{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

Presorted Standard US POSTAGE

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

P.O. BOX 39 n MARYSVILLE, WA 98270

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Vol. 13 No. 12 n

2019

Holiday Guide

PAID

Kids Coloring Contest Community Holiday Events & So Much More

Mt. Vernon, WA Permit #34 ECRWSS POSTAL CUSTOMER

Holiday Guide A Special Supplement to North County Outlook • November 27, 2019

Inside

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Marysville drama students present 'A Christmas Story' By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The classic holiday film ‘A Christmas Story’ will be brought to life on the Marysville-Pilchuck High School stage as the drama club’s fall production. The Marysville-Pilchuck/Marysville Getchell drama club will present the play on Dec. 4, 5, 6 and 7 at 7 p.m., with a matinee performance on Dec. 7 beginning at 1 p.m. Cost is $8 for adults and $7 for students or seniors. “This is a retelling of the classic story of the 1983 movie,” said Kris Lawler, a drama club member who plays the main character of the film. “It’s a very fun comSee DRAMA on page 11

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Victoria Campos drops off some toys at the Toys for Tots collection drive on Nov. 23 outside the Quil Ceda Walmart.

Toys for Tots collecting for the holiday season By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Student Nolan Crumrine, left, during a Nov. 21 Marysville-Pilchuck High School rehearsal of ‘A Christmas Story’ about to put his tongue on a frozen pole while actors, from left, Kris Lawler, Nikole Dufour and Angela Ferguson watch.

Toys for Tots volunteers came out to the Quil Ceda Walmart on Nov. 23 and 24 to collect toy donations for this holiday season. "We are down here to-

day doing a donation drive to help support our kids in Snohomish County," said Mary Butler, Toys for Tots area coordinator for Snohomish County. Toys for Tots brought

See TOYS on page 2

Arlington food bank hands out Thanksgiving dinners By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Local families in need were again able to come to the Arlington Community Food Bank to receive food for their Thanksgiving dinner with an expanded program this year. “Instead of one day, we started holiday shopping on Nov. 18 and are providing them five different days they can shop,” said Carla Gastineau, executive director of the Arlington Community Food Bank. The first day open for Thanksgiving dinners was Nov. 18, which was a Monday. Gastineau said Mondays usually bring in 30 to 35 people but 78 people came out for the first night.

“So it was really crazy. Wednesdays are generally bigger family nights so we’re expecting around 120 families tonight,” said Gastineau. Clients can come twice a month to receive meals at the food bank. “My goal is that clients get what they get every month, plus a holiday meal,” said Gastineau. The holiday meal often includes a turkey, although other meal options are available. Clients also receive classic Thanksgiving food items. “Normally a family unit of 1 to 2 people leaves with 85 pounds of food, but with the holiday service they’re leaving with about

Santa Claus is coming to Slumber Ease!

Get Your Pictures with Santa November 29th until Christmas Eve

425.870.7297

See DINNERS on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington Community Food Bank volunteer Christie Kurtz organizes some produce before clients come for the Thanksgiving dinner giveaway on Nov. 20.

North Puget Sound’s Only Mattress Factory Open Directly to the Public. FREE Custom Fitting FREE Built for your body type within 5 days! NO Retail Store Can Compare!

Mattresses • Upholstery Cut-to-size Foam

SLUMBER EASE mattress factory since 1962

Showroom at 4th & Cedar in Marysville Factory at 1327 8th Street in Marysville

360-659-8458 • 360-659-3598 BBB Rated A+ www.slumberease.com


2

s ’ h a e L eads L Check out these upcoming local events! NOVEMBER

30 30 30

Hometown Holiday Kickoff November 30, 4pm – 7pm City of Arlington www.arlingtonwa.gov/HH Elf on the Shelf Holiday Week November 30 – December 7 Downtown Marysville Merchants Small Business Saturday November 30 Participating Local Merchants

DECEMBER

1

Local News

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Holiday Craft Fair and Santa Pictures December 1, 11am – 3pm Marysville Historical Society www.marysvillehistory.org

DINNERS Continued from page 1

150 pounds of food,” said Gastineau. Volunteers said they enjoyed helping their community. “It’s the sense of giving back and serving the community that is important to me,” said food bank volunteer Susan Summers. They said that they enjoy working with the clients who come in. “I just love to help people and see people come in. I’m the person who cries because of my empathy,” said volunteer Christie Kurtz. “I just like to see the families come in with their kids and smile with what they get." Food bank clients will also be experiencing a new way to shop through the shelves of the organization this year, as Gastineau said she has adopt-

TOYS Continued from page 1

down their bus as part of the event. "It's been really good. This is our Stuff a Bus and

• • •

k Th in tmas s i Chr w o N ing Fram nts e Pres D

g atin ecor

ed the ‘full-client shopping model’ of food banks. “It used to be when people came to the food bank they got food boxed up by the volunteers and they could point to a couple of produce items and a couple of boxed goods and it was given to them,” said Gastineau. “When I go to the store, when you go to the store, we get to touch and grab our own things,” she said. Gastineau was hired earlier this year as the food bank’s first executive director and she began to investigate other food bank models. “I was lucky enough to get a grant,” to build cabinets and transition to a new model for the organization, which they have been using since late July. They are continuing with the new program even with the additional items required for the holiday dinners.

we already have half a busload," said Butler. "And we have Santa and a Marine out here to help represent." The organization is well known so many people in the community are willing

• • •

s sey Jer

k wor Art

1

3

Festival of Trees December 3 – 7 Tulalip Resort Casino washington.providence.org/donate/ providence-general-foundation/ events/festival-of-trees

5

Home for the Holidays Chamber Dinner & Auction December 5, 5pm – 9pm Tulalip Resort Casino Orca Ballroom www.marysvilletulalipchamber.com

6

Holiday Variety Show December 6, 7:30pm – 10pm Marysville Opera House www.marysvillewa.gov

les ctib

le Col

CAROLE ESTENSON OWNER/DESIGNER

Custom Framing Art of the Frame by Carole

425-750-5767 artoftheframeby carole@gmail.com

1331 State ave. • Marysville, WA

Marysville Stop & Shop Holiday Vendor Event December 1, 11am – 4pm Marysville Boys & Girls Club www.facebook.com/marysvillestopand shop

www.northcountyoutlook.com

“I decided we would stock the shelves with holiday items like they do at the stores,” said Gastineau. “It’s a big push still to get those holiday items." She added that the model helps clients feel more dignity through the process. “They feel empowered and they’re shopping for themselves. They get what they want and they don’t get stuff they don’t want,” said Gastineau. When Gastineau started at the food bank people just left the food they didn’t want in the parking lot, or traded with other clients. “We don’t want to give out food people aren’t going to eat,” she said. The only pushback about the new system is from volunteers who have to do more set-up and stocking work now, but Gastineau said they have bought into the new model now.

to help them, said Butler. "People recognize who we are so most of the time we don't even have to ask." Last year the organization gave out toys to 52,182 children in Snohomish County. Butler said the organization is seeing an increasing level of families in need. "Just because of everything that is happening because of all the opioid addiction we're seeing the numbers rise," she said. "So we're doing everything we can to meet the need." She said she is happy to see the people come by to donate during drives. "What I enjoy the most is to be able to say 'thank you' to this community because they have been so generous," said Butler. "I enjoy the interaction with everyone. People on the whole are so nice and welcoming and this is the time of the year for that, isn't it?" she said.

Community members who donated this year said they were happy to help the organization continue their work. "I think they're wonderful. It's a great thing and we love doing it every year," said community member Caprice McPherson. "I think it's a great organization and everybody deserves to have something on Christmas," said local Victoria Campos. The organization distributes the toys in a couple of different ways. "Families and individuals with children can apply online and we screen the applications. They're given an appointment, day and time to come down to our warehouse to pick up toys," said Butler. "Those are usually working class families," she said. They distribute toys through the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services as well. "We also work with community organizations like Pathways for Women," and others, said Butler. The county branch of Toys for Tots will continue collecting throughout the county this holiday season, said Butler. "There are local events going on all throughout December," she said. Eighty-four local businesses are also registered as drop sites where anyone can leave some toys for the organization. More information on those drop sites and other local opportunities to donate is available at everettwa.toysfortots.org.


facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Communities

Hometown Holidays return Nov. 30 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Fire pits, music and holiday spirit will be all along Olympic Avenue as part of the Hometown Holidays kickoff that returns to downtown Arlington on Nov. 30. The event is meant to begin the holiday season in Arlington and serve as a Shop Small Saturday event for the downtown. It will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. “We had such a great reaction last year and it really ended up being an event where families could come together,” said Kiersten Baiamonte, one of the organizers of the event and a small business owner at the Stilly Valley Collective. “I know as a family with two young kids we really appreciated it,” she said. Baiamonte said it was a good community event for locals. “I know, for my husband and I, we came from the bigger town of Edmonds and you could walk around and not see anyone you knew. And what was sweet about the Hometown Holidays is that we got to walk around and see people we knew and feel like a community,” she said. The event will be similar to last year’s event. “We’re doing really similar to what we did last year because we had a great response,” said Baiamonte. “We’ll have the fake snow again and the fire pits on Olympic, just free, fun things for families,” she said.

FILE PHOTO

Nathan Shaboth, right, and daughter Charlie Shaboth warm up a marshmallow to make s'mores during last year's Arlington Holiday Open House on Nov. 25, 2018. A tree lighting at Legion Park will be held at 5 p.m. Mrs. Claus will also show up for the event and there will be fake snow along certain portions of the downtown as well. In addition to a family community event, the Hometown Holidays kickoff is meant to promote Small Business Saturday. Many local businesses will be open late hours for the event. “We’re focusing on shopping local and we want to encourage people to not only shop from their local stores but know their local stores,” said Baiamonte. The Stilly Valley Chamber of Commerce will again be hosting a charm walk. For $25 participants can get charms at 25 local participating busi-

3 Arlington City Council votes to not increase 2020 property taxes November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

nesses. “You get to go to 25 different local businesses and collect a charm. Each business is coming up with something special for individuals who do that,” said Baiamonte. “It’s a good opportunity for people who may not otherwise take the time to find 25 local businesses,” she said. The Stilly Valley Collective, which is home to many small local businesses, is also holding an open house with many of the business owners there. “A lot of businesses within the building will be there as well participating in the charm walk,” said Baiamonte. “People can come in and see the building and what we have,” she said. More info about the event is available at arlingtonwa.gov/HH.

On Monday, Nov. 18, the Arlington City Council approved keeping the city’s portion of the 2020 property tax collection at the 2019 level. With this decision, the city will collect the same amount of funding from the city’s portion of the property tax in 2020 as in 2019 from existing homes and businesses. The city of Arlington uses property tax to provide essential services such as police, fire protection, EMS services, and roads. Property tax collections will stay at this same amount, except for the property tax to be collected from new buildings that were occupied during 2019. In making the recommendation to keep property taxes at 2019 levels to the City Council, Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert stated “I am pleased that our financial plan is working well and we can pass the savings in terms of tax relief to our residents and

____

I am pleased that our financial plan is working well and we can pass the savings in terms of tax relief to our residents and businesses.

____

Mayor Barb Tolbert

businesses. City Administrator Paul Ellis echoed Mayor Tolbert’s comment, noting that “the city can continue to meet its obligations while operating within its means.” Mayor Pro Tem Marilyn Oertle, expressing her pleasure at making the motion, stating “It hasn’t been very often that we have been able to make the decision to keep property tax collections at the same level. I am appreciative of the city staff ’s efforts to keep costs in check so we can approve decisions like this.”


4

Sports

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Lincoln defeats Tomahawks By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The Marysville-Pilchuck football team travelled to the Lincoln Bowl to take on the Lincoln Abes in the Quarterfinals of the WIAA 3A State Tournament on Nov. 23. The Abes started with the ball and scored quickly as they went for a 56yard touchdown run on the first play of the game. After going up 7-0, Lincoln forced the Tomahawks to punt on their first drive. Marysville-Pilchuck made their first big play of the game moments later as they forced a turnover on an interception. Unfortunately, the Abes got a tipped interception of their own a few plays later and ran it back for a touchdown, 14-0. Lincoln continued to extend their lead, forcing a punt and throwing a long touchdown pass to go up 21-0. The Tomahawks weren’t going to lay down as they went on a quick drive and scored on a 24-yard run to close to gap 21-7 as time expired in the first quarter. Marysville-Pilchuck continued to bounce back as they forced an interception early in the second quarter, and scored shortly after on a long touchdown run, 21-14. Lincoln answered the touch-down with one of their own moments later, as they went on a long run to extend their lead back to 28-14. The Tomahawks were the next ones to score, grinding down the clock to 1:40, and closing the gap to 28-21. Over the next two minutes the Abes exploded, as they scored two touch-downs and forced a turnover on downs to enter halftime up 42-21. Both teams began to slow down in the second half as neither team scored until late in the third quarter. Lincoln managed to punch it in from a yard out to go up 49-21 with 41 seconds left in the quarter. The fourth quarter was more of the same as the Abes stayed on the ground to bleed time off the clock. Marysville-Pilchuck found some success with a handful of big plays but failed to find the end zone to eat at the

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Dylan Carson, Tomahawks’ sophomore running back, runs through the tackle and gains big yardage against the Lincoln Abes at Lincoln High School on Nov. 23. deficit. Lincoln scored once more before the final whistle as they took the victory with a final score of 56-21. “I never thought we’d come this far and to come into this one undefeated, I’ll never forget this. I did what I came here to do, I gave it everything I could and It feels like I left a mark,” said Tomahawks’ senior running back and safety Jordan Justice. Justice was a standout player for the Tomahawks all season and made an impact against the Abes on both sides of the ball. On offense he carried the ball 10 times for 91 rushing yards and two touchdowns, as well as catching one for eight yards. He also made his mark on defense with a handful of tackles and an interception. The Tomahawks' playmakers on offense were Jake Elwood, Dylan Carson, Dillon Kuk and Jay Gray. Elwood, senior quarterback, only passed for eight yards but added 21 yards rushing with a touchdown. Carson, sophomore running back, led the team in rushes with 18 as he ran for 77 yards. Kuk, senior receiver and safety, had five carries for 28 yards, three tackles and a pass de-

flection. Gray, junior running back, only had four carries but took them for 33 yards and added a fumble recovery on punt team. “We have a special group of kids. They love each other, they play for each other and they don’t care who gets the credit. It’s tough to see the seniors walk off for the last time. They’re good people, good football players and great students, and when you’ve coached for as long as I have you know how much you’ll miss them,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach Brandon Carson. Marysville-Pilchuck’s seniors stepped up on defense behind Kentron King, Mauro Bejar, Michael McPherson and Kyle Nyblod. King, cornerback, locked up on the outside with three tackles, two pass deflections and an interception. Bejar, linebacker, led the team in tackles with eight and a tackle for loss. McPherson, defensive end, and Nylbod, linebacker, combined for 11 tackles and a pass deflection. With the loss, the Tomahawks finish the season as one of the top-8 3A football teams in Washington, with a final record of 11-1.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MAX WRIGHT

Morgan Stacey, Cougars’ senior receiver, celebrates with Jackson Schultz, left, after scoring a touchdown in the first half against the Hawks at Hockinson High School on Nov. 23.

Lakewood falls to Hockinson 29-28 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Lakewood football team travelled to face the two-time defending State Champion Hockinson Hawks in the Quarterfinals of the 2A State Tournament on Nov. 23. Lakewood started off with the ball to begin the game but quickly had to punt it away after a threeand-out drive. The Cougars' defense responded to the Hawks as they forced an interception on their

first drive and ran it back for a 34-yard pick six, going up 7-0. Hockinson took to their ground game as they drove down the field and scored a rushing touchdown to tie it up at 7-7 heading into the second quarter. The second quarter was back and forth early on, as the Cougars had a fumble recovery on their 25-yard line, threw an interception a few plays later and then forced an interception of

See LAKEWOOD on page 5

High School Winter Sports Marysville Getchell Chargers GIRLS WRESTLING Dec 4

Meet begins at 7 p.m.

Cedarcrest

Home

Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks GIRLS BASKETBALL

BOYS WRESTLING MGHS

Dec. 4

Meet begins at 7 p.m.

Cedarcrest

Home

MGHS

Dec. 3

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Lakewood

Nov. 30

Game begins at Noon.

Arlington Jamboree

Away

GIRLS BASKETBALL ArlHS

Game begins at 7:15 p.m.

Nov. 30 S-W Jamboree Dec. 3 Marysville-Pilchuck *Game begins TBD

M-PHS

Nov. 30

Game begins at Noon

Arlington Jamboree

Home

Away Away

GIRLS BASKETBALL SWHS* M-PHS

Game begins at 7:15 p.m.

Nov. 30 North Creek Jamboree Away Dec. 2 Seattle Prep. Home *Game begins at 1 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL NCHS* ArlHS

Nov. 30

Game begins at Noon

Arlington Jamboree

Home

Schedules subject to change. For more info, visit www.wescoathletics.com.

Proud to Support Our Student Athletes 7 Lakes Gifts Action Sports Albertson’s-Marysville All Creatures Vet Clinic Altitude Trampoline Park American Distributing Arlington Electric & Solar Arlington Hardware Arlington Muffler & Brake Arlington Pediatric Dentistry Awning Builders A-Z Transmissions Beef Jerky Outlet Big Foot Music Bleachers Grill Bob’s Burgers and Brew Brown’s Plumbing Bud Barton Bundy Carpet C Don Filer Insurance

Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Clinic Chinook Lumber CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E&E Lumber Edward Jones-Andy Smith Edward Jones-Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Gary Wright Realty Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance H&M Electric Heritage Bank-Marysville Hibulb Cultural Center Honda of Marysville Julie’s Licensing

ArlHS

Arlington Eagles

Lakewood Cougars BOYS BASKETBALL

Home

BOYS BASKETBALL

Kuhnle’s Tavern Lake Goodwin Store/Resort Langabeer, McKernan, Bennett & Co. Les Schwab-Marysville Les Schwab-Smokey Point Locals Espresso Marysville Awards Marysville Care Center Marysville Laundry Station Marysville Orthodontics Marysville Travel & Cruise Marysville-Everett Ceramic Tile Maxi’s Chinese Restaurant Mirkwood Public House Mountain View Rehab Mountain Loop Motorcars North County Outlook Noble Palace NW Diesel Pacific Propane

Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pilchuck Rentals Port Gardner Bay Winery Port of Subs-Tulalip Reaction Physical Therapy (Arlington|Smokey Point) Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Riverside Topsoil Roy Robinson S&S Roofing LLC Schaefer Shipman Shaklee Skagit Regional Clinics Sleep Advantage-Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning Sno-Isle Natural Food Co-op

Sonic Burger-Marysville Soroptomist Int’l of Marysville Stanwood Redi-Mix Stilly Auto Parts Stilly Diner Stilly Sand & Gravel Strawberry Lanes Stryker Brothers Tall Guy Small Guy The Creamery The Shop-Arlington The UPS Store-Tulalip Tulalip Tribes Unique Interiors Village Licensing Who’s on First Sports Cards Wild Birds Unlimited

ArlHS


Sports

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

5

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Eagles place 6th at State Tournament By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Arlington girls volleyball team travelled to the SunDome in Yakima to compete in the 3A State Tournament from Nov. 22 – 23. The Eagles opened up the tournament early Friday morning as they took on the Peninsula Seahawks. After taking the first set by a score of 25-18, they battled to go up 2-0 with a tough-fought 26-24 second set. The Seahawks managed to sneak one away by a score of 25-17, but Arlington secured the win with a 25-16 final set and a 3-1 set score. Arlington’s second matchup was against the defending, and current, State Champion Mount Spokane Wildcats. The Eagles stayed neck and neck in the first set as they barely dropped it with a score of 25-23. In the second set the Wildcats caught fire to take it 25-10 and then closed out the match with a final set of 25-20. Mount Spokane took the match, 3-0, and sent Arlington into the other side of the bracket. The next morning the

Eagles matched up with a familiar opponent in the Snohomish Panthers. In the first set the Panthers took one, as they came in fighting and won with a 26-24 score. After the first set, Arlington locked in and dominated the next three sets winning by 25-10, 25-17 and 25-14. This gave them the 3-1 match win and sent them into a battle for fifth place. In their final match Arlington had a rematch from their District Tournament, the Ferndale Golden Eagles. Going into the final match the Eagles came in banged up and had to leave it all out on the court. They went back and forth in the first two sets as Ferndale took one 25-22 and Arlington took the second one 25-21. In the final two sets, the Golden Eagles managed to secure the win with scores of 25-16 and 2519, giving Ferndale the 3-1 victory. With the loss, Arlington placed sixth overall in the State Tournament. This was the Eagles third State Tournament appearance in school history and their first trophy as well. They finished with an

LAKEWOOD

Continued from page 4

their own. Immediately after getting the ball back, Lakewood pulled out a double-pass trick play and were able to score from 20-yards out, 14-7. Both teams traded possessions over the next two drives as the Cougars controlled the ball for the last possession prior to halftime. Lakewood marched down the field and scored on a short run, heading into halftime up 21-7. The Hawks came out in the second half looking to close the gap as they scored on a rushing touchdown in the first three minutes, 21-14. The Cougars responded on their next drive as they worked their way down the field to score a rushing touchdown of their own to extend the lead back to 28-14. Through the rest of the half, Hockinson took over and Lakewood stum-

Pet Jake

overall record of 19-3. “I was a part of a losing program when I was in high school here, and it means a lot to be able to come back as a coach and try to build something with the amazing community and players we have. There is nothing more exciting than to bring the trophy back home and show everyone at the Tournament who we are,” said Arlington Head Coach Whitney Williams. Arlington’s seniors Arianna Bilby, Julia Parra and Reese Talbot made their mark. Bilby, outside hitter, led the team throughout the weekend with a total of 59 kills, 39 digs, two blocks, four assists and eight aces. Parra, middle blocker, had 14 kills, six digs and a team leading nine blocks. Talbot, outside hitter, cycled in to tally 11 total kills and two blocks. Taylor Helle and Teagan Sutherland took the lead for the Eagles’ junior class. Helle, libero, totaled 19 digs, two assists and one ace. Sutherland, middle blocker, finished the tournament with five kills and four blocks. The Eagles young sopho-

bled as the Cougars lost the ball on multiple turnovers. The Hawks scored two more touchdowns on the ground and converted a two-point conversion to go up 29-28. Lakewood had a chance to go for the win with two minutes left, but unfortunately threw an interception and lost the game by the close score of 29-28. “I couldn’t be prouder of these guys and no matter what the score was they were going to be champions to me. They’ve done everything we’ve asked of them, they’ve come together, matured as men and have executed all year long. This was a really special group and we’re going to miss having them out there,” said Lakewood Head Coach Dan Teeter. The Cougars’ seniors Jared Taylor, Landen Pruitt, Morgan Stacey and Mason Toponce made a big impact on the game. Taylor, quarterback, went 7-10 passing for 91 yards and a touch-

PHOTO COURTESY OF AHS PRINCIPAL DUANE FISH

The Arlington Eagles pose with their trophy for placing sixth in the WIAA 3A State Volleyball Tournament at the SunDome in Yakima on Nov. 23. more players Emily Mekelburg, Taylor Pederson, Brookelynn Ramey and Malia Shepherd played beyond their years. Mekelburg, outside hitter, stepped up with a total of 46 kills, 18 digs, one block and two aces. Pederson, setter, led the team in assists with 76 along with 47 digs, one kill and seven aces. Ramey, setter, was second

down as well as rushing 21 times for 88 yards. Pruitt, running back, had eight carries for 25 yards and a touchdown, four catches for 60 yards and one kick return for 24 yards. Stacey, receiver and linebacker, had one catch for an 18-yard touchdown and also had an interception on defense. Toponce, senior receiver, showed out on special teams with three kick returns for 81 yards. Lakewood’s juniors Malik Dotson and Carson Chrisman also contributed on both sides of the ball. Dotson, running back, made the most of his carries as he had eight for 45 yards and a touchdown. Chrisman, receiver and defensive back, only had two catches for 13 yards on offense but showed out on defense with a 34-yard pick six. With the loss to the Hawks, Lakewood finishes the season as one of the top-8 2A football teams in Washington with a record of 9-2.

Building A Bond For Life.

Jake is a 1 year old male Mixed Breed Cattle Dog Jake is a silly, energetic guy looking for an active family to share all of life’s adventures. He has strong Heeler instincts, so an experienced owner willing to put him through some “good manners training” is highly recommended. Jake LOVES people, but doesn’t know his own strength and has a tendency to jump up and “bop” you in the face when he greets you, so he will need a home with Kids 12+. Jake has done well with other dogs, so be sure to bring yours along (if you have one) for a meet and greet. If you have the time (and space) for a bouncy, energetic breed, hurry into The NOAH Center and meet with Jake today! I weigh lbs. Open Monday - Friday, 11-6 and weekends from 11-5. 31300 Brandstrom Road • Stanwood • 360-629-7055 Visit us on the web at www.thenoahcenter.org email: adopt@thenoahcenter.org

Our doors are open!

on the team in assists with 32 and six digs. Shepherd, outside hitter, filled the stat sheet with nine kills, nine digs, one block, one assist and three aces. “These girls have an incredible work ethic, tenaciousness, competitiveness and they gave everything

Cremation $795 Direct Burial $1195*

Contact our office about your Veterans benefits

Funeral Alternatives

Veterans Serving Veterans 1321 State Avenue Marysville Saving our 360-658-1921 Neptune Society funeralsandcremationswa.com

Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County

Wednesday, November 27, through Tuesday, December 3 Wednesday, November 27 Sunrise 7:32 am • Sunset 4:19 pm

Sunday, December 1

Thursday, November 28 Sunrise 7:33 am • Sunset 4:19 pm

Monday, December 2 Sunrise 7:38 am • Sunset 4:17 pm

6:02 am 11:42 am 4:25 pm 11:45 pm

6:50 am 12:36 pm 5:05 pm

Volunteers Needed!

Call 360-926-2228 Today ! Apply at 1108 State Ave. NE , Marysville

Call Leslie at 360-659-1100 to include your services in this directory for as little as $50 per month! leslieb@northcountyoutlook.com

they had this year. Everywhere we’ve gone, I cannot tell you how many times people have told me how kind and classy our team is. I think that speaks volumes to their character and I’m so lucky I’ve been able to coach such an amazing group,” said Coach Williams.

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide

11.6 ft 5.8 ft 11.0 ft -2.3 ft

11.8 ft 6.2 ft 10.4 ft

Friday, November 29 Sunrise 7:35 am • Sunset 4:18 pm 12:26 am 7:36 am 1:31 pm 5:47 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-2.1 ft 11.8 ft 6.4 ft 9.7 ft

Saturday, November 30 Sunrise 7:36 am • Sunset 4:18 pm 1:08 am 8:23 am 2:31 pm 6:34 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-1.6 ft 11.7 ft 6.5 ft 9.0 ft

Sunrise 7:37 am • Sunset 4:17 pm

1:51 am 9:09 am 3:39 pm 7:28 pm

2:37 am 9:56 am 4:54 pm 8:32 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-0.9 ft 11.5 ft 6.3 ft 8.3 ft

0.0 ft 11.3 ft 5.9 ft 7.5 ft

Tuesday, December 3 Sunrise 7:40 am • Sunset 4:16 pm

First Quarter 3:26 am 10:43 am 6:07 pm 9:50 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

1.0 ft 11.0 ft 5.2 ft 7.0 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

M-PHS students honored By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Students Mackensie Connelly and Parker Devereux were recognized for their athletic and academic achievements with the November Students of the Month award. The award is given out by the Marysville Kiwanis and Soroptimist clubs each month to students who put a lot of work into being part of their community. Mackensie Connelly is a Marysville-Pilchuck High School student who has taken a course load that includes honors English, college Algebra, AP Composition and AP U.S. History. In her sophomore year of school she was a Homecoming Court Winner and received the M-PHS Most Spirited award. She has been an ASB officer in her sophomore and junior year and is now the ASB president in her senior year. Active in soccer, Connelly has been an honorable mention All-Wesco member for girls varsity soccer for three years and has served as the varsity soccer captain.

In her community she has also worked as a youth soccer referee with the Pilchuck Soccer Alliance and has supported a high school girls soccer camp and was a U9 Girls Rec Soccer coach. Connelly also played basketball for one year where she was named the “Most Inspirational” on her team. She was also a coach at Hoops for Hope. At M-PHS she was a Link Crew leader. Link Crew is a program that helps students transition to new schools. Volunteer work outside of her school includes counting and collecting toys for the ‘Miracle on State’ toy drive and helping collect food for local food drives. Parker Devereux is also an M-PHS student and also an Everett Community College student. Currently he has a 4.0 GPA at both schools. Devereux’s athletic achievements go back far as he took part in the Washington Open Taekwondo Championship for four years. In 2007 he received a

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Richards hopes to keep Marysville on track By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

COURTESY PHOTO

COURTESY PHOTO

Mackensie Connelly

Parker Devereux

gold medal and he took home a silver medal in 2008, 2009 and 2010 Since 2007 Devereux has taken part on baseball teams, from little league to current varsity teams at his school. He has also been involved in basketball teams at his school and volunteered as an assistant basketball coach for middle schoolers. His team has received the District 1 Wesco championship twice. This year Devereux has also been the varsity tennis team captain and has competed at tennis the last four years.

He has volunteered to help at a tennis camp for younger players as well. Outside of athletics Devereux is also involved in other parts of his school, such as the M-PHS band and the National Honor Society. He has helped with campus cleanup projects with You Gotta Love This Place in the past. Devereux has also been a part of his school’s leadership that sets up and plans school events. In his community Devereux also volunteers for events, such as supporting the Eagle Wings Talent Shot.

Kelly Richards will be the newest Marysville City Council member and hopes to keep the city moving in a positive direction. The election is not certified yet but Richards leads with 52.18 percent of the vote for the vacant city council seat. Richards has been a Marysville resident since 2004 and has spent seven years on the city’s planning commission. “Being on city council is something that I have thought about for a number of years,” said Richards. “I’ve been on the planning commission for a while and I’ve seen the city council and thought ‘that’s something I could do,’” he said. He decided to campaign for the empty seat that was available this election. “When I heard that Rob Toyer was leaving his seat I thought it was a good time to try and run,” he said. Toyer left the seat to make a campaign for Snohomish County Treasurer. Richards said he wanted to be on the city council to

Urgent Care. We’re here for

COLD & FLU MOUNT VERNON 1400 E. Kincaid St., Mount Vernon 360-428-6434 SMOKEY POINT 3823 172nd St. NE, Arlington 360-657-8700 RIVERBEND 2320 Freeway Dr., Mount Vernon 360-814-6850 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Monday to Friday 7:30a - 7:30p Weekends/Holidays * 8:00a - 4:00p *Closed Christmas Day

Kelly Richards

COURTESY PHOTO

help Marysville. “I care about our community,” he said. “I have always been community involved.” Richards has been involved with the local Rotary Club, helping to run the Rotary Pumpkin Patch for a number of years. He is also a former PTA president and a former member of the 10th Street Music Boosters and M-PHS Music Boosters. “I have been involved with Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts with my kids,” he said. Richards has three children currently going through Marysville schools. In terms of a platform, Richards said he hopes to “keep the city moving in the direction that it is going,” he said. “I’d like to see continued slow, steady growth.” He is in favor of supporting more manufacturing jobs for the area. “It will be nice if get the Cascade Industrial Center going,” so that there will be quality jobs in Marysville and less people will have to commute, he said. For the future, Richards also wants there to be a continued focus on transportation projects to ease some of the congestion that exists around the city. “I hope funding will still be available for the 156th Street overpass interchange,” which will help with traffic on the north end of the city, said Richards. He encourages everyone to come together to work on the city’s problems. “I think it is everyone’s responsibility to help the city be what they want it to be,” said Richards. “If there is something you don’t like, let’s work together to find solutions.”

Share your news!

For Urgent Care wait times visit

SkagitRegionalHealth.org

Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send nformation to: North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or email the information to: editor@northcounty-outlook.com.


facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Communities

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

7

America's Best opens in Marysville By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com A new branch of America’s Best Contacts & Eyeglasses opened up in Marysville this month. The business is located at the Gateway Center in central Marysville, at 3721 116th St. NE, Suite 213. They plan to be open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, while being closed on Sunday. The national company is one the most common retailers meant primarily to meet glasses, contacts and eye exam needs. “We’re one of the biggest optical retailers in the U.S.,” said Catalina Lou, the local district manager for America’s Best Contacts & Eyeglasses. “We offer a huge selection of discounted frames and contact lenses,” she said. Lou said that they aim for affordability when it comes to glasses and contacts. “We try to offer the best in eye care and eyewear, but where it is affordable for everyone, especially for those who may not have been able

to previously afford vision insurance,” she said. She said that they try to offer a good value for the eye care and eyewear in the stores with "everyday prices." The Marysville location has been open for approximately four weeks now and opened near the beginning of November. Client feedback has been positive, said Lou. “It’s been really nice. Every day we get more eye exams coming in and the feedback has been really good from the community. They’re happy we’re here for those who do know what we offer,” she said. Lou said it has been nice that many locals are glad to have a closer location for them now. “People are happy that we’re here because they don’t have to drive as far north as Bellingham or down to Lynnwood to fix their eye care needs,” she said. America’s Best Contacts & Eyeglasses now has 14 locations across the state of Washington. “We have stores as far south as Vancouver and as far north as in Bellingham,”

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Opticians and staff from the recently opened America’s Best Contacts & Eyeglasses stand outside the new business on Nov. 20. From left, Lorraine Dickinson, Jeannette Murry, Judy Barcamontes, Kulvir Kainth, Teresa Hestkind, Maria Paniagua and Galilea Arias. said Lou. Lou said the new store looks forward to being part of the community and serving locals with glasses or contact needs. “We’re really happy to be here and happy to be able to offer affordable eye care for everybody, especially for those in need who have been looking for a place like this,” she said.

NCCB plans Arlington performance Celebrating it’s 25th year, the North Cascades Concert Band’s Conductor/Music Director Robert Pattermann and the NCCB announce that the theme for the fall concert series will be “North Cascades Concert Band — 25th Anniversary World Tour” The concerts will be presented Friday evening, Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., at Whatcom Community College’s Syre Student Center; Saturday afternoon, Dec. 7, p.m., at Anacortes High School’s Performing Arts Center; and Sunday afternoon, Dec. 8, 3 p.m., at Arlington High School’s Byrnes Performing Arts Center. Pattermann has chosen musical selections that celebrate the diversity of musical styles from all parts of the world. The concerts will feature music that represents the music of Latin America, Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and of course, several more choices to celebrate the American jazz and concert band tradition. Each concert will also feature a community band including the Marysville City Band under the direction of co-directors Peter Joseph and Nathan Sachman. Arlington High School’s Byrnes PAC is located at 18821 Crown Ridge Blvd. Admission to the con-

certs is free, but all donations are greatly appreciated. Donations go to cover expenses for the concerts and also to provide for the music education college scholarship

program and the grant program for area high schools for the purchase of concert band music. For more information, visit their website at www.nccband.org.


8

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Magic Shears collects to help cancer patients By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Downtown Arlington business Magic Shears will again be collecting donations to help cancer patients and their families get through chemotherapy. This is the 15th year that owners of Magic Shears

have held the donation collection in honor of their son who passed away due to cancer. “It actually started out with a friend of Cameron’s,” who brought items to a cancer program, said Debbie Howell, Cameron’s mother and co-owner of Magic Shears.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Magic Shears co-owner Debbie Howell holds up one of the handmade quilts that was donated during this year’s collection drive for cancer patients on Nov. 22.

“After that we decided to donate to Cascade Valley Hospital because that’s where Cameron went and we have our business here,” she said. The donation drive is open now through Dec. 20. They collect items to keep cancer patients warm or activities to help them pass the time. “When you’re doing chemo you’re really cold, so our son always wanted to have a little blanket,” said Howell. As part of the donation collection, Howell said she usually gets homemade quilts. However, Skagit Regional Health doesn’t take anything homemade so she has started donating to Everett cancer clinics in addition to Arlington’s hospital. Many of the donations she receives are meant to help people pass the time, she said. “Going to the different hospitals when our son was sick there wasn’t that much for them to do,” she said.

Often families bring a number of small items that can help provide some activity. “I collect small activities things like puzzles, books, coloring books and crayons, and journals,” said Howell. Howell said that she wants cancer patients to have as easy a time as possible in the hospital. “I want them to be at ease and as comfortable as they can be,” she said. The collection drive of-

ten brings in many items to the local barbershop. “We empty out our bin a couple of times and then bring it up to the hospital before Christmas so they can have a Christmas present,” said Howell. She said that there’s many people in the community who have dealt with a loved one who went through cancer. “There’s hardly anyone I know that hasn’t had to deal with cancer in some way,”

she said. Howell hopes that families will continue to bring whatever they can. “Take your kids to the Dollar Store and get a coloring book and crayons and let them know where it is going toward,” she said. “I’m just trying to bring a little comfort to patients while they’re getting cancer treatments,” she said. Magic Shears is at 306 N. Olympic Ave., No. 1339, Arlington.

Christmas Worship Join us in Silvana for a joyous Christmas Eve!

Christmas Eve Candlelight Worship Service December 24th at 7:00p.m. with Carols and Holy Communion

PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH, 1717 Larson Road 5:00pm

Our Saviors 615 E. Highland Dr. Arlington Lutheran 360-435-8921 Church

LITTLE WHITE CHURCH ON THE HILL, 23605 Pioneer Hwy 10:00pm Both early and late services will offer festive Christmas music, candelight and Holy Communion

www.arlingtonwachurch.org

Holiday Directory

Craft Fairs & Bazaars

ANNUAL HOLIDAY BAZAAR Saturday, December 7th 9am-4pm Handmade Items • Gift Ideas Bargain Boutique • Bake Sale Goods Homemade Soup & Pie Immaculate Conception Catholic Church Parish Hall 1200 East 5th St. • Arlington

Holiday at the Fair

Get the Shower Door You Really Want! Hundreds of design, color and glass combinations.

- Presented by the Stillaguamish Grange & Stanwood Community Fair-

Saturday Nov. 30th, 9am-4pm, Stanwood Fairgrounds

Santa & Olaf will be there for pics at 10am-Noon Bring Non-Perishable Food items for the Stanwood Food Bank for extra tickets in the raffles!  Food  Music  55+ Vendors  Raffles  Kids Activities  Fun!

Over 88 years of experience

Monday - Friday 8 am to 5 pm

Events

360-653-9292

1-877-289-8444 • www.budbartons.com

805 Cedar Avenue • Marysville

FREE Shipping & 20% OFF

*

Mixed Fruit Medley WAS $24.99

19

$

Send a box full of Winter Sunshine. 3 unique varieties + FREE Shipping!* These hand-picked, snack size fruit are specially nurtured and treasured for their ultra-sweet flavor. These will delight everyone on your list and for a very special price.

• 6 Ruby Red Gems • 8 Tiny Tim Navels • 4 Fresh Orchard Apples

NOW ONLY

99

1-855-301-3484

Visit PittmanDavis.com/M10140 Order Item #MXFM, mention Code PMVH-N203 and Save 20%

Only $19.99 (reg. $24.99), plus FREE Shipping.* Satisfaction completely guaranteed. Order by December 17, 2019 for GUARANTEED Christmas delivery.

Call Now or go Online and SAVE 20% with FREE Shipping* Limited time offer, good while supplies last. Not valid with any other offer. Limit 5 boxes per customer.

Pittman & Davis, Harlingen, TX 78552

* Free standard shipping

IC: PMVH-N203


Opinion

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

9

n LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Our Favorite Quotes "Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings."

Author ­— William Arthur Ward Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

Our Best Friends

County Executive shouldn't usurp management of jail from sheriff The people of Snohomish County elected Adam Fortney as sheriff because they liked his promise to make the county a safer place. Now we hear that, even before all the votes are counted, the county executive Dave Somers wants to usurp the management of the jail from the elected sheriff. The rationale seems to be more "compassion" for jail inmates. Sheriff-elect Fortney did

not campaign on compassion for criminals but on safety for the citizens and families of Snohomish County. This includes managing the incarceration and disposition of prisoners. To usurp this critical function would effectively sabotage and negate the results of the 2019 election which, we suspect, is the intention of the county executive (a democrat). Ralph Dufresne Marysville

&

Clyde

RAVE RAVE: I just want to wish everyone one a Happy Thanksgiving. I'm grateful for so many things, including our great community and all of the wonderful people who call it home. RAVE: A big thank you to the Arlington Community Food Bank, its volunteers and all of its donors for providing Thanksgiving dinners to local families in need again this year. It's great to see the incredible generosity and caring in our commu-

nity that makes this great program, and others like it, possible.

RAVE: My family and I are looking forward to this year's Merrysville for the Holidays on Dec. 7. It's a fun family event to kick off the holiday season. We especially enjoy the Electric Lights Parade and seeing Santa and Mrs. Claus at Comeford Park. Thank you to the city of Marysville and everyone else who helps make this great event happen every year.

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

Fun Fact: there were actually six members of the infamous Rat Pack. This is Clyde who is the Best Friend of Kristi Neeleman.

North County Outlook is published every Wednesday and mailed direct to households and businesses in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address below. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher. News Deadline: Friday 5PM before publication editor@northcountyoutlook.com

Send us photos of you and your pet The North County Outlook has a weekly feature titled Our Best Friends. Community members can send us photos of them with their pets and we will elect one to run in that week’s issue. To submit a photo, please send it to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com. Please include the names of the people and pets in the photo.

Printing and Direct Mail Services provided by Skagit Publishing

Weekly Puzzles Fun by the Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. See answers on page 10

Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Staff Writers .....Christopher Andersson, Andrew Hines Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson Directory Ad Sales ..............................................Leslie Buell Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson Contributing Writers .......Steve Smith, The Tulalip Chefs

Ad Deadline: Thursday before publication 4 PM sales@northcountyoutlook.com

P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 1331 State Ave. #A • Marysville, WA (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 www.northcountyoutlook.com

Member Washington Newspaper Publishers Association


10

Communities

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

Submit your events via email to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com UPCOMING EVENTS

Navigating the Holiday Treat Table: Navigating the Holiday Treat Table will be held Dec. 5, 2-3:30 p.m., at Stilly Valley Health Connections 875 Wesley Street, Suite 240, in Arlington. The event is free. Making good food choices during the holiday season can be a challenge, especially around the des-

sert table. During this presentation, ideas, tips and recipes for healthier desserts and treat options will be shared, as well as holiday food samples. This presentation will be led by a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist from Sound Dietitians. In this adult cooking demonstration class, participants learn different ideas and techniques on how to incor-

Classified: Events/Festivals PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

Classified: Announcements

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855415-4148. ATTENTION: OXYGEN USERS. Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed lowest prices. Call the Oxygen Concentrator store: 844-495-7230. DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details, 855-6354229.

porate healthy choices into their meals.Class is 90 minutes long. Recipes and food samples will be shared. Strawberry Festival Meeting: Marysville Strawberry Festival will be meeting on Tuesday, Dec.10 at 6 p.m. at the Strawberry Festival Office 1412 1st St. The meeting has been moved up 1 week due to Christmas. Binky Patrol: Binky Patrol, which meets at a private home in Marysville, provides quilts and afghans to Snohomish County infants and children who need comfort.Volunteer knitters, quilters and crocheters are needed, as well as donations of fabric, batting, thread or money to buy sewing supplies. In particular, the group is looking for volunteers interested in helping make quilts. All levels of experience are welcome. For more information: call Ernalee Munday at 360-6597198.

Answers from page 9

WIN $3,000 IN CASH! Enter to win. Take our survey at www.pulsepoll.com and tell us about your household shopping plans & media usage. Your input will help us improve the paper & get the advertising specials you want.

Classified: Help Wanted

Beginner

www.northcountyoutlook.com

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BILLY EARL BERRYHILL, Deceased, NO. 19-4-01901-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: DENNIS WILLIAM DEARINGER, Deceased, NO. 19-4-0190031, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: November 6, 2019 Personal Representative: Loren Berryhill Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01901-31.

THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE NAMED BELOW has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: November 20, 2019 Personal Representative: Devin William Dearinger Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01900-31.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT J. NORMAN, Decease, NO. 19-4-02052-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DONNA M. JEFFERY, Deceased, NO. 19-4-01938-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

NOTICE OF CALL FOR BIDS City of Arlington Innovation Center Remodel 404 North Olympic Ave Arlington, WA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received on December 18, 2019 until 2:00 p.m. at the City of Arlington 238 North Olympic Ave Arlington, WA. Bid Proposals will be recorded as to time and date received and secured until the time set for the opening. All bids must be plainly marked on the outside: City of Arlington Innovation Center Remodel 404 North Olympic Ave Arlington, WA Attn: Community Revitalization PM OPENING OF THE BID PROPOSALS: At 2:00 p.m. or as soon as possible thereafter on December 18, 2019 Bid Proposals will be opened and publicly read aloud at City of Arlington Council Chambers 238 North Olympic Ave Arlington, WA. ITEM FOR BID: The Project consists of furnishing all labor, materials and other incidentals for the remodel and site improvements to an existing 1,080 S.F., 1-story building. The project is subject to the Special Provisions, the Standard Specifications including the amendments thereto, and Contract Documents hereunder. The Architect’s estimate is $ 275,000. BID DOCUMENTS: Plans and specifications may be obtained from https://solicitbid.com within the posted projects section. Informational copies of plans and specifications are on file for inspection at the offices of Carletti Architects, P.S., 116 E. Fir Street, Suite A, Mount Vernon, WA, (360-424-0394). Copies of the plans and specifications can be paid for and obtained from the Blueprint Company located at 909 Riverside Drive, Mount Vernon, WA 360-428-5655. A non-mandatory pre-bid conference for prospective bidders will be held at the project site on December 3, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish the necessary additional Bond(s) for the faithful performance of the Work, as prescribed in the Bidding Document. CONTRACTOR REGISTRATION: Pursuant to RCW 39.06, the Bidder shall be registered and licensed as required by the laws of the State of Washington, including but not limited to RCW 18.27. In order to perform public work, the successful Bidder and Subcontractors, prior to Contract award, shall hold or obtain such licenses and registrations as required by State Statutes and Codes, and Federal and local laws and regulations and a City of Arlington business license. BID SECURITY: Certified check, bank cashier’s check or bid bond congruent with the Form of Bid Bond as identified in the “Instructions to Bidders” is required to be submitted with each proposal, in the amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total basic bid plus additive alternate bids (if applicable). Make bid security payable to the City of Arlington, furnish bond executed by a licensed bonding agency authorized to do business in the locality of the Project. RIGHT TO ACCEPT OR REJECT: The Owner shall reserve the right to reject any or all proposals and the right to waive any irregularities or informalities in any proposal, subject to the Laws of the State of Washington as pertinent to Public Works and congruent with requirements and policies of City of Arlington, and as may be deemed in the best interest of the Owner. In particular, the Owner reserves the right to reject a proposal which is not accompanied by the required bid security or subcontractors listing, Bidder’s Qualifications, Certification Regarding Debarment Suspension or Ineligibility, Supplemental Bidder Responsibility – Declaration of Bidder, as described heretofore, and incomplete or irregular proposals which may exclude any item(s) as may be required by the Bid Documents. NO PROPOSALS WILL BE ACCEPTED AFTER THE TIME SET FOR RECEIPT OF BID PROPOSALS. City of Arlington is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. Small, Minority and Women-Owned firms are encouraged to submit bids. WITHDRAWAL OF BID: No proposal may be withdrawn after the time set for the opening thereof, unless the Award of the Contract is delayed for a period of forty-five (45) calendar days. NOTICE GIVEN BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF ARLINGTON

THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE NAMED The personal representative named BELOW has been appointed as personal below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any perrepresentative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent son having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the crediserved or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) tor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: November DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: November 27, 2019 13, 2019 Personal Representative: Robert M. NorPersonal Representative: Pamela L. man Freemon Attorney for Personal Representative: Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA WA 98223 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-02052-31.

Intermediate

utlook

Real People. Real Life. P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 classifieds@northcountyoutlook.com

In Print and Online!

Your classified ad runs in our print edition (published Wednesdays) and at www.northcountyoutlook.com for one low price!

q AUTOMOTIVE q FURNITURE q HOUSEHOLD q MISCELLANEOUS q PETS/ANIMALS q RENTALS/REAL ESTATE q SERVICES Flat Rate: 50¢ per word covers print and online publication. Deadlines: Friday 5 PM the week before publication. 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Name_______________________________________________ Address _____________________________________________ City, State, Zip ________________________________________ Daytime Phone _______________________________________ e-mail ______________________________________________ Payment method:

q Check encl. q Credit Card

q Visa q MasterCard q AmEx

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01938-31.

LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EUGENE V. ANDERSON JR., Deceased, NO. 19-4-01379-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be

presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: November 20, 2019. Personal Representative: Kristopher Anderson Address for Mailing or Service: 228 Old Tulalip Road, Tulalip, WA 98271 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01379-31.

Exp. Date __________________

Card # _______________________________________ Sec. Code ______ Signature____________________________________________________

Submit Legal Notices to: editor@northcounty-outlook.com

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF ARLINGTON Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held before the Arlington City Council on Monday, December 2, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. at the Arlington City Council Chambers located at 110 E. Third Street, Arlington, Washington. Purpose of the hearing is to take public comment and testimony regarding amendments to the 2019 Budget and modifications to the 2020 Budget. Copies of the budget amendments and modifications are available by contacting the City Clerk’s Office at (360) 403-3441. Wendy Van Der Meersche, City Clerk


facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Communities

DRAMA

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

11

Follow us on Facebook: /TheNorthCountyOutlook

Continued from page 1

edy story about my character Ralphie who wants a BB gun for Christmas,” he said. Drama club member Veronika Gardulski plays Ralphie’s mother who is worried Ralphie will ‘shoot his eye out.’ “Obviously the first time he mentions it to his family he is immediately shot by my character,” she said. “He goes through a whole bunch of shenanigans to hopefully acquire the BB gun,” said student Everet Hayes who plays Ralphie’s father. Many of the students had seen the classic holiday film before taking part in the play. “You kind of want to pay homage to the actors and make sure you do your best to portray what they were trying to portray,” said Hayes. Gardulski said she has seen the movie several times and had fun recreating the memorable moments. “I remember watching the movie and thinking ‘wow, the movie knows a lot of trivia facts,’” she said. The scene where Ralphie’s father receives a leg-shaped lamp in a contest which leads to a fight between the parents was also fun to present, said Gardulski. “It is so funny to look at the lamp and actually pretend to hate it,” she said. Others had not seen the film before being cast. “The first time I watched it was a week before auditions,” said Lawler. “It’s very interesting because we all have to same spirit of the original story but we can all add our tiny bits and moments to the show,” he said.

North County

TREE FARM GUIDE

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Student Kris Lawler plays Ralphie in ‘A Christmas Story’ during a rehearsal of the play at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. Students said the audience will enjoy the humor of the film which they hope to bring to the small stage. “The way it is retold through the narrator is very fun to see,” said Gardulski. “It’s very comedic and there is a lot of jokes that we make.” “I think the audience will like the comedy and funny situations,” said Hayes. Many students said they enjoyed working on the play just because of the other actors. “I love the cast in general, and I love theater. I want to do it professionally when I get older,” said Lawler. “I like the other actors. They’re very friendly and they keep it fun, and they’re very supportive,” said Hayes.

1

Turkey Drawing Each Week!

1

2

Paterson’s Lazy Acres

Free Hot Cider & Candy Canes! Douglas Fir $35 Save $2 with military ID! Grand Fir & Norway Spruce $45 Frazier Fir & Noble Fir $55

All prices include tax. Cash or check.

1315 188th St. NE • Smokey Point 360-652-7661 Open 9am to 4pm Weekends Only Come see Red Chinese Pheasants! Nov. 29-Dec. 15th Pets welcome on leash! Unless Sold Out!

Take I-5 exit 206, go west 1 mile, turn right on 19th Ave NE (do not cross railroad tracks). Turn left on 188th St. NE. Farm is three blocks down on right. Our farm never floods!

www.christmastreesucut.com

2

Business & Services DIRECTORY Your Search for Local Services Ends Here AUTO REPAIR

DECKING

SideJobBOB BOB

Decks • Siding • Fences Custom Sheds • Carports Creative Outbuildings Handrails • Stairs & Steps Rebuilds & New Construction

Erickson’s Painting

30 Years Exp

pressure washing • gutter cleaning interior/exterior painting • general painting general handyman

425-210-7424 Free Estimates

love2paint4you@outlook.com

LIC#ERICKPI870BG

INSURANCE

Over 40 Years of Exceeding Your Expectations...

Open Enrollment

But NEVER Your Budget!

“The Gutter Professionals since 1977”

Gilmore Insurance Services Visit www.gilmoreins.com 800-745-7033 / 360-657-1275

decks2fix@gmail.com • Lic/Bond/Ins SIDEJB94506

7305 43rd Ave NE • Marysville 360-659-9322 • www.garysgutters.com

The Exchange Open Enrollment for 2020 begins 11/1 and ends 12/15. We are a licensed representative with the exchange in Marysville. Contact us for help for 2020.

REAL ESTATE

SEPTIC SYSTEMS

SHOPPING

Call 425-870-4084

PAINTING

GUTTER SERVICES

Continuous Gutters • Steel, Aluminum & Copper Pre-painted Gutters & Downspouts

Over 30 Colors to Choose From • Free Estimates • See Our Showroom Displays

Sue Stevenson, Broker Cell: 425.418.7902 Office: 360.659.1253 ext. 15 Fax: 360.653.3346 suestevensonRE@gmail.com

MacPherson’s RHB 1333 State Avenue Marysville, WA 98270

Residential and Commercial • Septic Service

• Septic Tanks • Vaults • Manholes • Catch Basins • Pumps • Pipes SEPTIC TANK SERVICE • Septic Pumping • Vacuuming • Pump Repairs and Sales • Cleaning Septic Line and Drainfields • Water Jetting

Serving Snohomish County for the past 50 years

360-435-5531 19604-67th Ave. NE, Arlington www.cuzseptic.com

...an absolutely charming store WE’VE MOVED! Shabby Chic • Romantic • Cottage 1508-A 3rd Street

Marysville • 1508-A 3rd St. 360-653-3538

Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5 email: vintagevi@comcast.net

Advertise Your Message Here for as Little as $25 per Insertion! Call Today! 360-659-1100

leslieb@northcountyoutlook.com


12

November 27, 2019 - December 3, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n WHISTLING GARDENER

Christmas trees - Real or fake? As gardeners, day. For every the concept of real Christmas “going natural” tree harvested, is nothing new. three seedlings Whatever our are planted in its reasons, whenplace.” ever practical we By Steve Smith “Real trees tend to shy away are usually disfrom synthetics and in- posed of not in landfills, stead choose products that but by being chipped up are natural. In the case of for landscaping or put into Christmas trees we have lakes and ponds for smaller the same choices — one fish to survive. There are is buying an artificial tree, about 15,000 Christmas and the other is buying a tree growers in the U.S., real tree. Here are some and over 100,000 people things to consider before employed full or part time making up your mind. in the industry.” Artificial trees are made Studies done at the Unifrom petroleum products versity of Surrey in the UK (which are nonrenewable) also suggest “There is a lot and contain plastics and of evidence that people remetals, such as lead. They cover more quickly from will not decompose once stress and mental fatigue they are disposed of and when exposed to natural, normally have a useful life as opposed to built-up and of 6 to 10 years. They are ‘fake’ environments.” Addmanufactured in a country ing a real tree to our home far, far away and conse- environment can have this quently there are transpor- calming effect. And let’s tation costs to consider. If not forget the pleasing frathey catch on fire they can grance that a fresh cut everpotentially release toxic green tree emits. fumes. On the plus side, for It is time once again to people with allergies they go find the “perfect” tree can be a practical substi- for your home. Garden tute for the real thing and centers are just starting to they are quick and easy to receive their allotments of set up, so there is a lot less Nobel, Fraser and Doughassle. But that’s about it in las Firs. Always make a my book. fresh cut at the base of the On the other hand, real tree before you place it in a trees have a whole host of stand that will hold water. benefits both for the envi- You will be surprised how ronment and for us as well. much water your tree will Here is what the National absorb in the first week. Christmas Tree Associa- When the season is over be tion has to say about real sure and recycle your tree. trees. While I realize that for “Christmas tree farms the most part I am preachstabilize soil, protect wa- ing to the choir, hopefully ter supplies, and provide some of you will take to refuge for wildlife while heart this information and creating scenic green belts. consider buying a real tree Often, Christmas trees are this year. It’s a decision that grown on soils that could is good for the environnot support other crops.” ment, good for you, and “As a benefit to the at- good for the tree that was mosphere, real Christmas raised on a farm with the trees absorb carbon diox- sole purpose of ending up ide and other gases, emit- in a family’s home this time ting fresh oxygen. One acre of year. You wouldn’t want of Christmas trees produc- to disappoint that tree, now es the daily oxygen require- would you? ment for 18 people. With approximately one million Steve Smith is the ownacres producing Christmas er of Sunnyside Nursery trees in the United States, in Marysville and can be that translates into oxygen reached at info@sunnysidefor 18 million people every nursery.net.

That’s what you’ll find in every issue of

North County Outlook

The only free local community paper that’s delivered d­ irect to your mailbox every week.

Locally owned, locally managed.

Freshly cut real Christmas tress have a host of benefits for the environment as well as for people.

COURTESY PHOTO

Profile for The North County Outlook

Nov. 27, 2019 North County Outlook  

Nov. 27, 2019 North County Outlook  

Advertisement