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utlook

Real People. Real Life. www.northcountyoutlook.com

P.O. BOX 39 n MARYSVILLE, WA 98270

Vol. 13 No. 05 n

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Home & Garden

Pages 6-8 October 9, 2019 -October 15, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Color Run kicks off Unity Month By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Arlington Kiwanis president Bob Nelson, right, presents Rex Bartlett, left, and his wife Cindy with the Arlington Kiwanis Citizen of the Year award on Oct. 3.

Kiwanis name Bartlett Citizen of the Year By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Arlington’s Kiwanis Club recognized Rex Bartlett, owner of Rex’s Rentals in Arlington, for his community service and giving spirit on Oct. 3. The club recognized Bartlett with their Citizen of the Year Award at their

annual installation banquet. The club has given out the award for more than a decade to various local figures who members think deserve some recognition for the work they do in the community. “We want to honor the See BARTLETT on page 15

Local kids ran through color as part of the Tulalip Tribes' fourth annual Say Something Color Run to kick off their Unity and Wellness Month. The color run was held on Oct. 4. The month is all about promoting positive mental health and preventing domestic violence, suicide, substance abuse and bullying in the community. The Color Run is often the first event of the month and allows participants to run from the Tulalip Health Clinic to the Tulalip Youth Center and run through clouds of powdered color along the way. “I think people like it because they just get to have fun and enjoy each other’s company,” said Jessica Bustad, who works with Tulalip

Youth Services as a positive youth development manager. She said the kids like to get splashed with color as they run along the road. The Say Something Color Run is about getting people comfortable about talking about their problems. “It’s about encouraging people to talk to other people. Say something if they’re having a hard time, say something if they know someone else is struggling,” said Bustad. The turnout was pretty good this year, she said. “It’s going pretty good considering that it’s raining in different parts of Tulalip right now." This year the event also served to support a Tulalip family who had tragedy strike that morning. “We are supporting a See COLOR on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Kristina Williams runs across the finish line of the Tulalip Say Something Color Run on Oct. 4.

Dike breached at SR-529 estuary project By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY SUE STEVENSON

The work site of the SR-529 estuary restoration project on Oct. 4 after the dike was breached to return tidal waters to the area.

A dike was breached at two locations just south of Marysville near SR-529 last week in an effort to restore about 11 acres of estuary habitat. The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has been working on the project since July. The goal is to restore some estuary habitat (where fresh and saltwater mix) which are vital to many species of fish and birds. Since the summer, construction crews have been removing trees and other fill that has been in the area. WSDOT hopes to create about 11 acres of new estuary with the project. The funding comes from mitigation

funds for the upcoming SR-529/I-5 interchange which is scheduled to begin next year. “We’re going to need about 2 to 2.5 acres [of estuary] when we do the SR-529/I-5 Interchange project. So we’re going to have to take some wetlands for that, but we’ve put in a lot more than we’re going to take,” said Tom Pearce, WSDOT communications director. The project will restore the area at the north end of SR-529 to it’s historic state. “We’ve lost a lot of the habitat in this area to development over the last 150 years,” said Pearce. “WSDOT filled this area a long time ago to build SR-529 and then later to build

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October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Local News

s ’ h a e L eads L

COLOR Continued from page 1

Check out these upcoming local events!

OCTOBER Foster’s Pumpkin Patch

Now & Corn Maze

Now thru October 31, 9am – 5pm Daily 5818 SR 530 NE, Arlington www.fosterscornmaze.com Fall Festival at Stocker Farms

Now Now thru October 31, 10am – 6pm 8705 Marsh Road, Snohomish www.stockerfarms.com Thomas Family Farm

Now Now thru October 31,

Days and Times Vary 9010 Marsh Road, Snohomish https://thomasfamilyfarm.com

11

Int’l Quilt & Fiber Arts Festival October 11-13, Times Vary Edward D Hansen Confrence Center, Everett www.qfamuseum.org

11

One Night With Elvis October 11, 7:30pm Historic Everett Theatre https://yourhistoriceveretttheatre.org

11

Leavenworth Oktoberfest October 11-12, 18-19 www.leavenworthoktoberfest.com

11

Ladies LOL! Comedy Show October 11 and 12, 7pm – 9:30pm Marysville Opera House https://marysvillewa.gov

17

Live Music at the OH The Blues Project October 17, 5:30pm – 7:30pm Marysville Opera House https://marysvillewa.gov

www.northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Sylus Edwards runs across the finish line of the Tulalip Say Something Color Run on Oct. 4.

local family whose house burned down this morning,” said Rochelle Lubbers, executive director of education for the Tulalip Tribes. Community member Steven Williams said he appreciates the event. “I thought it was pretty cool, especially as a fundraiser,” he said. “It’s good how the community comes together for families like this,” he said. The Tulalip Tribes have worked for the last four years to continue putting on Unity Month. “Unity Month came out of the tragedy at M-P, to come together and move forward as one. We don’t need separation and division in our communities,” said Lubbers. It was also a way to bring together the work of a lot of people in Tulalip.

____

It's about encouraging people to talk to other people. Say something if they're having a hard time, say something if they know someone else is struggling.

____

Jessica Bustad

“A few years ago we were talking about all of the different issues that were coming up in the community. We were focusing on bullying and another was focusing on domestic violence and another substance abuse, so we figured why not unite and promote all of the issues,” said Bustad. The Tribes work with a number of organizations as well. “I think what is special about this one is that it is a partnership with the Marysville School District and the city of Marysville,” said Lubbers. “There are very few times that we get together as a community in a positive manner in the name of the unity,” she said. The idea of the month is to promote positive communities. “We want to promote healthy relationships within our community,” said Lubbers. “There are specific reasons we are putting positive energy to keep those things out of our community: suicide, domestic violence, bullying,” she said. The month continues with a Family Hope Rock Paint Night on Oct. 9 at the Don Hatch Youth Center at 5 p.m. Speaker and former wrestler Marc Mero returns to Marysville for a community night on Oct. 10 at Marysville-Pilchuck High School at 7 p.m. A family movie night is scheduled for Oct. 16 and a coastal jam on Oct. 18 with locations to be determined for those events. The Don Hatch Youth Center will also host Trickor-Treating on Oct. 25 starting at 5 p.m.

Share your news! Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send nformation to: North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or email the information to: editor@northcountyoutlook.com.


facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Communities

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

M'ville RFA formation completed Oct. 1 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Voters approved the formation of a Marysville Regional Fire Authority in April and the final steps for the formation of the new organization were completed Oct. 1. The Marysville Fire District will keep its name, service area and staff, however it now has a more consistent funding source and a different governing structure. “There was a great buzz in the air and you could sense the excitement,” said Martin McFalls, Marysville Fire District chief. “It felt really cool to be a part of it. To sign the paperwork and transfer the titles and ownerships,” he said. The local fire district had long been looking at different options to secure funding for fire and EMS services. “It was rewarding to be at the end of such a long journey,” said McFalls. He said one of the district’s staff members still remembers meeting Dennis Kendall in 2003, the Marysville Mayor at the time, to talk about different structures for the Marysville Fire District. “At that time most of the talk was about annexation,” said McFalls. McFalls himself was with the district at the time and was a battalion chief in 2004 who traveled to central Washington at that time. “The legislature had just passed the law that allowed for Regional Fire Authorities,” he said. “That was where the first one formed at the time." Talks began a few years ago in Marysville in ear-

nest about a Regional Fire Authority, in large part because call volume increases were stretching the Marysville Fire District thinner and thinner. Officials put the decision on the April ballot, as required by law, and voters approved the measure. “This will help us consolidate to become more efficient,” said McFalls. Formerly the organization was funded by the city of Marysville and Fire District 12, which includes parts of Tulalip and areas outside of Marysville’s city limits. “We truly have been running like two separate organizations in one much of the time, with joint funding and ownership,” said McFalls. “There was often double the paperwork and double the reporting,” he said. Simply having more reliable funding will be a boon to the district, said McFalls. “It’s a huge improvement with just the opportunity to know what our funding will be,” he said. The governing structure changes for the Marysville Fire District now, which will include a six-member

COURTESY PHOTO

The first governing board of the Regional Fire Authority Marysville Fire District. From left, Fire District 12 commissioners Richard Ross, Marysville City Council members Michael Stevens, Tom King and Stephen Muller, and, front, Tonya Christoffersen and Marysville City Council member Kamille Norton. board of four Marysville City Council members and two Fire District 12 commissioners, one of whom is a non-voting member of the board. After the Regional Fire Authority proposal was passed, McFalls said that the district hired two more staff positions. “We have maintained

staffing since the 2008 downtown, but everything points to more staffing being needed now,” because of growth in the area, he said. “The availability will mean our response times will go down. I don’t know much yet, but it will improve,” he said. Without funding coming from two different

sources, McFalls said longterm planning is now much more possible and they plan to undertake a strategic planning process soon. “That will be the first formal published plan that we’ve undertaken,” said McFalls. They hope to work with the Center for Public Safety Excellence, who help dis-

trict examine their services. “They will measure and delve into your performance,” said McFalls, who hopes to come out of the process with a three-to-five year strategic plan. “That really helps us to gear up our staffing, employment and stations to continue to improve our services,” said McFalls.


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Sports

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Eagles battle Chargers for a 14-13 victory By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Arlington football team played their 2019 Homecoming game as they took on the Marysville Getchell Chargers in a backand-forth battle on Oct. 4. The Eagles started off with the ball and immediately ran into some trouble as the Chargers forced them to fourth down quickly. With an aggressive call to run a fake punt-pass they converted for a first down and began to march down the field. They looked like they were going to score, when Marysville Getchell grabbed the momentum with an interception in the end zone. Arlington’s defense stood strong as they forced a punt and got their offense back on the field. The Eagles began to attack more on the ground and were able to put up the first points of the game, going up 7-0 near the end of the first quarter. After a few tough drives in the second quarter, neither team was able to find the end zone as they entered halftime with Arlington ahead 7-0. The Chargers came out strong to open the second half as they owned time of possession with a 10-minute drive. They capped off the drive with a short run to tie up the game at 7-7. With little time left in the quarter the Eagles weren’t

able to do much before the fourth. In the final quarter of the game, Arlington began to make huge plays through the air and secured the lead once again with a big 22yard touchdown pass to go up 147. The Eagles stalled the Chargers offense as they were forced to punt with four minutes left. Marysville Getchell flipped the script over the next two minutes as Arlington punted it right back. The Chargers went on a quick run as they scored through the air with 1:24 left on the clock. They decided to go for the win rather than the tie but failed to convert the two-point conversion. In the end, the Eagles walked away with the narrow victory 14-13. “I don’t think we came out focused enough or ready to go with all of the distractions around, which Homecoming can do sometimes. We need to close our potential gap, focus on us and we can find a lot of success through the rest of the year,” said Arlington Head Coach Greg Dailer. The Arlington offense was led by Trent Nobach, Joseph Schmidt, Cade Younger and Jaden Roskelley. Nobach, sophomore quarterback, threw for 144 yards and also added to the scoreboard with a passing touchdown. The Eagles senior receivers Schmidt, four receptions for 39 yards, and Younger, six re-

ceptions for 73 yards and a touchdown, led the receiving corps. Roskelley, junior running back, had six carries for 46 yards with a rushing touchdown. On the defensive end the Eagles linebacker corps stepped up huge. Cole Cramer, junior, had a tackle for loss and also subbed in at quarterback for 48 passing yards. Quintin Yon Wagner, sophomore, and Michael Tsoukalas, junior, combined to lead the team in tackles to go with four tackles for loss, two forced fumbles and a fumble recovery. Their other two senior linebackers Kirahy Meyers and Luke Green also found their way on the stat sheet with a combined three tackles for loss. “We challenged the kids to come out here and buy into what we’re doing, and they did that. I’m super proud of them and they challenged one of the best teams in WESCO. We’re not going to lay down and we’ll be fighting every game,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach Davis Lura. Josiah Koellmer, junior quarterback, led the Chargers' offense and made an impact on the ground and through the air. He racked up 130 passing yards and 44 rushing yards to go along with both a passing and rushing touchdown. Marysville Getchell has a ros-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Chargers’ junior quarterback Josiah Koellmer, left, rolls out and looks to throw back into the middle as the Eagles’ senior defensive end Addison Edwards, right, reaches out for the sack at Arlington High School on Oct. 4. ter of players who play both ways including Landyn Olson, Cheron Smith and Max White. Olson, junior receiver and defensive back, caught four passes for 66 yards and also grabbed a key interception. Smith, junior fullback and linebacker, had 18 carries for 58 yards and also led the Chargers in tackles. White, senior tight end and linebacker, had two catches for 21

yards, a receiving touchdown and a pass deflection. If you want to come out and watch the Eagles, their next home game will be against the Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks on Friday, Oct. 25, at 7 p.m. The Chargers next home game will also be against the Tomahawks as they match up with their cross-town rivals on Friday, Oct. 11, at 7 p.m.

High School Fall Sports Marysville Getchell Chargers FOOTBALL

Oct. 11

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Marysville-Pilchuck

Home

QuilCeda

Oct. 12

Oct. 10 Oct. 15

Monroe Marysville-Pilchuck

Home Home

Oct. 10 Oct. 15

Everett Snohomish

Away Home

Bill Kehoe Invite

Away

StMartin

Oct. 12

Meet begins at 2:30 p.m.

MGHS MGHS

Oct. 10 Oak Harbor Home Oct. 12 District Dive Qualifier Away *Meet begins TBD

EvtHS MGHS

Matches begin at 7:30 p.m.

MPHS MarHS*

Oct. 10 Oct. 14 Oct. 15

Everett Snohomish

Home Away

Hole in the Wall

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Meadowdale Monroe Marysville-Getchell

Oct. 10 Oct. 14

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

MGHS VetMemSt

Shorewood Jackson

Away Away

ShwdHS JksnHS

Oct. 10 Oct. 15

GIRLS SOCCER

Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

Oct. 10 Snohomish Oct. 15 Everett *Match begins at 7 p.m.

Home Away

Snohomish Everett

Away Home

Oct. 15

ArlHS Lincoln*

Oct. 11

Oak Harbor

Away

SnoHS ArlHS

Oak Harbor

Oct. 12

Hole in the Wall

Away

OHHS

LWHS

Marysville-Getchell

Away

TotemMS TotemMS MGHS

Meet begins at 2:30 p.m.

Oct. 10 Oak Harbor Home Oct. 12 District Dive Qualifier Away *Meet begins TBD

Home

MPHS

Oct. 15

Oak Harbor

Away

Game begins at 7 p.m.

OHHS

Archbishop Murphy

Home

CROSS COUNTRY LWHS

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

Sehome Anacortes

Home Away

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

Sehome Anacortes

Home Away

Away Home

Kuhnle’s Tavern Lake Goodwin Store/Resort Langabeer, McKernan, Bennett & Co. Les Schwab-Marysville Les Schwab-Smokey Point Locals Espresso Marysville Awards Marysville Care Center Marysville Laundry Station Marysville Orthodontics Marysville Travel & Cruise Marysville-Everett Ceramic Tile Maxi’s Chinese Restaurant Mirkwood Public House Mountain View Rehab Mountain Loop Motorcars North County Outlook Noble Palace NW Diesel Pacific Propane

LCHS LWHS*

BOYS TENNIS

LWHS AMS

Match begins at 4 p.m.

Oct. 9 Burlington-Edison Oct. 14 Squalicum *Match begins at 3:30 p.m.

GIRLS SOCCER

Oct. 9 Oct. 15

Meet begins at 4:15 p.m.

Oct. 9 Lynden Christian Oct. 12 Hole in the Wal *Meet begins at 8 a.m.

Away Home

LWHS AHS

Proud to Support Our Student Athletes Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Clinic Chinook Lumber CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E&E Lumber Edward Jones-Andy Smith Edward Jones-Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Gary Wright Realty Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance H&M Electric Heritage Bank-Marysville Hibulb Cultural Center Honda of Marysville Julie’s Licensing

MPHS MarHS*

VOLLEYBALL

Match begins at 7 p.m.

Schedules subject to change. For more info, visit www.wescoathletics.com or www.nwcathletics.com.

7 Lakes Gifts Action Sports Albertson’s-Marysville All Creatures Vet Clinic Altitude Trampoline Park American Distributing Arlington Electric & Solar Arlington Hardware Arlington Muffler & Brake Arlington Pediatric Dentistry Awning Builders A-Z Transmissions Beef Jerky Outlet Big Foot Music Bleachers Grill Bob’s Burgers and Brew Brown’s Plumbing Bud Barton Bundy Carpet C Don Filer Insurance

QuilCeda

GIRLS SWIM

VOLLEYBALL

Oct. 10 Oct. 15

CROSS COUNTRY Meet begins at 8 a.m.

Home Home Away

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Lakewood Cougars Oct. 11

FOOTBALL

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Oct. 11

FOOTBALL

VOLLEYBALL

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

LWHS

Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

Arlington Eagles BOYS TENNIS

Away

GIRLS SOCCER

GIRLS SOCCER

Oct. 10 Oct. 15

Meet begins at 3:45 p.m.

BOYS TENNIS

GIRLS SWIM

VOLLEYBALL

Match begins at 7 p.m.

Meet begins at 9:10 a.m.

FOOTBALL

CROSS COUNTRY

CROSS COUNTRY

BOYS TENNIS

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks

Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pilchuck Rentals Port Gardner Bay Winery Port of Subs-Tulalip Reaction Physical Therapy (Arlington|Smokey Point) Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Riverside Topsoil Roy Robinson S&S Roofing LLC Schaefer Shipman Shaklee Silvana Plumbing Skagit Regional Clinics Sleep Advantage-Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning

Sno-Isle Natural Food Co-op Sonic Burger-Marysville Soroptomist Int’l of Marysville Stanwood Redi-Mix Stilly Auto Parts Stilly Diner Stilly Sand & Gravel Strawberry Lanes Stryker Brothers Tall Guy Small Guy The Creamery The Shop-Arlington The UPS Store-Tulalip Tulalip Tribes Unique Interiors Village Licensing Who’s on First Sports Cards Wild Birds Unlimited

BEHS* LWHS


Sports

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Tomahawks blank Chargers By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville-Pilchuck boys tennis team hosted their cross-town rival Marysville Getchell Chargers for the first time this season on Sept. 30. The Tomahawks entered the matchup with a 2-1 league record, 5-2 overall, while the Chargers were 0-4 in league, 1-6 overall. From the start of the matches, Marysville-Pilchuck made a statement as they dominated the first set in six out of seven matchups. The Tomahawks continued their dominance throughout the day as they finished six matches in two sets and

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Parker Devereux, Tomahawks’ number one singles, sprints cross-court as he sends back the shot against Marysville Getchell at Totem Middle School on Sept. 30.

closed out the final match in the third set to secure to 7-0 victory. “We have an experienced roster and it’s good to see those older players show the younger guys how we play and showing them how to get better every day. It’s a huge advantage to have those experienced players, because we’re able to focus more on strategy and techniques, rather than how to play the game,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach Evan Shaw. Marysville-Pilchuck’s singles were led by incredible performances from Parker Devereux and Trae Tingelstad. Devereux, number one, only dropped two games the entire match as he beat the Chargers’ Liam Perkins by scores of 6-1 in both sets. Tingelstad, number three, was consistent with 6-2 scores in both sets over Marysville Getchell’s Rylee Worth. The Tomahawks’ doubles also had big showings from their number one team of Aaron Kalab and Treven Southard, as well as their number two team of Dawson Coe and Jake Sulya. Kalab and Southard dropped a total of three games as they beat Luke Olason and Mikah Marshall by 6-1 in the first set and 6-2 in the second. Coe and Sulya only dropped three games as well, over Ryder Hurley and Keegan Brennan, with a first set of 6-0 and a second of 6-3. “Even though it was 7-0, we saw a lot of strong play and I saw a few highlights that are good to see with a young team. Right now we’re just focusing on the mindset of working hard and continuing to compete through to the end, as well as fundamentals in or-

The Arlington girls soccer team matched up with the Mountlake Terrace Hawks in a lopsided performance on Oct. 3. Arlington wasted no time attacking the Mountlake Terrace defense as they stayed deep in Hawks' territory from their first possession. The Eagles forced a corner kick early in the first half and scored off a header to go up 1-0, in the 13th minute. Arlington intercepted a pass moments later and went on another quick run to score again in the 15th minute. The Hawks were able to slow down the Eagles through the rest of the half as they ended the half down 2-0. The Eagles came into the second half with the same mindset to move the ball and score. Only six minutes into the half, Arlington was able to earn a penalty kick and scored once again to extend their lead to 3-0. Over the next handful of possessions, the Eagles were able to create shots on goal but were unable to convert them goals on the scoreboard. Mountlake Terrace managed to

put together a few runs of their own but simply didn’t have the ability to pose a threat when given the chance. Arlington scored once again near the end of the match as they went up 4-0 in the 73rd minute. In the end, the Eagles walked away with the 4-0 victory over the Hawks. “We need to take care of business through the rest of the year because we’re about to face a few teams that are below us in the table. The expectation is to win those and put ourselves in a good position,” said Arlington Head Coach Nathan Davis. Arlington’s two biggest contributors were Audrey Jay and Ellie Rork. Jay, sophomore mid, had an incredible performance as she pulled off the hattrick with three goals in the match. Rork, junior forward, was responsible for the big lead early in the first half as she scored the second goal on the day. Sydney Crandall, junior forward, and Athena Dumadag, senior mid, also tallied their own stats with each of them ending the day with an assist. For the first time in league play this season, Ar-

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PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Chargers’ number two singles Mason Devereux steps up as he sends back a shot against the Tomahawks at Totem Middle School on Sept. 30. der to get them there,” said Marysville Getchell’s first-year Head Coach Steve Uppendahl. Marysville Getchell had a rough day, but their best performance came from their number two singles player Mason Devereux as he took on Carson Asper. Devereux was the only Charger to take a set as he won the first set 6-4, but then dropped the second 6-4 and lost the tiebreaker 10-6. If you want to come out and support the Tomahawks their next home match will be against the Meadowdale Mavericks on Thursday, Oct. 10, at 3:30 p.m. On the same day and time, the Chargers will be hosting a match of their own against the Monroe Bearcats.

Eagles defeat Mountlake Terrace By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

5

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County Wednesday, October 9, through Tuesday, October 15

Wednesday, October 9 Sunrise 7:19 am • Sunset 6:32 pm 2:39 am 9:12 am 4:07 pm 10:42 pm

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Eagles’ sophomore mid Audrey Jay takes the ball up the sideline as she looks to pass inside against the Mountlake Terrace Hawks at Arlington High School on Oct. 3.

lington’s sophomore goalkeeper Lexi Miller-Wood earned a shutout victory. She organized a strong defense led by senior captain Grace Bynum and senior Sarah French. “To see us defend a little better and come out with a shutout was huge. We can score goals, everyone

knows that, but right now we’re focusing on playing sound defense and not giving up any easy shots,” said Coach Davis. Your next chance to come out and cheer on the Eagles will be at home as they take on the Snohomish Panthers on Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7:30 p.m.

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

7.9 ft 1.5 ft 10.3 ft 3.7 ft

Sunday, October 13 Full Moon Sunrise 7:25 am • Sunset 6:24 pm 5:42 am 11:52 am 5:34 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide

9.4 ft 2.7 ft 10.3 ft

Thursday, October 10 Sunrise 7:20 am • Sunset 6:30 pm

Monday, October 14 Sunrise 7:26 am • Sunset 6:22 pm

Friday, October 11 Sunrise 7:22 am • Sunset 6:28 pm

Tuesday, October 15 Sunrise 7:28 am • Sunset 6:20 pm

3:36 am 10:00 am 4:32 pm 11:09 pm

4:23 am 10:41 am 4:52 pm 11:32 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

8.3 ft 1.6 ft 10.3 ft 3.1 ft

8.7 ft 1.9 ft 10.3 ft 2.5 ft

Saturday, October 12 Sunrise 7:23 am • Sunset 6:26 pm 5:04 am 11:18 am 5:12 pm 11:54 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

9.1 ft 2.3 ft 10.3 ft 1.9 ft

12:19 am 6:20 am 12:27 pm 5:58 pm

12:47 am 6:59 am 1:03 pm 6:23 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

1.3 ft 9.7 ft 3.3 ft 10.3 ft

0.6 ft 10.0 ft 3.9 ft 10.1 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

Home & Garden

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n WHISTLING GARDENER

October is the month of change in the garden den comes alive Of all the seasons of the year, again in the fall fall is probably and it shifts into my most favorite high gear in Ocand the month tober. of October is After the highwhen it all starts ly unseasonable By Steve Smith to happen (alrain and even though this year one could frost that we have experiargue that fall actually start- enced recently, I have started in September). There is ed to clean out my summer a crispness in the air, new annuals and veggies in orvibrant colors on the trees, der to prep the ground for fresh growth on our sum- some fall color and hardy mer dormant lawns, mums veggies, like garlic, broccoli, and asters in full bloom, and shallots. There is a cerpumpkins and gourds ev- tain catharsis in pulling out erywhere, fresh rainfall, col- all those overgrown annuals orful berries, and of course and mildew ridden squash pansies and violas. The gar- plants and plunging in a

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October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

How to protect your plants from winter weather For the majority of gardening enthusiasts, gardening is a warm weather activity. While some people live in climates that make it possible to enjoy gardening year-round, those who don’t often lament the end of the gardening season. Winter might not be conducive to gardening, but the arrival of dreary, wet weather does not necessarily mean a gardener’s work is done until the following spring. Taking steps to protect plants from winter weather is an important part of maintaining a healthy garden that thrives from year to year. Autumn means it’s time to clean up the garden, said Martha Clatterbough, a WSU Master Gardener. Get

rid of anything that is diseased, and remove fallen fruit or anything that may harbor disease over the winter. It’s also a good time to remove diseased branches and annuals. She encouraged people to set bait for slugs, which appear throughout the year. Timing is of the essence when winterizing a garden. The online gardening resource Get Busy Gardening!TM advises gardeners that the best time to winterize is after the first hard freeze in the fall. A hard freeze occurs when temperatures dip below freezing overnight. When that occurs, annual plants and vegetables are killed off and perennial plants, which grow back year after year, begin going dor-

mant. Better Homes and Gardens notes that perennials are the easiest plants to prepare for winter, as they require just a little cutting back and mulching to be safe from cold weather. But no two perennials are alike, so homeowners should consult their local gardening center for advice on how to prepare their particular perennials for the coming months. Clatterbough encourages people to use leaves from deciduous trees and to avoid using fruit tree leaves because it could attract pests and diseases. “It’s important not to mulch right See PLANTS on page 8

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8

Home & Garden

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

SMITH Continued from page 6

the compost pile. Canna lilies will be dug up, hosed off, divided, and then stored in 15 gallon nursery pots where they will be covered with damp newsprint and kept in a cool greenhouse where they won’t freeze. Cannas in the ground simply need to be mulched and they will be fine for the winter. Papyrus and red bananas on the other hand will never make it through the winter, so just treat them as a summer love affair and give them the heave ho. For the rest of my yard I mostly let it go to sleep naturally; leaving the perennials to set seed for the birds, blowing the leaves off my driveway and into the beds to supply nutrients and insulation, and after fertilizing the lawn with a balanced

organic fertilizer, I mow it an inch higher than I did for the summer. Oh, I almost forgot. I also drain out the hoses and put away the patio furniture. As for the garden center, there are also lots of changes that take place in October. For starters, many of the tired summer blooming shrubs and perennials are moved to the back where we hope to clear them out at half price. We call this our “Take Me Home Please” department and gardeners can find some great deals on tired plants that simply need a new home. Most nurseries have a clearance area where you can find some great bargains. October is also when conifers and broadleaf evergreens, once again, take front stage with their coats of many colors. ‘Carsten’s Winter Gold’ mugo pine is already showing its win-

ter gold highlights as is the coveted ‘Chief Joseph’ lodge pole pine. Conifers come in an array of winter colors from green to blue, yellow, orange, and plum. The same can be said for several broadleaf evergreens, like Leucothoe and Nandina. These shrubs take on an incredible color change when the nights get cool, changing from plain boring green to shades of bronze and dazzling red. There are even some perennials, like Bergenia and Wintergreen, that sport a whole new personality during the dark and cool months of winter. Planting a few of these in containers is a great way to keep the garden interesting. October also marks the reintroduction into the garden center of winter heather, rhodies, and camellias, all of which now have their buds set for spring and in the case of heather, are actually

blooming with the start of some color that will persist for almost 6 months. Pieris ‘Passion Frost” is another broadleaf evergreen shrub that is covered with buds in October that will finally open to blooms in February and March. Between Camellias, rhodies, and Pieris, I think the sight of these buds gives me so much hope and anticipation for the forthcoming spring that it makes the end of summer seem somewhat irrelevant. October ushers in lots of changes for us gardeners and for garden centers. Take advantage of the scattered sunny days and embrace the change that this month offers us. You won’t be sorry you did.

Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

www.northcountyoutlook.com

PLANTS Continued from page 7

up next to the tree,” Clatterbough said. She added it would provide shelter for voles, which could start nibbling on trees. The steps necessary to winterize annuals depends on which type of annuals, cool- or warm-climate, you have. “I bring my dahlias inside,” Clatterbough said. She describes dahlias as “marginally hearty” and susceptible to water damage. Cool-climate annuals should be covered with polyspun garden fabric when light frost is in the forecast. In addition, Better Homes and Gardens recommends pulling dead annuals and adding them

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to a compost pile after a killing frost. Any annuals that developed fungal disease should be discarded. Mulch annual beds with a three- to four-inch layer of chopped leaves or similar materials, spreading the mulch only two inches thick over self-sown seeds you want to germinate in the spring. Warm-climate annuals also should be covered with polyspun garden fabric when light frost is expected. Seeds of cold-hardy annuals can be planted for extended winter bloom, while gardeners also can collect seeds of warmweather plants that will breed true to type. Even though you’re winterizing, Better Homes and Gardens recommends that gardeners continue to weed and water their plant beds and plants while also keeping an eye out for pests. If organic mulch has decomposed or thinned out, replace it with a new layer. The fall is a good time to clean up the garden and take care of hoses and the irrigation system. It’s a good time to cover plants to provide warmth and to protect from insects. She mentioned it might be necessary to continue watering plants especially in sheltered areas. Dried out plants can become more susceptible to cold damage. “I would advise people not to overreact to winter damage,” Clatterbough said, noting that damaged plants may heal and come back. “Patience is a virtue in a garden.” She said to continue weeding as invasive plants will continue to grow during the winter. Get Busy Gardening!TM notes that the bulbs of tender plants like dahlias and tuberous begonias can be dug up and overwintered in their dormant state. All dead foliage should be removed after the bulbs have been dug up, and the bulbs should be allowed to dry out a little before being stored. Container gardeners can overwinter their tender bulbs in their pots inside, but be sure to remove their foliage and store them in a dark, cool place that maintains temperatures above freezing. Winterizing may mark the end of gardening season, but it’s an important task that can ensure a healthy, beautiful garden next spring, summer and fall. For more information, go to extension.wsu.edu/ snohomish/garden/mastergardener-program/.


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October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

...our school to talk to us.

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Communities

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Arlington begins planning for downtown corridor Over the next several months community members will help create a downtown plan By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Arlington community members will be helping to assemble a plan and direction for the city’s historic downtown corridor throughout this year. Western Washington University staff and students are facilitating the process of forming a strategic plan for downtown Arlington and the first community workshop was held at the Downtown Arlington Business Association’s meeting on Oct. 2. The second workshop will be for the general community and will be held on Nov. 14 at the Haller Middle School commons at 6 p.m. “We want to get an collaborative vision or the downtown,” said Arlington Mayor Barbara Tolbert at the Oct. 2 meeting. The Olympic Avenue corridor is one of the more iconic and traveled parts of the town, she said. “We all know that this the heart and soul of our town,” said Tolbert. “We know that we need to have a long-term plan for downtown,” she added. Throughout the process Tolbert said she hopes to hear from everyone about ideas where the downtown Arlington area can go.

ESTUARY Continued from page 1

I-5. It was to build up the ground because this was all low, swampy marsh.” The ground will still be built up to support SR529 and I-5, but much of the area did not need to be filled in decades ago when I-5 was built. “A long time ago people didn’t think as much about the environmental effects,” said Pearce. Pearce said that WSDOT has done other projects like this local estuary habitat restoration. “We haven’t done a lot, but we have done some,” he said. Usually the animals are quick to return to the area. “We’ll start to see fish and birds in here almost immediately. To them, the flow is going this way and the current will bring them in,” said Pearce. “From environmental projects like this you see that happen almost immediately,” he said. The plants will take a little while longer to grow into the estuary habitat. “In a few years this will look like all the other wetland areas in this area. It will take a couple years for all the plants to grow,” he said. WSDOT contractors removed a lot of the vegeta-

“We want to hear from the community. From the building owners and business owners, to the people who love to come down here and shop during events,” she said. The first part of the process is simply taking in ideas about what people would like to see in the downtown Arlington area. “We want to get a really good sense of Arlington as a community, to understand what’s here now and what you want as a community. So we’ll take the assets you have now and think through how to get some of these things,” said Tammi Laninga, assistant professor at Western Washington University, at the Oct. 2 meeting. Local community members and DABA officials came up with a variety of ideas about what they would like to see in the downtown. Some of those suggestions included more family activities, healthfocused activities like an outdoor basketball tournament, more restaurants like a bakery and an ice cream shop, infrastructure improvements such as more public restrooms, and to maintain the historic feel of the downtown area. More ideas will be gathered at the Nov. 14 meeting. “Feel free to come again, add anything else you think of,” said Barbara Coe, adjunct faculty at Western Washington University.

tion and trees and are in the process of putting in more native plants to the restoration area. Many of the trees that were cut down were kept on site to give the birds and fish a more natural habitat.

“It will feed into the next steps and we appreciated your hard work and great ideas,” she said. There is also a plan for a virtual bulletin board put up where people can post their ideas online, she said. “We will get that up soon,” Coe said. After the ideas are collected, the facilitators will begin to work with them. “Winter quarter we’ll look at taking ideas from this studio and turning them into conceptual ideas and designs,” said Laninga. Further meetings will help refine those designs and concepts. “You’ll have opportunities to give a thumbs up or thumbs down, let us know if it’s great or if it’s never going to work,” she said. Finally, toward the end of the school year they hope to pare those designs into a strategic plan with directions that the city can take. “We’ll figure out how you make it happen and look at your design and land use codes,” said Laninga. “We’ll look at funding sources such as things that come from the state and other funds to pay for those, especially some of those infrastructure things which can be pretty expensive,” she said. Updates to the downtown corridor plan project will be found at the city of Arlington’s website at arlingtonwa. gov/downtownplan.

On midnight on Oct. 3 and 4 the crew breached the dike near Steamboat Slough which has allowed tidal waters to flow back into the area. “We needed a low tide to open the dike and the

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Communities

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11

Rock and Gem show comes to Marysville By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Kayley Middlemist, left, and Isabella Wayne look at some of the rocks available for sell at the Marysville Rock and Gem Show on Oct. 5.

Locals brought their quartz, amethyst and other rocks and gems out to display at the annual Marysville Rock and Gem Show. This year's show was held Oct. 5-6 at Marysville Totem Middle School. "We're having a gem show and showing rocks and gems and jewelry," said Bill Moser, president of the Marysville Rock and Gem Club, which put on the show. "We put it on because we like everyone to see what we do and it gives a chance for everybody around to get supplies and see what other people are doing," said Moser. In addition to displaying their rocks, gems and jewelry, many people enjoy the

show as a chance to pick up supplies or talk with people. "It's a great place to find material," said local Rod Vonthun. "People like being able to get what they need," said Moser. Moser said he enjoys watching people look through the rocks to find what they want. "I like seeing people walk out with full bags and smiles," he said. In addition to the static displays there are some kids activities. Rock painting and other activities are provided by the Marysville Rock and Gem Club. "I like seeing kids crack the geodes. When the pop the geodes open and they look ugly on the outside but they're all sparkly on the inside," said Moser. Erin Middlemist was there with her daughter and her friend this year. "The show is good, they enjoy it," she said. "I came

here last year and I enjoyed it. I like to collect rock." There are many rock enthusiasts at the event showing their craft as well, including the best ways to make jewelry out of rocks. "I like making jewelry," Moser said. "Taking nothing and making something out of it. I think that's why a lot of people like doing it." The Marysville Rock and Gem Club is a group for local rock enthusiasts that meets frequently to organize events and their annual show. "We get together once a month and we hold meetings at the United Methodist Church on 64th Street," said Moser. "We go out and collect rocks. We put on this show. We help the food bank. We teach silver-smithing and we tried to teach lapidary [engraving, cutting, polishing stones and gems]," he said. More information about the local club is available at marysvillerockclub.com.

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Communities

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Marysville Olympian Jarred Rome dies By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Marysville’s two-time Olympian discus thrower Jarred Rome was found dead on Sept. 21 at 42. It will likely take weeks before a cause of death is known, according to the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Officer. Rome was a longtime Marysville resident and attended Marysville schools. “I knew him as a student at Marysville Junior High School first,” said Randy Davis, a local Marysville teacher. “When I moved to Marysville-Pilchuck High School I asked him to come out to the track team, which he did,” he said. Davis followed him for a long time after Rome moved on to college. “Every time he was throwing in the area I would follow that as a fan,” he said. “Me and his throwing coach decided to fly him down for the Olympic trials in Sacramento,." That would be the first Olympic trials that Rome won, which allowed him to compete in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. He would represent the U.S. at the Olympics in 2004 and 2012, and in 2011 Rome won a silver medal at the Pan American Games. Davis said he remembers at those first qualifiers officials would take all the winners aside to interview them. “He was relatively unknown at this point, so they took him aside and

asked him for some of his background, and he said he came from this little town called Marysville and he talked a lot about his hometown. That was something that was always apparent, that he was very proud of his hometown,” said Davis. Rome would eventually return to Marysville to give back. “He would approach me later about putting on a throwing camp here in Marysville,” said Davis. “Jarred did a great job bringing people together for that.” Davis said that Rome wanted to share his knowledge and skills with local youth and help them. “He had learned so much about athletics and the world,” because he had traveled so much, said Davis. “He always felt that he should share those things with the people here,” he said. The summer camp that Rome put on was popular with local throwers from around the Puget Sound and with Marysville locals. “The kids just absolutely loved it,” said Davis, who added that some of the kids took up track and field and would text him for tips after the camp was over. The fees for the camp also returned to the Marysville community. “He would always turn around and give any money he raised from the camp back to our track and field

Jarred Rome passed away on Sept. 21.

program here,” said Davis. Rome also didn’t turn away people for lack of funds. “Jarred told me that if there’s any Tomahawks that were having trouble paying, just to let him know and he would let them in the camp,” said Davis. Rome was in town this September to be inducted into the Snohomish County Sports Hall of Fame, which took place on Sept. 18. “I met Jarred for the first time at the Snohomish County Sports Hall of Fame Banquet recently. He was very humbled to be honored into the Sports Hall of Fame,” said Tammy Dunn, executive director of the Snohomish County

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Sports Commission. “He arrived early so that he could bring us items for the memorabilia table we had for the 2019 Induction Class,” she said. He was a track and field assistant coach for throws at Boston University and the director of the Ironwood Thrower Development Camp in Idaho. Davis said he’ll remember Rome as someone who was “always upbeat, positive and happy.” He said it was a tragedy that Rome was only 42 when he died. “Sometimes things don’t make sense,” he said. Rome is survived by his wife, Pamela Rome, parents Dan Rome and Jane Blackwell, and his two sisters.

LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: SUZAN COLLINS MIDDLETON, Deceased., NO. 19-4-01547-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: October 2, 2019. Personal Representative: Anna Mae Collins Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01547-31.


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Opinion

n GUEST OPINION

Timber industry an integral part of our local economy

The timber industry has long been an integral part of our local economy and community in Snohomish County. The timber trust lands managed by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) were committed many years ago to support local infrastructure projects. Counties, schools, fire departments, and hospitals have all benefited from these harvests as they provide important funding for capital projects each year. But this funding is increasingly at risk as political pressure continues to stall timber sales in our region. Over the years, DNR and timber companies have implemented sustainability strategies to reduce the impact of timber harvests while continuing to provide revenues to timber beneficiaries (schools, fire, etc.). These strategies encourage responsible harvesting and replanting so that our working forests continue to produce timber and protect certain wildlife habitat. With that being said, there are times when additional regulations can become burdensome and have negative impacts to the timber industry. One such example is the habitat protection efforts for the marbled murrelet. An updated conservation plan is currently under consideration at the Board

Nate Nehring

of Natural Resources, which governs the DNR. Some of the options in this plan would greatly reduce the availability of DNR forestland that can be sold to mills like Hampton Lumber in Darrington. Many in the timber industry feel that the Environmental Impact Statement for this effort does not appropriately take into consideration the economic impacts of the options under consideration. This is why the Washington State Association of Counties (WSAC) is teaming up with local districts to fund its own study on the economic impact of increased restrictions on timberlands. Local economies, including here in North Snohomish County, still rely on timber sales and harvests for local jobs. In addition, many local school and fire districts rely on the revenues from these sales to fund important education and public safety services. I currently serve on the

Executive Board for WSAC and I am enthusiastically supporting this study. While it is important that we carefully consider environmental impacts of decisions made by state agencies, it is also important to consider the local impact to economies and service providers. We are working to ask the Board of Natural Resources to put a pause on the consideration of the conservation plan until a study can be done on the local economic impact of such decisions. Decisions such as these regulations being considered by the DNR have significant impacts to the people living in our region. It is crucial that these decisionmaking processes include information and careful consideration regarding all of the potential unanticipated consequences of potential action. I will continue to work with stakeholders on this and other issues that affect our local economies and service providers in our region. Nate Nehring is a member of the Snohomish County Council and represents District 1 which includes Arlington, Darrington, Granite Falls, Marysville, Stanwood, and unincorporated north county. He can be reached by email at Nate. Nehring@snoco.org or by phone at 425-388-3494.

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Our Favorite Quotes "Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible." Author ­— Francis of Assisi Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

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RAVE RAVE: My kids had a great time at the Tulalip Tribes' Say Something Color Run. It's a great way to kick off Unity and Wellness Month.

person that stole the cross can return it and that would be the end of it. If not, I pray your conscience will bother you enough that you don't sleep well at night.

RANT: I think it is absolutely reprehensible that someone would steal a solar paneled cross off of a grave in the cemetery. I have a feeling that the person who stole it only did it as a prank but otherwise had no use for it. As if there isn't enough sorrow over losing your loved ones, to have someone do such a mean act is not very nice. The

RAVE: Just a reminder that the ballots for the Nov. 5 General Election should be arriving in your mailbox soon after they are mailed on Oct. 17. You should also be receiving the local voters' pamphlet at about the same time. Please get involved and let your voice be heard by casting your ballot and returning it by the Nov. 5 deadline.

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Weekly Puzzle CLUES ACROSS . Google certification 4. Cloths spread over coffins 9. Disorderly 14. “Star Wars” hero Solo 15. Toward the rear 16. The order of frogs 17. Alternative pain treatment (abbr.) 18. “Wolf of Wall Street” star 20. Evoke 22. Units of metrical time 23. Helps to predict eclipses 24. Some say they attract 28. Pitching statistic 29. Baseball box score (abbr.) 30. Force unit 31. Repaired shoe 33. English theologian 37. Commercial 38. Exchange money for goods or services 39. Give off 41. One from Utah 42. Computer department 43. Begets 44. English navigator 46. C C C 49. Of I 50. Pouch 51. Add notes to 55. A way to fall into ruin

58. Cunning intelligence 59. Blood disorder 60. Disgraced CBS newsman 64. Tax collector 65. Type of grass common to the Orient 66. Cosmic intelligence 67. No (Scottish) 68. People who rely on things 69. Stairs have them 70. Mathematical term (abbr.) CLUES DOWN 1. Clarified butters 2. Primitive Himalayan people 3. Completely 4. Steep cliffs along the Hudson River 5. Assist 6. Language spoken in Laos 7. Type of screen 8. An attempt to economize 9. Volcanic craters 10. Still outstanding 11. Takes responsibility for another 12. California think tank 13. Former Rocket Ming 19. A pigeon noise

21. Central part of 24. Academy Award statue 25. Distinct unit of sound 26. Relative on the female side of the family 27. Passover feast and ceremony 31. The brightest star in Virgo 32. Made with oats 34. Subjects to laser light 35. Beloved Hollywood alien 36. Neatly brief 40. The Great Lakes State (abbr.) 41. Soon to be released 45. Swiss river 47. Become involved in 48. More dour 52. They’re on floors 53. Boxing’s GOAT 54. Swarms with 56. Quantum mechanics pioneer 57. Facilitated 59. As fast as can be done (abbr.) 60. Regional French wine Grand __ 61. Owns 62. Tell on 63. Precedes two


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Communities

October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

trusting and respectful relationship. Join experts from Cocoon house in learning about this vital subject. This event is intended for parents and caregivers of teens. Held Saturday, Oct. 12, beginning at 1 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com Friends of the Arlington Library Book Sale: Great books available at bargain prices. Something for everyone. Proceeds support the Arlington Library. Held Wednesday, Oct. 9, 10 a.m.

to 2 p.m. at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading.

Classified: Events/Festivals

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

Classified: Announcements

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855-4154148.

Bring your sewing machine, regular sewing equipment and a few basic colors of construction thread. Kits and instructions will be provided.  Bring your brown bag lunch, beverage and enjoy sewing fun.  Meeting is at the Cedar Valley Grange,  Lynnwood  from 10-2. For more information contact Arlene Harrison 425-743-0118.

Baby and Me Storytime: Wiggle and giggle with your baby through silly stories, happy songs, rhymes and activities that inspire a love of reading. Playtime follows. For newborns through 18 months. Caregiver required. Held Tuesdays, Oct. 15-29, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Submit your events via email to:

October 9 - October 15

www.northcountyoutlook.com

For ages 3-5. Caregiver required. Held on Wednesdays, Oct. 9-30, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Viking Hall Open House: Viking Hall inn Silvana need volunteer and financial support. They will be having an open house of Oct. 19, 3:30-6:30 p.m. with a dessert social with all homemade desserts. Raffles and gift baskets will be available. Viking Hall is located at 1331 Pioneer Hw. in Stanwood,

COMING EVENTS

Parenting Teens - Successful Communication With Your Teen: Communication happens all the time and comes in many forms. Successful and effective communication is key to building a

Sew Thoughtful: On Oct. 18 the Clothing and Textile Advisorswill be sewing totes for children who are being temporarily cared for at Safe Place in Everett.

Spooky Science: the amazing oozing pumpkin trick, make balloons scream and create a spooky edible "dirt" dessert. For ages 6 and up. Held Saturday, Oct. 19 beginning at 2 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Classified: House Cleaning

HOUSECLEANING: Disabled veteran seeking families in need of housecleaning, move-ins and move-outs preferred. Reliable, trustworthy service. $241.00 first three hours. Please call Ray at 206-751-0939.

ATTENTION: OXYGEN USERS. Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed lowest prices. Call the Oxygen Concentrator store: 844-495-7230.

Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories, music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 19 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Held on Mondays, Oct. 21 and 28, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Classified: Help Wanted

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details, 855-635-4229.

Family Chikcen Dinner: The Stillaguamish Senior Center will be having it Family Chicken Dinner on Nov. 3 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Stillagumaish

STILL PAYING TOO much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 866-6856901.

Fighting Fires!

Let’s all help to prevent fires. You can start by talking with grownups in your family about fire safety and prevention. Check at your school to see if firefighters can come to talk to your class.

Fire Prevention and Safety Week

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Do you know

some dogs Family Fire Safety Checklist that live in fire

Cook in the kitchen only when an adult is helping you.

stations?

Don’t touch matches, lighters or candles. They are only for adults to use. Do you have smoke detectors on every level of your home? Test them monthly. Change the batteries at least once a year. Do you know two or more ways out of the house? Never use elevators if there is a fire (stairs are much safer). Smoke rises. If there is a fire, stay low: crawl under the smoke. Have you picked a place to meet the rest of your family once you are all out of the house? Once you are out of the house, stay out of the house.

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Senior Center. The dinner includes roaster chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, coleslaw, rool, vegetables and dessert. Cost for the dinner is $8 for seniors, $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 years and younger. There will be live entertainment by local musicians. Please bring canned goods for the food bank. The Stillaguamish Senior Center is at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd.

ONGOING EVENTS

Learn to Square Dance: Come learn to Square Dance, held on Mondays, from 7-9 p.m. at the Totem Middle School Cafeteria, 1605 7th St. NE, Marysville. Get healthy and make new friends dancing to modern upbeat music! No experience or partner is necessary. Experienced dancers will be there to partner and assist in class. Dress is casual and the first lesson is free. For additional information, call Eric or Cindy at 425-334-4374 or email squaredancelessons@gmail. com. Visit their website at www.happyhoppers.org.

Binky Patrol: Binky Patrol, which meets at a private home in Marysville, provides quilts and afghans to Snohomish County infants and children who need comfort.Volunteer knitters, quilters and crocheters are needed, as well as donations of fabric, batting, thread or money to buy sewing supplies. In particular, the group is looking for volunteers interested in helping make quilts. All levels of experience are welcome. For more information: call Ernalee Munday at 360-659-7198.

Stillaguamish Senior Center: The Stillaquamish Senior Center at Smokey Point is looking for participants to join them in the following activities whether you are a member or not. Volunteers always needed. Mah Jong - Mondays, 1-4 p.m.; Bingo - Tuesdays  and Fridays;  Cribbage - Tuesdays, 1-4 p.m.; Popcorn and movie - Wednesdays, 12:45 p.m.; Stamp and Scrap - 1st & 3rd Thurs 10 - 1 Karaoke - 1st & 3rd Thursdays, 1-3 p.m.; Bunco - 2nd Thursday, 1-4 p.m.; and Jam Session - 2nd & 4th Thursdays, 1-3 p.m. Call the center for more details at 360-653-4551.

Crossword answers from page 13


Communities

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BARTLETT

chinery but things like tables and chairs,” said Bauer. Bauer said that Bartlett is always willing to help with local events and has given time and equipment to many different local groups, including the Kiwanis Club, the Arlington Boys & Girls Club, Arlington High School and various local Christian schools. “These are things that he would be able to receive money for and he just donates them,” said Bauer. “If it’s for a good cause he’s just right there for you, ready to help you with what you’re asking for,” she said. The Kiwanis Club and other

Continued from page 1

people who would otherwise go unnoticed,” said Arlington Kiwanis member Jan Bauer. “There are a lot of people who participate in community service and who do good things around here,” she said. Bartlett has owned Rex’s Rentals with his family since April 2006 and managed United Rentals in Arlington for 17 years before that. “He has a rental business that has a lot of machines that we can rent, but it’s not just the ma-

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October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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organizations put on many different events throughout the year and Bartlett has helped many of them be successful, said Bauer. “During our annual auction we needed extra tables and he donated a lot of tables and chairs for us to use,” she said. There are many community members who are also friends with Bartlett because he is friendly and welcoming, said Bauer. “People like the fact that he’s always treating people as friends and family,” she said. “He has such a big hear." Bauer said that Rex’s Rentals is always a friendly place to step into as well, and Bartlett is a big

People like the fact that he's always treating people as friends and family. He has such a big heart.

____

Jan Bauer

part of that. Bartlett also spends a lot of his extra time coaching soccer in Marysville and Granite Falls and has a passion for the sport, said Bauer. “He has led some of the local teams to some good finishes

throughout the years as well,” she said. Bauer said that the local Kiwanis Club was glad they could honor Bartlett his year. “It was our pleasure to honor Rex for all of his work and dedication to others,” she said.

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PAINTING

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SEPTIC SYSTEMS

REAL ESTATE Sue Stevenson, Broker Cell: 425.418.7902 Office: 360.659.1253 ext. 15 Fax: 360.653.3346 suestevensonRE@gmail.com

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19604-67th Ave. NE, Arlington www.cuzseptic.com

Your Neighborhood Business Center Mailbox Rentals Notary Service Pack & Ship Freight Services

You can receive ALL carriers at our mailboxes! 360.657.5500 Hours: Mon Fri 8am-6pm 8825 34th Ave NE Sat 9am-5pm Quil Ceda Village, Tulalip Sun Closed

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October 9, 2019 - October 15, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Tulalip Boys & Girls Club opens teen center By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Tulalip teens have a new place to go to after school now that the Tulalip Boys & Girls Club new multi-media center is open. The $2 million extension to the current club provides a wide range of activities for teenagers. “We have six stations with Xboxes that they’re able to play and game on. We have a number of TVs that they’re able to watch,” said Justice Vela, co-director of the new teen center. A surround sound audio system can also pump up the music. “It gets pretty loud,” said Vela. Two large projectors will also be able to make displays inside the teen center and outside, as well, if the Boy & Girls Club wants to hold summer outdoor events. There are activities like foosball and a pool table, snacks and a smart board that hooks up to iPads to provide a combined mental and

physical activity. The new center has been open since Sept. 18 and the response has been positive so far. “We’ve tripled and quadrupled the number of teens that have been here,” said Diane Pouty, an administrative assistant at the club. Pouty said the teens who come in like a lot of the different activities at the center. “I come back to check in every once in a while, and I’ll see them play a game and they come back and they’re playing cards,” she said. The large extension to the club is able to bring in a lot of people as well, said Vela. “We’ve had parents come off the street and ask us ‘what is this in here?’ It gets there attention so I think it will be good in the long run to keep kids in here,” she said. Vela said that the club is planning events for the center as well, such as an upcoming Halloween Dance that will be the first official event for teens there.

Tulalip officials started planning the new center a few years ago. Much of the money was raised from money collected during the club’s annual golf fundraisers and through grants. “We’ve raised the money every year though that and kept it in a restricted budget,” said Pouty. “So this has been a long time coming,” she said. Club officials had been looking for a way to provide more programming and space for teenagers as their old teen center was running out of room. “We’ve outgrown our space and we had the teens up in a room that we redid and was formerly storage, so this was badly needed,” said Pouty. There are other great opportunities for Tulalip youth, said Pouty, but the area lacked a dedicated teen center. “We have the Tulalip Tribes Youth Center, but it is more into sports. They take the kids out and

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Justice Vela, co-director of the Tulalip Boys & Girls Club new teen center, in front of some of the game stations they have at the new center on Oct. 3. about to a lot of field trips,” she said. She said she hopes that the new teen center provides a place where kids will be able to have a safe envi-

ronment in Tulalip. “We wanted to keep the kids off the street,” she said. “We’re here for them to come to us.”

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