-sharing programs. This change of approach, to selectively paying for projects and smaller programs, caused the city significant financial turmoil. However it made for practical politics. McGuinty had to keep the support of his caucus,

which often meant convincing skeptical MPPs that his policies were not Toronto-centric. On balance our city government probably achieved as well as it could have under any premier. The results speak for themselves. Prior to McGuinty’s arrival, the provincial Liberals had nine of Toronto’s seats in the provincial legislature. After Premier McGuinty took charge, Toronto has become a Liberal stronghold, currently holding 18 of 23 seats. But those heady days being able to pin blame elsewhere and spending one’s way out of trouble have ended. Through bad luck, bad decisions and perhaps fatigue, the McGuinty government faces strong enemies, a deficit measured in billions, contempt resolutions and an approval rating of about 20 per cent. The Liberals have a tough battle ahead. As it will be tough for all of Toronto to get a good

deal from one of the two other main parties. Current voting intentions point to the NDP making gains downtown, while the PCs would gain in the suburbs – results which cast Toronto in terms of groups of downtown or suburban seats. If either Tim Hudak or Andrea Horwath is our next premier, they will either need to pull their policies to the political centre, or risk governing with support from only part of our city. In retrospect the McGuinty government had a good run. It provided Toronto with a reasonable and stable political environment, although on a tight fiscal leash. In return, Toronto gave the Liberal party solid support for three terms. It was a fair bargain for both. n David Soknacki is a former city councillor and city budget chief. Contact him at www.soknacki.com

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Giant Fall Sale WHEN: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. WHERE: Donway Covenant United Church, 230 The Donway West CONTACT: Jaren McLeod, 416-444-8444, donwaycovenant.com, donwaycovenant@msn.com COST: Free Howling Hootenanny WHEN: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. WHERE: Black Creek Pioneer Village, 1000 Murray Ross Pkwy. CONTACT: http://blackcreek.ca/ COST: See website for details Happening Oct. 20, 21, 27 and 28. The Willowdale Group of Artists Fall Show and Sale WHEN: Noon to 5 p.m. WHERE: North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge St. COST: Free More than 100 watercolor, oil, acrylic and pastel paintings. Continues to Nov. 2. Show times: Saturday noon to 5 p.m. and weekdays 9 to 5 p.m. Part of the revenue funds a scholarship for an art student at York University. Human Library WHEN: Noon to 5 p.m. WHERE: North York Central Library, 5120 Yonge St. CONTACT: 416-395-5660 COST: Free Borrow a ‘human book’ for a one-onone conversation. Hear their stories, ask questions, broaden your mind and find some common ground. Call to register. Kith, Kin and Kimchi WHEN: Noon to 5 p.m. WHERE: Gibson House Museum, 5172 Yonge St.

CONTACT: gibsonhouse@toronto.ca, 416-395-7432, www.toronto.ca/gibsonhouse, gibsonhouse@toronto.ca COST: Admission In the historic kitchen discover how pickling used in 1850s Ontario compares to the process of making the traditional Korean pickled dish Kimchi. Antiques Sale for North York Women’s Shelter WHEN: 4 to 7 p.m. WHERE: Yorkminster Citadel Salvation Army Church, 1 Lord Seaton Rd. CONTACT: Grace Foster, 416-417-2141, grace.foster@sympatico. ca COST: $5 admission

n Sunday, Oct. 21

Kimchi and Pickle Making Workshop WHEN: 1 to 3:30 p.m. WHERE: Gibson House Museum, 5172 Yonge St. CONTACT: gibsonhouse@toronto.ca, 416-395-7432, www.toronto.ca/gibsonhouse, gibsonhouse@toronto.ca COST: $25 plus HST Join Kimchi expert BongJa Lee to learn traditional Korean preserving. Take home a container of Kimchi and a jar of Mrs. Gibson’s pickles. Registration and pre-payment required. Israel and Canadian Jews: From Indifference to Israel Centric WHEN: 1:30 p.m. WHERE: Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto, 210 Wilson Ave. CONTACT: 416-487-3281, www. templesinai.net, education@templesinai.net COST: $8/$10 This discussion will consider why and

how Israel became so central to Canadian Jewish self-definition and how it impacts our lives today.

n Tuesday, Oct. 23

African Violet Trailers WHEN: 7:30 to 10 p.m. WHERE: Toronto Botanical Garden, 777 Lawrence Ave. E. CONTACT: Sayeh Beheshti, www. tavs.ca, info@tavs.ca COST: Free Dr. Bill Price will be the guest speaker at the Toronto African Violet Society’s October meeting.

n Wednesday, Oct. 24

Cardinal Carter Academy for the Arts Open House WHEN: 5:45 to 9 p.m. WHERE: Cardinal Carter Academy for the Arts, 36 Greenfield Ave. CONTACT: Dorothy DiRosa, head secretary, 416-393-5556, www. tcdsb.org, dorothy.dirosa@tcdsb.org COST: Free Witness our innovative programs: dance, drama, instrumental, strings, visual arts, vocal. eh List Author Series: Peter Robinson - Watching the Dark WHEN: 7 to 8 p.m. WHERE: North York Central Library Auditorium, 5120 Yonge St. CONTACT: Call 416-395-5639 to register COST: Free

n Thursday, Oct. 25

Installation of New Senior Cantor WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto, 210 Wilson Ave. CONTACT: Education Office,

416-487-4161, www.templesinai.net, office@templesinai.net COST: Free A concert to welcome Cantor Charles Osborne.

n Friday, Oct. 26

Kabbalalalat Shabbat WHEN: 7:15 p.m. WHERE: Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto, 210 Wilson Ave. CONTACT: Education Office, 416487-3281, www.templesinai.net, education@templesinai.net COST: Free An interactive musical event with the Temple Sinai Choir and Band. War for Dessert: A Play about 1812 WHEN: 7:30 to 9 p.m. WHERE: Historic Zion Schoolhouse, 1091 Finch Ave. E. CONTACT: gibsonhouse@toronto.ca, 416-395-7432, www.toronto.ca/gibsonhouse, gibsonhouse@toronto.ca COST: $18 plus HST Registration and pre-payment required. Call for tickets.

n Saturday, Oct. 27

Church of the Advent Fall Bazaar WHEN: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. WHERE: Church of the Advent, 40 Pritchard Ave. CONTACT: Dianne Izzard, 416-7632713, Advent.Toronto@gmail.com COST: Free Bazaar, Craft and Bake Sale WHEN: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. WHERE: Amesbury Community Centre, 1507 Lawrence Ave. W. CONTACT: William Demy, 416-558-4883, bilda80@live.ca COST: Free

Flea Market WHEN: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. WHERE: St. Timothy Catholic Church, 21 Leith Hill Rd. CONTACT: Helen Carvalho, 647628-4950, COST: Free Spanish Community Forum WHEN: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. WHERE: North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge St. CONTACT: Lisa, 416-707-6551, http:// us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=a4564 a306fc0ee2867f30b35, L5R@hotmail. com COST: Free Latin@merican Education Network presents a forum for youth and parents to express their opinions and experiences about the education system. Change for Kids Halloween Party WHEN: 6 p.m. to midnight WHERE: Ontario Science Centre, 770 Don Mills Rd. CONTACT: Samantha Stefanin, www.hollandbloorview.ca/, SStefanin@ hollandbloorview.ca COST: $18 (kids 4 and under are free) Halloween party in support of children with disabilities. Admission includes private access to all Ontario Science Centre exhibits, a family dance party with DJ, and chances to win prizes. Visit www. changeforkids.ca for details. All Hallows Eve at Black Creek Pioneer Village WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Black Creek Pioneer Village, 1000 Murray Ross Pkwy. CONTACT: Geri, http://allhallowseve.ca COST: See website for details This is a pre-ticketed event.

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5 | NORTH YORK MIRROR | Friday, October 19, 2012

It’s Happening in North York


NORTH YORK MIRROR | Friday, October 19, 2012 |

6

Community

‘It’s a specialized SWAT team’ >>>from page 1 faster so treatment begins earlier, maximizing the patient’s recovery.” Every year, more than 50,000 Canadians suffer strokes, the third-leading cause of death in the country. Ong’s daughter, Jericha Ong-Daof, who came from California to be with her father, is impressed with his care. Ong suffered a gunshot wound to the head about 20 years ago while in the Philippines and Ong-Daof was worried his medical history could complicate his stroke recovery. “He felt light-headed. He went to the emergency room. They checked him right away and he came up here (to the stroke unit). They were able to prevent any major things, like he is able to walk,” she said. “To me, if they didn’t respond quickly, because of his history, it could have been worse.” Ong is receiving therapy because the stroke left him weak on his left side and he has some memory problems but overall,

he is doing very well, Ong-Daof said. “He’s got nine lives. Seven to go,” she laughed. “They’re all awesome over here. The therapists, the nurses, they’re wonderful.” As part of the new stroke unit’s designation, there are now 10 beds dedicated for stroke patients. The SATT team can go anywhere in the hospital to assess patients suspected of having a stroke and have them immediately sent to the stroke unit to be treated by doctors and other health professionals. The team includes nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and speech pathologists. The hospital has also purchased four new Holter monitors, a portable device worn by a patient for 24 to 48 hours to assess the cardiovascular system. The introduction of the new unit and SATT team means stroke patients can be assessed faster than having to wait for neurologist, leading to a better

chance for a full recovery, hospital president Dr. Tim Rutledge said. “They (neurologists) get there when they can in a busy day. Now, we have a SWAT team. It’s a specialized SWAT team,” he said, likening SATT to a police emergency task force unit called in to deal with crises such as hostagetakings. “When treating a stroke, every minute counts. This is really an amazing day. This is truly an exciting day.” Rutledge read a letter from Beth Linkewich, regional director of the GTA North and East Stroke Network, congratulating the hospital on the new stroke unit. “You are truly leading the way within the province with the implementation of a stroke unit with (a) model of care that includes seven days a week allied health staff,” she said. “The work you have done to create a geographically defined space, train staff and develop processes of care to support best practice for all stroke patients in your hospital is commendable.”

Vehicle in Scarborough murder investigation found in North York ANDREW PALAMARCHUK apalamarchuk@insidetoronto.com The vehicle wanted in connection with a Scarborough murder has been found in a North York mall parking lot. Police found two victims, a deceased man and an unharmed woman, after being called to a commercial building at 1970 Ellesmere Rd. at 3:02 p.m. Wednesday. Police said the woman was shaken up and taken to 43 Division where she was co-operating with investigators. Two male suspects fled in a white Mercedes SUV, licence plate BNNZ 922. The vehicle was found just before 9 p.m. Wednesday in the parking lot of the Bayview Village Shopping Centre, northeast of Bayview and Sheppard avenues. Det. Mike Carbone said the Mercedes will undergo a forensic examination. The victims were found in Unit 2, an empty unit, at 1970 Ellesmere. “There shouldn’t have been anybody there,” Carbone told reporters Wednesday night.

The detective wouldn’t disclose whether or not the victims were tied up when found. “We’re still looking into speaking to some more witnesses,” he said. A factory employee who identified herself only as Angela said she passed by Unit 2 while taking her boss’s dog out for his daily walk about 15 minutes before police arrived at the crime scene. She said the dog, a Weimaraner named Bosko, sensed trouble at the unit. “He was sniffing, smelling something,” Angela said. “He was crying almost, whimpering. It took all my strength to pull him back. I told my boss something is going on back there.” Moments later, Angela heard sirens. Police wouldn’t speculate on how the male victim died. There were obvious signs of trauma on the body. The man’s name and age weren’t released. He is the city’s 42nd murder victim of the year. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 416-808-7400 or Crime Stoppers at 416-222-TIPS (8477).

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DAVID NICKLE dnickle@insidetoronto.com The Pan Am Games preparations are right on track, but organizers are still figuring out how to transport spectators and participants to the University of Toronto Scarborough’s soon-to-be-built aquatic centre without light rail in place on Sheppard Avenue. “We’re working on our strategy for transportation and we’re really playing the cards we’ve been dealt,” said Pan Am CEO Ian Troop. “There are lots of other major markets that have had games. And Ontario’s played a big part in having that strategy to bear. We’re looking at how we move spectators without a major disruption for the urban domain.” Troop made the comments following a breakfast address yesterday to the Toronto Board of Trade, updating the business organization on the progress his team is making on getting Toronto and the surrounding region ready to host the 2015 Pan Am Games. Troop told the crowd preparation for the Games is right on schedule, and described how the Games could ignite the city in terms of business, sport and the social fabric. He told the group the Games will be a home game for Torontonians coming from 41 countries, and will leave a legacy

Staff photo/NICK PERRY

ROLLING ALONG: Mark Anthony Kaye of the York Lions moves the ball past Bobby Turnbull of the Brock Badgers during an OUA soccer match Sunday afternoon. York defeated the Badgers 3-2. Wednesday, the Lions fought McMaster to a 1-1 draw. York, 12-0-2, wraps up its regular season with games in Waterloo today and Laurier Sunday.

in communities across the Golden Horseshoe. He highlighted the new aquatic centre at the University of Toronto’s Scarborough Campus, showing a computer-generated walkthrough on video. “The biggest and most ambitious of all the facilities is the aquatics centre,” he said. Troop said transportation around the region will be a challenge, but the plan is to cluster sports in individual centres as much as possible. At this point, the main infrastructure improvement for transportation purposes is the fixed rail link between Pearson Airport and Union Station. Troop wouldn’t elaborate on any details of how the Games intends to deal with public transit issues in Scarborough. At the time the Games were awarded to Toronto, plans to construct a light rail line along Sheppard Avenue were on track to be ready for 2015. In 2010, Mayor Rob Ford demanded the provincial government stop work on the light rail line in favour of building a subway. Council voted earlier this year to stop the subway. Currently, the provincially controlled transit body Metrolinx is building light rail on Eglinton Avenue. A Sheppard Avenue East LRT line is now not expected to be completed until 2021.

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Pan Am Games will leave legacy for Toronto, say CEO Ian Troop

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Dress for success OKTOBERFEST: Clockwise from top: Bernie Schmider, Peter Neudorf, Dieter Schumann and Wally Baker of Euro Connection provide the oom-pah-pah sounds during Oktoberfest in the Square at the Shops on Don Mills on Sunday; Addison Haag, 18 months, is dressed for the event; Evita Craan, right, and her husband Philip join the dancing. Photos/William Meijer

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City Hall

City asked to rule on status of electric bikes DAVID NICKLE dnickle@insidetoronto.com

A

bicycle by any other name... may or may not be an e-bike on Toronto streets. Toronto transportation staff has been tasked with finding an answer to the question of what status to give electric bikes, after the city’s Public Works and Infrastructure Committee heard from riders or electric bikes demanding some respect on Toronto’s mean streets. “Regular cyclists have been on committee agendas 64 times in the past five years,” said e-bike owner John De Marco. “Not us.” De Marco was speaking in support of his letter to committee chair Denzil Minnan-Wong, asking that the electric bikes – some of which resemble mountain bikes with a motor attached, and others resembling Vespas – be given the same status as human-powered bicycles. He pointed out that they already enjoy that status in provincial and federal legislation. But when it comes to city bylaws governing who can and cannot

use on-street bike lanes and recreational bike trails, e-bikes are strictly verbotten. He and other e-bike riders argued there’s no reason that should be so. They maintained the top speed of e-bikes is regulated by their motors, whereas a bike can go as quickly as a rider can pedal. Andy McKenna, a 58-year-old former motorcycle racer from Don Mills, said he tried riding a pedal-powered bike and found it was too uncomfortable and unsafe.

‘You don’t hear a lot about e-bikes getting in accidents, but for cyclists it happens every day.’ – Andy McKenna “On an e-bike you start off relaxed, you get to your destination in the same state of mind as when you left,” he said. “You don’t hear a lot about e-bikes getting in accidents, but for cyclists it happens every day.”

Astrid Idlewild was the lone cyclist deputing at the meeting. She called De Marco’s request “dodgy,” and said e-bikes were properly motorized vehicles and should be treated as such. “An e-bike is a moped,” she said. “E-bike companies know this, that’s why they equip their bikes with mounts for license plates. They don’t require plates for e-bikes right now but will they? Good question... You can’t will an electric bike into being a safety bicycle, what with their sealed head light, brake light, turn signals, instrument cluster, wind screen, mass, and grip-operated throttle.” The committee didn’t debate the request, just asked that it be sent off to staff for a report, to be delivered in the spring. Minnan-Wong said he wasn’t sure which way the city should go. “There are issues – the size of the e-bikes, the safety issues, these are all elements of a debate and discussion that we need to have,” he said. “We need to structure the format and the issues around what are the things that we need

to be concerned about, and one of them is the size and the safety elements, and there may be more.” The report is only looking at expanding the definition of a bicycle to include e-bikes.

‘I think evaluating the safety concerns of e-bikes in parks is something we have to look at. The bike lanes is a more careful conversation.’ – Coun. Mike Layton Currently, the city’s bylaw defines bicycles in such a way as to include familiar mountain, touring and racing bikes as well as more exotic devices such as recumbent bicycles, tricycles and antique vehicles like penny farthings. Trinity-Spadina Councillor Mike Layton, an avid downtown cyclist, said it makes sense to get more clarity on just where e-bikes fit into the mix.

He pointed out there is more than one kind of e-bike. “You see the mountain bikes with just that little box on the back of the main frame, and then you see the ones that look very much like Vespas, and that’s an e-bike, too,” he said. “We need a better definition. One you can stop the motor and pedal, and the other you have to be Lance Armstrong to get the thing moving at all. So you can’t base your definition on (whether they have pedals). I think evaluating the safety concerns of e-bikes in parks is something we have to look at. I’ve gotten complaints about e-bikes in parks. The bike lanes is a more careful conversation.” Layton said one problem he’s noticed is that the e-bikes tend to be faster than most cyclists, and because their motors are electric, nearly silent. “I’ve had a couple of instances where I’ve had e-bikes very silently come up behind me and given me a little surprise as I’m checking over my shoulder because they move so fast — but at the same time I’ve had that experience with Priuses.”


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$200$2000

Cash 4 Cars Dead or alive Same day Fast Free Towing

647-861-7399 1-888-9895865 WE BUY ALL CARS! Running or Not, we will buy it! Cars/Trucks/vans. Sell ANY Car today with ONE FREE Phone call to: 1-800-551-8647

Why rent when you can own? Free list w/pics of homes for under $1,700/month*. www.zerodowngta homeguide.com

Free recorded message 1-888-265-6359 ID# 1025 Faizel Bhabha Your Choice Realty Corp, Brokerage

Home Renovations AFFORDABLE HANDYMAN CONTRACTOR Carpentry, Electrical, Plumbing, Tiling, Drywall, Painting Bathrooms, Kitchens Basements, Counters, Closets, Flooring, Windows/Doors, Fences, Decks, Additions Lester 416-223-0226 BRASS HORN VENTURES Bathrooms, Plumbing, Carpentry, Fixture and appliance installation. Tiling, Drywall, Painting, Decks and F e n c e s . (416) 356-7030 brasshornventures @yahoo.ca registered insured BUILDER/ GENERAL CONTRACTORS RESIDENTIAL/ COMMERCIAL. Finished basements. Painting. Bathrooms. Ceramic tiles. Flat roofs. Leaking basements. Brick/chimney repairs. House additions 9 0 5 - 7 6 4 - 6 6 6 7 , 416-823-5120 DICK’S HOME Improvements. Reliable, experienced, top quality service. Renovate an entire home or room. Carpentry, plumbing, electrical, ceramic, painting...(416)816-6219, anytime.

Garage Sales

OFFICE FURNITURE

FOR SALE

Mortgages/Loans

FULL TIME RETAIL FULL TIME RETAIL SALESPEOPLE You must enjoy serving and SALESPEOPLE satisfying customers, exhibit work

Articles for Sale (Misc.)

CRAFT VENDORS WANTED

for Christmas craft sale November 17th 10am - 2pm Don Way Place 416-445-7555 ext 2005

OVER 200 UNITS

Stuff to get rid of?

AVAILABLE

Call (416)

798-7284

CONTACT BARRY AT 416-774-2362 FOR DETAILS. Waste Removal

Plumbing

ALWAYS CHEAPEST!

RENOVATIONS. PLUMBING, ceramic, drywall, bathroom and basement specialist. Fred 416-543-3402

All Garbage Removal! Home/ Business. Fast Sameday! Free Estimates! Seniors Discounts. We do all Loading & Clean-ups! Lowest Prices. Call John: 416-457-2154 Seven days

PETER’S DEPENDABLE JUNK REMOVAL From home or business, including furniture/ appliances, construction waste. Quick & careful!

416-677-3818 Rock Bottom Rates!

Concrete & Paving

CONCRETE WORK

Waterproofing Basement Lowering Under Pinning Sidewalk Patio stones General stonework Brick repair Fence repairs Parging Reasonable prices 416-825-3334

Decks & Fences

Plumbing

0 ALL DECKS built in 1 day. Highest quality. Lowest Prices! Free design and estimates. Call Mike 416-738-7752 www.griffindecks.ca

EMERGENCY?

Painting & Decorating

Clogged drain, camera inspection Leaky pipes Reasonable price, 25 years experience Licensed/ Insured credit card accepted Free estimate James Chen

647-519-9506 FOR PLUMBING repairs and installation call a licensed plumber at 416-540-7158

BROTHER’S HOME Painting & Renovation. From $125 per room. Interior/ Exterior. Wallpapering. Free estimates. Over 30 years experience. 416-558-3391 FINE QUALITY RESIDENTIAL PAINTING. References, 20 years experience, reasonable rates. Call Keith 416-720-8394

your news with family and friends online and in print! .... . . . y .bu Now Hiring

Moving & Storage A-1 MOVING & Storage Local & long distance. Short notice and negotiable rates. Houses/ apartments/ offices. Parking available. Ken: 416-658-5307

MOVING

Call (416) 798-7284 to plan your advertising campaign.

LOCAL, long distance Packing service, FREE boxes.

www.toromovers.ca

416-844-6683

Flooring & Carpeting NESO FLOORING Carpet installation starting from $1.29/ sq.ft. Hardwood, laminate at low prices. 26 yrs experience. Free Estimates. Best Price! 647-400-8198

Appliance Repairs/ Installation APPLIANCE/ TV Repairs (since 1988) Free Estimates Warranty, Credit cards, TV’s, Fridge’s, Stoves, Dishwashers, Washers, Dryers, Air Conditioning, & Heating. 416-616-0388

.

... l l e s . . ..... ..... . . t n ..re ... t s o p ..... Do it all in the classifieds. Call (416)

Get Noticed. An effective, easy way to spread the word about your business or event. Submitting is easy. And it’s FREE! Visit prlink.insidetoronto.com Publish. Your way. Right now.

Share

798-7284 to plan your advertising campaign today!

Call us at 416-798-7284 and we’ll show you how!


HOME IMPROVEMENT Directory

NORTH YORK MIRROR | Friday, October 19, 2012 |

14

HOME RENOVATIONS

ELECTRICAL

PLUMBING

FOR ALL YOUR RENO NEEDS

Burton Electric Inc.

R & Z PLUMBING & DRAINS

• Windows • Doors • Bathrooms • Kitchens • Awnings • Eavestroughs • Porches • Railings • Steps • Patios • Stucco • Waterproofing • Brickwork • Decks • Roofing • Mould

MODEL RENOVATIONS INC. (416) 736-0090

FINANCING AVAILABLE - AS LOW AS $39/MO LICENSED & INSURED • 25 YRS. EXPERIENCE

416 419-1772

Knob and tube replacement LED Lighting Aluminum wire reconditioning Permits and inspections

Replacement & Repairs (Faucets, Pipes, Drains, etc.) 24hrs/7days a week 28 Years Experience • Licensed

416.661.9393

Master Electrician * License # 7001220 * Insured www.burtonelectric.ca mark.burton@burtonelectric.ca

DANAR RESTORATION

NO DOWN PAYMENT FOR SENIORS!

- INTERIOR RENOVATIONS - PORCH ENCLOSURES - BASEMENT FINISHING - WINDOWS, DOORS - CONCRETE PORCHES, WALKWAYS - ALUMINUM WORK & RAILINGS - BASEMENT LEAKS - ROOFS, AWNINGS & CANOPIES DON’T PAY FOR 1 YEAR! O.A.C. 18 YEARS WITH THE SAME NAME AND NUMBER

WWW.DANARCO.CA 416-791-1234

RETILE TUB AREA

New Ceramic Tiles & Waterproof Drywall Rip out & disposal included Licensed Contractor New Complete Washroom $3,500

LANDSCAPING, LAWN CARE, SUPPLIES

NO HST

ON LAWNCARE �����

1967 • QUALITY LAWN CARE • HEDGE & TREE PRUNING • WALKWAYS, PATIOS & DRIVEWAYS • SODDING, SEEDING & TOPDRESSING

FREE ESTIMATES

416-288-0313

WWW.UNDERHILL-WECARE.COM

599

$

416-297-4834, Cell 416-565-3573

Want to get your business noticed? Call 416-798-7284 to plan your advertising campaign today!

PLUMBING

PLUMBER

SERVICING ALL YOUR PLUMBING NEEDS

BEST RATES GUARANTEED!

FALL SPECIAL - 20% OFF

24/7 - No extra charges for evenings, weekends or holidays Seniors Discounts Metro lic. # P20212 • Fully insured

FREE ESTIMATES (416) 427-0955

Picture galleries insidetoronto.com/ photozone

ROOFING REPAIRS • SHINGLES • FLAT ROOFS • SKY LIGHTS • CHIMNEY’S • VALLEY’S • ANIMAL PROOFING 15% Senior’s Discount

ALL TYPES OF ROOF REPAIRS 647-857-5656

All Eavestrough Repairs BESTRoof, PRICE ROOF & EAVESTROUGH REPAIRS and Wildlife Removal

EAVESTROUGH CLEANINGS FROM: 2 stories from $5995 Bungalow from $3995 Roof Repairs from $9995 Gutter Guards from $395/Ln.Ft.

ROOF

MASTERS

• Shingles • Flat Roofs • Skylights • Chimneys • Eavestroughs • Repairs • Free Estimates

Save UP TO 15% OFF

Fully Licensed & Insured

416-626-0777

www.canadianroofmasters.com

Roof Repair Experts

DUN-RITE

• SIDING/FASCIA • EAVESTROUGH 24 HOURS • TUCKPOINTING EMERGENCY REPAIRS • VENTING • GUTTER GUARDS • ANIMAL REMOVAL

CANADIAN Lic. # B21358

Metro License #16137896

ROOFING

SATISFACTION GUARANTEE

✓Full roofs ✓Missing Shingles ✓Minor/Major Leaks ✓Raccoon Problems

✓Eaves & Downspout ✓Skylights LIC# L179362 20% Senior Discount

416-248-0211

TREE/STUMP SERVICES

Jacob Tree Service

est. 1997

• Tree & Shrub Removals • Pruning • Planting Landscape Design • FREE ESTIMATES 24hr Emergency Service

(416) 417-TREE (8733)

FREE ESTIMATES - SENIOR DISCOUNTS

CALL

416-820-3634

www.the-homepro.com Insured and Licensed

BEST BUY ROOFING • Shingles • Flat Roofs

• Skylights • Chimneys Save • Repairs • Free Estimates UP TO Fully Licensed & Insured 15% OFF 416-823-1710

PUZZLE CORNER

How to do it: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Watch for the answer next week.

insidetoronto.com/ videozone

BEST RATES AND SERVICE IN TOWN

10% SENIORS’ DISCOUNT • MEMBER BBB

Sudoku (challenging)

Online video

Pot lights Service upgrades Breakers/Panels FREE ESTIMATES

ROOFING

Last week’s answers

n See answers to this week’s puzzles in next Friday’s edition

www.bestbuyroofing.ca

WATERPROOFING BASEMENT WATERPROOFING LOWER BASEMENT & UNDER PINNING Since 1982 RENOVATION Insured • Guaranteed

Atena Construction 416-854-5156 www.atenaconstruction.com

YOUR Weekly Crossword


15

| NORTH YORK MIRROR | Friday, October 19, 2012


NORTH YORK MIRROR w | Friday, October 19, 2012 |

16

TAX COURSES - Level 1 and Level 2

Job Opportunities WHAT YOU WILL LEARN:

✓ How to prepare and file tax returns. ✓ Proven tax-saving ideas. ✓ Changes to tax laws. ✓ Which deductions are most often overlooked. ✓ How to maintain necessary tax records. ✓ How easy it is to prepare forms and schedules. ✓ How to calculate deductions and credits correctly. ✓ How to properly claim dependents. ✓ Special rules for senior citizens. ✓ How to make adjustments to a tax return.

WHAT DO YOU GET: ✓ High quality instruction from experienced professionals. ✓ Text books, Online Materials, and CRA Publications. ✓ Upon completion, successful students will receive “Certificate of Accomplishment”. ✓ Taxtron – Canada’s tax software.

REGISTER NOW! SPACE IS LIMITED! Fairview Mall 416-773-1999 Scarborough Town 416-290-0900 Bridlewood Mall 416-491-4900 Centrepoint Mall 416-221-0010 Mississauga Head Office 905-273-4444

softron.ca


October 19 West  

The North York Mirror October 19 West Edition

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