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the northerner

the independent student news organization of northern kentucky university

DONE DEAL

Edition 59, Issue 6 Wednesday, February 15, 2017 www.thenortherner.com

@northernermedia

SIDE Boehne: Mearns out May 7 Rich Boehne, chair of the NKU Board of Regents, announced Tuesday that NKU President Geoffrey Mearns will leave NKU after spring commencement on May 7. An interim president will be named “soon.” Page 2

students rally for education funding Matt Sexton EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

F

aced with shrinking state funding and a potential seven-figure subsidy to WNKU, the NKU Board of Regents voted Tuesday to negotiate the sale of the radio station. The station received an offer from Bible Broadcasting Corporation for $1.9 million. NKU will maintain the WNKU call letters. In addition, the university will sell WNKE in New Boston and Portsmouth, Ohio, for $700,000 to Educational Media Foundation, which syndicates Christian programming through Air1 and K-LOVE.

Story continued on page 3

A group of Northern Kentucky University students bused to Frankfort on Monday to attend a rally promoting greater state funding for universities. Page 6

Summon the Bearcats? BB&T Arena will host the University of Cincinnati Bearcats men’s basketball team next season while UC’s Fifth Third Arena is renovated.

PHOTO BY MATT SEXTON

Dennis Repenning, regent, talks about WNKU during Tuesday’s Board of Regents meeting.

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02 HAPPENINGS / SGA

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

northerner staff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Matt Sexton [radiokor@gmail.com]

MANAGING EDITOR Mackenzie Manley [mackmanley@gmail.com]

upcoming events

15 FEB

NEWS EDITOR

The Commemorative All-Star Whiffle Ball game will start at 5 p.m. in the Campus Rec Center, to honor and celebrate Negro League Baseball.

ASST. NEWS EDITOR Hannah Hagedorn [hannahhagedorn82@gmail.com]

ASST. A&L EDITOR Nicole Browning [maggiemay2570@gmail.com]

SPORTS EDITOR

Chris Decker [deckerc0023@gmail.com]

ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Austin Elmore [autyelmore@gmail.com]

COPY EDITOR

Emily Sherry [emmie9494@gmail.com]

“The Shawshank Redemption” will be playing at 4 p.m. in the Griffin Hall Digitorium. Chris Strobel, the host of the event, will be offering a short discussion with students after the film ends.

All-Star Whiffle Ball Game

Cole Grecco [cdgrec10@gmail.com]

ARTS & LIFE EDITOR Emily Osterholz [emilyooo991@gmail.com]

Movies that matter (to us!)

16

Museum of Anthropology Open House

17

Valentine’s Day Swing Dance

FEB

FEB

This National Anthropology Day, the NKU Museum of Anthropology will be open all day to raise awareness and illustrate the significance of anthropology in our daily lives. Some of the collections will focus on contemporary arts of Native Americans and folk arts of Latin America and Africa. This event is free, and will begin at 9 a.m.

In honor of Valentine’s Day, the Catholic Newman Club presents a night full of swing dancing and treats at 7 p.m. in the University Center Ballroom. Beginners are welcome and dancers are encouraged to bring friends. Any questions, email ewmanclub@nku.edu.

PHOTO EDITOR Fabio Souza [souzaf1995@gmail.com]

VIDEO EDITOR

Tommy Bailey [tommybailey44@gmail.com]

DESIGN EDITOR Brittney Gunter [gunterb2@nku.edu]

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR / ASST. MANAGING EDITOR

Abby Anstead [abbya3394@gmail.com]

DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Derek Daley [nccdaley@gmail.com]

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER Alec Reynolds [reynoldsa13@nku.edu]

ENGAGEMENT EDITOR Rachel Warren [rachelwarren45@gmail.com]

ASST. ENGAGEMENT EDITOR Lauren Goderwis [goderwislauren@gmail.com]

POLICEBEATS U N I V E R S I T Y

FEB. 7, 10:08 A.M.: Report was received that mace had been accidently discharged into the air at Steely Library. FEB. 7, 1:37 P.M.: Report received that an unknown person stole an unattended jacket and hat at Regents Hall. FEB. 8, 3:45 P.M.: Report received that a student was a victim of an internet theft scam. FEB. 10, 4:22 P.M.: Victim has been receiving unwanted communication via text messages and in-person from a subject

known to her.

FEB. 11, 11:36 A.M.: Report received that an unknown person stole a camera from an unlocked vehicle that was parked in

Lot K.

FEB. 11, 4:40 P.M.: Report was received that there was a male subject that appeared to be passed out in the driver’s seat of a

vehicle in the Welcome Center Garage. The subject was taken into custody and transported to Campbell County Detention Center.

BUSINESS TEAM Essence Donloe [essenced3@gmail.com] Cason Walden [waldenc2@nku.edu] Julianna Gregg [greggj4@mymail.nku.edu]

BUSINESS ADVISERS Mitchell Wendling [wendlingm1@nku.edu] Ashley Hempfling [ahempfling@enquirer.com]

ADVISER Michele Day [daymi@nku.edu]

contactinfo

furtherdetails

The Northerner Griffin Hall Rm. 125

Entire content is copyright of The Northerner and may not be reprinted without prior consent. Views expressed do not represent those of the administration, faculty or student body. The Northerner is considered a designated public forum. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. The Northerner staff respects the right to a free and open dialogue as allowed under the First Amendment.

Highland Heights, KY 41099 Editor in Chief: (859) 572-6128 Designers Desk: (859) 572-6677 Advertising: (859) 572-5232 Website: www.thenortherner.com

Mearns to leave after spring commencement Mackenzie Manley MANAGING EDITOR

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS, Ky. — President Geoffrey Mearns will leave Northern Kentucky University after spring commencement on May 7. An interim president is expected to be named before May, according to a letter sent Tuesday from Board of Regents Chair Rich Boehne. The email said that the Board of Regents is already looking towards soliciting search firms to choose the next president and that the proposals will begin within the next few days. Regent Norm Desmarais, who joined the Board of Regents last June, will chair the search committee. Previously, Desmarais was the chairman and founding partner of the Covington-based tech firm Tier1 Performance Solutions, according to the email. His two daughters and wife are also graduates of NKU. “[Demarais] will be in touch soon with faculty, staff, students, and members of our community as we build out the search com-

mittee,” Boehne said in the email. “This is important work, and also time-consuming. I hope those of you asked to participate will be willing and eager to help select the next president of our outstanding university.” The news follows the announcement of his decision to leave for Ball State University on Jan. 24. The NKU community learned of his departure with little warning. Rich Boehne, Chair of Board of Regents said that he knew of Mearns’ departure a week prior to the event. According to our previous coverage, Mearns’ contract was set to expire on July 31. After the initial shock of the announcement, Mearns’ sent an email to the NKU community, stating that the decision was not an easy one to make. “… it is with very mixed emotions that I decided not to renew my contract,” Mearns said in the email. “As you know by now, I have accepted a position as the next president of Ball State University.

The board is looking towards the NKU community as a whole for their input as they look toward choosing the upcoming president. According to the email, a schedule of open forms both on and off campus will be released shortly, in order to receive feedback. The committee will also factor in the results from the recent presidential assessment. “This period of information gathering is one of the most critical phases of the search,” Boehne said in the email. “Transitions, although stressful, provide an opportunity to recalibrate and consider what traits and experiences are most critical for our next president.” Below is what Boehne called an “aggressive” schedule that outlines the search process, which should conclude early in the fall semester.


Ed 59, Issue 6

NEWS 03

Board of Regents confirms sale of WNKU Continued from front page

University spokesperson Amanda Nageleisen said that the vote authorizes President Geoffrey Mearns to execute those agreements, which should happen in the coming days. The agreement is subject to FCC approval, according to Nageleisen. She said that process could take months. “WNKU will stay on the air until that process is completed,” Nageleisen said. Nageleisen said approximately 20 full and part-time employees will be impacted.

An emotional meeting The Board of Regents met in executive session for two hours. Before the board voted, members of the audience, which included both employees and friends of WNKU, had the opportunity to address the board. This included Aaron Sharpe, the acting general manager of WNKU. Sharpe, a 2000 graduate of NKU, was disappointed that he didn’t have an opportunity during the process to work with the board. “I’m not here to ask you to not sell WNKU,” Sharpe said to the board. “I completely understand the reasons. I completely understand the university’s situation. What has been disappointing to me is not having a seat at the table to talk about what can be done.” The likely change in format and the potential loss of a locally-owned public radio outlet also concerned Sharpe. “Not to keep the station here, but to protect WNKU as a local public media outlet,” Sharpe said. “Especially in this climate right now, where the arts are under fire, the CPB (Corporation for Public Broadcasting) is looking at cuts in funding. Public media is more important than it has ever been before. “When public radio stations get sold to religious broadcasters, you’re getting into dangerous territory. Again, I’m not suggesting that you don’t sell it. I’m suggesting that we work together to find a way to find the right buyer.” Rich Boehne, chair of the Board of Regents, said the process was broad and open. Nageleisen said that former WNKU General Manager Sean O’Mealy had “extensive conversations” with the

PHOTO BY MATT SEXTON

Rich Boehne (left), chair of the Boards of Regents, and Geoffrey Mearns (right), president of NKU, during Tuesday’s Board of Regents meeting.

WNKN in Middletown will pay off the $5.1 frustration.” million debt NKU is carrying from the 2011 The sale of locally-owned campus radio radio station expansion. stations is something that has become more Boehne said that while many of the concerns common, according to Sharpe. addressed by WNKU supports were valid, the “Unfortunately it has become the norm with university had its own universities,” set of issues to consider. Sharpe said. “Everything you all was the “I transferred from the University of “This say is true, but it’s also last univertrue that we believe Cincinnati to NKU because of this radio sity-owned we’ve run a very good radio station. Even 20 years ago, I didn’t feel public process,” Boehne said. station in our “These are the best like there was a home for me in the market. Foropportunities for our tunately, the corporate radio landscape.” students and for the other stations, core mission of the WMUB and Aaron Sharpe university.” WVXU, were After the board appreserved as proved the sale, Boehne public radio made a statement where he confirmed entities and have done very well. “It’s painful to let go of something that has “I was hoping we would be given the same reflected so well on our deep commitment opportunity. And that didn’t happen, and it’s a to this region,” Boehne said. “However, the shame.” media world is shifting dramatically and these Despite the disappointment, he understands terrestrial voices no longer provide access to why the decision was made. our most important constituents. “I have no doubt that the Board of Regents “To the staff, thank you very much. You’ve and President Mearns and Rich Boehne have done a sensational job. The marketplace has, the best interest of the students in mind,” unfortunately, turned against us here.” Sharpe said. “I know that comes first for them. I think students need to know that. That’s important.” A painful day NKU President Geoffrey Mearns announced April 5, 2016, that the university should explore After spending the last 18 years with the possibility of selling WNKU-FM and its WNKU, Sharpe couldn’t hide his disappointassets. To begin that process, Mearns issued ment at the decision to sell the station. a Request for Proposal (RFP) for a broker to The 2000 graduate of Northern Kentucky came to the Highland Heights campus specif- explore a potential sale. At that time, Nageleisen said the NKU had ically because of WNKU. spent an average of $600,000 over the previous “I transferred from the University of Cincinfive years subsidizing WNKU. In fiscal year nati to NKU because of this radio station,” 2015, that subsidy was $900,000. Sharpe said. “I had wanted to go into radio Mearns commented on the decision in a cambefore, but even 20 years ago, I didn’t feel like pus-wide email. there was a home for me in the corporate “As we continue to wrestle with financial radio landscape. I transferred to NKU to get challenges, I concluded that we could no longer close to WNKU for that very reason.” justify using our resources -- our students’ tuiFor Sharpe, it was a day he and his staff tion and our state appropriation -- to subsidize knew was coming. That did not make it any WNKU’s operations,” Mearns said in the email. less painful. “This decision was made only have lengthy eval“I’m still a bit disappointed that we didn’t explore more options,” Sharpe said. “Of course uation and study, and it was not made lightly.” Since April 29, 1985, WNKU has operated as I’m not privy to a lot of the conversations a non-commercial radio station at the frequency because I wasn’t part of the conversations. 89.7 on the FM dial. PHOTO BY MATT SEXTON That’s my biggest disappointment. That’s my

board regarding the station’s business model and its future. Boehne said the university could no longer subsidize the station at the expense of its students. “We believe these are the best offers and opportunities we’ve received,” Boehne said. “Our goal being we cannot finance on the backs of our students and our core mission.” Nageleisen said Tuesday the university spent $1.1 million in fiscal year 2016 subsidizing the station, and it was anticipated the university would spend another $1 million in fiscal year 2017. In addition, Nageleisen said the sale of the properties will allow NKU to invest that $1.1 million back into programs that directly benefit students. The revenue from the sale of WNKU, WNKE/WPAY, and the anticipated sale of

Aaron Sharpe, acting general manager of WNKU, speaks to the Board of Regents during Tuesday’s meeting.


04 ARTS & LIFE

NKU community reflects on W

bunch of different colors. The unity symbolism from that was really cool.” The march not only allowed women’s rights activists to express their views, but members of the Black Lives Matter movement and LGBTQ community also were able to make their voices heard. “I have a lot of diversity in my friend group,” Creamer said. “I had a friend who went to stand for his LGBTQ rights. I had a friend who went for the Black Lives Matter portion. I had a couple friends advocating for general women’s rights. It was such a nice atmosphere. Everyone there was really supportive and peacefully wanting to make their voices heard.” These different movements intersecting, and the support that flowed through the members of the crowd, created a sense of camaraderie between marchers, according to Creamer. “We liked the fact that everyone there, even though there were different things that were being stood for, kind of had everyone’s back as a whole,” Creamer said. “It was like a giant support system circling all these different issues.” One of the biggest surprises of the day was the lack of resistance Creamer and the rest of the marchers saw on their route. This wasn’t the case in Columbus, Ohio, however, where the PHOTO PRO march Creamer’s mother participated in was When Boyd first arrived the crowd hadn’t filled to 14 blocks. met with hostility. “I was surprised there weren’t more people and the different forms that it takes. trying to start fights. I didn’t see any of that,” Going into class, she said that she told her Creamer said. students about the project. She told them that Creamer believes the march was a success and they would see her around wearing the sashes, was an important step on the way to causing but would not bring them into the classroom. As change. “I liked the fact that when people gather in mass a professor, she wanted to keep her own political to voice their opinion, people will listen,” Creamer bias from leaking into the classroom. “What struck me is that, my students started said. “I think that’s all that needed to be accomasking questions about the project and one of plished. We get enough people and at least voice them said, ‘I want to be the first person to wear our opinions, we don’t even have to be aggressive that sash,’” Mader-Meersman said. about it. Say what you need to say and in a big As time progressed, the project began to evolve. enough number the higher ups will listen. She formed the sashes into book holders. When “I think listening is the first step to potential on, sash across the chest, a small book hangs at change.” the wearer’s hip. Contained in the book are gender specific insults. According to Mader-Meersman, it was here that people started wanting to get involved. Mader-Meersman wore them in her daily life. She wore them to the grocery store, to the gas staMackenzie Manley tion and in her own home. One by one, she said, MANAGING EDITOR people began to show interest in wearing them as well as making the solidarity sashes. The first of the presidential debates aired. Julie Mader-Meersman said she saw no reason why Mader-Meersman watched it with her husband anyone couldn’t use her idea to make a statement and young children. alongside her own. At one point in the debate between Donald Despite the interest, Mader-Meersman hoped Trump and Hillary Clinton, Alicia Machado was that she could put the project behind her and brought into the conversation, a former Miss move on after the election. When she learned of Universe who Trump referred to as “Miss Piggy” Trump’s victory, she was shocked. in a series of tweets penned by Trump “I only could think to myself that this would be The next morning, Mader-Meersman, a visual behind me after election day, and I wanted it to be communication professor, sifted through several behind me,” Mader-Meersman said. “I thought, news outlets, listening to an array of interviews. ‘You know what, what am I going to do? How am She was struck. The body shaming perspective was I going to conduct myself ?’” doubled down on, rather than forgiven. She decided to choose love. Love not only for In response, she ran down the hall and made the those who aligned to her own political beliefs, but prototype of her first solidarity sash, which she for those who didn’t, Mader-Meersman said. later shared with colleagues. Seven days after the election, Mader-Meersman “You can be Miss Universe and still be body and around 12 others gathered -- a group consistshamed. Her sash might as well have been Miss ing of families, friends, men, women and children Piggy,” Mader-Meersman said. “I just felt so much -- to create their own sashes with the message “I empathy for any woman who struggles with body choose love” at the Newport World Peace Bell. image; thousands, if not millions, do. I wanted to “All the rights that women fight for so hard are stand up for that person and those people.” bashed down in the process, historically,” MadHer sashes were on display in the School of the er-Meersman said. “So here I am, I’m willing to Arts, lined on a wall with one another. Each sash put myself in history to stand against prejudice.” on the bottom row contained a different derogaMader-Meersman and others later wore these tory comment targeted toward women said by sashes at the Women’s March at Washington Park Donald Trump. Above the insults, sashes with “I in Cincinnati. Coming together, she said, felt choose love” hung. empowering and good. When she first made the sashes, she was coinciAfter the election, she reflected, many people dentally teaching her students about typography

Mader Meersman: “I choose love.”

PHOTO PROVIDED BY MACKENZIE BOYD

Mackenzie Boyd went to the march at Washington D.C. She said her mother inspired her to be politically active.

S

ince the inauguration of President Trump some women have lent their voices to movements speaking out about rights that they believe have been threatened and the issues they are worried about in the years ahead. These worries were expressed through various means, one being the international Women’s March. Below, three women in the NKU community reflect on their own participation and what it meant for them.

Creamer:

“Listening is the first step to potential change.” Christopher Decker SPORTS EDITOR

Keely Creamer first heard of the Women’s March when her friends announced they’d be going to the demonstration being held at Washington Park in Cincinnati. Her answer? “Absolutely.” Along with the thousands of people who participated at the local Women’s March and millions more across the globe, the NKU volleyball player

rode with her friends to Washington Square on Jan. 21 to lend her voice to the movement. “I liked what it stood for,” Creamer said. “I think a lot of people wanted to make their voices heard about a lot of issues that are real issues and I think they accomplished that and that’s really admirable. I want to be apart of something great like that.” Though she didn’t realize the scope of the event until she arrived, Creamer was amazed to see the crowd that showed up. The crowd only grew after Creamer and her friends arrived, so much so that many people were unable to hear the speakers who showed up to express their views. “We got just close enough we could hear everything,” Creamer said. “It got to the point where there were so many people that people way in the back couldn’t hear. Which is disappointing but also cool because more people showed up than they expected or else they would have had a better sound system.” Creamer enjoyed the posters that people created for the march and appreciated some of the humor in the messages. “A lot of them were humor based. It kept things on the lighter side,” Creamer said. “There were real issues there but you can do it and still have fun with it. [One pictured someone] holding a torch and there were a bunch of different hands and a


ARTS & LIFE 05

Women’s March, women’s issues

Her sashes were on display in the School of the Arts, lined on a wall with one another. Each sash on the bottom row contained a different derogatory comment targeted toward women said by Donald Trump. Above the insults, sashes with “I choose love” hung. When she first made the sashes, she was coincidentally teaching her students about typography and the different forms that it takes. Going into class, she said that she told her students about the project. She told them that they would see her around wearing the sashes, but would not bring them into the classroom. As a OVIDED BY MACKENZIE BOYD professor, she wanted to keep her own political bias from leaking into the classroom. “What struck me is that, my students started asking questions about the project and one of them said, ‘I want to be the first person to wear that sash,’” Mader-Meersman said. As time progressed, the project began to evolve. She formed the sashes into book holders. When on, sash across the chest, a small book hangs at the wearer’s hip. Contained in the book are gender specific insults. According to Mader-Meersman, it was here that people started wanting to get involved. Mader-Meersman wore them in her daily life. She wore them to the grocery store, to the gas station and in her own home. One by one, she said, people began to show interest in wearing them as well as making the solidarity sashes.

After the election, she reflected, many people are struggling to look up again. The Women’s March was larger than she expected and she said that the environment was warm and inviting. “I’m getting chills just thinking about it. The experience was way more powerful and moving than I expected,” Mader-Meersman said. “I knew it would feel better to come together because I had already had this other version, though it was only 12 people, and I was able to come to grips with a lot of things just by doing so.” What was most striking about the march was the juxtaposition of the event feeling both peaceful and loud at the same time. Walking alongside bounds of people, Mader-Meersman said the signs did the screaming. Mader-Meersman said a lot of the pain and the turnout was a result of so many civil rights coming off the site at the White House. Many felt like they went for the jugular on their societal values. Going forward, Mader-Meersman said that engaging congressional representative and continuing to articulate one’s point of view is how the discourse can continue. “I don’t know the answer except to choose love for myself,” Mader-Meersman said.

Boyd:

“We were all friends at that moment.”

Mackenzie Boyd said her mom is her main inspiration behind her efforts to become more politically involved. Boyd has supported Clinton since the 2008 election, but was not previously involved in her campaign prior to the 2016 election. Her mother would have her out canvassing for Clinton’s campaign and give Boyd bags of buttons to hand out to her friends.

“She’d keep us updated and she’d talk about the different debates,” Boyd said. “She’d text me to see if I was watching the debates and when I’d come home we’d watch Clinton’s speech.” When Clinton came to Cincinnati on the campaign trail to speak, Boyd and her mother went together. “On election night, she was the one I went to when I was crying my eyes out,”Boyd said. In the aftermath of the election Boyd searched for an outlet to express her feelings. She found this outlet in the Women’s March in Washington D.C. on Jan. 21. On all seven continents, millions gathered to express similar sentiments and to object regulations and policies that they felt were an infringement on their rights. Boyd, a junior and integrative studies major, described the event

PHOTO PROVIDED BY MACKENZIE BOYD

The Women’s March took place internationally.

Nicole Browning

ASST. ARTS & LIFE EDITOR

Mader-Meersman said she saw no reason why anyone couldn’t use her idea to make a statement alongside her own. Despite the interest, Mader-Meersman hoped that she could put the project behind her and move on after the election. When she learned of Trump’s victory, she was shocked. “I only could think to myself that this would be behind me after election day, and I wanted it to be behind me,” Mader-Meersman said. “I thought, ‘You know what, what am I going to do? How am I going to conduct myself ?’” She decided to choose love. Love not only for those who aligned to her own political beliefs, but for those who didn’t, Mader-Meersman said. Seven days after the election, Mader-Meersman and around 12 others gathered -- a group consisting of families, friends, men, women and children -- to create their own sashes with the message “I choose love” at the Newport World Peace Bell. “All the rights that women fight for so hard are bashed down in the process, historically,” Mader-Meersman said. “So here I am, I’m willing to put myself in history to stand against prejudice.” Mader-Meersman and others later wore these sashes at the Women’s March at Washington Park in Cincinnati. Coming together, she said, felt empowering and good.

PHOTO BY MACKENZIE MANLEY

Mader-Meersman had her sashes on display. After she made her own, others wanted to contribute.


06 NEWS

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

SGA rallies with Ky. schools for more funding

Commonwealth college students demand stop to higher education cuts PHOTO BY SAM ROSENSTIEL

Sam Rosenstiel CONTRIBUTOR

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY -- Northern Kentucky University students rallied at the state capitol Monday for more funding for all public universities. Students from Murray State, Western Kentucky University Kentucky University, Eastern Kentucky University, University of Louisville and other state schools convened to protest and petition against increased cuts in funding. Nearly 30 members of SGA represented NKU at the Rally for Higher Education in Frankfort. The rally’s goal was to prevent cuts to the state’s higher education budget. The Rally for Higher Education was hosted by the SGA of Murray State and sponsored by the Kentucky Board of Student Body Presidents, which sent a petition to the governor and state legislature titled “Defend Kentucky Higher Education” last month. The petition cited state lottery money being “diverted away from need-based scholarships” and decisions by legislature not to “reinvest in higher education over time.” These reasons “have made it increasingly

NKU students made the trip to Frankfort Monday to rally for increased state funding for universities.

difficult for the vast majority of college students to afford college, especially those who rely on need-based financial aid,” the petition said. “In order to reverse this trend, we, as students, are taking action.” Student speakers attending the rally were NKU SGA Sec. of Public Relations Sami Dada and SGA senator Hannah Edelen. Dada, a junior communication studies major, told of his family’s struggle immigrating from Liberia to the U.S.. Dada said the obstacles of being a lower-income family made life difficult. He said he is thankful for the needs-based scholarships that have allowed him to be the first person in his family to attend college. For freshman Edelen, affording college required hard work academically and financially. Edelen said she had to work 20 hours a week as a high

PHOTOS BY SAM ROSENSTIEL

(Photo on right, left to right) NKU SGA members Brenda Moran, Madison Vaughn and Onyi Okorie hold handmade signs in the capitol buidling

school junior after her mother was diagnosed with cancer, all while studying hard to raise her ACT score and get into Kentucky’s Governor’s Scholars Program. “I paid for my own college because I knew my family couldn’t do it for me,” Edelen said. Despite her economic situation, Edelen said she found hope through education and a teacher that encouraged her to achieve her goals. “An educator believed in me, and through her

I believed in myself,” Edelen told the crowd. “My background had no correlation to who I really was.” Other student speakers included one of the event’s organizers, Murray State student body president Carter Hearne. Hearne said that united students can influence state policy makers. “We must stand together,” Hearne said. “We must allow people to have the opportunity for affordable education.” Chair of the Kentucky Board of Student Body Presidents Jay Todd Richey of WKU listed the benefits of postsecondary education on society as well. He called the rising cost of tuition added with state funding cuts “bad for Kentucky” and “unacceptable.” Several lawmakers appeared at the rally to show support for increased education spending. Kentucky Sec. of State Alison Lundergan

Grimes and Atty. Gen. Andy Beshear both spoke with students against furthering education cuts. Beshear also discussed winning lawsuits against Gov. Matt Bevin’s budget cuts, and believes everybody in Kentucky should receive the opportunity to go to college. Agricultural Commissioner Ryan Quarles called for students to meet with their representatives and invite them to campuses in order to have positive discussions about education instead of “pointing fingers.” State senator and UK professor Max Wise stressed the importance of the arts in tandem with academics as well as preventing the departure of students going to out-of-state colleges, or “brain drain.” The Northerner reported last year on the goal of NKU president Geoffrey Mearns to implement outcomes-based funding. According to NKU research, state appropriations made up only 28 percent of the school’s budget. The state legislature and Gov. Bevin recognized NKU is underfunded and pledged an additional $5.33 million for 2017. After the rally, NKU student body president Will Weber delivered handwritten letters to Gov. Bevin’s office. The letters, written by NKU students at the rally, addressed reasons why public universities deserve more funding. Kayla Lowe, NKU alumni , said she wants her alma mater to receive the amount of funding and recognition from lawmakers it deserves. “I hope that they realize NKU is not a hidden gem anymore,” Lowe said. “I hope they realize we are doing great things and that we need to be supported.” Edelen said she believes all Kentucky citizens should have the opportunity for postsecondary education, no matter their background. “This generation right now will one day lead us, lead you,” Edelen said. “Do you want to see them get an education?” Even if current NKU students will not reap the benefits of future scholarships, Dada said it is important that funding helps NKU grow. He compared the value of building young minds to the value of building bridges. “You can build a bridge and make it last a century,” Dada said, “When you invest in the minds of Kentucky students, that value will last for generations.”


Ed 59, Issue 6

07 SPORTS

Building from the bottom:

Riddle takes over men’s soccer Austin Elmore ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

A

t only 19 years old, Stuart Riddle received an unexpected call. It was from the New Zealand National Soccer Team that included an invite to national team camp. That 1996 invitation led to four appearances for the national team, including an olympic qualifying tournament. Perhaps the most influential part of Riddle’s time with national team was having the chance to learn from manager Bobby Clark. “He gave me a really good foundation of what a good coach does,” Riddle said. “He made me see the game in a different way.” Twenty-one years later, Riddle received a call from Northern Kentucky University. Now he’ll be the head coach of the Norse. Just over a month after NKU men’s soccer coach John Basalyga announced his retirement in December, NKU hired Riddle to be his replacement. Prior to NKU, Riddle was the head coach at the University of Buffalo, where he led the Bulls to the Mid-American Conference championship game the last two seasons. Riddle coached the Bulls to a 28-32-13 record in his four seasons at Buffalo, including 20 wins over the last two seasons. Riddle recruited and developed Russell Cicerone, who was selected in the fourth round

of the 2017 MLS SuperDraft by the Portland Timbers. Before taking over at Buffalo, Riddle was the head coach at Western Michigan University from 2009-2012, where he took the Broncos to two MAC championship games. With seven years of head coaching experience in the MAC, Riddle has been to four conference championship games and has compiled a record of 61-68-21. Riddle’s biggest obstacle in the MAC was the University of Akron, one of the top soccer schools in the nation, and the top-ranked team in the country at the start of the 2016 season. Akron has won all but one MAC championship since 2009. A native of Wellington, New Zealand, Riddle grew up around the game of soccer and Riddle led Buffalo to 2 MAC Championship games. spent his entire life playing and coaching it. In 1999, he graduated from Coastal Carolina ran and jumped into the pile with the team,” University where he played for two years. He Spina said. “He runs up and down the sidelines then played professionally throughout the early and he gets really into the games.” 2000s in Austria, England and Scotland. These emotional moments have always been there for Riddle. He says that emotion stems Nowhere to go but up from his time as a player; he was a striker and loved to score goals. As a player and coach, he’s known for being “I was addicted to that feeling of finding the emotional. back of the net, there’s nothing quite like it,” Louis Spina, who worked along side Riddle Riddle said. “I sort of draw off of that on the in the athletic department at Buffalo, recalled a sideline as a coach now.” couple of occurrences when Riddle got excited This resonates with players, too. Spina said on the sidelines. athletes respond well to him, and years down the “This year after we scored late in overtime, he line alums come back because of him. “He’s a very energetic guy, a good coach, good recruiter, someone that requires a lot out of his guys, requires a lot out of everyone,” Spina said. “Players respond well to him. He’s a good influence outside of soccer as well.” Riddle takes over an NKU soccer program that is coming off of one of its worst years in school history; a 1-13-4 campaign that saw the Norse go winless at home and win only one Horizon League game. Going into the 2016 season, the roster was comprised of 10 freshmen and only one senior. “If you look at the RPI rankings, NKU were 205 out of 206 last year,” Riddle said. “There’s one way to go and that’s building from the bottom up. Everyone is going to get a fair crack of the whip and have an opportunity to showcase what they can do.”

‘You have to trust the process’

PHOTOS COURTESY OF UB ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

Riddle coached at Buffalo and Western Michigan prior to NKU.

Aside from the challenges that come from taking over a new program with a plethora of young players, Riddle is also taking over for Basalyga, the winningest coach in NKU history.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF UB ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

Basalyga spent 14 seasons as head coach of the Norse and has a career record of 161-8838, along with leading the Norse to the 2010 NCAA Division II National Championship title. “Enormous shoes to fill for sure,” Riddle said. “Anyone who has won a national championship at any level has obviously been doing something very well.” Now that Riddle has gotten to campus and settled in, the focus now shifts to 2017 and beginning to build the program in his own way. “I have seen college soccer at the highest level, had to prepare my team against arguably the best team over the last decade year in and year out,” Riddle said. “I’ve been through this twice before and I feel very confident that we’re going to get this turned around pretty quick.” Riddle understands that it’s going to be an adjustment for both the players and himself. He has to adjust to a new program and getting to know an entire team, while the players have to learn what is expected of them. “I am trying to create an environment where the players can be as successful as they want,” Riddle said. “I am very honest with the players. You have to trust the process, it’s proven. That’s the way it’s gonna be here.” Despite all the work that lies ahead, Riddle is excited to get to know the team and begin evaluating where the NKU soccer program currently stands. “I’m proud to be here and be given this opportunity,” Riddle said. “I didn’t leave a team that won 12 games last year for a position that is going to be a dead end. It’s going to take some time. We can be a national top 25 contender year in and year out, but you can’t wave a magic wand and it happen straightaway.”


08 SPORTS

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

UC basketball is coming to BB&T Arena

PHOTO BY AUSTIN ELMORE

Austin Elmore

BB&T Areana will host the University of Cincinnati men’s basketball team for the 2017-2018 season.

ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

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opened in 2008 and is the newest basketball facility in the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati Area. It features two party suites and 12 luxury suites. Aside from Norse men’s and women’s basketball games, the arena frequently hosts concerts, comedians, and a variety of other shows. Andy Meeks, director of Business Operations and Auxiliary Services, said the university looks forward to showing off its arena to more tristate basketball fans. “We are excited to host the UC Bearcats next year and expose a new fan base to our beautiful arena,” Meeks said. “With the modern amenities in BB&T Arena, we will provide a positive experience to UC, its men’s basketball team, donors and fans.” Bohn said in a release from the University of Cincinnati that they were grateful to be able to work with NKU and BB&T Arena. “The modern amenities of BB&T Arena will mimic some of the improvements UC fans will experience when we return to Fifth Third Arena in 2018 more closely than other facilities in the area which was important to us,” Bohn said. “The convenience of parking and the arena being less than a 10-mile drive from our campus was also appealing.” The UC athletic director said the university will transport its own branded floor to BB&T Arena. “We are grateful to Ken FIFTH THIRD ARENA BB&T ARENA Bothof and Andy Meeks from the NKU administraSEATS tion and Darren Stearns and the BB&T Arena staff for 13,000 9,400 allowing us an opportunity to share their arena for a season,” Bohn said. AVERAGE ATTENDANCE When the Bearcats call BB&T Arena home next 9,215 2,297(2016) season, it will add another residence to the storied history of the UC basketball program. TIME IN DIVISON 1 Cincinnati opened the most successful era in 100+ YEARS 1 YEAR program history in 1954 with a new on-campus arena, DISTANCE BETWEEN according to gobearcats.com. The Armory Fieldhouse 7.47 MILES played host to a period of

ne of the top 25 basketball teams in the nation will call BB&T Arena home next season. Northern Kentucky University announced Feb. 10 that the University of Cincinnati men’s basketball team will be playing its home games at BB&T Arena in the 2017-18 season. The Bearcats current home, Fifth Third Arena, will be undergoing renovations next season. Ken Bothof, NKU athletic director, said in a release they were pleased to help UC during its time of need. “We are pleased to assist the University of Cincinnati and its men’s basketball program for the 2017-18 season and to host the Bearcats in BB&T Arena during their renovation of Fifth Third Arena,” Bothof said in the release. “We certainly appreciate the great working relationship we have had with (UC athletic director) Mike Bohn and all of his staff throughout this process.” The Bearcat men’s team is enjoying a resurgence this season, and will likely fill the 9,400seat capacity of BB&T Arena. The Bearcat men are averaging 9,215 fans over 15 games at Fifth Third Arena this season. The $60 million state-of-the-art BB&T Arena

GRAPHIC BY DEREK DALEY

UC basketball which saw the Bearcats win the national championship twice. The Bearcats left the Armory Fieldhouse in 1976 as they moved to Riverfront Coliseum, now known as US Bank Arena. They remained downtown until plans for a new on-campus arena were revealed, according to gobearcats.com. Two years from moving into Fifth Third Arena, UC moved its games once again to The Cincinnati Gardens in 1987, sharing the building with archrival Xavier. In 1989 the Bearcats’

opened the Shoemaker Center, which would later be renamed Fifth Third Arena. The University of Cincinnati has not announced plans for its women’s basketball or volleyball teams for next season, according to gobearcats.com. The Northerner Editor-in-Chief Matt Sexton and Sports Editor Christopher Decker contributed to this story.

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