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Real People. Real Life.

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www.northcountyoutlook.com

Vol. 13 No. 16 n

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Shelter for homeless families opens soon in Marysville By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville homeless families will soon have a new emergency shelter open to them with Interfaith Family Shelter’s Miracle House location. The nonprofit organization largely operates in Everett but will expand into Marysville with a location in partnership with the Marysville United Methodist Church. The Miracle House location is scheduled to be opened sometime this January. It will hold two families and up to eight people at a time. “The biggest reason we want to do it is because currently in Snohomish County we have about half as many See FAMILIES on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington Boy Scout Troop 29 member Avery Hayes carries a Christmas tree to be recycled at the troop’s annual tree recycling event on Jan. 4.

Arlington Scouts help community recycle trees By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Interfaith Family Shelter executive director Jim Dean, left, and development director Mary Grace Antony in one of the rooms of Miracle House on Jan. 3. The new Marysville shelter location is scheduled to open in January.

Arlington neighborhoods were lined with Christmas trees on Jan. 4 as Boy Scout Troop 29 once again helped gather up trees to be recycled. “We are continuing our tradition of the annual

Christmas tree recycling program,” said Patrick Bouquet, Scoutmaster for Troop 29. “We set up here in Legion Park and they are brought to us and we also canvass the neighborhoods and pick up trees that peo-

See SCOUTS on page 6

M'ville Scouts recycle Christmas trees By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville Boy Scout Troop 80 member Austin Hines carries a tree to be shredded at Jennings Parks during the troop’s annual tree recycling event on Jan. 4.

Marysville Boy Scout Troop 80 recycled Christmas trees from around the community during their annual service project they held on Jan. 4. Troop members traveled around to various local neighborhoods to collect trees and also set up at Jennings Park to assist in shredding trees. “We’re just collecting Christmas trees so they can turn it into sawdust for the park,” said Eagle Scout Austin Hines. The event put on by Troop 80 helps local Scouts provide a service to community members. “We really want to help,” said Molly McKinney, a Star Scout with Troop 80.

“We just want to provide a little community service. The city parks asked us, they need the sawdust and we need the work,” said Hines. Part of being a Boy Scout is taking part in the community and helping out. “It gives us the volunteer hours that are really needed,” said McKinney. The recycling effort also allows many of the Scouts to go out into their community and get to know more people. “I think we like it because it really gets us out and about doing something in the public eye,” said McKinney. “It’s a great way for the troop to get publicity so that we can get our name out there

See TREES on page 6

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Communities

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

s ’ h a e L eads L Check out these upcoming local events! JANUARY

11

MMA Showdown January 11, 6:00pm Tulalip Resort Casino www.tulalipresortcasino.com

13

Civic Center Groundbreaking January 13, 1:30pm 5th & Delta and Ken Baxter Comm Ctr RSVP ltocco@marysvillewa.gov

FAMILIES Continued from page 1

rooms available for families in shelters as we have families that are unhoused,” said Jim Dean, executive director of the Interfaith Family Shelter. “There is just not enough, and this is a way to provide shelter that seems reasonable to us cost-wise,” he said. The need is large not just in the county, but locally as well. “There’s not a whole lot of options for families in Marysville facing homelessness,” said Mary Grace Antony, development director for Interfaith Family Shelter. She said Marysville families would have priority for the housing spots, although if there are no Marysville families waiting then the spots will be given to others in need. Interfaith Family Shelter

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specializes in working with entire families. “In Marysville, there’s only one other place [Maud’s House] that deals with families,” said Dean. Many of the other shelters don’t take men and/or don’t take teenage boys once they reach a certain age. “We have lots of families that choose not to break up, rather than live in a shelter,” said Dean. “I’ve seen cases where we brought families back together where the son had been at Cocoon House, father had been at the mission, and mom and child had been at one of the other shelters in the area,” he said. Antony noted that they serve a wide variety of families. “The definition of ‘family’ is flexible, as long as there is a legal relationship between an adult and a child,” she said.

Outdoor Speaker Series – Tom “Nelly” Nelson January 14, 6:30pm – 8:30pm Marysville Opera House www.marysvillewa.gov

12

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Like many other shelter programs, Interfaith Family Shelter provides support for kids. “We try to help them stay on top of their school work and their homework so we have a child advocate at our shelter and she has a whole team of volunteers,” said Anthony. “And when they’re on break we have activities." Miracle House will be an emergency shelter like Interfaith Family Shelter’s main shelter in Everett. That means families are meant to spend only 90 days at the shelter. “We’re moving clients faster than we ever have before,” said Dean, who added the average time in one of their shelters in 68 days. “Eighty percent of them are moving into new housing,” he said. “Some move out and go back into homelessness. Of those 20 percent I would say that every one of them has some sort of untreated mental illness that they just won’t get help for or active substance abuse that they would not stop." The organization provides guidance and support to get families into housing they can live in, including financial support with first and last months rent and a rental deposit. “We provide them some subsidy for rent that declines over that year, until they get to the end of the year where they’re paying for it all themselves,” said Dean. Ninetyfour percent of those people are staying housed, he said. The shelter is meant to a be low-barrier housing. “People are not turned away for substance abuse or addiction and we and try to meet people where they are at and withhold judgement,” said Antony. Felonies and current drug use are not automatic strikes that will prohibit a family from entering the shelter.

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“We do screen for crimes against children and crimes against people. Someone with fresh assault charges or who has sex offender status, we do screen those out. When you have kids in the process, you have to protect the kids in the program,” said Dean. Drug use at the shelter is still prohibited. “You can’t use any of that stuff at the shelter and you can’t be at a place where your behavior is inappropriate for a communal living situation,” said Dean. Families who need help can call the shelter intake line at 425-200-4121, although Dean recommends calling 211 before contacting them directly. “What we always push people to do is to try 211 first. Call 211, get a housing navigator and get into the system, because we’re going to send you there immediately after anyway,” said Dean. Unfortunately the need is great so there is often a backlog of people who need help. “In November we had almost 100 individual calls and we only had five spots open,” said Dean. The Interfaith Family Shelter has been open since 1984, when a number of Everett Christian groups got together to provide a night shelter for families. At the time it was all volunteer but it has grown over the years into an organization with paid staff and a full-time Everett shelter. Last year, 68 families went through their family shelter in Everett, including 147 children. The organization also runs a ‘Cars to Housing’ program that began last summer and provides a safe parking lot for families living in their vehicles. The program also provides support for those families and connects them with services and staff to help them secure permanent housing. The Miracle House shelter will be the organization's first extension into Marysville. “I’m excited,” said Dean. They are one of the first shelters to try to bring a “scattered-site” model to the county, which means providing a shelter through family houses instead of large complexes. “It has less impact on the community. To put a shelter with 10 or more families can have a pretty big impact with traffic,” said Dean. He also looks forward to working with the Marysville United Methodist Church. “The partnership is really solid with the church,” he said. The church already hosts local clothing bank Kloz 4 Kidz and makes homeless support a part of their community work. “They see it as part of their mission to help the homeless,” said Dean.


Communities

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

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January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Mayor discusses 2020 plans for Marysville By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Marysville began to implement some of their bigger picture ideas last year and hopes to continue this year according to Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring. “I think that last year was a very good year for the city of Marysville,” he said. “We are transitioning from planning some big plans to really beginning to execute some of those plans,” he said. Transportation continues to be a big need for the city and work has begun on major projects now. “We’re really excited about getting some major transportation projects underway,” said Nehring. The First Street Bypass project would extend First Street to the Sunnyside neighborhood and provide another major east-west traffic corridor in the city. Construction began last year for that project and continues this year. State Avenue will be expanded to five lanes for the entire city as a bottleneck around 100th Street gets expanded and a culvert replaced with a bridge this year with work that has now begun. The I-5/SR 529 interchange is also almost beginning as the first stages of construction are scheduled for late in 2020. “When we got that money it seemed like it was quite a ways away and now we’re right on the doorstep,” said Nehring. Public safety continues to be a priority for the city. “In the public safety arena we have seen some suc-

cesses in reducing crime,” said Nehring. “When I doorbelled when I was campaigning last year I heard a lot of people that were excited about the progress about improving crime rates and getting those people off the streets." Throughout the first year and a half of the Embedded Social Worker program, social workers have helped local homeless people with drug abuse problems. About 100 people got into treatment in Marysville as a result, said Nehring. “It was so successful that we really wanted to continue that,” he said. At the end of 2019 the City Council authorized the city to fund a fulltime officer for that program. Previously the city had been sharing with the county. The city will continue police enforcement for those who are reluctant to cooperate with social workers, said Nehring. “With those who re-

fused help we’ve taken a more criminal enforcement approach,” he said. The city plans to hire more police officers this year as well. The police will also be receiving a new jail and public safety building soon. “We went out to bid for our new public safety building and civic center that was approved by the voters,” said Nehring.

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Construction is scheduled to being this year for that project, he said. “We’re excited about how that will help revitalize the downtown area,” said Nehring. In addition to being a jail and police station, the civic center will provide a new city hall and senior community center located near Comeford Park. City staff continue work

on the Cascade Industrial Center which they hope will expand the job base of the city. “We really got through more of the planning work with the Cascade Industrial Center,” said Nehring. The north Marysville area is largely vacant property right now, but city staff hope manufacturing jobs will be attracted to the area. “We received the manu-

facturing-industrial designation this June,” said Nehring, which will help bring in federal funding for more infrastructure to help those businesses. Nehring said that 2019 was a good year for the city and he hopes to continue that this year. “I wish everyone a happy New Year and look forward to what we’ll be able to do in 2020,” he said.

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Sports

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Tomahawks defeat Granite Falls 46-36 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The Marysville-Pilchuck girls basketball came out of the winter break and travelled to Granite Falls to match up with the Tigers on Jan. 2. Both teams came out

struggling to score as the Tigers held a 4-0 lead about halfway through the first quarter. After a time out by Granite Falls, the Tomahawks’ junior forward Madyson Baxter went off for 11 points. Behind her offensive explosion, Marysville-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Tomahawks’ junior forward Madyson Baxter gets behind the Tiger defense on the Fastbreak and looks to score on the close shot at Granite Falls High School on Jan. 2.

Pilchuck went on an 11-2 run to close out the quarter 11-6. In the second quarter both teams came out working the ball inside and taking advantage of turnovers on fastbreak buckets. They went back and forth as they traded shots on the way to a 13-11 quarter with the Tigers edging out the Tomahawks. Marysville-Pilchuck still held the lead as they entered halftime up 22-19. The second half continued the play from the second quarter as both teams played with high energy and pushed the pace up and down the court. The Tomahawks were able to keep the Tigers out of the paint as they grew their lead to 33-27 by the end of the third quarter. MarysvillePilchuck forced Granite Falls to take a time out a couple of minutes into the quarter, as they rattled off a 6-0 run to take a commanding 39-27 lead. They battled the rest of the way, but the Tigers couldn’t close the gap as the Tomahawks secured their second win of the season, 46-36. “Madyson Baxter played out of her mind. It’s great to

see her stand out because we need more of it, and if she can play like that then we’re going to be in good shape,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach Taylor Stevens. Madyson Baxter was the best player on the court as she scored the Tomahawks' first 17 points of the game on her way to a game-high 26 points. She also secured a double-double with 11 rebounds, three three-pointers, five steals and an assist. Mar ysv i l le-Pi lchuck also had big contributions from Imajine Moses, Kelsey Edge, Aubre Zackuse and Alissa Edge. Moses, sophomore guard, finished second in scoring with eight points, two three-pointers, three assists, six rebounds and one steal. Kelsey, senior forward, was second in rebounds and steals with nine boards, four steals, three points and one block. Zackuse, sophomore center, used her size to play strong defense as she only scored one point but filled the stat sheet with seven rebounds, one assist, two blocks and two steals. Alissa, senior forward, came off the bench to score two points, four re-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Marysville-Pilchuck’s sophomore guard Emily Hamre beats her Tiger defenders along the baseline and looks to score in the second half at Granite Falls High School on Jan. 2. bounds and one steal. “It was good to be able to take a lead and keep a lead throughout the game. We just need to work on our awareness and understand when we need to press the issue or not. I’m just looking

for them to gain confidence and continue to grow,” said Coach Stevens. Your next chance to catch the Tomahawks at home will be on Friday, Jan. 10, at 7:15 p.m. as they take on the Shorecrest Scots.

High School Winter Sports Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks GIRLS BASKETBALL Jan. 8 Jan. 10 Jan. 14

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Archbishop Murphy Shorecrest Mountlake Terrace

Away Home Away

Jan. 9 Oak Harbor Away Jan. 11 Kentridge Invite Away Jan. 14 Glacier Peak Home Jan. 14 Snohomish Home *Meet begins at 9 a.m. **Meet begins at 4 p.m.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

BOYS BASKETBALL AMHS M-PHS MlkTerHS

Jan. 8 Jan. 10 Jan. 13

Games begins at 7:15 p.m.

Archbishop Murphy Shorecrest Mountlake Terrace

Home Away Home

M-PHS ShcstHS M-PHS

Meet begins at 7 p.m.

VandPool** KCAC* M-PHS M-PHS

Jan. 9 Everett Jan. 9 Snohomish *Meet begins at 5:30 p.m.

Away Away

SnoHS* SnoHS

Meet begins at 9 a.m.

Atown Tourney

Away

Jan. 10 Jan. 14

Shorewood Lynnwood

Away Home

BOYS WRESTLING Meet begins at 7 p.m.

Jan. 10 Jan. 13

Jan. 9 Snohomish Away SnoHS* Jan. 9 Everett Away SnoHS Jan. 11 Panther Classic Away SnoHS** Jan. 11 Storm JV Tourn. Away SqualHS*** *Meet begins at 5:30 p.m. **Meet begins at 9 a.m. ***Meet begins at 10 a.m.

Jan. 8 Jan. 10 Jan. 13

Jan. 8 Jan. 10 Jan. 13

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Mountlake Terrace Shorewood Lynnwood

Away Home Away

Meets begin at 6 p.m.

Home Away Away Home

MBHS SWHS

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Mount Baker Sedro-Woolley

Home Home

LWHS LWHS

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Meet begins at 7 p.m.

Jan. 8 Sedro-Woolley Jan. 11 King of Beacon Hill Meet begins at 8 a.m.

Home Away

GIRLS WRESTLING Jan. 11

Matches begin at 9 a.m.

Atown Tourney

Away

Meadowdale Lynnwood Shorewood

Away Home Away

MdlHS MGHS ShwdHSn

Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Clinic Chinook Lumber CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E&E Lumber Edward Jones-Andy Smith Edward Jones-Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Gary Wright Realty Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance H&M Electric Heritage Bank-Marysville Hibulb Cultural Center Honda of Marysville Julie’s Licensing

ArlHS

Jan. 10 Jan. 14

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Lynnwood Shorewood

Away Home

LynnHS MGHS

GIRLS WRESTLING SnoHS SnoHS SnoHS ArlHS*

Jan. 11

Meet begins at 9 a.m.

Atown Tourney

Away

Meet begins at 9:45 a.m.

Jan. 9 Oak Harbor Home MGHS* Jan. 9 Stanwood Home MGHS** Jan. 11 Sky Valley Invitational Away SHS Jan. 14 Clash on Casino Away CasHS*** *Meet begins at 5:30 p.m. **Meet begins at 7 p.m. ***Meet begins at 5 p.m.

ArlHS

BOYS SWIM

Meets begins at 3:15 p.m.

Jan. 9 Oak Harbor Away VandPool** Jan. 11 Kentridge Invite Away KCAC* Jan. 14 Glacier Peak Home M-PHS Jan. 14 Snohomish Home M-PHS *Meet begins at 9 a.m. **Meet begins at 4 p.m.

Schedules subject to change. For more information, visit www.wescoathletics.com.

Proud to Support Our Student Athletes 7 Lakes Gifts Action Sports Albertson’s-Marysville All Creatures Vet Clinic Altitude Trampoline Park American Distributing Arlington Electric & Solar Arlington Hardware Arlington Muffler & Brake Arlington Pediatric Dentistry Awning Builders A-Z Transmissions Beef Jerky Outlet Big Foot Music Bleachers Grill Bob’s Burgers and Brew Brown’s Plumbing Bud Barton Bundy Carpet C Don Filer Insurance

LWHS CHS*

BOYS WRESTLING

GIRLS BASKETBALL MlkTerHS ArlHS LynnHS

GIRLS WRESTLING Jan. 8 Edmonds-Woodway Jan. 8 Snohomish Jan. 8 Glacier Peak Jan. 11 Atown Tourney *Meet begins at 9 a.m.

Away Away

BOYS BASKETBALL

BOYS BASKETBALL ShwdHS ArlHS

Mount Baker Sedro-Woolley

BOYS WRESTLING

BOYS BASKETBALL

ArlHS

Arlington Eagles GIRLS BASKETBALL

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Marysville Getchell Chargers

GIRLS WRESTLING Jan. 11

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Jan. 9 Jan. 13

BOYS WRESTLING

BOYS SWIM

Meets begins at 3:15 p.m.

Lakewood Cougars

Kuhnle’s Tavern Lake Goodwin Store/Resort Langabeer, McKernan, Bennett & Co. Les Schwab-Marysville Les Schwab-Smokey Point Locals Espresso Marysville Awards Marysville Care Center Marysville Laundry Station Marysville Orthodontics Marysville Travel & Cruise Marysville-Everett Ceramic Tile Maxi’s Chinese Restaurant Mirkwood Public House Mountain View Rehab Mountain Loop Motorcars North County Outlook Noble Palace NW Diesel Pacific Propane

Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pilchuck Rentals Port Gardner Bay Winery Port of Subs-Tulalip Reaction Physical Therapy (Arlington|Smokey Point) Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Riverside Topsoil Roy Robinson S&S Roofing LLC Schaefer Shipman Shaklee Skagit Regional Clinics Sleep Advantage-Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning Sno-Isle Natural Food Co-op

Sonic Burger-Marysville Soroptomist Int’l of Marysville Stanwood Redi-Mix Stilly Auto Parts Stilly Diner Stilly Sand & Gravel Strawberry Lanes Stryker Brothers Tall Guy Small Guy The Creamery The Shop-Arlington The UPS Store-Tulalip Tulalip Tribes Unique Interiors Village Licensing Who’s on First Sports Cards Wild Birds Unlimited


Sports

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Chargers fall to Mountlake Terrace 49-42 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville Getchell boys basketball team hosted their first league game after the winter break as they took on the Mountlake Terrace Hawks on Jan. 3. Mountlake Terrace drew fouls early and got off to a 4-0 lead within the first few minutes of the game. The Chargers began to deny the Hawks in the paint and forced them to shoot from the perimeter as they bounced back. Throughout the rest of the first quarter

they went on a 12-6 run to establish a 12-10 lead. In the second quarter both teams slowed down the pace as defense became the primary focus on both ends of the court. They went back and forth as they traded buckets on their way to a 10-9 quarter, where Marysville Getchell entered halftime up 22-19. The Hawks came out in the second half and forced the Chargers to take a time out after rattling off a 7-0 run over the first four minutes, leading 26-22. After the time out, Marysville Getch-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Chargers’ junior guard Cole Norton drives into the paint against the Mountlake Terrace Hawks on Jan. 3.

ell began to battle back but still couldn’t close the gap as Mountlake Terrace entered the fourth up 34-28. Over the final quarter both teams had their runs, but the Chargers couldn’t shut down the Hawks’ size inside as they lost 49-42. “Our guys came to play, and they played really hard. It was good to see that our guys never backed down and we just couldn’t hit some shots late against a really good team. I want us to keep playing like we did tonight, showing passion and playing with heart. As long as we bring that every single night, we’ll be fine,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach Corby Schuh. Malakhi Knight, junior guard and captain, stood out for the Chargers as he kept them in the game on both ends of the floor. Knight finished with a game-high 23 points with two three-pointers and a perfect six for six at the line. He also had two assists, 13 rebounds, one block and four steals. Other key players for Marysville Getchell were Will Dunn, Alex Owens, Josiah Koellmer and Cole Norton. Dunn, senior forward and captain, put up seven points, two assists, one rebound and one steal.

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Pet

Building A Bond For Life.

Miles

Miles is an 8 month old male Vizsla mix.

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Malakhi Knight, Chargers’ junior guard, organizes the offense as he brings the ball up court against the Mountlake Terrace Hawks at Marysville Getchell High School on Jan. 3.

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Owens, junior guard, led the team in assists with three, four points, one three-pointer, one rebound and a steal. Koellmer, junior guard, used his speed to find openings but failed to convert as he finished with three points and an assist. Norton, junior guard, played inside and out as he finished with two points, one assist and five rebounds. Your next chance to support the Chargers at home will be against the Lynnwood Royals on Friday, Jan. 10, at 7:15 p.m.

Arlington competes at Everett Classic By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Arlington boys wrestling team went to compete at the Everett Classic against 24 other schools on Jan. 4. The Eagles finished the day with nine scoring wrestlers and five of them finishing in the top six in their weight class. As a team they placed fifth with a final score of 96.0. “Dorian Tollenaar wrestled about as good as I’ve ever seen him, and he never ceases to amaze me with how much he’s improving day-by-day. It was incredible to see him dominate his matchups and then almost end it with a tech fall in the finals against a good opponent,” said Arlington Head Coach Jonny Gilbertson. Arlington’s most impressive performance came from their junior 120-pound wrestler Dorian Tollenaar. He started the tournament on a bye in the first round, beat his Lake Stevens opponent with a pin in the second round and then closed out the semifinal with a pin in the second round against Woodinville. Tollenaar finished his incredible tournament with a 10-2 major decision over his Blaine opponent, securing the first-place finish and 27 team points. The other four top finishers for the Eagles were Eric Vogel, Casten Tollenaar, Cole Phillips and Trevor Latta. Vogel, freshman 113-pound wrestler, went 4-1 on the day as he won one match by decision, two by major decision and one by pin in the third round. After losing his second match of the day, he went on a three-match streak

5

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Our doors are open!

Volunteers Needed!

Call 360-926-2228 Today ! Apply at 1108 State Ave. NE , Marysville

Call Leslie at 360-659-1100 to include your services in this directory for as little as $50 per month! leslieb@northcountyoutlook.com

Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County Wednesday, January 8, through Tuesday, January 14

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Dorian Tollenaar, Arlington’s junior 120-pound wrestler, takes control early in the match against the Lake Stevens Vikings at the Everett Classic on Jan. 4. in the consolation bracket to take the fourth-place finish and earned 16 team points. Tollenaar, sophomore 120-pound wrestler, won his first two matches of the day by decision, 8-1 and 11-7, before taking his first loss in the tournament by sudden victory in the semifinal. He bounced back in the Consolation bracket as he won a 7-4 decision to finish in fourth with 12 team points. Phillips, sophomore 132-pound wrestler, took his first match with a 9-3 decision but then lost in the quarterfinal by pin in the first round. After getting sent to the consolation bracket, Phillips won the next two by decision and a first-round pin before losing his final match to finish in sixth place with nine team points. Latta, sophomore 138-pound wres-

tler, dominated in his first match with a 21-6 technical fall before being sent to the consolation bracket with a close 6-3 loss by decision. After the loss he went on a three-match streak with a 15-0 technical fall, second round pin and a 12-5 decision to earn a fourthplace finish and 17 team points. “The guys wrestled hard and it was good to see some of our guys have success from our varsity through our JV. We have a young team, so we knew this was going to be a rebuilding year, just focusing on getting our basics under us and building that team culture again,” said Coach Gilbertson. The Eagles will be competing away from home for the majority of the regular season but will compete nearby at the Panther Classic in Snohomish on Saturday, Jan. 11, at 10 a.m.

Wednesday, January 8 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:25 pm

Sunday, January 12 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:30 pm

Thursday, January 9 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:26 pm

Monday, January 13 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:31 pm

2:47 am 9:44 am 4:48 pm 9:10 pm

First Quarter 3:31 am 10:21 am 5:42 pm 10:32 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-1.3 ft 11.3 ft 4.9 ft 7.3 ft

2.5 ft 11.1 ft 4.2 ft 7.0 ft

Friday, January 10 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:27 pm 4:19 am 10:59 am 6:32 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

3.7 ft 10.9 ft 3.3 ft

Saturday, January 11 Sunrise 7:58 am • Sunset 4:28 pm 12:08 am 5:17 am 11:37 am 7:15 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

7.1 ft 5.0 ft 10.8 ft -2.3 ft

1:51 am 6:28 am 12:15 pm 7:54 pm

3;09 am 7:45 am 12:53 pm 8:31 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

7.8 ft 6.0 ft 10.6 ft 1.3 ft

8.7 ft 6.8 ft 10.5 ft 0.4 ft

Tuesday, January 14 Sunrise 7:57 am • Sunset 4:32 pm

4:02 am 8:53 am 1:32 pm 9:08 pm

High Tide 9.7 ft Low Tide 7.2 ft High Tide 10.4 ft Low Tide -2.1-0.6

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

Communities

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

TREES

to mailing out the flyers because of lack of volunteers. Community members have a convenient place to get rid of their trees. “It helps them by getting rid of their Christmas trees. The trees can just sit on the curb otherwise,” said Hines. The troop works with city of Marysville staff to get the trees shredded into wood chips. “All the trees get chopped up and turned into bark and that is put

Continued from page 1

and more kids can join,” she said. The recycling project takes a lot of preparation for the troop each year to put on right after the holiday season. “In past years it took a lot of work because we’ve had to hand deliver our envelopes to each house,” although not as much work was required this year due

back into the park. It helps with maintaining the trails,” said McKinney. The service is free for the community, although many locals donate to the troop for the service. “The donations that are given help us pay for things that we need on our trips,” said McKinney. “Donations sometimes go toward trips that we can take, whether that be a Scout who can’t fully pay for their trip. It helps us with our equipment as well."

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington Boy Scout Troop 29 member Kolyn Braaten, left, and Scoutmaster Patrick Bouquet carry a Christmas tree to be recycled at the troop’s annual tree recycling event on Jan. 4.

SCOUTS Continued from page 1

ple have left out,” he said. The troop does work throughout the holiday season each year to let people know about the service. “The Boy Scouts are collecting the trees that people put out. We delivered letters before that tell people to just put out the tree on their lawn if they have them,” said troop member Benjamin Korthuis. Part of the mission of the Boy Scouts is to be a positive part of their communi-

ty, said Bouquet, and the recycling service helps troop members fulfill that goal. “It’s nice to know that I’m helping people,” said troop member Avery Hayes. It’s good for the Scouts to learn about how to give back, said Bouquet. “They learn community service, about giving back to the community. One of the key points of Boy Scouts is being a good part of the community and a good steward,” he said. “Going out and being in the neighborhood, talking to people, learning to give without expecting a return

are all important,” he said. The yearly recycling service provides an convenient place for community members to get rid of their Christmas trees. “I just talked to someone who dropped off their tree and he said he probably would have spent a month cutting it up and leaving it in the recycling bin,” said Bouquet. “They can take it to one place and just be done with it,” he said. Hayes said lots of trees were coming in this year. “Lots of people left out trees in their neighborhood, it looks like,” he said. Trees gathered as part of the event are shredded and recycled. “The city uses the trees and the wood,” said Korthuis. The wood chips end up going to parks to help maintain trails. “They’re using them for the disc golf course, so we’ll be taking them over to Twin Rivers Park,” said Bouquet. The event is put on without charge, although Troop 29 does collect donations throughout the day for anyone who wants to give back. Those funds go toward activities for the troop which help defer some of the costs. “It helps buy and maintain the equipment we have. We have a fleet of canoes we use and we make sure they’re clean and ready to use. Those are used for the Duck Dash each Fourth of July,” said Bouquet. Bouquet said the troop is currently accepting new members and encourages local parents to reach out to him. He said that interested individuals can contact him at patbouquet@hotmail. com. “I’d be happy to share information about our troop and our program. We meet every Monday at 6:30 p.m. at the Arlington United Church, so if they want to stop by and see a meeting they’re welcome to attend,” he said.


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Communities

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

7

School, fire district measures on Feb. 11 ballot By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville, Arlington and Lakewood school districts, as well as the Tulalip Bay Fire District, will have levy and bond measures on the upcoming Feb. 11 ballot. The levy measures will affect tax rates and funding for the local school districts and the fire district. “Local elections are important and have a direct impact on the services our communities receive for the taxes we pay. The February 11 Special Election is no exception with ballot measures in most north county school districts,” said County Auditor Garth Fell. The deadline to register to vote or update your information for the February election is Feb. 3. Residents can check their registration status online as well, said Fell. “I encourage all voters to make sure they are ready to participate this February by checking their voter registration online at votewa. gov,” he said. Registration can be done at the same site. “This online portal allows you to see your current address and submit changes, if necessary. And if you’re not registered, the portal directs you to a registration form,” said Fell. The deadline to register for voting in-person is Feb. 11. Washington state has mail-in ballots that are typically available a couple of weeks before voting day. “Ballots for the Feb. 11 election will be mailed on Jan. 23 and can be returned without postage through any postal box or county ballot drop box,” said Fell. Marysville School District The Marysville School District’s capital levy would rebuild Liberty and Cascade elementary schools as well

Share your news! Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send nformation to: North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or email the information to: editor@northcountyoutlook.com.

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as provide safety and security improvements across the district. Both schools are well over 60 years old. The $120 million levy would mean an increased property tax rate of about $1.92 per $1,000 of assessed property value for four years. More information about the levy is available at msd25.org/capitallevy-2020. Arlington School District The Arlington School District is running two levies and a bond on this ballot. The Educational Programs and Operations Levy would replace an expiring levy. Formerly known as a ‘Maintenance and Operations’ levy, these levies provide funding for staff and programs not funded through the state. In 2016 the former levy was approved for a property tax rate of $3.51 per $1,000 of assessed property value, but was reduced to $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value due to state law. That law has been rolled back slightly and so this levy, if approved, would be a small increase to $1.70 per $1,000 of assessed property value. A second levy would expand Arlington High School to meet growing population needs, improve STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) offerings and fund safety and security upgrades.

That levy would increase local property tax rate by $1.15 per $1,000 of assessed property value for four years. Finally, a bond measure would rebuild Post Middle School. The 20-year bond would replace the middle school which does not have the infrastructure for modern STEM classes or security features. It would cost an estimated $0.64 per $1,000 of assessed property value for the first four years and an estimated $0.94 per $1,000 of assessed property value

for the remaining 16 years. More information on these measures is available at asd.wednet.edu/2020_ levies_and_bond. Lakewood School District Lakewood is running two levies on February’s ballot. The Educational Programs and Operations Levy would replace an expiring levy. This levy provides money for extra-curricular activities and staff such as mental health support. State law put a cap on the property tax of these levies

of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value. That law has been rolled back slightly and so this levy, if approved, would be an increase to about $2.17 per $1,000 assessed property value. The technology and capital improvements levy provides the district with funds for building maintenance and technology for classrooms and security. This levy would also replace a formerly approved levy and remain at a tax rate of $0.27 per $1,000 of assessed property value.

Tulalip Bay Fire District Fire District 15 (the Tulalip Bay Fire District) has put an Emergency Medical Services measure onto the February ballot. This measure would restore the district’s EMS levy to $0.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value. For the next five years it would also allow the district to increase the levy collection amount up to 6 percent each year as long as the tax rate does not increase beyond $0.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value.

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Opinion

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

n GUEST OPINIONS

RAP Program helps address workforce shortages in trades

Workforce shortages in the construction and building trades have become ever apparent with a red hot building market in the Puget Sound region. Fewer young people are joining the trades and, when they are, it typically is not until they are in their late twenties. This represents a decade of potentially lost productivity and wage-earning. This is the problem that the Regional Apprenticeship Pathways (RAP) Program seeks to solve. On January 7th, we held a ribbon cutting ceremony at Marysville-Pilchuck High

Nate Nehring

School to celebrate the first academic year of this innovative program and show appreciation for the many dedicated stakeholders who made it happen. The RAP Program started with a conversation

between labor leaders, industry representatives, and education officials. It became clear that there was a lack of career pathways for young people to transition from high school into the building trades. While much of the focus of our K-12 education system is on four-year universities, there are many students whose interests and skillsets fit better with an apprenticeship in the skilled trades following high school. The RAP Program is a pre-apprenticeship proSee NEHRING on page 11

City, MSD and Tribes look at 2020 and beyond With the new year comes a new legislative session beginning Jan. 13. Your Marysville-Tulalip community leaders regularly meet with elected officials in Olympia about state funding priorities. Here are some highlights for 2020 and beyond. City of Marysville City leaders have prioritized these three projects for state funding requests: n 156th Street NE Railroad Overcrossing: The city requests $17.7 million to build an elevated roadway overcrossing the BNSF mainline tracks at 156th Street NE just west of I-5.

This would replace a former at-grade crossing that was closed about 20 years ago and offer expanded access to the Lakewood-area residents and businesses. n Ebey Waterfront Trail: The city requests $500,000 to secure rightof-way needed to build the next and final phase of this urban trail. A 1.28-mile trail section along the dike through the Ebey Estuary would connect the First Street Bypass area with the existing trail in the Sunnyside area. When complete, the Ebey Waterfront Trail will have nearly six miles of fully connected trails.

n Grove Street Overcrossing: The city requests $24 million to build an elevated roadway over the railroad tracks on Grove Street between State and Cedar avenues. Routing traffic away from the railroad crossing would help alleviate congestion and increase east-west connectivity downtown. These two projects are already designated for state funding. City leaders will continue to stress the importance of these transportation improvements to Marysville residents, businesses and quality of life. See 2020 on page 11

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Our Favorite Quotes "For eleven months and maybe about 20 days each year, we concentrate on the shortcoming of others, but for a few days at the turn of the New Year we look at our own. It's a good habit." Author ­— Hays Sulzberger Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

n LETTER TO THE EDITOR Take ownership of our schools The single biggest way most of us help support and raise our children is through our schools. These schools are concrete expressions of the care and vision we have for the next generation and for the future of our community. The quality of each child’s school experience cannot be left up to anonymous “experts” or distant policy makers. These are our children, this is our community, and these are our schools. And with ownership comes responsibility. Here are two actions you can take: 1. Consider sharing your gifts, talents, experience, and support directly with our children as a volunteer. Every member of our community has an educational role to play, and our need for strong intergenerational relationships has never been greater.

Contact me for more ideas on creative and meaningful ways you can share your strengths with our young people. 2. Keep investing in the physical structures where our children spend most of their waking hours by supporting the Marysville School District Capital Levy this February 11th. I have been teaching for 30 years and this levy will replace two schools (Liberty Elementary and Cascade Elementary) that were built long before I was even born. We may not be able to solve all the world’s problems, but together we can make our schools exactly what we need them to be. Jim Strickland Teacher, MGHS Marysville

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Weekly Puzzles Fun by the Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. See answers on page 9

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Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

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www.northcountyoutlook.com COMING EVENTS Ready Readers Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories, music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 18 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Supported by the Friends of the Arlington Library. Held on Mondays, Jan. 13 and 27, beginning at10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Ready Readers Baby Storytime: Wiggle and giggle with your baby through silly stories, happy songs, rhymes and activities. Playtime follows. For ages birth to 18 months. Caregiver required. Supported by Friends of the Arlington Library. Held Tuesdays, Jan. 14-28 • 10:30 a.m., beginning at10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Ready Readers Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs

and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3-5. Caregiver required. Supported by Friends of the Arlington Library. Wednesdays, Jan. 8-29, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. STARS Training Series - Designing Learning: StarHow a learning environment is furnished, equipped, arranged and decorated impacts the quality of learning and frequency of challenging behavior. This workshop will give you specific tips and ideas for how to take your licensed home childcare or childcare center classroom environment to the next level. The strategies you will learn will be especially helpful if one or more of the children in your care have challenging behaviors and/or special needs. 2 STARS credits. Registration required. Adults only. Held Sunday, Jan. 12, 10 a.m. to noon, at the Arling-

ton Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Arlington Book Discussion Group: Arrive early tonight for a BYOB sharing time, before we discuss this month's book selection, "The Sympathizer" by Viet Than. This novel follows a Viet Cong agent starting over in 1975 Los Angeles. New members are always welcome. Books for discussion are chosen throughout the year. Held Tuesday, Jan. 14, 6-7:30 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Friends of the Arlington Library Meeting: Guests and new members are welcome to join the generous folks who help raise funds for library programs. Held in the Stillaguamish Conference Room at 154 W. Cox Ave. Held on Wednesday, Jan. 15, beginning at 3 p.m.

Answers from page 8

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January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HSIU-CHING LIN, Deceased, NO. 19-4-02119-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY ALVIN JOSEPH ABRAHAMSON III, a single man, Plaintiff, vs. THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF SANDRA J. LAZARWICH, Deceased; SHERYL SPRUIELL; KARLYNN PATTERSON; THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GARY W. MASTERJOHN, Deceased; and JOHN MASTERJOHN; Defendants, NO. 19-2-10543-31 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO: THE STATE OF WASHINGTON AND TO: THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF SANDRA J. LAZARWICH, Deceased; SHERYL SPRUIELL; KARLYNN PATTERSON; THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GARY W. MASTERJOHN, Deceased; and JOHN MASTERJOHN

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: PAUL WILLIAM HODGE, Deceased. NO. 19-4-02187-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030)

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 18, 2019 Personal Representative: Michael Melyan Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #44519 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02119-31

LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WARREN M. COX, Deceased, NO. 19-4-02141-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this Summons; to wit, within sixty (60) days after the 4th day of December, 2019; and defend the aboveentitled action in the above-entitled court; and answer the Complaint of the plaintiff, Alvin Joseph Abrahamson, III; and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff at their office below stated; and in case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the Complaint which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The lawsuit is to quiet title in certain real estate to the plaintiff. DATED: November 26, 2019 BAILEY, DUSKIN & PEIFFLE, P.S. Attorneys for Petitioner: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704, 103 North Street, P. O. Box 188, Arlington, WA 98223

LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATES OF MICHAEL J. SLYE and PATRICIA M. SLYE, Deceased, NO. 19-402142-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 18, 2019. Personal Representative: Steven M. Cox Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of these estates. Any person having a claim against the decedents must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedents’ probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 18, 2019. Personal Representative: Shawn M. McMillian Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02141-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02142-31

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The personal representatives named below have been appointed as personal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representatives or the personal representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 8, 2020 Co-Personal Representative Paul G. Hodge Co-Personal Representative Erik C. Hodge Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02187-31

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: KENNETH F. SHANK, Deceased, NO. 20-4-00005-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030)

The co-personal representatives named below have been appointed as copersonal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the co-personal representatives or the co-personal representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the co-personal representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 8, 2020.

Co-Personal Representative: Kevin Ryan Co-Personal Representative: Kathleen L. Card Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 20-4-00005-31

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January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

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n WHISTLING GARDENER

Gardening trends for 2020 I have just all known this, spent this last but now it is ofweek, and countficial. Out of less hours, reEngland from searching the the Royal Hortopic of "trends ticulture Society for 2020’’ in comes the followhopes of bring- By Steve Smith ing announceing you something of deep ment: “New findings have profundity. Unfortunately, I revealed that a soil bacteria have to confess; it has been known as mycobacterium a struggle to find the per- vaccea is good for our imfect morsels of wisdom for mune systems, which could your reading pleasure and I spark interest in mud pies have come to the conclusion next year.” Okay, I am not that perhaps I am trying to so sure that “mud pies” are set the bar too high. The going to be the next rage, trends for 2020 are really but at least it is good to just a continuation of what know that we don’t have to I have observed over the last be quite so OCD about little 5 years, so here are some of Johnny getting some dirt on the points that caught my his hands. For me personaleye that hopefully you will ly, I have always preferred to find informative and useful. garden without gloves and Dirt is good for us. I by the end of the summer think intuitively we have my hands are a mess — but

you know what, I don’t recall ever having a cold in the summer so maybe there is something to this dirt stuff. Plus, I get a huge emotional high from putting my hands into a healthy bed of soil. It becomes a therapeutically beneficial activity. I suspect some of you can relate. Gardeners are becoming more and more environmentally aware. When I was into the organic gardening movement back in the early '70s, I was considered crazy. Fast forward 50 years and “organic” has become mainstream. Home gardeners and even some areas of commercial farming are now embracing the ageold principles of good soil stewardship and the value of compost and integrated pest management. “No

dig” and “no till” methods of planting are becoming popular. Along with growing our own organic food, we are also becoming increasingly aware of the importance of providing habitat for beneficial insects, bird, frogs, and all that goes along with what we call “nature”. This gives me hope for the future. Messy can be good. As a corollary to the above environmental awareness, gardeners are beginning to realize that they don’t need to control everything in the garden. Gardens that have neat and tidy lawns and shrubs that don’t touch each other can be sterile environments for attracting the birds and the bees. We are learning to let our plants grow together and

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Hanging houseplants will continue to be a trend in 2020. go to seed and leaving the mess until spring so the fallen leaves can replenish the earth. This doesn’t mean that we let the blackberries, morning glory, and horsetail take over the yard though. We still have to “manage” our little piece of paradise, but we do it with

good stewardship in mind. Creating secluded spaces. As builders continue to put bigger houses on everdecreasing lots, homeowners are challenged to find creative ways to use their outdoor living areas. Vertical gardening continues to increase in popularity with people finding all sorts of creative ways to build planters on fences and walls and growing plants in small spaces. Incorporating fountains and ponds adds a level of interest and often tranquility to the garden, not to mention that they attract birds, frogs, and those not always welcomed raccoons. I remember back when I was 14 as the neighborhood yard boy, that almost every garden I worked in had some sort of water feature in it. It just goes to show that some things never go out of style. House plants are back in vogue. I don’t care what generation you belong to, house plants will improve your indoor living environment. They are a great way for younger generations to get back to nature and learn the basics of gardening and to allow older generations to still be surrounded by their beloved plants as they downsize their living conditions. The choices and sizes have never been more diverse, so start thinking about adding some living plants to your home. You will breathe better and probably have a more positive attitude towards life. Finally, no matter what size your garden (or maybe it doesn’t even exist yet), with a little effort and imagination, you can make it your own special place to recharge your batteries or to fill your belly. In my opinion, with our current pace of life it has never been more important to spend time outside in our gardens. May it be your 2020 resolution to do just that.

Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.


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2020 Continued from page 1

n I-5/Marine View Drive to SR 528 Lane and Interchange: This State of Washington project will extend the HOV lane from north Everett to SR 528 (4th Street) and build a new freeway interchange connecting with SR 529 in south Marysville, adding vehicle capacity and avoiding railroad crossing delays. The project is expected to go to bid in mid-2020 with construction in 2021 and completion in 2022. n I-5/156th Street Interchange: Building on the city’s construction of an overpass at 156th Street NE, this project would build a full freeway interchange about one mile south of Smokey Point to serve the growing Cascade Industrial Center and Lakewood retail centers. The project was selected for state funding in 2015 through the Connecting Washington package with disbursement of funds beginning in 2025. Marysville School District School board legislative representatives regularly participate in advocacy opportunities both locally and at the Federal level to advocate for fair and equal funding for their local school districts. This includes participation at the annual Washington State School Directors Association (WSSDA) conference and attendance at legislative workshops including the Federal Relations Network institute in February. School board director Chris Nation has served in the role of legislative representative for the school board on

and off for the past several years and most recently board director Pete Lundberg was appointed to serve in 2020. Director Nation is also starting his fourth year of service on the WSSDA legislative committee. The Marysville School District believes that providing a free public education that provides for the educational, social, emotional, mental health, and diverse needs of every student served is a fundamental human right. The Legislature must take a close look at the negative impacts to districts such as Marysville caused by the funding structure. To this end, the Marysville School District Board of Directors annually review and set legislative priorities. For the coming year, the Board will consider WSSDA’s priorities as they address the concerns that our district has continued to advocate for: fair and equitable school funding, local levy authority, and mental health supports. “These priorities address the educational challenges and life struggles that our young scholars face every day,” says Director Chris Nation. Legislative Representative and Director Pete Lundberg added, “We appreciate and value the efforts of the legislators in the days to come to create a funding system that meets the needs equitably. All of our students deserve nothing less.” The City of Marysville, Marysville School District and Tulalip Tribes jointly prepare this monthly column about topics of interest to the Marysville Tulalip community.

January 8, 2020 - January 14, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

NEHRING Continued from page 1

gram designed by education and labor experts to incorporate key competencies from the trades into a curriculum preparing students for a successful career as an electrician, carpenter, laborer or any other of a large host of options. Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to graduate high school with their high school diploma, college credentials from Everett Community College, and preferred or direct entry into a statecertified apprenticeship program. Our many involved stakeholders have made the creation, funding, and operation of the program successful. Representatives from labor, industry, education, and local government helped to support the development of the concept of the RAP Program and the lobbying effort in Olympia to secure stable funding for its ongoing operation. The recent ceremony celebrated our stakeholders and recognized the work of the first class of students in the program who started in September of 2019. This class of students have shown great progress in just a couple of months in building their compe-

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tencies and building unit projects to demonstrate their new abilities. We had the opportunity to hear from one of these students at the ribbon cutting ceremony along with comments from school district and elected officials. Following the program, we toured the RAP Center, a building the Marysville School District has donated which will host the program moving forward. The space is perfect for the program with areas for classroomstyle instruction and shop areas for the students to put their knowledge to the test. The students also presented some of the products of their labor and were available to speak to guests about their experience in the RAP Program so far. I am excited about the early success of the RAP Program and appreciate the great work of all the community partners who came together to make a positive impact for our students.

Nate Nehring is a member of the Snohomish County Council and represents District 1 which includes Arlington, Darrington, Granite Falls, Marysville, Stanwood, and unincorporated north county. He can be reached by email at Nate.Nehring@snoco.org or by phone at 425-388-3494.

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Marysville Wedding Show returns Jan. 25 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The city of Marysville’s annual Wedding Show will return this January with numerous vendors to help you plan your wedding. The event will be held Jan. 25, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Marysville Opera House at 1225 Third Street, Marysville. “We’re very excited to be able to offer this wedding show,” said Chris Taylor, cultural arts supervisor for the city of Marysville. “We’ll have local vendors form Marysville, of course, as well as vendors from all around the region from Everett to Lake Stevens." They currently expect around 40 to 45 different vendors to be at the event. “They’re going to have booths there with some swag as well as some information for people that are interested,” said Taylor Taylor said there will be a large

variety of vendors to help with all aspects of a wedding. “It’s a combination of boutiques, wedding photographers, meal services and catering, hair and makeup, and dress alterations,” he said. “We’re hoping to have at least a couple of different vendors for all the different areas that a wedding planner would need,” he said. The vendors will have information about what they provide and some of them will have their products available for viewing as well. “Some boutiques will be bringing some models there who will be modeling some of the dresses, both for the brides and the bridesmaids, just so that people can get a feel for the color and fashion of all the dresses,” said Taylor. Representatives from wedding venues around the county will also be available for locals to learn about their options when picking a venue.

The city of Marysville owns the Marysville Opera House where the event is located and rents it out often as a wedding venue. “So a wedding show is kind of a great fit for the building,” said Taylor. Individuals can learn about renting the venue for their wedding if they want one at the building. Taylor said that the event helps individuals learn about all the different aspects of running a wedding as well providing information and contacts to further help. “We hope that people will come by and take away info for their wedding and ideas that they may not have thought about when planning before,” said Taylor. “There’s so much that goes into planning a wedding,” he said. More information about city of Marysville events and the Marysville Wedding Show is available at marysvillewa.gov.

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Marysville's annual Wedding Show will return to the Marysville Opera House on Jan. 25.

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January 8, 2020 North County Outlook  

January 8, 2020 North County Outlook

January 8, 2020 North County Outlook  

January 8, 2020 North County Outlook

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