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From: hisall-bounces@listserv.nku.edu [hisall-bounces@listserv.nku.edu] on behalf of Paul Tenkotte [tenkottep@nku.edu] Sent: Sunday, September 04, 2011 3:52 PM To: hisall@listserv.nku.edu Subject: [Hisall] Porgam Review, CPE, and Changes Hello Colleagues: “Change is inevitable, growth is optional.” In the past few years alone, we have witnessed enormous changes in higher education— technological, pedagogical, and financial. Coupled with the recession that began in 2008, the worst since the Great Depression, our academic world seems sometimes unrecognizable. The implementation of the SAP computer system, massive changes in General Education, and a new emphasis on SCH/FTE (Student Credit Hours/Fulltime Equivalency) have challenged us in ways that we could have never fathomed. With the official release of a CPE (Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education) 55-page “Academic Programs Procedures” document last week, our world of higher education is changing once again. To be implemented by Fall 2013, the guidelines—as approved by Kentucky’s eight public university presidents—specify conditions for the assessment and continuation/suspension of programs based upon such factors as enrollment, numbers of graduates, success of graduates in obtaining employment, alignment with state and university goals, etc. This academic year, our department will be among the first at NKU to undergo a program review under the new guidelines. We have a choice. We can wail and gnash our teeth, or we can adapt and grow. Nationwide, the humanities are shrinking in enrollment, budgets, and importance. Our department generally reflects those trends. Even during much better times economically, we have experienced dismal growth in majors. Between Fall 2003 and Fall 2010, NKU’s overall enrollment increased from 13,945 to 15,748, or 13%. Of the 13 departments comprising the College of Arts and Sciences, History & Geography was the 2nd worst performer in terms of percentage of increase of majors during the same period. >From Fall 2003 to Fall 2010, we increased “active majors” from 338 to 348, or only 3%. Although Mathematics/ Statistics decreased, every other department in A&S left us far behind in the dust: Psychology (+16%); Sociology/Anthropology/Philosophy (+19%); English (+20%); Visual Arts (+21%); Music (+31%); Biology (+38%); World Languages (+45%); Theater/Dance (+52%); Chemistry (+55%); Political Science/Criminal Justice (+87%); and Physics/Geology (+ 299%). Please be reassured that we are taking active steps to increase our enrollment. This summer, we completed a new video brochure (available on our website), a new full-color departmental brochure, vast enhancements to our website, and a Facebook page for our graduate program. Special thanks to Burke Miller, Tracy DeBellevue, Aleia Brown, Debra Meyers, Carol Medlicott, and Eric Jackson for all of their help with these developments. Further, our outreach this past year ranks among the very best at the entire university, with exhibits and programming ranging from the massive St. Elizabeth Healthcare 150th Anniversary Project to the Fort Thomas Museum, to the Behringer-Crawford Museum, History Day, MWOW! (Museums without Walls!), the Fort Mitchell Centennial Project, the Shaker Hymnal Project, our contributions to the 6@6 Lecture Series (with Jim Ramage and Carol Medlicott) and to the impressive school outreach of Burke Miller. Overall, our programs reached over 100,000 regional residents, an accomplishment that will go far in our recruitment efforts. Further, the MA in Public History program surpassed an enrollment of 50 this Fall. Although the SAP system currently counts 520 undergraduate majors in our programs, we know that probably 100+ of these are “inactive.” We will be doing our best to track these inactive majors who have, for various reasons, “stopped out” or even “dropped out.” Thanks to Provost Gail Wells, and Dean Sam Zachary, we will be hiring a person in the next month or so to assist us in this task, namely to identify and advise at-risk and transfer students, and to increase our retention rates. We will share this person half-time with the English Department. Of course, we must also concentrate on increasing our total student credit hours, as well as our SCH/FTE. The latter will determine our future operating budgets, as well as fulltime faculty lines. We can no longer depend on General Education for growth in student credit hours, as we could before implementation of the new GenEd in Fall 2010, and as demonstrated by these departmental enrollment statistics: SCH and our GEN ED enrollment: Fall 2009: OLD GEN ED: 3,140 students in 99 GenEd sections Fall 2010: NEW GEN ED: 1,952 students in 66 GenEd sections Fall 2011: NEW GEN ED: 2,084 students in 62 GenEd sections What we’ve done so far to attempt to improve our SCH/FTE:  Drastically reduced Gen Ed sections  Laid off a dozen part-time instructors  Laid off 3 fulltime Lecturers  Increased enrollments in both GenEd and upper-level classes  Increased online offerings of both GenEd and upper-level courses from 6 sections in Fall 2009 to 21 in Fall 2010 and 27 sections in Fall 2011  Designed and implemented a Course Rotation plan  Deleted courses through UCC  Added new offerings through UCC  Added an online concentration in History


 Increased number of student majors  Streamlined the Military History minor  Inaugurated an MA in Public History Future efforts to increase SCH, SCH/FTE, and the number of our majors must concentrate on attracting new audiences. This is especially true in light of the new CPE “Academic Programs Procedures” document that expresses concerns for programs that have “fewer than 12 degrees awarded during a five-year period.” Also of importance is the document’s following statement: “The combination of core courses within any major or area and core courses within a track or concentration should equal at least half of the credit hours in the academic program at the undergraduate and master’s levels.” While undergoing our program review this academic year, we should be proactive and adopt the 50% rule for our History and Geography BA programs. Hopefully, we can create a lively debate as to how we accomplish that goal. To get the discussion started, I attach two documents: Plan A for the History Major, and Suggested Guidelines for our Program Review. I have asked Burke Miller to create a new sidebar on our Blackboard site under “Topics” for “Program Review,” where we will upload these and other documents to guide our debates. During our program review, we will also need to create a senior Capstone experience for our History major. Exactly how our minors in History, Geography, Black Studies, Women’s & Gender Studies, Military History, and Medieval & Renaissance Studies will fare under the new CPE guidelines is still very uncertain. Again, it is better to be proactive than reactive. In case minors decline university-wide and statewide, we need to be prepared to step up to the plate with new programs. As part of our plans to “grow” our department in terms of majors and student credit hours, we will also be discussing proposals for an online major in History, as well as a new major in Race and Gender Studies. So, we have much work ahead of us this academic year. Our department has arisen to the occasion many times over the years, has met new challenges, and has forged ahead. As the saying goes in the business world, “If you don’t like change, you’ll like irrelevancy even less.” Change is inevitable. Let’s choose growth together. Thanks for all that you do to make this department well-beloved by its students. Paul Paul A. Tenkotte, Ph.D. Chairperson, History and Geography Black Studies, and Women's & Gender Studies Northern Kentucky University Landrum Academic Center 415A Nunn Drive Highland Heights, KY 41076 tenkottep@nku.edu 859-572-5461 (secretary) 859-572-6186 (office) 859-572-6088 (fax)


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