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Edition 62, Issue 2 Wednesday, August 29, 2018 www.thenortherner.com

@northernermedia

NORSE GO PRO By Mike Canizales SPORTS EDITOR

F

ormer NKU men’s basketball stars Jordan Garnett and Lavone Holland II have signed to play with competitive European professional teams. Garnett and Holland are both members of the legendary Norse squad that took the team to an NCAA National Tournament in the program’s first eligible year in Division I. Garnett signed with Omonia Nicosia Aug. 25, a pro team based in Cyprus. Holland signed with the Den Helder Suns, a Dutch team, on Aug. 27. (Story continues on pages 4 & 5) PHOTOS BY COLIN JOHNSON

Lavone Holland II (left) and Jordan Garnett (right) both signed to professional Eurpoean teams this week.

Page 3 Mitch McConnell at NKU

Page 4 & 5

Norse basketball stars sign to pro teams

Page 6

‘Traveling Feast’ comes to campus

Page 7

Adult education changes PACE

Page 8

Women’s soccer falls to Bearcats


02 Happenings

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

NORTHERNER STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Sam Rosenstiel [ramsosenstiel@gmail.com] MANAGING EDITOR Nicole Browning [browningn30@gmail.com] NEWS EDITOR Natalie Hamren [hamrenn1@mymail.nku.edu] ASST. NEWS EDITOR Josh Goad [goadj2@mymail.nku.edu] ARTS & LIFE EDITOR Maria Dossett [dossettm1@mymail.nku.edu] ASST. ARTS & LIFE EDITOR Josh Kelly [kellyjoshual17@gmail.com] SPORTS EDITOR Mike Canizales [canizalesm1@mymail.nku.edu] PHOTO EDITOR Colin Johnson

WHAT TO DO Check out the hottest campus happenings and can’t-miss events in Greater Cincinnati. 30

AUG

GOLD ANNIVERSARY ON THE SILVER SCREEN | DIGITORIUM | 6:30 P.M.

To honor NKU’s 50th anniversary, English and Cinema Studies is flashing back to 1968 with “Planet of the Apes”. Every two weeks, free screenings of 1968 films will offer complimentary popcorn, chocolate covered pretzels, water and other concessions.

1

CRUISE-A-PALOOZA | CONEY ISLAND | 12 - 4 P.M.

2

RUBBER DUCK REGATTA | NEWPORT ON THE LEVEE | 3 P.M.

SEPT SEPT

2

SEPT

Classic cars will be revving their engines at the car show on Coney Island. Different makes and models from over the years will be showcased throughout the afternoon. The event is free to guests.

Looking to leave the nest this weekend? Waddle on down to the Levee to see 200,000 rubber ducks migrate along the Serpentine Wall by the Newport Levee. The ducks will begin floating at 3:00. Don’t worry you cheep-skates: unlike ducks, this event has no bill.

RIVERFEST & WEBN FIREWORKS | RIVERBOAT ROW | NOON - 9 P.M.

Live entertainment, food and beverages along Riverboat Row from noon to 9 p.m., with the largest and oldest fireworks display in Cincinnati. Come rock out and watch stuff blow up.

[johnsonphotography6626@gmail.com]

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Jasmine Cummins [cumminsj5@mymail.nku.edu] VIDEO EDITOR Clay Crouch [wclaycrouch@gmail.com] DESIGN EDITOR Bridgette Gootee [gooteeb1@mymail.nku.edu] DESIGN EDITOR Ian Lape-Gerwe [lapegerwei@mymail.nku.edu] WEB EDITOR Laine Harrett [harrettn1@mymail.nku.edu] ASST. WEB EDITOR Steven Geiger [geigers3@mymail.nku.edu] SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Emerson Swoger [emeswagg16@gmail.com] SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Kate Fulmer [fulmerk1@mymail.nku.edu] BUSINESS TEAM Tristan Tapia [northerneradvertising@gmail.com] BUSINESS ADVISOR Ashley Hempfling [ahempfling@enquirer.com] ADVISOR Michele Day [daymi@nku.edu] JOIN US 5 p.m. Mondays in Griffin Hall 204

FURTHER DETAILS Entire content is copyright of The Northerner and may not be reprinted without prior consent. Views expressed do not represent those of the administration, faculty or student body. The Northerner is considered a designated public forum. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. The Northerner staff respects the right to a free and open dialogue as allowed under the First Amendment.

CONTACT INFO

The Northerner Griffin Hall Rm. 125 Highland Heights, KY 41099 Editor in Chief: (859) 572-6128 Designers Desk: (859) 572-6677 Advertising: (859) 572-5232 Website: www.thenortherner.com

u n i v e r s i t y

POLICE BEAT

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From University Police logs, here’s the week in crime at NKU.

Aug. 21 - Student reported being stalked by another student on campus. Aug. 21 - Camera missing or stolen from Loch Norse area near Steely Library. Aug. 23 - Student reported another student harassed them several times over the week in Kentucky Hall. Aug. 27 - Student reported a sexual assault in Kentucky Hall on Aug. 22. Police said the male suspect is not a student and met the victim on a dating app.

What you missed at SGA Aug. 27 RYAN CLIFTON CONTRIBUTOR

Student Government Association carried out its second meeting of the 2018-19 fall semester, discussed accusations leveled against a judicial nominee and confirmed a new justice. Here’s what you missed at the SGA meeting on Aug. 27, 2018:

Allegations of white supremacy In response to allegations of white supremacy leveled against judicial nominee Trey Baker, SGA held discussed the allegations. Baker, also a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, was not appointed to the judicial council after a guest at the meeting leveled charges of homophobia and racism against him at SGA’s Aug. 22 meeting. “These allegations are totally fabricated,” Baker said. Derek Holden, president of Tau Kappa Epsilon called the allegations an “indictment of [Baker]’s character” and “baseless.” “This is not who we are as a fraternity,” Holden said. “We believe in love, charity and esteem.” The student senate engaged in a Q&A with members of Tau Kappa Epsilon. Baker said he would be back next week seeking another chance at becoming an SGA justice.

SGA members voiced overwhelming support for her candidacy. Previously, Voland served as a first-term senator and a Veterans Resource liaison. She was motivated to run for SGA justice by her “loyalty to NKU” and her “willingness to serve the student body.” She also hopes to use her position to help SGA accomplish its goals and fulfill its purpose. “I feel that as a justice I can help SGA accomplish many different things,” Voland said. “I hope to help senators accomplish something, even if not just resolutions.”

Confirming a new justice SGA appointed and confirmed sophomore Alex Voland as a one of five justices who oversee the interpretation of the SGA constitution and the soundness of resolutions passed by the SGA.

SGA meets 3:30 p.m. Mondays in SU 104.


Ed 62, Issue 2

News 03

D ada, McConnell Bluford praises win SGA Kentucky presidential at NKU ejudge lection Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks to northern Kentucky judges, politicians and lawyers at NKU’s Greaves Concert Hall, Aug. 27, 2018.

By Sam Rosenstiel

PHOTO BY COLIN JOHNSON

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell lauded President Donald Trump’s pick for a federal judge in Greaves Concert Hall Monday. “He is clearly a standout individual and incredible legal talent,” McConnell told an audience of northern Kentucky judges, politicians and lawyers gathered in Greaves. “That’s why I recommended him to President Trump for this nomination.” The event honored new U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge John B. Nalbandian, a northern Kentucky native that has practiced law for over 20 years in Cincinnati and served several government legal agencies. McConnell ribbed Senate Democrats and other 6th Circuit judges for getting only Republican votes at their confirmation. Nalbandian was confirmed in May, 52-43, with three Democratic votes. “So we’ve got here bipartisan support,” McConnell joked. “Knowing the Senate these days, that’s a little unusual, as our friends on the minority side seem to have a little different view of who should be put on the federal courts.” Nalbandian is the seventh AsianPacific American to serve as a U.S. appeals court judge. In addition to private practice, he was appointed a special Kentucky Supreme Court Justice in 2007.

In 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Nalbandian to the State Justice Institute, a non-profit agency that aims to improve state courts. McConnell called Nalbandian “unanimously well-qualified” and “the perfect choice” for the 6th Circuit, which handles appeals cases sent from lower courts. 6th Circuit Judge and Chase professor Amul Thapar administered Nalbandian’s oath Monday. Thapar made national news in July as a finalist for the U.S. Supreme Court, though Trump ultimately chose D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the seat. Northern Kentucky native Nalbandian has been a judge on the 6th Circuit for three months. Monday’s ceremony, a judicial investiture, celebrates the start of his tenure on the bench. President Ashish Vaidya welcomed the court and supporters, noting NKU’s Chase College is celebrating 100 years of women in law education in 2018. State Senator Wil Schroder and State Representative Joe Fischer, who both represent NKU’s district and nearby Campbell County, attended the investiture. Nalbandian compared becoming a Circuit Judge to “kind of like getting struck by lightning,” a result of luck more than anything else. “But having it happen to two people like Amul [Thapar] and me who

have been friends from the same region at the same time for the same way is probably not a bet that I would have taken,” Nalbandian said. “Well I suppose that depends

on what the odds are on that.” Nalbandian closed by remembering the mantra of one of his heroes, the late Sen. John McCain: “Serve a cause greater than yourself.”

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04 Sports

Sports 05

Holland, Garnett sign to European pro teams (continued from cover)

By Mike Canizales SPORTS EDITOR

F

ormer NKU men’s basketball standout and 2017 Horizon League Tournament MVP Lavone Holland II signed his first professional contract to play overseas with the Den Helder Suns in the Netherlands. The Suns were founded in 2016 and entered the Dutch Basketball League, the highest level of men’s professional basketball in the Netherlands, in the 2017-18 season. “Lavone can handle both guard positions well, has length, scoring ability and is versatile,” said Suns head coach Peter van Noord. “We were looking for such a type of player and think we have found the right man in Lavone. He is creative and complementary to the Dutch core we have and has a good shot coupled with speed and we are looking forward to next season.” Averaging 13.8 points per game and a team-high 140 assists last season, Holland II graduated 19th all-time in scoring (1,250) and was the only player in the Horizon League to average double-digit scoring and more than four assists and four rebounds per game. He also became the 27th member of NKU’s 1,000-point club when he hit a jumper at the top of the key against Oakland in January. Like Garnett, Holland played an integral part in the Norse’s initial success during its first two years of eligibility in Division I status. He helped lead the team to a Horizon League regular season and tournament championship, an NCAA tournament appearance against Kentucky and an NIT appearance against Louisville. No other program has achieved this amount of success in their first two years of Division I play. The 6’1”, 185-pound guard from Ballard High School in Louisville also ranks 5th in assists per game (4.2), 7th all-time at NKU in total assists (396),19th in steals (108) and 38th in rebounds (362). “Our goal is to prepare our young men for two careers when they leave Northern Kentucky University, a career beyond basketball in their chosen field and a professional basketball career,” Norse head coach John Brannen told The Northerner.

By Mike Canizales SPORTS EDITOR

F

PHOTOS BY COLIN JOHNSON AND MATT SEXTON

Lavone Holland II (30) and Jordan Garnett (1).

ormer Northern Kentucky University men’s basketball star forward Jordan Garnett has signed to play his rookie season overseas in Cyprus Division A with Omonia Nicosia. Omonia Nicosia is based in Nicosia, Cyprus, an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean, and competes as a member of the Cypriot Basketball Division A, the highest level of men’s professional basketball in the league system. Averaging 6.6 points and 2 assists per game last season, Garnett graduated 18th on NKU’s all-time games played list (113) and equalled his career best in points (15) against Memphis, James Madison and Texas A&M. Garnett was largely underrated during his time with the Norse but earned a reputation as a tenacious defender in the 2016-17 season. Notably, he shut down the nation’s then-fourth-most prolific scorer, Youngstown State’s Cameron Morse who averaged 23.1 points per game, to just 13 points on 4-for-14 shooting. Though he was a part of last year’s Horizon League regular season championship team, Garnett’s name is etched in school history as a member of the iconic Norse squad that earned a NCAA Division I National Tournament berth in the program’s first eligible year. The Norse became the seventh team all-time and only the second since 1970 to qualify for the NCAA tournament in its first year after reclassifying to D1. This summer, the 6’5”, 220-pound forward from Warren Central High School in Indianapolis attended the Free Agency/SBS Louisville pro workout and was a top five player in the event. Shortly thereafter, he signed with Free Agency Basketball (Spain) and competed in Las Vegas at the Kentucky Pro-Am Summer League, where he was named to the honorable mention team.


04 Sports

Sports 05

Holland, Garnett sign to European pro teams (continued from cover)

By Mike Canizales SPORTS EDITOR

F

ormer NKU men’s basketball standout and 2017 Horizon League Tournament MVP Lavone Holland II signed his first professional contract to play overseas with the Den Helder Suns in the Netherlands. The Suns were founded in 2016 and entered the Dutch Basketball League, the highest level of men’s professional basketball in the Netherlands, in the 2017-18 season. “Lavone can handle both guard positions well, has length, scoring ability and is versatile,” said Suns head coach Peter van Noord. “We were looking for such a type of player and think we have found the right man in Lavone. He is creative and complementary to the Dutch core we have and has a good shot coupled with speed and we are looking forward to next season.” Averaging 13.8 points per game and a team-high 140 assists last season, Holland II graduated 19th all-time in scoring (1,250) and was the only player in the Horizon League to average double-digit scoring and more than four assists and four rebounds per game. He also became the 27th member of NKU’s 1,000-point club when he hit a jumper at the top of the key against Oakland in January. Like Garnett, Holland played an integral part in the Norse’s initial success during its first two years of eligibility in Division I status. He helped lead the team to a Horizon League regular season and tournament championship, an NCAA tournament appearance against Kentucky and an NIT appearance against Louisville. No other program has achieved this amount of success in their first two years of Division I play. The 6’1”, 185-pound guard from Ballard High School in Louisville also ranks 5th in assists per game (4.2), 7th all-time at NKU in total assists (396),19th in steals (108) and 38th in rebounds (362). “Our goal is to prepare our young men for two careers when they leave Northern Kentucky University, a career beyond basketball in their chosen field and a professional basketball career,” Norse head coach John Brannen told The Northerner.

By Mike Canizales SPORTS EDITOR

F

PHOTOS BY COLIN JOHNSON AND MATT SEXTON

Lavone Holland II (30) and Jordan Garnett (1).

ormer Northern Kentucky University men’s basketball star forward Jordan Garnett has signed to play his rookie season overseas in Cyprus Division A with Omonia Nicosia. Omonia Nicosia is based in Nicosia, Cyprus, an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean, and competes as a member of the Cypriot Basketball Division A, the highest level of men’s professional basketball in the league system. Averaging 6.6 points and 2 assists per game last season, Garnett graduated 18th on NKU’s all-time games played list (113) and equalled his career best in points (15) against Memphis, James Madison and Texas A&M. Garnett was largely underrated during his time with the Norse but earned a reputation as a tenacious defender in the 2016-17 season. Notably, he shut down the nation’s then-fourth-most prolific scorer, Youngstown State’s Cameron Morse who averaged 23.1 points per game, to just 13 points on 4-for-14 shooting. Though he was a part of last year’s Horizon League regular season championship team, Garnett’s name is etched in school history as a member of the iconic Norse squad that earned a NCAA Division I National Tournament berth in the program’s first eligible year. The Norse became the seventh team all-time and only the second since 1970 to qualify for the NCAA tournament in its first year after reclassifying to D1. This summer, the 6’5”, 220-pound forward from Warren Central High School in Indianapolis attended the Free Agency/SBS Louisville pro workout and was a top five player in the event. Shortly thereafter, he signed with Free Agency Basketball (Spain) and competed in Las Vegas at the Kentucky Pro-Am Summer League, where he was named to the honorable mention team.


Ed 62, Issue 2

Arts & Life 06

Author NKU taste of new book D a d a gives , ‘The Traveling Feast’ and thanking mentors

Bluford win SGA presidential election

By Noël Waltz CONTRIBUTOR

Rick Bass, an environmental activist and author, read from his most recent work, “The Traveling Feast: On the Road and at the Table with My Heroes” in the Otto M. Budig Theatre at NKU’s University Center Wednesday. After thanking the event sponsors, the Friends of Steely Library and Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement, Bass stressed the importance of staying in motion. “[It’s] the only thing that you can do to keep from going crazy. Don’t think about winning or losing, just keep moving,” Bass said. It is common for writers to write eulogies of their favorite mentors when they pass away; however, Bass discussed the sadness that those who pass do not get to hear nor read those kind words. That’s when he decided that he was going to visit his literary mentors and tell them everything that he would otherwise put into a eulogy. “Of course I don’t just say, ‘I’m going to tell you how nice you are before you die,’ but that was kind of what it was,” Bass said. At the same time, he started cooking and loved it. “I started to think I was a pretty good cook…but what I would never do was cook for somebody else in their kitchen.” That’s where the brilliant idea for “The Traveling Feast” flourished — a documentation of his travel to show gratitude to all of his favorite literary mentors, by cooking a nice meal for them in their kitchen while warming their hearts at the dinner table. When he read from chapter four of his book, the crowd fell absolutely silent. Everyone in the room was drawn to the specificity of Bass’ description of his feast with Denis Johnson, an American writer and mentor of Bass, and Johnson’s wife, Cindy. “…Back up into Denis’ Valley, following an intricate system of logging roads more washboarded and torturous than my own. The glass casserole dishes and metal pots and pans jangle and clatter rhythmically, and the dust of autumn plumes. Our teeth rattle, the windows are down, music’s playing,” Bass read. At the finish, the crowd erupted in applause. During the Q&A portion of the event, Bass spoke about the reality of being a writer. He discussed the revision process, the effect that location has on the pace and energy of his writing and how busy his schedule can be when juggling his literary career and activism. His advice to young writers receiving peer review in college is to accept and use the ideas shared by your peers about your work; however, it is also important to stay true to yourself and to have an equal mix of confidence and humility.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY LOWRY BASS


Ed 62, Issue 2

News 07

Dada, Changing PACE: NKU’s adult learning program expands Bluford win SGA presidential election PACE, NKU’s adult education program is expanding to encompass more majors as Adult Learners Programs and Services (ALPS). PHOTO PROVIDED BY TIM SOFRANKO

By Nicole Browning MANAGING

EDITOR

For anyone trying to access the website for NKU’s Program for Adult Centered Education (PACE), you might be concerned to see a blank screen. But PACE isn’t ending — the program offered to approximately 200300 non-traditional students is broadening. Amy Danzo, director of Adult Learner Programs and Services (ALPS), describes PACE as a successful way for adult students in the workforce to complete their degree. But she says it’s time for a change. “[PACE] was a program underneath this bigger umbrella called ALPS...since it’s not going to be its own program anymore, it’s going to be opened up to everyone—all adult students. It makes sense to close that umbrella,” Danzo said. According to Danzo, the program offered such concentrated help to its students that it had to be limited to a smaller number. This included extensive advising, pre-admission counseling, recruitment and creating a path to graduation. The smaller PACE program offered only a handful of majors: computer information technology, business information systems, organizational leadership and integrative studies. “When people think of PACE, they think of those four majors,” Danzo said. “We don’t want them to think like that anymore. “We want anyone—whether you’re in

anthropology, or you’re in nursing, or you’re in a business major or you’re in psychology, we want all adult students to feel like they can come and use our services.” That “anyone” includes the 2,500 nontraditional adult students here at NKU. Although the program is opening itself up to a larger population, the staff includes Danzo and two ALPS coordinators and advisors, Sara Conwell and Kim McCoy. The challenge now is to do more with less. “We’ll see what happens. I think if this continues to be successful and we continue to grow it... and we can prove that these services are necessary, then possibly we’ll get more people to help us then,” Danzo said. “But right now, it’s us three.” Although the difference between 300 and 2,500 may seem vast, Danzo said current adult students aren’t necessarily in need of some of the services ALPS provides, such as information about registration. Still, they are welcome to seek help with other inquiries; ALPS recruits nontraditional adult students, helps incoming students receive credit for courses based on their previous certifications and experience, advises students and exists as an anchor when adult responsibilities such as raising children or working full time can get to be too much. “Our mission is to see to it that adult

students are retained and graduated here at NKU. If they stick with us, we’re going to help them through that,” Danzo said. One thing Conwell emphasized was the importance of professors in the role of ALPS. Without the professors, she said, night classes would not be available to students who work during the day. In effect, ALPS wouldn’t exist. “As soon as they’re done at 5 o’clock, they’re coming to campus for class at 6 and they’re here until almost 10. And they get up the next morning and they do it all over again,” Conwell said. “The instructors, they understand. They just get it.” Anson Turley, a PACE student turned ALPS student, 51, is an organizational leadership major who had no desire to go back to college online. “Sitting at home alone on a computer is not my idea of beneficial learning,” Turley said. Turley said he’s met really great people on the program and benefited from this educational avenue that worked well with his schedule. “It’s allowed me to pursue my degree while at the same time taking care of my work and family responsibilities,” Turley said. The relationships formed through PACE and now through ALPS, according to all three ALPS staff members were a key component of their excitement about expanding the

program. McCoy said a gratifying part of PACE and ALPS is hearing feedback from graduates they helped along the way. “It feels good getting those emails, like, ‘Thank you,’” McCoy said. Danzo also expressed her gratitude for the hard work that Conwell and McCoy invested in the students of PACE, and she’s excited to work with them as PACE transitions to ALPS. “If you talk to any of these PACE students, you will not hear one horrible thing about these two,” Danzo said. “They’re amazing advisors; they are always so responsive to their students. They’ve been nominated by their students for awards and I feel lucky, very, very lucky, to be able to work with them and learn from them. “And I’ve learned a lot already. They’re helping me to be a better champion for adult students.”

“Sitting at home alone on a computer is not my idea of beneficial learning.” - Anson Turley, ALPS student


08 Sports

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Women’s soccer falls to UC

Keeper Emily Lohmann (00) reacts after letting in a goal during overtime in the game against UC. PHOTO BY COLIN JOHNSON

Norse lose third straight Riverboat Rivalry By Aric France CONTRIBUTOR

The NKU women’s soccer team fell in overtime to University of Cincinnati 1-0 in the third annual “Riverboat Rivalry” at Gettler Stadium Sunday. With the loss, the Norse drop to 2-2 overall on the season, while the Bearcats move to 3-0 overall. It’s the third year in a row the Bearcats defeated the Norse by a score of 1-0. “[Bearcats head coach Neil Stafford] has done a great job with the UC program,” Norse head coach Bob Sheehan said. “This match has become such a great showcase for our two programs.” Just minutes into overtime, the Norse had an opportunity to score after Ally Perkins crossed the ball into the box and found Samantha Duwel, who then fired a shot that was blocked by the Bearcats defense. Shortly after, the Bearcats’ Jill Vetere netted the game-winning goal in the 98th minute off a corner kick from Dee Picou. Senior goalie Emily Lohmann played the entire 98 minutes and led the Norse as she faced 18 shots and collected six saves. “Emily was fantastic in goal tonight,” Sheehan said. “Our defensive shape and work ethic was again outstanding, we competed for 98 plus minutes and we will learn and grow from this match.”

Chloe Mills took the first shot in the 13th minute for the Norse but was quickly deflected by Bearcats goalie Madison Less. The redshirt sophomore sprang into action again as she would make two more saves in the 20th and 21st minute. Lohmann would join in on the action between the net, as she used her foot to clear a shot from Bearcats midfielder Emi Carlo in the 29th minute and Picou’s kick from outside the box in the 40th minute. After making two crucial saves in the 83rd and 85th minute, Lohmann would continue her dominance throughout the second half and helped send the game into overtime. The Norse missed an opportunity to score early on, after Duwel fired a shot deflected by the Bearcats defense. The Bearcats would seal the victory minutes later, after Vetere grounded the ball off of a corner kick by Picou and fired a shot past Lohmann. 987 fans turned out for the match, marking it the eighth-largest home crowd for the Bearcats and the 16th-largest crowd they have ever played (home or away). The Norse will hit the road and travel to Athens, Ohio to take on the Bobcats of Ohio University, Friday, Aug. 31. Kickoff is scheduled for 4 p.m.

Above: Shawna Zaken (8) fights toward the goal before releasing a shot during the game against UC. Right: Head Coach Bob Sheehan argues with a referee about a call on the field. PHOTOS BY COLIN JOHNSON

The Northerner | Ed. 62 Issue 2  
The Northerner | Ed. 62 Issue 2