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Real People. Real Life.

P.O. BOX 39 n MARYSVILLE, WA 98270

www.northcountyoutlook.com Vol. 13 No. 15 n December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Arlington Rotary Club puts together holiday food baskets By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Arlington Rotary Club members helped put together and deliver food baskets for community members who are in need and homebound on Dec. 19. The annual program from the Arlington Rotary Club has been going on for 30 years now. “Rotary is about ‘Service above Self.’ That is our mission,” said Carla Gastineau, executive director of the Arlington Community Food Bank and an Arlington Rotary member. “We’re blessed as business owners, leaders and managers and it’s important to give back." Rotary members sign up to sponsor individual basSee ROTARY on page 8

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Matt Urtz, left, and Quinnly Urtz meet Santa Claus during the Tulalip Santa Run on Dec. 20.

Tulalip Santa Run collects for food bank By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington Rotary member Devin Broussard, right, grabs some potatoes for one of the club’s food baskets for the homebound being held by member Brad Kihm, during the club’s packing event on Dec. 19.

The Tulalip Santa Run brought local firefighters and Santa Claus around various Tulalip neighborhoods from Dec. 20 to 22. The event helps raise donations for the food bank at the Tulalip Church of God (the Little Red Church). “We’ll be going around

just getting some pictures if they want pictures with Santa Claus and collecting food and cash donations that help the local food bank,” said firefighter Patrick Dinneen, who has been the main organizer for the event for the last three years. Santa Claus goes around

See SANTA on page 6

Hilton Pharmacy celebrates 100 years of service to Marysville By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Hilton Pharmacy celebrated its 100th birthday this month as the business remains a staple of the downtown Marysville community. Jeffrey Hilton Sr. bought the pharmacy on Dec. 7, 1919. At that time it was a branch of the Everett Drug Co. Hilton’s great-granddaughter Mary Kirkland has owned the business since 1984. “The pharmacy was found on what was then called Front Street and is now First Street,” said Kirkland. In the early ‘20s the business moved into it’s current storefront on Third Street, although it was only 1,000-square-feet at the time. It’s gradually expanded to the 4,000-square-foot space it now owns. Kirkland’s uncle owned the pharmacy

for a long time before she did. “There was a soda fountain right in the front window and I often talk to old-timers who often say they remember sitting in front of the window and having a malt or whatever drink,” she said. “Not too long ago I got a note from my cousin Tom and he remembers coming here after Sunday school and he would come with his friends and uncle Jeff would give them a free soda,” said Kirkland. She said her family has enjoyed being part of the Marysville community. “The druggist was a good friend to everyone at that time and helped everybody, and that’s what my uncle Jeff did,” she said. “He was not only the pharmacist and the druggist, but he was a piano player who played at the opera house,” she said. See HILTON on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Hilton Pharmacy staff member Janet Wiklund McAllister talks to customer Kelly Sunagel on Dec. 20.

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Communities

December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

s ’ h a e L eads L Check out these upcoming local events! DECEMBER

26

Warm Beach Lights of Christmas December 26-29 5:00pm – 10:00pm www.thelightsofchristmas.com

26

Wildlights December 26 – January 5 5:30pm – 8:30pm Woodland Park Zo www.zoo.org

30

Blood Drive December 30, 10am – 12pm, 1pm – 4pm Marysville Police Department www.marysvillewa.gov

31

Black and White Ball December 31, 6:00pm – 1:00am Tulalip Resort Casino www.tulalipresortcasino.com

31

New Year’s Eve at the Oxford Saloon December 31, 8:00pm – 12:00am Oxford Saloon, Snohomish www.oxfordsaloonsnohomish.com

HILTON Continued from page 1

Helping her Marysville neighbors remains one of the things she enjoys most about running the business, said Kirkland. “Certainly serving the community and being a pharmacist, helping people with their health and wellness and finding solutions,” she said. Third Street remains one of the areas in downtown Marysville with the most history behind it, while many of the surrounding areas have changed greatly throughout the years. Including a butcher shop, a theater, a furniture store and a shoe store, there have been a lot of other businesses that have come and gone throughout Hilton Pharmacy’s time there, said Kirkland. “It used to be that the mall area was homes and some businesses. Across the street in the ‘20s was a garage/automobile repair place,” she said.

The pharmacy has changed as well, with more gifts and other types of merchandise offered throughout the years instead of focusing solely on medicine. Many community members appreciate the store and its presence in the downtown. "We're really proud of her and excited to celebrate this milestone," said Lorene Wren, owner of nearby Wrenhaven Vintage Market. "Mary is the absolute queen of Marysville. She is the kindest and most compassionate person I've ever met. She always does the right thing," said Wren. Kirkland helps organize many of the Third Street events, from street fairs to the annual downtown Halloween event. "She's definitely involved in a lot of the downtown activities. We wouldn't be where we are today without her," said Wren. "Hilton Pharmacy is such an institution in this city,” said Marysville Mayor

____

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Hilton Pharmacy wouldn't have survived without the great people that we've had come through. Without them and without really loyal customers we wouldn't have made it to 100.

____

Mary Kirkland

Jon Nehring. "It is one of the shops that make Marysville the city that it is." Many Marysville residents enjoy seeing Hilton Pharmacy still be a part of the town, said Nehring. "We're really happy to have them in our community and we're excited to celebrate this milestone with them,” he said. Throughout the years many people have memories of the store. "What we love is the history behind the pharmacy. So many people who have lived here have been able

to enjoy the store over the years,” said Nehring. Kirkland thanked her employees and her customers for supporting the pharmacy. She added that many of the employees have been high school kids and many of the employees were residents of Marysville. “Hilton Pharmacy wouldn’t have survived without the great people that we’ve had come through,” she said. “Without them and without really loyal customers we wouldn’t have made it to 100.”

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(Back, L to R) Christina, Christopher, Sue, Nathan, Scott, Carole. (Front, L to R) Leah, Terrie (& Tiny) and Leslie. Marysville • Arlington • Smokey Point Lakewood • Tulalip • Quil Ceda Village P.O. Box 39 • 1331 State Avenue, Ste. A, Marysville 360-659-1100 • Fax 360-658-7536 www.northcountyoutlook.com

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

seeking multi-cultural entertainment

A new community event titled “Stronger Together” is currently being planned for Saturday, May 16, 2020. The planning committee is seeking groups to provide multicultural entertainment. We are also inviting cultural and equity groups to have a presence at the event. The entertainment will be presented on stage at Legion Park from approximately 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in approximately 45-minute sets. Interested groups should contact Sarah Lopez at the City of Arlington for more information at 360403-3448. The entertainment should provide cultural enrichment and could be dance, song, poetry or instrumental. In addition to entertainment, there will be interactive activities, displays, education opportunities, and a community resource fair. Organizations who would like to have a booth in the exhibitors’ tent should contact Will Nelson at Arlington School District 360618-6228. The event is a collaboration of people from Arlington, Lakewood, and Darrington School districts, the Stillaguamish and SaukSuaittle Tribes, the City of Arlington and Town of Darrington, Sno-Isle Libraries, and other agencies and volunteers from our areas. More information on the program: www.arlingtonwa. gov/stronger.


facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Communities

December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

Bridge construction on State Avenue to begin in 2020 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

State Avenue will be five lanes for the entirety of it’s run once a new bridge is built for the 100th Street area. Construction of the bridge and other improvements for the area of State Avenue between 100th and 104th streets is scheduled to begin early in 2020. The project is estimated to cost $11.8 million and $6.2 million of that is coming from the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board while the rest of the funds are coming from the city through its Streets Capital Improvements Fund. “Revenues for this fund are generated through grants, loans, developer mitigation fees, and real estate excise taxes,” said Pat Gruenhagen, city project manager. Construction is expected to last until fall of 2021. This area of State Avenue is the only section of the street that hasn’t received improvements in the past two decades. Because of the culvert the project would be the most difficult and expensive to replace as it required building a new bridge across Quilceda Creek. That means that it is the only portion of State Avenue remain-

ing at three lanes, which can cause problems during high traffic volume times. “Since it lies in such close proximity to I-5 — paralleling the interstate for a number of miles — State Avenue has traditionally served as the ‘go-to’ alternate route when incidents occur on the freeway within the Marysville area,” said Gruenhagen. “When this is the case, substantial volumes of traffic are suddenly introduced to State Avenue, and the five-lane roadway section is much more able to handle this demand than the current threelane section,” he said. More cars will be able to get onto this section of State Avenue with five lanes as well, he said. Gruenhagen also added that the expansion is meant to support further growth in the city, which most projections say is coming. “This is also one of the underlying reasons for the current project — knowing that as the population grows and demands on the city’s transportation network continue to rise, the added lanes will provide the necessary capacity to keep pace with growing demand and thereby reduce the likelihood of future congestion,” he said. The new bridge is expected

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

This section of State Avenue is currently has a culvert for Quilceda Creek and is planned to become a bridge with construction beginning in early 2020.

to be an improvement over the current culvert for the Quilceda Creek. A large portion of the stream is currently covered by an “earthen embankment” that the roadway is on top of. “By replacing this with a bridge, it opens up the area dramatically, creating new wildlife habitat where once there was none,” said Gruenhagen. The city is also responsible for wetland restoration in those areas, he said. “Lastly, fish passage will be vastly improved as well, as the open stream channel will prove superior to the culvert in allowing fish to traverse the area unim-

peded,” he said. A number of other improvements are meant to improve the roadway conditions for drivers and pedestrians. Five-foot-wide sidewalks are planned for both sides of the roadway, along with a cement concrete curb. “This will provide a safer means for pedestrians to travel the corridor, particularly in the area of the stream crossing,” said Gruenhagen. Lights are also planned for the new bridge. “They will be ‘decorative’ luminaries, very similar to those found along State Avenue to the

north and south,” said Gruenhagen. Strider Construction is the contractor for the project and Gruenhagen said the city is working with them to reduce traffic impacts. “This will include a construction phasing scheme that allows for traffic to be routed around construction areas utilizing temporary lane shifts that will keep two lanes of traffic flowing just as they do today,” said Gruenhagen. “Intermittent traffic interruptions may be necessary for the setting of bridge girders and other critical activities, but they will be kept brief,” he said.


4

Sports

December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO ANDREW HINES

Chargers’ Kameron Wilkes leads the pack early on in the 100-yard butterfly against the Lake Stevens Vikings at MarysvillePilchuck High School on Dec. 17.

M'ville swim takes on Lake Stevens By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Arlington’s junior guard Abbey Hassing moves the ball upcourt against the Cedarcrest Red Wolves at Arlington High School on Dec. 17.

Arlington defeats Cedarcrest 67-44 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Arlington girls basketball team opened up the regular season on their home court as they matched up with the Cedarcrest Red Wolves on Dec. 17. The Eagles got off to a fast start as they forced turnovers and made their shots to go on a quick 15-7 run halfway through the opening quarter. Cedarcrest called a time out with 4:23 left in the first and came out of it as a different team, outpacing the Arlington

defense and hitting open threes. Through the rest of the quarter the Red Wolves outscored the Eagles 10-4, entering the second down 19-17. In the first couple of minutes of the second quarter both teams went back and forth as they found themselves tied at 22-22. After the tie, Arlington began to find themselves on the defensive end, forcing turnovers and bad shots while pushing the ball in transition. The Eagles began See EAGLES on page 5

The Marysville-Pilchuck and Marysville Getchell boys swim teams took on the Lake Stevens Vikings on Dec. 17. It was a tough day for both Marysville teams as the Vikings controlled the day with victories of 144-30 over the Tomahawks and 152-26 over the Chargers. “We had some more best times, which is what you always want to have coming out of every meet. For our new swimmers we want to focus on making sure that everyone knows what they’re doing. For our veterans, it’s about qualifying for Districts, or getting close, so we’re set up after winter

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Tomahawks’ diver Andrew Kallio competes in the one-meter dive on Dec. 17.

relay in fifth with a time of 2:10.77. All of the members, excluding Gibbs, also competed on the 400-yard freestyle relay that placed third with a time of 4:32.47. Christensen also had a great day in his solo races with a fourthplace finish in the 200-yard individual medley, 2:36.19, and second place in the 500-yard freestyle, 6:03.73. Brown placed fourth in both of his individual races with a time of 1:06.22 in the 100yard butterfly and 1:12.78 in the 100yard backstroke. Wilkes also placed in the top four with a fourth-place in the 50-yard freestyle, 26.03 seconds, and a third-place finish in the 100yard butterfly, 1:03.70. Gibbs placed fourth in the one-meter dive with a score of 98.15 and eighth in the 100yard breaststroke, 1:47.07. In addition to his solo events he also competed in the fifth-place 200-yard freestyle relay, 2:14.54. “We run our team on athlete leadership, so the seniors are part of our decision-making process and they are the example during practice. We stand for unity, class, perseverance and fun, and it’s extremely important to have them there,” said Coach Jenks on her senior leaders. Your next chance to support the Chargers and Tomahawks at home will be on Tuesday, Jan. 14, at 3:15 p.m. as they will be taking on the Glacier Peak Grizzlies and the Snohomish Panthers.

break,” said Marysville Head Coach Meredith Jenks. Marysville-Pilchuck was led by their top three swimmers Ian Meetsma, Luke Pusateri, Jose Anderson. Meetsma ended the day with four topthree finishes including two team races of the 200-yard medley relay, second-place with a time of 1:59.63, and a third-place finish in the 200-yard freestyle relay, 1:55.94. He also placed first in the 50-yard freestyle, 23.79 seconds, and second in the 100-yard freestyle with a time of 52.50 seconds. Pusateri also competed as part of the 200-yard medley and 200-yard freestyle relays, as well as earning a fourth-place finish in the 100-yard breaststroke with a 1:21.76. Anderson competed as a member of the 200-yard medley relay as well as placing sixth in the 50-yard freestyle, 28.95 seconds, and fifth in the 100-yard backstroke on a time of 1:21.32. The Tomahawks also had a big day from their lone diver Andrew Kallio who placed second in the one-meter dive with a score of 260.20. Kallio finished less than four points behind the first-place diver who finished with a 263.45. Marysville Getchell was led by the entirety of their 200-yard medley relay team in Andrew Christensen, Hunter Brown, Kameron Wilkes and Isaiah Gibbs. The team finished the medley

High School Winter Sports Marysville Getchell Chargers BOYS BASKETBALL Dec. 27 Dec. 28

Games begin at 3 p.m.

MLT ournament MLY Tournament

Away Away

Lakewood Cougars GIRLS BASKETBALL Game begins at 3 p.m.

MlkTerHS MlkTerHS

Dec. 27 Renton Dec. 28 Lummi Nation *Game begins at 11:30 a.m.

Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks GIRLS BASKETBALL Dec. 28

Game begins at 7:15 p.m.

Mariner

Home

BOYS BASKETBALL M-PHS

Dec. 27 Dec. 28

Games begins at TBD

Christmas Tournament Away Christmas Tournament Away

SLHS SLHS

Home Away

BOYS BASKETBALL BLHS BLHS*

Game begins at 7:30 p.m.

Dec. 27 Davis Dec. 28 Ellensburg *Game begins at 6 p.m.

Home Away

Arlington Eagles BOYS BASKETBALL Dec. 30

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Issaquah

Away

IssHS

Schedules subject to change. For more information, visit www.wescoathletics.com and www.nwcathletics.com.

Proud to Support Our Student Athletes 7 Lakes Gifts Action Sports Albertson’s-Marysville All Creatures Vet Clinic Altitude Trampoline Park American Distributing Arlington Electric & Solar Arlington Hardware Arlington Muffler & Brake Arlington Pediatric Dentistry Awning Builders A-Z Transmissions Beef Jerky Outlet Big Foot Music Bleachers Grill Bob’s Burgers and Brew Brown’s Plumbing Bud Barton Bundy Carpet C Don Filer Insurance

Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Clinic Chinook Lumber CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E&E Lumber Edward Jones-Andy Smith Edward Jones-Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Gary Wright Realty Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance H&M Electric Heritage Bank-Marysville Hibulb Cultural Center Honda of Marysville Julie’s Licensing

Kuhnle’s Tavern Lake Goodwin Store/Resort Langabeer, McKernan, Bennett & Co. Les Schwab-Marysville Les Schwab-Smokey Point Locals Espresso Marysville Awards Marysville Care Center Marysville Laundry Station Marysville Orthodontics Marysville Travel & Cruise Marysville-Everett Ceramic Tile Maxi’s Chinese Restaurant Mirkwood Public House Mountain View Rehab Mountain Loop Motorcars North County Outlook Noble Palace NW Diesel Pacific Propane

Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pilchuck Rentals Port Gardner Bay Winery Port of Subs-Tulalip Reaction Physical Therapy (Arlington|Smokey Point) Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Riverside Topsoil Roy Robinson S&S Roofing LLC Schaefer Shipman Shaklee Skagit Regional Clinics Sleep Advantage-Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning Sno-Isle Natural Food Co-op

Sonic Burger-Marysville Soroptomist Int’l of Marysville Stanwood Redi-Mix Stilly Auto Parts Stilly Diner Stilly Sand & Gravel Strawberry Lanes Stryker Brothers Tall Guy Small Guy The Creamery The Shop-Arlington The UPS Store-Tulalip Tulalip Tribes Unique Interiors Village Licensing Who’s on First Sports Cards Wild Birds Unlimited

SunDome SunDome*


Sports

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

MG wrestlers host Scots, Storm Pet By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville Getchell boys wrestling team hosted a dual match against the Shorecrest Scots and Squalicum Storm on Dec. 18. The Chargers took an early 24-6 lead against Shorecrest as they took three victories by forfeit, another by pin and a loss by pin over the first five matches. Over the next five matches the Scots took control with four victories, two by pin and two by decision, as well as one loss by pin. Heading into the final four matches, Marysville Getchell held a 30-24 lead. Over the final stretch of matches the Chargers extended their lead with two victories by pin, one win by forfeit and one loss by pin. Marysville Getchell took the win by a final score of 48-30. Marysville Getchell came out strong against the

5

December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Building A Bond For Life.

Maverick

Maverick is a 2 year old male Mixed Large Breed Get ready to rumble cause Maverick is all about play time! He’s intelligent and treat motivated, which means as long as you’re willing to teach, he’s ready to learn. Maverick has proven that life in an apartment does not provide enough of an outlet for his energy so he does need a home with a yard. Regular walks and training will also help this smart boy burn off his mental energy. Maverick likes playing with other dogs but he can play a little rough, so if you have any dogs at home it’s important he meets them to see if they would be happy playing together. In fact, bring the whole family to meet Maverick and give him the chance to steal your hearts! He does need a home with children 12 or older. He is also unsure of men at first so will need help building his trust with the men in his life. I weigh 49 lbs.

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PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Marysville Getchell’s senior 138-pound wrestler Joel Fosterl looks to control the wrists early on against the Squalicum Storm at Marysville Getchell High School on Dec. 18. Storm as they won eight out of the first nine matches of the night, securing a dominate 45-6 lead. After the Chargers hot start, Squalicum was able to capitalize in the final five matches, winning three, but failed to close the gap. The Chargers took the victory 57-24 and finished the dual meet 2-0.

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Jesus Cabadas, Chargers’ junior 160-pound wrestler, gets the single-leg takedown early in the first round against the Squalicum Storm at Marysville Getchell High School on Dec. 18.

EAGLES Continued from page 4

to separate themselves before heading into halftime as they went on a 15-5 run to end the first half up 37-27. In the second half Arlington continued to play incredible defense, allowing less than 10 points in each of the last two quarters of the game. With struggles on the offensive end the Red Wolves fell behind by nearly 20 points heading into the fourth quarter, 53-35. In the final quarter, the Eagles were able to test their depth with a unit made entirely of bench players. Arlington was still able to outscore Cedarcrest 14-9, as they took the 67-44 victory. “We had a rough start in the first quarter, but it was good to see them come together and take care of business through the rest of the game. We had a couple of kids out tonight and it showed that our depth is one of our biggest strengths. We don’t have any weak links. We feel like we could put anyone out there on the floor and we let them know to always be ready because they are going to get their shot,” said Arlington Head Coach Joe Marsh.

“We’re working hard and we’ve started 10-0, but as of right now it doesn’t mean anything because we have so much tough competition in our division. We’ll be happy with how we’ve started but we need to take care of all the small things so we can make the big things happen,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach John Deaver. Jacob Steele and Cody Mitchell were the Chargers' two strongest competitors on the night. Steele, sophomore, went up to the 120-pound weight class to earn a pin with 21 seconds left in the first round against the Scots. He then followed up that performance in the 113-pound weight class with another first-round pin with 1:04 left on the clock. Mitchell, junior, also wrestled up a weight class to 138 as he earned a pin 30 seconds into the second round. In his second match he wrestled back at 132 and fought for a 5-2 decision. Three other wrestlers secured two victories on

The Eagles entire starting lineup made big contributions to the win behind Keira Marsh, Josie Stupey, Jenna Villa, Sierra Scheppele and Makenzie Gage. Marsh, sophomore guard, was the leading scorer with 16 points, two three-pointers, three assists, five rebounds and three steals. Stupey, junior guard, went two-for-two from three with 11 points, five assists, three rebounds and four steals. Villa, freshman guard, also had 11 points along with one three-pointer, one assist, gamehigh seven rebounds and two steals. Scheppele, senior guard, scored all six of her points on two threes as well as tallying two assists, two rebounds and two steals. Gage, junior forward, also finished with six points, two assists, two rebounds and one steal. Off the bench the Eagles had solid performances from Allison DeBerry, Abby Schwark and Hannah Rork. DeBerry, senior guard, was the fourth leading scorer for the team with seven points, one three-pointer, two rebounds and one steal. Schwark, junior forward, tied for second in rebounds with five as well as dropping five points, one three-pointer and two steals. Rork, sophomore guard, also had five points along with one shot

the night including Omar Salcedo, Taylor Herridge and Joel Fosterl. All three of them took forfeit victories to open the dual match against Shorecrest. Salcedo, 106-pound sophomore, closed out the final match against the Storm with a pin 1:09 into the first round. Herridge, 126-pound senior, also secured a firstround pin as he finished his match with 35 seconds left on the clock. Fosterl, 138-pound senior, also won his match by pin with 48 seconds left in the second round. The Chargers’ senior in the 195-pound weight class, Caleb Blonk, only secured one win on the night but also scored the quickest pin. In his first match against Shorecrest he pinned his opponent 12 seconds into the first round. The Chargers next home competition will be another dual match as they take on the Oak Harbor Wildcats and Stanwood Spartans on Thursday, Jan. 9, at 5:30 and 7 p.m.

THINKING ABOUT SELLING YOUR HOME OR LAND? FREE CONSULTATION NO OBLIGATION Questions on how to get started? Need market value? Contact me today! Sue Stevenson 1333 State Ave. Marysville Phone: 425-418-7902

MacPherson’s RHB Since 1982

Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County

Wednesday, December 25, through Tuesday, December 31 Wednesday, December 25 New Moon Sunrise 7:57 am • Sunset 4:20 pm 5:24 am 10:50 am 3:21 pm 10:47 am

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

11.5 ft 6.6 ft 11.0 ft -1.9 ft

Thursday, December 26 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:20 pm 6:06 am 11:42 am 4:03 pm 11:26 am

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

11.8 ft 6.7 ft 10.6 ft -2.1 ft

Friday, December 27 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:21 pm PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Keira Marsh, Eagles’ sophomore guard, scores on the lay up in the first half at Arlington High School on Dec. 17. made from beyond the arc, three rebounds and one steal. If you want to come out and cheer on the Eagles their next home game will be against the Mountlake Terrace Hawks on Tuesday, Jan. 7, at 7:15 p.m.

6:45 am 12:31 pm 4:45 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide

12.0 ft 6.6 ft 10.1 ft

Saturday, December 28 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:22 pm 12:06 am 7:21 am 1:19 pm 5:29 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-1.8 ft 12.0 ft 6.5 ft 9.6 ft

Sunday, December 29 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:23 pm 12:45 am 7:56 am 2:07 pm 6:16 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-1.3 ft 11.9 ft 6.2 ft 9.1 ft

Monday, December 30 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:24 pm 1:25 am 8:30 am 2:56 pm 7:07 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-0.6 ft 11.7 ft 5.9 ft 8.5 ft

Tuesday, December 31 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:24 pm

2:06 am 9:05 am 3:45 pm 8:02 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

0.2 ft 11.5 ft 5.5 ft 7.8 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

SANTA

Our Best Friends

Continued from page 1

with one of the fire district’s engines adorned with Christmas lights. “We have the engine decorated up again, a little better than last year. Every year we like to make it a little better,” said Dinneen. Last year the event raised $1,200 in cash donations and collected about 1,000 pounds of food as well. “Donating the food and seeing the food bank’s reaction to what we bring in is always good to see,” said Dinneen. The Santa run helps get people into the holiday giving spirit. “We get a lot of donations for the food bank. This is the season of giving and people like that they don’t have to travel that far to participate,” said firefighter/EMT John Carlson, who has volunteered for the event for three years now. The firefighters who participate in the event do so on their own time. “We’re coming up here on our days off just to do this. It’s important to give back to the community that gives to us in so many ways,” said Dinneen. He said that he enjoys seeing the event coming together with everyone’s help. “It’s always stressful to get people corralled in here to do it, especially on nights like this [Dec. 20] where we’re setting records for rain,” said Dinneen.

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Bruce Raidar Puppington

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Mason Midwell, center, and Kaidence Alpine meet Santa Claus during the Tulalip Santa Run on Dec. 20 “When it’s finally happening and coming to fruition it’s really good to see it,” he said. The event also allows the firefighters from the Tulalip Bay Fire District an opportunity to interact with their community. “This is a really good opportunity for us to get out into the community and say ‘hello’ in a non-emergency situation. We have hundreds of candy canes to pass out to the kids and the adults as well,” said Dinneen. “It’s just a cool way to interact with the community. Especially on a positive note. A lot of times, because of the nature of our job, we see people in more stressful situations,” said Carlson. Carlson also said he enjoys seeing the kids and their reaction to Santa Claus. “It allows us to be able to give some kind of happiness back,” he said. Santa Claus is often popular with the families

around Tulalip neighborhoods. “I would like to go toeto-toe with every department’s Santa Clause from the area. Our Santa Claus is very animated and just a lot of fun,” said Dinneen. “We definitely hear a lot of positive feedback about the kids getting to see Santa and they get to see us in a different light,” said Carlson. Dinneen wanted to thank everyone who helps with the event each year. “Thank you to the community members that show support or make donations,” he said. He said the Tulalip Bay Fire District hopes to continue to hold the Santa Run each year. “We’ve been doing it for a long time. As departments have grown they have separated themselves from this tradition. We’re growing rapidly too but we’re keeping this in our back pocket. It’s something we want to do every year,” he said.

Bruce Raidar Puppington owned by Rosanna Lehman of Arlington.

Send us photos of you and your pet The North County Outlook has a weekly feature titled Our Best Friends. Community members can send us photos of them with their pets and we will elect one to run in that week’s issue. To submit a photo, please send it to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com. Please include the names of the people and pets in the photo.

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A New Year Around the World 202

Many people all over the world ring in the New Year on the 31st of December at midnight. Some ring in their new year in a different season. Read my clues to learn about new year celebrations. Fill in the puzzle!

Kids: color stuff in!

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1. In ______ it is a time to pray, think about the old year and forgive (in the fall). 2. People in ___________ hang straw rope on their doors to ward off evil spirits; eat tasty rice cakes. 3. In __________, schools are closed. People use New Year’s Day to 4 rest from the parties and fireworks they went to the night before! Russia 4. In __________, people decorate with colors: yellow China for happiness, red for love, white for health! 5. In __________, the “first footer” – the first person to come 10 through your door in the new year – brings good luck! 6. In __________, during the festival of Songkran, people splash water on each other for fun. Some even use elephants to spray water (April). 7. In __________, parades are held with fireworks and dancing “dragons.” 8. In __________, people celebrate for 6 days with parties, fireworks and dancing. 9. In the __________, people wear polka dots and eat round fruits for good luck; streets are lined with bright lanterns. 10. In the __________ people watch a giant crystal ball drop at the stroke of midnight. People promise to better themselves in the new year. 11. In ___________, heads of households go door to door to wish neighbors well. Kids get sweets wrapped in colorful paper. 12. In __________, people release a flower-filled boat for the ocean goddess, Lemanjá.

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13. In __________, the President addresses the country; people make toasts; exchange gifts. 14. In ______ it is a joyful time, lasting about 12 days. There is a reading of the Koran at home. There are lighted candles. A leaf for each family member shows life and growth (March).


Communities

7 Local baker, author greets fans and signs books

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December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

COURTESY PHOTO

The Arlington Public Schools Board of Directors requested in 2018 that Snohomish County and the city of Arlington begin collecting school impact fees in 2019. The district used previously collected school impact fees to add four new portable classrooms to Kent Prairie Elementary School in 2018.

APS collects construction Impact Fees in 2019 The Arlington Public Schools Board of Directors requested in 2018 that Snohomish County and the city of Arlington begin collecting school impact fees in 2019. Washington state public schools are permitted to request that counties and cities impose fees on new residential construction within the school district’s boundaries. Public schools then use the fees to build new classrooms needed due to growth in student enrollment associated with new residential construction. The district used previously collected school impact fees to add four new portable classrooms to Kent Prairie Elementary in 2018. The classrooms helped provide space needed for new students in the Kent Prairie attendance area. “School impact fees help us respond to enrollment growth,” said Arlington Public Schools Executive Director of Operations, Brian Lewis. “New residential construction brings more students to our schools and impact fees help provide the space we need in which to educate them. Builders then share the cost of new school facilities.” School impact fees can only be spent on new construction or remodeling of school buildings needed in response to growth in stu-

Share your news! Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send nformation to: North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or email the information to: editor@northcountyoutlook.com.

dent enrollment. Through November 2019, builders paid $160,000 in school impact fees to Arlington Public Schools to support new school construction. Impact fees are one part of the range of funds used to pay for new school construction or remodeling. Schools continue to rely primarily on voter-approved bonds or Capital Projects Fund levies to support the vast majority of the cost of school construction. Fees collected in 2019 will be used to offset the cost of providing new classrooms or school buildings in the future.

Arlington baker and cookbook writer Emily Hutchinson stopped by downtown Arlington with Mrs. Claus on Dec. 21 to sign books and greet fans. Hutchinson is an Arlington local who has gained recognition for her cookie baking. "She just wrapped up her book tour where she was in New York, Chicago and L.A., and she had a little time to squeeze in today before she started her holiday stuff," said Tina Richardson, owner of Hometown Candle Co., the host of the event. Mrs. Claus greeted families as Hutchinson signed and sold books at the Arlington event. "Emily Hutchinson has a business called the Hutch Oven. She started baking cookies and it just sort of snowballed. Now she does things on the Hallmark Channel and was just a judge for a competition show on that channel," said Richardson. Many of the people who came out have known Hutchinson as friends or family. Catherine Cahuia is a cousin of Hutchinson's mother and knew her when she was growing up. When Hutchinson started 'the Hutch Oven' and began writing books, Cahuia said she was excited for her. "I'm a baker, too, but nothing like this," she said. Others like Robin Cooper became fans of Hutchinson's later.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Robin Cooper, left, talks with baker and author Emily Hutchinson at a book signing on Dec. 21. "I just started following Emily and I love the way she decorates her cookies and I love her attitude," said Cooper. Hutchinson just released a new book on cookies which inspired the local signing event. "There was no one in town locally who was selling it, so it was brought up that perhaps she would do a signing," said Richardson, who added she met Hutchinson because their children go to the same school. The new book goes into Hutchinson's background as well shows readers how to make cookies. "It teaches step-by-step how to do what she does with the cookies, from the decorating to the baking to the fin-

ishing touches," said Richardson. The book signing went well, Richardson said. "With just the Facebook event we were pretty surprised with how many people were interested," she said. "We had people here early before we even opened." Richardson said she wanted to feature the local baker to highlight a local success story. "She's inspiring to me as an entrepreneur and being local to Arlington. It's a big deal when you can break out of the state lines and make a name for yourself. I just wanted to give her an opportunity to have the local people come out for her," she said.

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Galovin is newest MSD board member By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The newest Marysville school board member Paul Galovin was sworn on to the board on Dec. 11. Galovin serves District 2 for the Marysville School Board, which is most of north Marysville. He defeated incumbent school board member Mariana Maksimos with 53.69 percent of the votes during the Nov. 5 general election. After getting out of the military, Galovin moved to Marysville in 2007 and has resided in the community since then. “I served for my country in the Army and later in the National Guard,” he said.

He wanted to continue serving his community at a more local level and has begun putting time into various committees around the school district and city, including the district’s facilities committee that helped shape the levy proposals that will be on this February’s ballot. After considering the options, Galovin said he decided to try to get more involved in the school district with a school board position. Galovin didn’t expect this much support when he started out. “Running for office is completely foreign territory for me,” he said. “The amount of voter

support took me by surprise actually, and has helped quiet some doubts in my mind if this was really right for me,” he said. Currently, Galovin has a 12-year-old that goes to a Marysville school as well as a foster child in his care. Galovin is a former foster child and said from third-grade to ninth-grade he moved around to many different schools. “I got to see a lot of the inconsistencies across school districts. A lot of the support services were different, sometimes even in the same district,” Galovin said. He hopes to improve some of those issues with the schools, he said.

“Even some of the wealthier school districts have those same challenges. I want to help try to build a layout for how the school district can work more consistently,” he said. As Galovin joins the board he said the district is heading in a positive direction and he hopes to continue projects already in the pipeline. “A lot of their goals are the same as mine,” he said. He hopes to foster the growth of Marysville educators. “I want to allow teachers to reach outside their tool box to find something that works better,” Galovin said. Improving the school environment for kids is also important for him, he said.

ROTARY Continued from page 1

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington Rotary member Jim Minifie, right, packs one of the club’s holiday food baskets for the homebound with help from Rotary member Casey Miller on Dec. 19.

kets and also help put the food baskets together and deliver them. “It’s a fun day to get involved by individually packing the boxes of food,” said Gastineau. “I think it gives people a good sense of service and giving back to their community,” she said. Many people said they enjoyed helping out “This is a tradition we have done with the Rotary Club,” said Rotary member Cory Duskin, “and it’s just to help the community in any way we can.” Community member Mary Catherine Meno said she has participated in the

“I really think that to get bullying out of schools, you have to make the schools be like a family,” he said. He points to 10th Street Middle School as a good example of community, which had about 150 of their 170 students attend this year’s Halloween event. “That’s just a beautiful environment there, and I want to help make all of our schools have that kind of environment. I know that’s a tall order,” he said. Galovin said he has already talked with parents who have helped to guide his thinking and encourages parents to reach out to him if they want their voice and opinions heard. “I want to win the trust

____

Paul Galovin

COURTESY PHOTO

of the people, and let them know that they can call me on my phone at any time,” he said. He said Marysville parents and community members can call him at 425272-3233.

Rotary is about 'Service above Self.' That is our mission. We're blessed as business owners, leaders and managers, and it's important to give back.

____

Carla Gastineau

event a few times. “I’ve helped a couple of times in the past and it’s amazing to see how happy people are just for a simple gesture of food for the holidays,” she said. Rotary member Jim Minifie said he enjoys coming out to help put together the food baskets. “It’s my favorite Rotary project of the year. It’s just a nice community project,”

he said. The Rotary works with the Arlington Community Food Bank to find those in need. “The food bank helps pick families in need who are especially homebound, either because they have transportation issues or physical issues and they can’t get out,” said Gastieanu. “So Rotary contacts us to get a list of names in the Arlington and Darrington communities." Members go out to buy the food from local organizations. “Rotary supports local businesses by purchasing all the food from Grocery Outlet, and Grocery Outlet supports back by giving it to us basically at cost,” said Gastineau. The food baskets are filled with cereal, pasta, sauces, soups, peanut butter, sugars, flour, eggs, milk, breads and fruits, among other items. “Our plan is that it is enough food to sustain them for a couple of weeks, sort of across the Christmas break period, and that it is holiday food. We’re providing a Christmas ham or turkey and all the staples for a holiday meal,” said Gastineau. Sure, you love our paper... but don’t forget to

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9

Local Boy Scouts will be recycling Christmas trees Marysville and Arlington Boy Scout troops will be out on Jan. 4 to collect and recycle Christmas trees for community members. Both troops will go around neighborhoods to collect trees, as well as set up at a local park for trees to be dropped off. Marysville Marysville’s Boy Scout Troop 80 will be collecting on Jan. 4 at Jennings Park, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Anyone can drop off a tree at that time. “We will also be out collecting trees in the neighborhoods all day on Saturday,” said Wanda McKinney, local parent and one of the organizers of the event. The trees will be used by Marys-

ville’s parks department. “It’s a good resource for the parks to be able to reuse these trees and turn them into wood chips,” said McKinney. The event also helps provide local Boy Scouts with an opportunity to support their neighbors. “It’s a good way for the boys and girls to go out and be visible in the community,” said McKinney. “It’s a day of service to their community.” She said they enjoy going out and grabbing the trees in the local Marysville neighborhoods. “They all have a good time going out for the day,” she said. Troop 80 also accepts donations

during the event. “This year we are asking people who want to donate to mail us the donations, instead of leaving them on the tree,” said McKinney. Checks can be sent to 8816 58th Dr. NE, Marysville , WA 98270. “The money will be to support our Boy Scout programs. It helps us to pay for our activities like hiking, camping or the summer camps,” she said. Arlington Arlington’s Boy Scout Troop 29 will be out on Jan. 4 picking up trees around the city. From Jan. 1 to Jan. 4 local community members can also drop off trees at the Legion Park parking lot.

The drop off location will remain open until 2 p.m. on Jan. 4. “This is a community service event where the boys are collecting and recycling trees for the city of Arlington,” said Leana Korthuis, committee member for the project and a local parent. The city has recycled them into wood chips in years past and will likely do the same this year. This year the troop has many new Scouts who will get to join the tree recycling effort for the first time, said Korthuis. “The kids get a sense of community when they go around to all the different neighborhoods and they meet their community members

as they’re helping at Legion Park,” she said. Troop 29 has done the recycling for many years. “This has been a tradition going back for many years,” at least a decade, said Korthuis. As part of the Boy Scouts of America, troops are supposed to help local people so the troop “tries to offer community service events for the boys,” said Korthuis. She encourages people to drive safe on that Jan. 4. “Make sure you watch out and drive slow that day,” she said. Troop 29 accepts donations during the event that go to support their youth activities.

Arlington Santa Run sets record Arlington's annual Santa Run for 2019 ended on Dec. 15 with 11,391 pounds of food collected and a record breaking $2,213 in monetary donations for the Arlington Community Food Bank. The Arlington Santa Run is a 30-year-old tradition that runs for 10 nights in December to bring Santa and holiday cheer to the Arlington community. The Arlington Fire Department, with the help from hundreds of Santa's elves, escorts Santa through the city on a decorated fire engine collecting donations for the Arlington Community

Food Bank. The Santa Run truly shows the commitment to community service that the employees of the city of Arlington, as well as the residents and businesses of Arlington possess. This year’s event was coordinated and conducted by the Arlington City Firefighters Local No. 3728, with support from the Arlington Police Department, City staff, Arlington Rotary Club, and other service organizations. Santa’s candy canes were generously donated by the Arlington Walmart. Stated Arlington Fire Chief Dave Kraski, "From

Our doors are open!

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ARLINGTON FIRE DEPARTMENT

From left, Deputy Fire Chief Chris Dickison, Fire Chief Dave Kraski, Arlington Community Food Bank Executive Director Carla Rankin Gastineau, and Arlington Firefighter/Paramedic Nich Sacha. the bottom of our hearts, thank you, citizens of Ar-

lington, for your incredible good will and generosity."

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December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Opinion

n BEING FRANK

Cooperation, commitment will recover salmon Treaty Indian tribes in western Washington are greatly encouraged by Gov. Jay Inslee’s recent commitment to challenge the status quo and take steps needed for salmon recovery. It happened last month at the annual Centennial Accord meeting. Created in 1989 to mark the 100th anniversary of statehood, the gathering brings together the tribes and state in a government-to-government forum to address issues of mutual interest such as health care, education and natural resources. Salmon are declining across western Washington for one main reason: Their habitat is being damaged and lost faster than we can fix it. The treaty Indian tribes in western Washington have been leading the fight for salmon habitat for decades. We know that to recover salmon we must hold ourselves accountable and do what is necessary to halt and reverse the ongoing loss and damage to their habitat. Tribes have documented the decline of salmon habitat through the State of Our Watersheds report series, which details habitat conditions and limiting factors for recovery throughout western Washington. We have developed solutions through gw∂dzadad, our strategy for restoring salmon habitat that takes its name from the Lushootseed word that means “Teachings of our Ancestors.” This work calls out a handful of immediate recommendations: n Protect streamside habitat through a consistent science-based approach across the region. That means creating and protecting healthy streamside buffers with plenty of mature trees that keep water temperatures low, stabilize riverbanks and contribute to diverse instream habitat for salmon. n Revise the state’s Growth Management Act and other resource protection guidelines from one of No Net Loss to one of Net Gain – working to better protect and enhance the ecosystems that salmon, orcas and we all depend on.

Lorraine Loomis n Develop a statewide permit tracking system to create transparency, accountability and efficiency in understanding the cumulative effects of our collective land-use decisions. n Reduce toxic contamination of water and salmon through improved water quality standards, source control and stormwater management requirements. At the Centennial Accord meeting, Gov. Inslee acknowledged the importance of healthy streamside areas as critical to both our region’s salmon recovery efforts and our resiliency in the face of global climate change. In a strong move, he directed his state environmental and natural resources agencies to develop a proposal for a consistent approach by the end of the year. State of Washington data show that more than 1,700 miles of streams and rivers in western Washington do not meet state/federal water quality standards for water temperatures. Ecology Director Maia Bellon and Fish and Wildlife Director Kelly Susewind echoed Gov. Inslee’s support and recognition for the need for clear and unified action across all sectors. Bellon, who is stepping down later this month, said the state will stay the course in the fight to stop the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from rolling back Washington’s hard-fought water quality standards that are the most protective of human health in the nation. EPA is moving to rescind the standards based on a complaint by some

industry groups claiming the rules increase their cost of doing business while ignoring the health risks to everyone who lives here. WDFW Director Susewind and I have committed to working cooperatively as co-managers through the annual North of Falcon salmon season setting process to embrace the actions outlined in the gw∂dzadad habitat restoration strategy and include the issues of habitat protection in our management discussions. These are the actions that are going to recover salmon and orcas, preserve our health and protect us from climate change while also addressing tribal treaty-reserved rights. To its credit, the state of Washington was the first state to establish a government-to-government relationship with tribes through a formal agreement like the Centennial Accord. We know there are those who oppose our efforts. They are the same people who want to lock us into the status quo. We know that path does not lead to salmon recovery. We don’t have to argue about what needs to be done. We’re past that. We know what the science and our hearts tell us are the right things to do. Right now, we are witnessing leadership, cooperation and commitment on a scale we have not seen in a long time. This is how we will recover salmon. More information about the State of our Watersheds and gw∂dzadad habitat strategy are available at: geo.nwifc.org and nwtreatytribes.org/habitatstrategy/.

Being Frank is a monthly column written by the chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chair, the column represents the natural resources management interests and concerns of the treaty Indian tribes in western Washington.

Weekly Puzzles Fun by the Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. See answers on page 10

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Welcome to the Berry Patch Welcome to the “Berry Patch,” your information source for the 88th Annual Marysville Strawberry Festival, to be held the third week in June, 2020. Maryfest Inc., established in 1974, is the official sponsoring organization for the Strawberry Festival. Maryfest Inc. is a strictly volunteer organization and is governed by a 15 member Board of Directors. Events held during the Strawberry Festival have varied over the years and the length of the Festival has increased from two days to 10 days and have included events such as the Grand Parade, Arts and Crafts Fair, Kiddies Parade, Fashion Show/Luncheon, Strawberry Ball, Royalty Pageant, Car Show, Bed Races and many other events. There was one event that gained National Television Exposure on America’s Funniest People and that was the Adult Trike Races. KOMO TV from Seattle also came up and filmed the event for their evening news program. In the beginning, the races were held between 1st and 4th streets on State and was sponsored by Herfy’s, a local hamburger drive-in restaurant in Everett. Trikes were built and ridden by local businesses and as the years went by, the competition became intense. The participants had to go

through obstacles, eat hamburgers and even drink a beer at two local taverns, Smokey’s and Kuhnle's. However, after several years, that part of the event was discontinued. It is with great pleasure that we announce that after listening to what you, the community, wanted, we will again have the Trike Races return to the 2020 Festival schedule of events. We would like to thank our community, both business and residential, for your continued support of the Marysville Strawberry Festival. It is our goal to provide you with good family entertainment and we will strive to put quality into every event. We ask for your input as to what we can do to make our events better and if there is something you would like to see us do, we welcome your input. We are always looking for volunteers to help with our events and if you are interested please feel free to contact us at 360659-7664, or attend our monthly meetings held the third Tuesday of each month at our office located on the corner of 1st and State next to the Waterfront Park. The meetings begin at 6 p.m. and are open to the public. We would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous 2020.

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Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

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www.northcountyoutlook.com UPCOMING EVENTS Ready Readers Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories, music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 18 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Supported by the Friends of the Arlington Library. Held on Mondays, Jan. 6, 13, 27,

beginning at10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

on Mondays, Jan. 6, 13, 27, beginning at10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Ready Readers Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories, music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 18 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Supported by the Friends of the Arlington Library. Held

Ready Readers Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3-5. Caregiver required. Supported by Friends of the Arlington Library. Held Wednesdays, Jan. 8-29, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

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Friends of the Arlington Library Book Sale and Membership Drive: Great books are available at bargain prices. Something for everyone. Proceeds support the Arlington Library. Become a member today. Held Tuesday through Thursday, Jan. 14-16, 10 a.m.tp 2 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

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LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HSIU-CHING LIN, Deceased, NO. 19-4-02119-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY ALVIN JOSEPH ABRAHAMSON III, a single man, Plaintiff, vs. THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF SANDRA J. LAZARWICH, Deceased; SHERYL SPRUIELL; KARLYNN PATTERSON; THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GARY W. MASTERJOHN, Deceased; and JOHN MASTERJOHN; Defendants, NO. 19-2-10543-31

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 18, 2019 Personal Representative: Michael Melyan Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #44519 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO: THE STATE OF WASHINGTON AND TO: THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF SANDRA J. LAZARWICH, Deceased; SHERYL SPRUIELL; KARLYNN PATTERSON; THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GARY W. MASTERJOHN, Deceased; and JOHN MASTERJOHN YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this Summons; to wit, within sixty (60) days after the 4th day of December, 2019; and defend the aboveentitled action in the above-entitled court; and answer the Complaint of the plaintiff, Alvin Joseph Abrahamson, III; and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff at their office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the Complaint which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The lawsuit is to quiet title in certain real estate to the plaintiff. DATED: November 26, 2019 BAILEY, DUSKIN & PEIFFLE, P.S. Attorneys for Petitioner: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704, 103 North Street, P. O. Box 188, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02119-31

LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WARREN M. COX, Deceased, NO. 19-4-02141-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 18, 2019. Personal Representative: Steven M. Cox Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02141-31

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LEGAL NOTICE SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE ADOPTION You are hereby notified that on December 16, 2019, the City Council of the City of Arlington, Washington, did adopt Ordinance No. 2019-019 entitled, “An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 2018-008 Which Adopted the 2019-2020 Biennial Budget of the City Of Arlington by Providing Supplement Thereto and Providing Transfer and Adjustment Authority for Calendar Year 2019” And Ordinance No. 2019-020 entitled, “An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 2018-008 Which Adopted the Biennial Budget of the City of Arlington by Providing Supplement Thereto and Providing Transfer and Adjustment Authority for Calendar Year 2020” These ordinances are effective five days from passage and publication, except as otherwise specified in the ordinances. The full text of the ordinances are available to interested persons and will be mailed upon request. Wendy Van Der Meersche, City Clerk, City of Arlington

LEGAL NOTICE

Submit Legal Notices to: editor@northcounty-outlook.com

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATES OF MICHAEL J. SLYE and PATRICIA M. SLYE, Deceased, NO. 19-402142-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of these estates. Any person having a claim against the decedents must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedents’ probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 18, 2019. Personal Representative: Shawn M. McMillian Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02142-31

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December 25, 2019 - December 31, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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n WHISTLING GARDENER

Last minute gift ideas for the holiday I know it is that under $7 is at the very least, crunch time for gift buying and cheap entertainment. For only a you might still have a few tough few dollars more, you can purchase ones to figure the Farmer’s Alout. Avoid the By Steve Smith crazy mall madmanac calendar ness and have an actual to be enjoyed all year long, tactile experience of touch- just by looking at the beauing the gifts you’re search- tiful colorful pictures withing for (to maybe even be out having to read a single hand-wrapped with care, word. There are days when rather than just clicking a this is just what I need. For the Animal Lover mouse for an online purchase) by traveling down to in your life who wants to your favorite garden cen- always take care of all the ter where there is always animals, get them a bird plenty of parking this time feeder! There is no better of year — you just might form of winter recreation find that something perfect than watching the coloryou’ve been hunting for. ful antics of our local bird Here are a few ideas to try populations. Stellar jays, hooded Juncos, chickaout. For your Organic-Only dees, flickers, bushtits, and friend who wants to be ac- my very favorite, those tively involved in the food crazy hummingbirds, all they eat, get them the Mar- visit my yard in the winitime Gardening Guide. I ter because I have water, recommend this book ev- food for them, and lots ery year because it is hands of vegetation where they down the ultimate garden- can feel protected to raise ing bible for northwest their young come spring. vegetable growers. Locally I focus on suet for most of authored, the information my birds and nectar for the is regionally appropriate, hummers. It’s a great way time tested, easy to under- to help the birds through stand for both the beginner winter while providing fun and advanced gardener, bird-watching entertainand economical at under ment for us. $20. Even the omniscient For your Aunt and UnWhistling Gardener owns cle who have everything, one — how’s that for an en- get them a winter interest dorsement! plant. Although difficult to For the New Home wrap and place under the Owner who needs tools but tree, plants make a wondoesn’t have them all yet, derful gift that can be reget them Wolf Garten tools. membered for years as they Essentially you buy one grow and mature in the long and one short handle, garden. Hellebores, Iceberg then you can interchange Alley willow, Viburnum a whole plethora of heads “Dawn”, “Charity” Mahosuch as hoes, cultivators, nia, Camellias, and a wide weeders, or what have you. range of colorfully foliaged Once you have the handle conifers and broadleaf evyou can add an attachment ergreens all provide winevery year. Just think of the ter interest in our gardens possibilities, birthdays, an- that can be appreciated for niversaries, Valentine’s day years to come. and of course Christmas. For the Millennial in For the Patriarch in your your in life who’s always family who likes to know plugged into technology, what’s happening next, get get them a houseplant. them the Farmer’s Alma- Younger people are taking nac. A combination of en- a serious interest in intertainment and education, door plant keeping, giving this publication takes the them a healthy new hobby Maritime Gardening Guide to dive into. Help fuel this to the next level. Part fact new hobby with a cool cacand part folklore, the alma- tus, a fragrant jasmine, a nac is always fun to read. It split-leaf philodendron or is a useful gardening guide, a sophisticated succulent

container. Houseplants have so many benefits, all by bringing the outdoors in. For the Matriarch in your family who has very specific tastes, get her a gift card! Avoid the headache of trying to find her that perfect gift (one she won’t return later) and let her pick her own present out. This has the added bonus of providing an opportunity for you to join her in a spring field trip adventure (bonding time!) to her favorite garden center. Now that’s a “win-win” gift in my book. Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

COURTESY PHOTO

There are a wide variety of bird feeders that would make a great last-minute gift for the gardener in your family.

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Dec. 25, 2019 North County Outlook  

Dec. 25, 2019 North County Outlook  

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