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The many faces of the genus Viburnum We have a another one that vast palette of gives us multiple plants to choose species to enjoy from for our in our yards. northwest garVi b u r nu m s dens, and in are all shrubs many cases they By Steve Smith that grow well come from the for us here in the same genus. The genus northwest. They can tolPinus for instance includes erate a wide range of soils eastern white, Japanese and are happy in sun or white, red, black, Swiss, shade. They come in evPonderosa, mugo, and so ergreen forms such as Vion and so forth. These are burnum davidii, which has all different species within a distinct tri-divided midthe same genus. Cotoneas- rib and sparkly blue berter is another genus that ries, and Viburnum tinus provides us with at least a ‘Spring Bouquet’, which half dozen different species, repeat blooms throughout from low growing ground the season with red buds covers to larger shrubs. that open to clusters of The genus Viburnum is yet white flowers.

Some Viburnums are semi-evergreen — which simply means that in a mild winter they will keep all their foliage, but in a harsh winter they will be completely deciduous. Viburnum burkwoodii is a good example of a variety that will lose about half of it leaves every winter. For me, I would prefer that it just makes up its mind and either loses them all or keeps them all. Being in a state of indecision drives me nuts. Several Viburnums have deliciously fragrant blooms. The above mentioned burkwoodii has a nice smell, as does the ‘Korean Spice’ Viburnum

— both are early spring bloomers. Fall color is a hallmark for all of the deciduous varieties, with the leaves turning a nice rich burgundy. Also in the fall, many varieties sport very attractive berries from black to blue to yellow-reddish and pink. The flowers on Viburnums are mostly white and grow in clusters. Two exceptions are ‘Mary Milton’, which has “snowballlike” flowers in pink, and ‘Molly Schroeder’ which is also pink but is a “lacecap” form. Probably the most popular white forms are the common snowball bush and a lacecap form

called ‘Mariesii’ that has layered flowers often confused with dogwoods, it will also re-bloom in the fall. Here are two varieties that caught my eye the other day in the nursery as I was snooping about. Viburnum ‘Brandywine’ — This shrub grows to about 6 feet tall with glossy green oval leaves that turn a burgundy-wine red in the fall. The white flowers in spring produce incredible clusters of multicolored berries later in the summer that are pink to blue and are edible (but probably not very tasty). ‘Brandywine’ is both moisture tolerant and deer resis-

Presorted Standard US POSTAGE

tant (I think all viburnums are deer resistant). Viburnum ‘Sparkler’ — This one struck me because of its brilliant blue berries this time of year. ‘Sparkler’ is a densely branched shrub that can reach 12 to 15 feet tall, thus making it a great choice for a privacy hedge. The dark green, ruffled foliage turns a bright yellow to red in the fall and is accented with clusters of blue-black berries that will delight the birds. Regardless of what variety of Viburnum you might be drawn to, you can find many choices in the garden center this time of year, sporting their fall colors and attractive clusters of berries. Some like ‘Summer Snowflake’, ‘Mariesii’, and ‘Spring Bouquet’ might even be re-blooming. Whatever your pleasure, there is probably a Viburnum that will fit the bill for your garden.

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Children experience aviation at Community Airport Day By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Children climbed in planes and took flight at Arlington’s annual Community Airport Day that was held on Sept. 28. Free flights and other activities are part of the event that is meant to open up the Arlington Municipal Airport up for the day. “The airport is a community resource and a lot of times it feels, because of the security regulation, that it is closed off. So it’s really important to share that resource with the community,” said Kristin Banfield, communications manager for the city of Arlington. The event was the first time that Daniel Woolman and his family came down to the airport, even though

they lived nearby. “We’ve missed the FlyIns and other stuff so this is the first time we’ve been able to come down here,” he said. “It definitely piqued the kids' interest in aviation and I think it’s really cool.” With good weather, Banfield said that the event had a good turnout this year. “Super busy and really excited to see so much of the community out here. They’re checking out everything that we have,” she said. Community Airport Day includes displays of small airplanes, crafts and meeting with local pilots. “People come over and see the search and rescue helicopter, the police deSee AIRPORT on page 15

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Local pilot Dan Tarasievich, left, helps Emily Sompro into his plane at Arlington’s Community Airport Day on Sept. 28.

Ballew retires after serving Marysville for nearly 30 years By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

the city of Marysville and one of Ballew’s longtime coworkers. After almost 30 years Now, Marysville had building Marysville’s parks more than 30 parks comand recreation offerings, prising 487 acres Jim Ballew, the “He did city’s first Parks amazing things and Recreation during his tenDirector, retired ure,” said Hion Sept. 25. rashima. Ballew was It was a long hired in Novemjourney for both ber of 1989. the city and “The city Ballew. only had two “When I got parks at the here the popuCOURTESY PHOTO time and a golf lation of the city Jim Ballew course,” he said. was about 9,600 The only parks in the city at the time and now it’s more than were Comeford Park and 60,000,” said Ballew. He was hired to be the Jennings Park. “We had just a couple of city’s first Parks and Recreparks and a maintenance ation director. “My first office here was program basically,” said Gloria Hirashima, chief See BALLEW on page 12 administrative officer with

County, Marysville candidates discuss issues By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville and Snohomish County candidates for the upcoming November election gathered on Sept. 27 for a candidates forum. Candidates for sheriff, treasurer, the County Council and Marysville City Council discussed issues like the opioid epidemic and economic growth at the forum hosted by the Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce. County Sheriff Incumbent Ty Trenary and current Snohomish County deputy sheriff Adam Fortney are running for county sheriff. Fortney is currently a patrol sergeant who works the graveyard shift in the county.

His policy focus is on increasing arrests booked into the county jail. “One of the things that has been a big topic for me has been the jail restrictions and refusals. It has been very difficult for deputy sheriffs and police officers in Snohomish County to book people who are high on drugs,” he said. Fortney was critical of the current policing of the county. “For the last six years we have had difficulty enforcing the law and the role of the Snohomish County Sheriff ’s Office under my watch would be getting back to basics. There will be no more free passes,” he said. Trenary is the current county sheriff and former Stanwood Police Chief. When he took over the position

he said the jails needed reforming. “We had a number of jail deaths and at that point the public outcry was that the jail needs to be safe and humane,” he said. Those deaths have also resulted in costly lawsuits for the county, he added. He said that about 2,800 people still go through the jail each year. “The jail is not being left vacant,” he said. He said the opioid crisis needs new solutions. “For 32 years a pair of handcuffs and a trip to jail was the easiest thing we can do and it worked. But it hasn’t worked for this crisis,” he said. County Treasurer Democrat Brian Sullivan and Republican Rob Toyer are running for the Snohomish County Trea-

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Snohomish County sheriff candidates Ty Trenary, left, and Adam Fortney discuss their platforms at a candidates forum on Sept. 27. surer position. Toyer is currently a Marysville City Council member but is not running for re-election to instead run for the county treasurer position. He said he wants to get into the position to help bring transparency

to the office and improve the way the treasurer functions. “I plan on sitting down with the management team. I’ll sit down and ask them some questions,” he said.

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October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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“What can we improve on? I want to dial in on customer service and our department is advocating for the taxpayer.” Sullivan is a former Snohomish County Council member. He had a number of policy goals for the position as well, including bringing more transparency as well for the taxpayers. The “Taxpayer Bill of Rights” which the state passed is something that most state residents aren’t that aware of, he said. “We do a very poor job of getting that information out,” he said. Sullivan also hopes to reorganize the county’s foreclosure fund, which is more than a $1 million now.

County Council District 2 District 2 of the Snohomish County Council covers Tulalip, north Everett and Mukilteo. The race is between Republican Anna Rohrbough and Democrat Megan Dunn. Dunn is a policy advocate who said she has spent more than 20 years working on local policy issues, including recently leading the vote for Everett City Council districts. “My focus for this campaign is livability, sustainability and affordability,” she said. She hopes to provide outreach, prevention and rehab services to those suffering from addiction. “Working with the tribes is part of my platform,” said Dunn, who said she has reached out and met with local tribal leaders since March.

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She supports policies such as funding a permanent tribal liaison position, officially recognizing Indigenous People’s Day, putting a ballot drop box in Tulalip and promoting equity in hiring of Native people. “I will seek out and recruit tribal members to serve on our boards and commissions,” she said. Rohrbough is a Mukilteo City Council member and vice-chair of the council there. To respond to the opioid crisis she hopes to bring a dual-diagnosis center to the county that treats mental illness as well as addiction issues. “Right now treatment centers don’t treat the cause, and we need to treat the cause,” she said. She also said that law enforcement must be part of

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the response to the opioid epidemic. “We need to use our laws as disruption,” she said. Rohrbough said she will have an ‘open-door policy’ with local tribal leaders. “Tulalip and the other tribes are a major economic force in Snohomish County,” she said. “I will continue to reach out and find what is needed. I want to know what they need." Marysville City Council Kelly Richards and Jeff Seibert are running for the Marysville City Council seat that has been left open with Rob Toyer’s decision not to seek re-election. Richards said he is an active member of the community with time on the planning commission, PTA, Rotary and Marysville Music Boosters. He said he hopes to support the Cascade Industrial Center that is underway. “I see that getting a lot of jobs for our local citizens. Marysville’s been a bedroom community for everywhere down south so it will be nice when we get everything running there,” he said. For the opioid epidemic Richards said that embedded social worker program has worked well and he hopes to continue that. “I think Marysville is in a unique opportunity because our mayor, the county and surrounding cities have done a lot with the embedded social worker program,” he said. Seibert is a local electrician and former City Council member of 16 years. “The 16 years I served on the council was a privilege,” he said. During that time he said he was on many committees including the public works committee for 16 years and the finance committee for 14 years and voted against new taxes. “I have consistently voted against raising property taxes,” he said. Seibert also said that the Cascade Industrial Center is a good next step for Marysville growth. “Now that we’ve brought retail stores here it’s time to focus on the next step, which is the manufacturing and industrial center, which will bring living wage jobs here,” he said.

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Communities

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

Donation provides weight cages for AHS By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Arlington High School students will be able to weight train better now that all weight cages for the school have been replaced thanks to a donation from the Stillaguamish and Tulalip tribes. Weight cages are weight training equipment that allow students to safely lift free weights. The school had 14 weight cages that have been replaced slowly over the last four years thanks to $18,000 from the Stillaguamish Tribe and $5,000 from the Tulalip Tribes. The final donation of $8,000 was sent this year from the Stillaguamish Tribe. A little more than four years ago Judd Hunter, who runs the Arlington High School P.E. Department, realized that the weight cages were bulky and old and would likely need to be replaced. “The old weight cages really took up a lot of space in our weight room,” said Hunter. “The new cages open up a lot more space and the students really like the versatility of the new equipment. We’re very thankful for the donations.” “They were pretty large and they were limited in what they could do,” said Gary Sabol, director of communications for the Arlington School District. The weight training room for the school has limited space so the larger weight cages from previous

years also took up a lot of the room. “It was pretty tight in there,” said Sabol. “These donations allowed us to get cages that were more versatile and could do a lot more.” The initiative was started by Arlington High School teacher Kimberly Meno who worked with a grant writer to fill out funding requests that she sent to local tribes for the project. “The local tribes put an emphasis on education and school facilities through generous funding for projects and materials for students and staff,” said Meno. “We appreciate their continued support of our students and staff.” After the first two years of grants she began to write the proposals herself, said Sabol. “We started replacing the cages four years ago,” said Sabol. “It’s a long process but we were able to replace the final four this year.” The reaction to the weight cages has been good, said Sabol. “The students have really been happy,” he said. The staff have also had positive reaction to having more room in the weight training room, which is used by more than the sports teams for the school, said Sabol. “There are five different classes that use this room as well, so it’s not just for the sports teams,” he said. The local tribes are very supportive of local schools and Sabol said that their

Arlington receives clean audits for 2018 The city of Arlington received notification from the Washington State Auditor’s Office on Sept. 16 that the city has received clean financial and accountability audits for 2018. Stated Mayor Tolbert, “We are pleased to hear that for the fourth year in a row the SAO issued a clean audit after reviewing the city’s finances, financial reporting, and accountability.” The SAO reviewed the city’s financial condition and processes, as well as areas representing the highest risk of fraud, loss, abuse, or noncompliance. The auditors paid special attention to employee wages, leave balances and accruals; the city’s payroll and cash receipting system conversion; the use of re-

stricted building and land use permit fees; water and sewer billings, collections, and adjustments; travel expenditures; and the city’s general financial condition and fiscal sustainability. The audit reports highlighted the hard work by city staff to ensure compliance with all state financial reporting requirements and safeguarding of public resources from fraud, loss, or abuse. The report states in part, “In those selected areas, city operations complied with applicable state laws, regulations, and its own policies, and provided adequate controls over the safeguarding of public resources.” The audit reports are available by visiting the city’s website at www.arlingtonwa.gov.

COURTESY PHOTO

The Arlington High School weight training room which recently finished replaced their weight cages thanks to local donations. funding is appreciated by local students and teachers. “We’re very thankful

for the donation from the tribes,” he said. “The Stillaguamish Tribe has been

very supportive of various projects of ours throughout the years. Certainly in this

area the $18,000 is very appreciated, and the Tulalip Tribes helped a lot as well.”


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Sports

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Lakewood wins homecoming 27-0 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Lakewood football team hosted their homecoming game as they opened league play against the Sedro-Woolley Cubs on Sept. 27. The Cougars started

with the ball on offense and wasted no time attacking the Cubs' defense on the ground. With a few huge runs down the field, Lakewood was able to score in the first two minutes of the game, securing an early 7-0 lead. After falling behind, Sedro-Woolley’s offense

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Lakewood’s junior receiver Carson Chrisman takes the screen pass up the sideline as he picks up a 32-yard gain against the Sedro-Woolley Cubs at Lakewood High School on Sept. 27.

took the field but quickly had to punt the ball away after failing to convert for a first down. Through the rest of the first half neither team was able to get their offense going as the defenses stood strong. With seconds left in the half, the Cougars were able to hit a field goal and went into halftime up 10-0. The second half opened like the first half ended, with both teams struggling to put together long offensive drives. Near the end of the third quarter, Lakewood seemed to start finding their stride as they marched down the field and scored on a trick-play with a pass into the back of the end zone. Even with the 17-0 lead, the Cougars' defense continued to keep the pressure on the Cubs. Through the rest of the half the Cougars continued to use their running game as they marched down the field and scored again halfway through the fourth quarter. Lakewood closed out the game with a last second field goal to secure the 27-0 shutout victory. “The defense was amaz-

ing, and I couldn’t be more proud of them for holding that team to a shutout. The offense and special teams came up in big situations and made plays when we needed to pull ahead. It’s a great team win,” said Lakewood Head Coach Dan Teeter. The Lakewood defense played a huge role as they shutout the Cubs, forced them to punt over five times and tallied three turnovers on downs. The biggest performance came from senior defensive end Brenden McClellan as he recorded two sacks and kept pressure on the Cubs’ quarterback. On the other side of the ball the Cougars were led by Jared Taylor, Malik Dotson, Landen Pruitt, Carson Chrisman and Jackson Schultz. Taylor, senior quarterback, proved to be a dual threat with 76 passing yards, 110 rushing yards and a passing touchdown. Dotson, junior running back, was breaking tackles all over the field as he had 100 yards on 10 carries. Pruitt, senior running back, rushed nine times for 52 yards and

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Lakewood’s senior kicker Alan Sepulveda sets the Cougars’ school record with a 44-yard field goal in the second half against the Sedro-Woolley Cubs at Lakewood High School on Sept. 27. scored on a long 30-yard run for the first touchdown of the game. Chrisman, junior receiver, led all receivers with four receptions, 59 yards and a receiving touchdown. Schultz, senior receiver, caught one pass for 10 yards but made the biggest impact on a trick-play pass where he threw for 24 yards and scored a touchdown. Lakewood’s senior kick-

er Alan Sepulveda had the best game of his career. He went three for three on extra points and hit two field goals, one from 33 yards and another from a schoolrecord 44 yards away. The Cougars only have one more home game scheduled for the regular season as they will be taking on the Archbishop Murphy Wildcats on Friday, Oct. 11, at 7 p.m.

High School Fall Sports Marysville Getchell Chargers FOOTBALL

Oct. 4

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Arlington

Away

ArlHS

Oct. 5

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Oak Harbor Everett Meadowdale

Home Away Away

Oct. 3 Archbishop Murphy Oct. 8 Shorecrest *Match begins at 6 p.m.

Away Home

Twilight Invitational

Away

Meet begins at 3:45 p.m.

CdrcrstG

GIRLS SWIM

MGHS Clark MdlHS

Meet begins at 2:45 p.m.

Oct. 3 Shorewood Oct. 8 Archbishop Murphy *Meet begins at 2:30 p.m.

GIRLS SOCCER

Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

Meet begins at 2:45 p.m.

Home Away

MPHS WstCst*

VOLLEYBALL

AMHS* MGHS

Oct. 3

Match begins at 7 p.m.

Archbishop Murphy

Home

Oct. 3 Shorecrest Away Oct. 5 - Twilight Invitational Away *Meet begins at 2:45 p.m.

Oct. 3 Shorewood Oct. 8 Archbishop Murphy *Meet begins at 2:30 p.m.

ct. 2 Oct. 3 Oct. 7

Stanwood Marysville-Pilchuck Shorecrest

Away Home Home

MGHS

GIRLS SOCCER

Oct. 3 Oct. 8

Matches begin at 7:30 p.m.

Mountlake Terrace Meadowdale

Home Away

Oct. 3

Match begins at 7 p.m.

Mountlake Terrace

Away

MlkTerHS

Oct. 4

Home

ArlHS

Oct. 3 Oct. 8

CROSS COUNTRY

ArlHS LynnHS Oct. 5

Meet begins at 2:45 p.m.

Twilight Invitational

MPHS WstCst*

Oct. 3 Cedarcrest Oct. 5 Snohomish Oct. 8 Shorewood *Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

Home Away Away

Away

ArlHS

Oct. 3 Oct. 8

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

Cedarcrest Shorewood

Away Home

Lynden

Away

LHS

Away

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

Blaine Burlington-Edison

Home Away

CdrcstHS M-PHS

Oct. 5

Meet begins at 2:45 p.m.

Twilight Invitational

Away

Home Away

Kuhnle’s Tavern Lake Goodwin Store/Resort Langabeer, McKernan, Bennett & Co. Les Schwab-Marysville Les Schwab-Smokey Point Locals Espresso Marysville Awards Marysville Care Center Marysville Laundry Station Marysville Orthodontics Marysville Travel & Cruise Marysville-Everett Ceramic Tile Maxi’s Chinese Restaurant Mirkwood Public House Mountain View Rehab Mountain Loop Motorcars North County Outlook Noble Palace NW Diesel Pacific Propane

LWHS BEHS KF*

BOYS TENNIS

LWHS BEHSGym Oct. 2 Oct. 4 Oct. 7

CROSS COUNTRY CdrcrstG

Match begins at 7 p.m.

Oct. 3 Blaine Oct. 7 Burlington-Edison *Match beings at 6 p.m.

Matches begin at 4 p.m.

Anacortes Bellingham Sehome

Home Away Away

CdrcrstG

Proud to Support Our Student Athletes Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Clinic Chinook Lumber CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E&E Lumber Edward Jones-Andy Smith Edward Jones-Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Gary Wright Realty Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance H&M Electric Heritage Bank-Marysville Hibulb Cultural Center Honda of Marysville Julie’s Licensing

M-PHS* VetMemSt ShrlnStd

GIRLS SOCCER

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Schedules subject to change. For more info, visit www.wescoathletics.com or www.nwcathletics.com.

7 Lakes Gifts Action Sports Albertson’s-Marysville All Creatures Vet Clinic Altitude Trampoline Park American Distributing Arlington Electric & Solar Arlington Hardware Arlington Muffler & Brake Arlington Pediatric Dentistry Awning Builders A-Z Transmissions Beef Jerky Outlet Big Foot Music Bleachers Grill Bob’s Burgers and Brew Brown’s Plumbing Bud Barton Bundy Carpet C Don Filer Insurance

QuilCeda

VOLLEYBALL

VOLLEYBALL

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Marysville-Getchell

Home

GIRLS SOCCER

FOOTBALL

FOOTBALL

Oct. 4

Stanwood

Matches begin at 7:00 p.m.

Match begins at 3:30 p.m.

Arlington

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Lakewood Cougars

VOLLEYBALL

StanHS ArlHS ArlHS

Home Away

Oct. 4

BOYS TENNIS

Oct. 3

BOYS TENNIS

Hamlin CdrcrstG*

GIRLS SWIM

Meet begins at 2:30 p.m.

Arlington Eagles Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

FOOTBALL

CROSS COUNTRY

CROSS COUNTRY

BOYS TENNIS

Oct. 2 Oct. 3 Oct. 8

Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks

Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pilchuck Rentals Port Gardner Bay Winery Port of Subs-Tulalip Reaction Physical Therapy (Arlington|Smokey Point) Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Riverside Topsoil Roy Robinson S&S Roofing LLC Schaefer Shipman Shaklee Silvana Plumbing Skagit Regional Clinics Sleep Advantage-Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning

Sno-Isle Natural Food Co-op Sonic Burger-Marysville Soroptomist Int’l of Marysville Stanwood Redi-Mix Stilly Auto Parts Stilly Diner Stilly Sand & Gravel Strawberry Lanes Stryker Brothers Tall Guy Small Guy The Creamery The Shop-Arlington The UPS Store-Tulalip Tulalip Tribes Unique Interiors Village Licensing Who’s on First Sports Cards Wild Birds Unlimited

LWHS BHS WCC


Sports

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Marysville swimmers host dual meet

That’s what you’ll find in every issue of

North County Outlook

By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville Getchell and Marysville-Pilchuck girls swim teams hosted a dual meet against the Monroe Bearcats and Mariner Marauders on Sept. 24. The Tomahawks split the competition as they took the loss against the Bearcats, 9475, but grabbed the win over the Marauders, 100-67. The Chargers battled hard throughout the day but were unable to grab a win as they fell to the Bearcats, 106-45, and the Marauders, 80-65. “We have a lot of veterans who are back, and they are able to pass on their knowledge and experiences to the younger girls on the team. It’s very important to have them because swimming is one of those sports where experience is everything, and they’re able to give the younger swimmers pointers on things that they have struggled with themselves,” said Marysville Head Coach Meredith Jenks. Marysville-Pilchuck had a few breakout performances from Katelyn Leary, Maddy Sulya, Cassidy O’Neal. Leary

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October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Fall Bazaar Directory PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Chargers’ Gemma Hodgins stays near the front of the pack during the butterfly leg of the 200-yard medley against the Bearcats and Marauders at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Sept. 24. found a lot of success in her individual events as she placed third in the 200-yard individual medley, 3:32.80, and first in the 100-yard butterfly, 1:05.94. She also took part in the relays as she swam a leg of the third-place 200yard medley relay, 2:35.33, and second-place 400-yard freestyle relay, 4:33.91. Sulya was also part of the 200yard medley relay as well as being the anchor for the 200-yard freestyle relay that placed second, 2:11.11. In her individual events Maddy placed fourth in the 50-yard freestyle, 30.41 seconds, and third in the 100-yard breaststroke with a time of 1:24.64. O’Neal competed in both of

the freestyle relays as well as placing second in the 200yard freestyle, 2:28.01, and third in the 100-yard butterfly, 1:29.03. Kelsey Harris and Devon Keator also came up huge for M-PHS as they took the top two finishes in the one-meter dive with scores of 163.35 and 160.60, respectively. Marysville Getchell's big performances came from Isabella Bennett, Lorelei Pringle and Sophie Alt. Bennett had all of her events finish in the top three as she placed third in the 50-yard freestyle, with a time of 29.94 seconds, and second in the 100-yard backstroke, 1:10.20. Isabella also helped her team to top

three finishes in the secondplace 200-yard medley relay team, 2:25.32, and thirdplace 400-yard freestyle relay, 5:15.26. Pringle was also part of the 200-yard medley relay while also finding success in the 50-yard freestyle with a fifth-place finish, 31.69 seconds, and the 100-yard breaststroke with a fourth-place finish, 1:30.98. Alt did her part in adding to the team score as she placed third in the one-meter dive with a score of 152.35. If you want to support both the Chargers and Tomahawks, their next home meet will be against the Shorewood Thunderbirds on Oct. 3, at 3:15 p.m.

Eagles spike Wildcats By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The Arlington volleyball team battled to keep their undefeated season as they hosted the Archbishop Murphy Wildcats on Sept. 26. Both teams came out fighting for each and every point as neither team was able to pull away early. The Eagles called the first time out in the set as they led 10-9 in the back-and-forth competition. After the time out, the Wildcats managed to put together an 8-5 run in order to secure their first lead of the match, 17-15. This wouldn’t last for long as Arlington came together and went on an impressive 10-3 run to close out the set, 25-20. The second set opened up in a similar way to the first, as each team stayed within a couple of points of each other. After starting the match 3-3, the Eagles began to slowly pull away on a 11-5 run before the Wildcats called their first time out. After the time out, Archbishop Murphy went on a small 3-0 run of their own to get them within three points, 1411. Arlington found their groove once again with the Wildcats closing in as they put together an 11-3 run to end the set 25-14. Arlington found their stride early on in the third set and managed to stay in control throughout the rest of the match. After creating space early, the Eagles closed out the set by a score of 25-14 and took the victory by a match score of 3-0. “We were positive, and we stuck with our plan even when we were struggling with our passing. We’re

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Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County Wednesday, October 2, through Tuesday, October 8

Wednesday, October 2 Sunrise 7:09 am • Sunset 6:46 pm PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Eagles’ senior outside hitter Arianna Bilby splits the Archbishop Murphy front line as she scores in the first set at Arlington High School on Sept. 26.

about to go on our stretch of away matches and we’ll be looking to stay healthy through it. We practice really hard and with being in the thick of school, we need to do everything we can to make sure everyone is good to go,” said Arlington Head Coach Whitney Williams. Arlington’s senior captain and outside hitter Arianna Bilby garnered Player of the Game honors after exploding for 13 kills, eight digs, two blocks and one ace. The Eagles’ frontline controlled the match behind Teagan Sutherland, Sophia Cushman, Reese Talbot and Emily Mekelburg. Sutherland, junior middle blocker, finished with four kills and two blocks. Cushman,

sophomore middle blocker, also had two blocks off her own to go with her three kills. Talbot, senior outside hitter, and Mekelburg, sophomore outside hitter, put up kills with five and four respectively. In the backline Arlington was led by Paige Richards and their two sophomore setters Brookelynn Ramey and Taylor Pederson. Richards, junior libero, kept the Eagles' runs alive with a match-high 12 digs. Ramey and Pederson combined for 22 assists and each had an ace in the match. The Eagles will be traveling for the next couple of weeks but will be back at their home court on Tuesday, Oct. 15, as they host the Everett Seagulls at 7 p.m.

2:22 am 8:43 am 2:46 pm 8:05 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-0.6 ft 10.6 ft 4.0 ft 10.5 ft

Thursday, October 3 Sunrise 7:10 am • Sunset 6:44 pm 3:10 am 9:48 am 3:45 pm 8:49 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-0.7 ft 10.3 ft 5.1 ft 9.8 ft

Friday, October 4 Sunrise 7:12 am • Sunset 6:42 pm 4:00 am 11:01 am 4:59 pm 9:41 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-0.4 ft 10.1 ft 5.8 ft 9.0 ft

Saturday, October 5 Sunrise 7:13 am • Sunset 6:40 pm FIrst Quarter 4:56 am 12:24 pm 6:40 pm 10:45 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

0.1 ft 9.9 ft 6.1 ft 8.2 ft

Sunday, October 6 Sunrise 7:15 am • Sunset 6:38 pm 5:59 am 1:44 pm 8:19 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

0.7 ft 10.0 ft 5.7 ft

Monday, October 7 Sunrise 7:16 am • Sunset 6:35 pm 12:05 am 7:07 am 2:47 pm 9:24 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

7.7 ft 1.1 ft 10.2 ft 5.1 ft

Tuesday, October 8 Sunrise 7:18 am • Sunset 6:33 pm

1:28 am 8:14 am 3:33 pm 10:08 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

7.7 ft 1.4 ft 10.3 ft 4.4 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

Home & Garden

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n WHISTLING GARDENER

The many faces of the genus Viburnum We have a another one that gives us multiple vast palette of plants to choose species to enjoy in our yards. from for our northwest garVi b u r nu m s dens, and in are all shrubs many cases they By Steve Smith that grow well come from the for us here in the same genus. The genus northwest. They can tolPinus for instance includes erate a wide range of soils eastern white, Japanese and are happy in sun or white, red, black, Swiss, shade. They come in evPonderosa, mugo, and so ergreen forms such as Vion and so forth. These are burnum davidii, which has all different species within a distinct tri-divided midthe same genus. Cotoneas- rib and sparkly blue berter is another genus that ries, and Viburnum tinus provides us with at least a ‘Spring Bouquet’, which half dozen different species, repeat blooms throughout from low growing ground the season with red buds covers to larger shrubs. that open to clusters of The genus Viburnum is yet white flowers.

Some Viburnums are semi-evergreen — which simply means that in a mild winter they will keep all their foliage, but in a harsh winter they will be completely deciduous. Viburnum burkwoodii is a good example of a variety that will lose about half of it leaves every winter. For me, I would prefer that it just makes up its mind and either loses them all or keeps them all. Being in a state of indecision drives me nuts. Several Viburnums have deliciously fragrant blooms. The above mentioned burkwoodii has a nice smell, as does the ‘Korean Spice’ Viburnum

— both are early spring bloomers. Fall color is a hallmark for all of the deciduous varieties, with the leaves turning a nice rich burgundy. Also in the fall, many varieties sport very attractive berries from black to blue to yellow-reddish and pink. The flowers on Viburnums are mostly white and grow in clusters. Two exceptions are ‘Mary Milton’, which has “snowballlike” flowers in pink, and ‘Molly Schroeder’ which is also pink but is a “lacecap” form. Probably the most popular white forms are the common snowball bush and a lacecap form

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called ‘Mariesii’ that has layered flowers often confused with dogwoods, it will also re-bloom in the fall. Here are two varieties that caught my eye the other day in the nursery as I was snooping about. Viburnum ‘Brandywine’ — This shrub grows to about 6 feet tall with glossy green oval leaves that turn a burgundy-wine red in the fall. The white flowers in spring produce incredible clusters of multicolored berries later in the summer that are pink to blue and are edible (but probably not very tasty). ‘Brandywine’ is both moisture tolerant and deer resis-

tant (I think all viburnums are deer resistant). Viburnum ‘Sparkler’ — This one struck me because of its brilliant blue berries this time of year. ‘Sparkler’ is a densely branched shrub that can reach 12 to 15 feet tall, thus making it a great choice for a privacy hedge. The dark green, ruffled foliage turns a bright yellow to red in the fall and is accented with clusters of blue-black berries that will delight the birds. Regardless of what variety of Viburnum you might be drawn to, you can find many choices in the garden center this time of year, sporting their fall colors and attractive clusters of berries. Some like ‘Summer Snowflake’, ‘Mariesii’, and ‘Spring Bouquet’ might even be re-blooming. Whatever your pleasure, there is probably a Viburnum that will fit the bill for your garden. Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

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Home & Garden

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

How to protect your wood floors from inclement weather

Wood floors are a worthwhile investment that can improve the beauty and function of just about any room in a home. Even though wood floors are durable, and new protective treatments help seal out many of the things that may have damaged floors in the past, homeowners still need to prioritize protecting their hardwood floors. Certain seasons of the year can be more harsh on wood floors than others. For example, seasons characterized by moisture and precipitation, particularly the early spring, winter and fall, can be hard on wood floors. The experts at ServiceMaster Clean say that cold, snowy days can damage wood floors, and Lumber Liquidators agrees that winter weather can be harsh on flooring. Homeowners need not give up on hardwood if they live in an area that sees all four seasons. They just need to take a few steps to keep floors looking beautiful. “The best thing for hardwood floor is keeping them clean,” said Jeff Petersen, owner of Craftsman Hardwood Flooring in Arlington. He’s owned Craftsman Hardwood Floors for more than 30 years. He encouraged home-

owners to take their shoes off indoors and to invest in area rugs for high-traffic areas. His website, www.craftsmanhardwoodf looring. com, offers a nice guide on floor care and offers the following suggestions: n Floor Finishes — Polyurethane, Swedish finish, water-based Swedish finish are a no-wax, no-oil (soap finish). Clean with a clean cloth using warm water or manufacturer’s recommended cleaner. n Floor mats — Dirttrapping mats near exterior doors to help prevent dirt and grit from getting inside. Keep door mats clean too. n Area rugs — Use area rugs at high spill locations such as the stove, sink and refrigerator. Mats with smooth backing, such as rubber or vinyl, may trap water underneath. Area rugs must be kept off a

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newly finished floor for two weeks and avoid mopping for seven days. n Vacuum wood floors as often as you would carpets. Sweep or dust daily or as needed. Avoid a household dust treatment because it might cause the floor to become slick, dull the finish. Some other general suggestions include: Invest in shoe storage. Wet or snowy boots can create puddles around the house. Have a special mat or tray by the front door where wet shoes can be kept. A nice bench in the entryway makes it easy for residents and guests to remove their shoes until it’s time to go back outside. Clean up the salt. Salt that keeps sidewalks and streets clear of snow and ice inadvertently gets tracked inside a home. Hard chunks of salt can scratch wood

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floors, and, if left to sit, that salt can eventually cause white marks and other stains. Routinely vacuuming and sweeping up salt is necessary to protect wood floors. Use water-wicking mats. Homeowners will probably need a few extra mats See FLOORS on page 9

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Home & Garden

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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How to create a winter-friendly outdoor living space at your home Covering a deck or patio and/or adding a fire feature are two ways to make outdoor living spaces more winter-friendly. For many homeowners, the arrival of fall and winter marks an end to time spent lounging and dining al fresco on the patio. But cold air and rain does not necessarily mean patio furniture must be packed up until flowers bloom anew in spring. In its 2017 Home Design Trends Survey, the American Institute of Architects found that consumers continue to emphasize practical features that expand the functionality of their homes via heavy investment in outdoor living spaces. The survey found that the popularity of outdoor living spaces increased by 72 percent between 2012 and 2017, highlighting just how much homeowners enjoy spending time outdoors. By taking measures to make their outdoor living spaces winterproof, homeowners can enjoy these areas of

FILE PHOTO

There are a variety of things you can do to make your outdoor living space more winter friendly. their homes even more. Homeowners should think about protection from the dreary weather of the Pacific Northwest, such as a roof that should be designed so it meshes with the house. “You want to make it look like it was there from the beginning,” said Jennifer VanderBeken of Vander-

Beken Remodel, which she owns with her husband, Ron. VanderBeken Remodel is a Marysville-based residential remodel business that has completed projects from Mill Creek to Camano Island. Along with the shelter a roof provides comes considering what kind of heat to provide like heating ele-

ments in the roof or some kind of fireplace. She said it’s important to decide needs for the outdoor space. Is it someplace to sit around and eat? Maybe watch the game? Or how about cooking? “I love the idea of a roof with some kind of heat,”

See OUTDOOR on page 9

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Home & Garden

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FLOORS

Continued from page 7

around to tame errant drips and wipe shoes. Any entrance that might be used by people or pets should be protected. Try to avoid petroleum-based, rubberbacked mats, as they could discolor the wood floor. Control humidity indoors. Cold, dry air in a home can be problematic because the moisture in the wood can eventually evaporate into the air. The heat will suck that moisture from the flooring, causing it to shrink, creak and splinter and become more brittle. Think about investing in an in-line humidifier for the home’s HVAC system that can keep a moderate amount of humid-

OUTDOOR

Continued from page 8

VanderBeken said. She said people can enjoy the fresh air and stay warm at the same time. Plant the right trees. Coniferous trees prevent wind, which can be especially harsh in winter. Homeowners who are unsure about which direction wind typically comes from can consult a landscape architect to determine where to plant the trees to ensure they’re most effective. Trees can also provide a buffer from the weather and add privacy. Fire up the patio. A firepit or fireplace can warm up an outdoor living area, making such a space warm and cozy even on a cold winter night. A patio with a built-in firepit can cost a pretty penny, but such an addition can withstand winter weather better than a standalone firepit, which might be vulnerable to being tipped over by winter winds. Install lighting. The sun sets early in winter, so homeowners won’t be able to rely on natural light to illuminate their outdoor living spaces well into the evening like they do in summer. Heat lamps can be used to both warm and illuminate a space, serving dual, budget-friendly functions. VanderBeken noted homeowners should have enough storage for the stuff people need to use their outdoor space year-round. She stressed the need to think about the project before moving forward and to get a remodel company involved. Having a remodel company take over during the middle of a project could prove costly. “It’s really important to

ity in the home. Hardwood floorboards are installed to accommodate minor temperature and humidity fluctuations. This is typically a range of between 60 and 80 degrees F with a relative humidity range of 35 to 55 percent, advises ServiceMaster. Use the right cleaning products. Avoid excessive water to clean wood floors, and select soaps that are specially designed for wood flooring. Consult with the flooring manufacturer for a list of detergents that are safe to use. In general, homeowners should also be aware of water leaks from toilets and dishwashers that could lead to damage of their hardwood floors. He added that owners overwatering their plants can cause problems think it through,” VanderBeken said. “We always encourage people to let us work with them from the beginning.” With the right adjust-

Art of the Frame by Carole Custom Framing

FILE {PHOTO

too. It can lead to condensation and eventually rot the wood — especially if they don’t move plants on the floor. “A lot of people don’t ments, outdoor living spaces can be enjoyed throughout winter. For more information, go to www.vanderbekenremodel.com.

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October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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10

Health

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n Emily’s Wellness Wisdom

How you can rev up your metabolism Your metaboSleep: Nothlism is a tricky ing in the body works properly thing. Many people I meet tell me when we aren't their metabolism getting enough is "slow" or "brosleep or enough ken," which for quality sleep. During sleep, your many is true as years of poor yo-yo body is repairing everything and relow-calorie dieting can cause muscle placing cells that loss. When we are weak or damEmily Countryman aged so they can lose muscle, then perform better the gain the weight back after the yo-yo diet is over, we next day. only gain fat. Thus, we have just reGetting Enough Nutrition: It's placed muscle with fat in our body not just about the calories you are and have a higher body fat percent- consuming, it's about getting the age, which leads to a slower metab- right balance. If you are trying to olism. So yes, it's "broken" but the lose weight and cutting calories, good news is, it can be fixed. but not getting enough nutrition, To get your metabolism run- your muscle mass will be reduced. ning back at full speed, try these Eat plenty of clean protein that packs a nutrition punch like salmeasy tips:

on, grass-fed beef or plant-based proteins like a pea protein. Getting in enough vitamins and minerals is essential so eat plenty of nutrientrich veggies such as kale, spinach, broccoli, and Brussel sprouts. The quality of your calories matter as much as the quantity. If you feel like your metabolism isn’t up to speed, try eating more. Yes, it seems counter-intuitive if you are trying to lose weight, but under-eating can slow metabolism way down. Figure out what your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) is from a simple online calculator. This is based on age, weight, and gender. Then factor in your activity level. Track your food intake for a few days, and if you aren't hitting your target amount, increase your intake with healthy proteins, nuts, and produce. If you are getting in your full caloric amount for a few

days with nutritious foods, your metabolism should rev right back up. Building Muscle Mass: As we age, our muscle mass is naturally reduced. However, with the right habits, we can reverse this and keep the muscle we have and continue to build. Small habits like lifting weights a few minutes each day, taking the stairs and parking a little further away can help maintain the muscles we have and help to build on them. Use it or lose it. Have your H2O and Coffee too: Drinking a large glass of cold water first thing in the morning as well as staying hydrated all day helps get your metabolism going. When we are dehydrated, metabolism slows down. It's said that cold water might spike metabolism for an hour after drinking it. The same is true for coffee; the caffeine will raise metabolism, just keep in

mind it's dehydrating, so keep up the H2O. Our metabolism slows down about 2-3% per decade as soon as we hit 20. So if you are in your 50's it may be close to 10% slower than it was at 20. This would be why so many think it's stopped working or broken. Doing all of these easy tips suggested can get it back to working order in no time, and if you have a few stubborn pounds you have wanted to lose, a properly functioning metabolism will take care of that in no time.

Emily Countryman is a boardcertified health coach and owner of Ideal Wellness located at 2639 172nd St. NE Suite 104 in Smokey Point/Marysville. She can be reached online at www.idealwellness.com or info@idealwellness. com.

First case of lung illness in Snohomish County associated with vaping The Snohomish Health District has identified the first case of vaping-related lung illness in a Snohomish County resident. A female in her twenties was admitted to a Snohomish County hospital in August with shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. The patient has since been released and is recovering. The patient reported vaping products that were purchased from legal retailers, and they did not appear to have been tampered with or modified.   Snohomish Health District staff are working to gather any additional information and samples of substances that may have contributed to the patient’s illness. The investigation into the specific vaping devices and products used is ongoing. This is the first recognized case in Snohomish County detected under heightened surveillance stemming from the nationwide outbreak of vaping-associated lung illnesses. However, it is likely that other cases occurred prior to this one but were not recognized as such. The relatedness of this case to the larger national outbreak is uncertain, as is the cause (or causes) of that outbreak. This case brings the current total to six vaping-related lung illnesses in Washington state. As of Sept. 19, 530 cases of lung illness associated with the use of ecigarette products have been reported to CDC from 38 states and one U.S. territory. Seven deaths have been confirmed.  All patients have a reported history of e-cigarette or vapor product use, and the cause appears to not be an infectious contaminant (i.e., it is not a germ). While no other cause has been determined as of yet, it is

conceivable that multiple factors or causes may be at play. Meanwhile, this outbreak highlights health care providers’ and public health officials’ ongoing concern over the safety of using ecigarettes and related vaping materials.

“Those who don’t vape shouldn’t start, and those who do vape should strongly consider quitting,” said Dr. Chris Spitters, interim health officer for the Snohomish Health District. “The safety of these products is uncertain at best, and their

contents are not regulated by consumer protection agencies. Just because it might be less hazardous than inhaling burning tobacco leaves doesn’t mean that it is safe.” People that use vape or THC products should seek medical attention if they

experience coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, fever, nausea or fatigue. Healthcare providers should also contact the Snohomish Health District at 425339-5278 to report cases of unexplained lung disease in people who have used e-cig-

arettes or vaped in the past 90 days. If you need help quitting tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, you can contact your doctor or call the Quitline at 1-800-QUIT-NOW for access to safe and proven methods.

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October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Coloring Contest

Win Tickets to Mickey’s Search Party at Angel of the Winds Arena Thursday November 7th ONLY

NAME:___________________________________________________________________ AGE: _________________ ADDRESS:_______________________________________________________________________________________ CITY: ___________________________________________________ STATE: ________ ZIP: ____________________ PARENT/GUARDIAN’S NAME: _________________________________________________________________________ PARENT/GUARDIAN’S HOME PHONE: _________________________________________________________________

Send your completed entry form to: Coloring Contest North County Outlook

Or hand deliver to: North County Outlook

1331 State Avenue, Suite A | Marysville, WA 98270

PO Box 39 | Marysville, WA 98270 Winners must exchange vouchers for actual tickets at: Angel of the Winds Arena Box Office, (425) 322-2600 2000 Hewitt Avenue, Suite 200, Everett 98201. Subject to availability. Contest open to children ages 4-11. Categories of competition are age 4-7, 8-9 and 10-11. Limit one entry per child. Entries must be received by Friday October 11, 2019 to be eligible to win. All entries become property of the North County Outlook and will be considered property of this newspaper to print. Decision of judges is final. Employees of this newspaper and their families are not eligible to enter.

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Communities

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Schaffler, Kalab named Students of the Month By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Mar ysv i l le-Pi lchuck High School seniors Aaron Kalab and Maggie Schaffler were named as the September Students of the Month for their work in their community and at their school. The award is given by the Marysville Kiwanis and Soroptimists clubs each month to one boy and one girl to recognize local students. Maggie Schaffler was recognized for her many leadership positions at the school and her volunteer efforts. She has a 4.0 GPA currently with a course load that includes classes such as AP Calculus, AP Composition and Honors English I and II. At Marysville-Pilchuck

BALLEW Continued from page 1

actually at a renovated chicken coop,” said Ballew. “There were some days it got so hot in there that I had to send some people home,” he said. He wrote on a typewriter at first. “I bought my own Macintosh to work on,” which was shared between three employees before it broke down, after which the city bought the department some computers. The City Council eventually authorized the purchase of a former real estate office, which was moved to Jennings Park where it still stands today.

High School Maggie has held many positions throughout the last four years to help lead the school. This includes being a freshman class officer, a sophomore class officer and the 2017 ASB Recognition Chair. Maggie has also been the National Honors Society president at the school, a national honors club that is focused on community service. Throughout her community Maggie has also been involved in a number of volunteer efforts. She has been a volunteer for the last three years in the Big Buddy Program at Marysville’s Kellogg Marsh Elementary where she helped students there. For the last three years

she has also been part of the Lil Tommie Cheer camp at her school as well. Through the You Gotta Love This Place program she has helped clean up local schools as well. Athletically, Maggie has been a varsity cheerleader and a varsity tennis player. She is a two-time qualifier for the National Cheerleaders Association AllAmerican Team and a NCA All-American Team Nominee. Aaron Kalab was honored for his schoolwork and his athletics. Throughout the last few years Aaron has been both the JV basketball captain and the varsity basketball captain. In 2017 he received the Most Improved Award

and Aaron has received many other awards for his basketball team participation including the WIAA Academic Student Athlete Award, the Most Inspirational Award in 2018 and 2019, the Captain’s Award in 2019 and the Coach’s Award in 2019. Aaron also does a lot of volunteering around basketball, including being a referee and coach at Hoops for Hope, supporting the M-PHS basketball camp and helping with a basketball camp in Italy. He also plays tennis for the school. He was named First Team All-Wesco and the Most Valuable Player in 2018. Academically, Aaron has maintained a 4.0 GPA while taking classes such as AP

Throughout the years Ballew’s department has brought a number of new programs to the city. “He’s brought a lot to the community like Touch A Truck, the holiday parade, and the Tour of Lights,” said Tom King, City Council member and frequent Kiwanis Club and Strawberry Festival volunteer. Ballew said he was happy with all the recreation offerings he was able to provide. “I’m proud of all those nice, little family outings we provide,” he said. “And the fact that we’ve kept them free or very low-cost and affordable.”

Events like the outdoor movie nights have become very popular and Ballew said he was happy to work with local service clubs like the Soroptimists and Kiwanis clubs. “On behalf of the Strawberry Festival, he’s done a lot to help us over the years as well,” said King. Ballew said he was also proud of events like Healthy Communities Day which promotes health options in the city. “We were looking at our community’s health and what we could do about that,” he said. Ballew is also excited about two projects that are

still continuing after his departure. “I can’t wait to see the development of the Ebey Waterfront Park,” he said. The city of Marysville acquired the property for Mother Nature’s Window and Ballew said he is also excited about seeing that turning into a park eventually. Locals said that they will miss Ballew. “He’s been a real asset to the community,” said King. “He’s always been personally involved with the events here, always helping to set them up, which I’ve always appreciated,” he said.

OCTOBER

Maggie Schaffler

COURTESY PHOTO

Composition, AP Calculus and AP Comparative Politics. In 2019 he was named Math Student of the Year. At M-PHS Aaron has been an ASB Ambassador, ASB Officer and a sophomore class representative. Throughout his community he has helped people

King also said he appreciated how much Ballew listens. “He always had an open-door policy. If you had an idea he would listen to what you had to say and if he thought it was viable he would run with it,” he said. Hirashima appreciated how much Ballew helped the city grow. “In terms of the community he just embodies the Marysville spirit,” she said. “I will miss his enthusiasm and creativity, and his desire to reach new heights with this community,” she said.

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by collecting and delivering presents for Miracle on State Street, being a church camp counselor and counting and collecting food for the local food bank. Aaron wants to go to the United States Military Academy after graduating high school.

____

In terms of the community he just embodies the Marysville spirit.

____

Gloria Hirashima

Ballew is moving to La Conner, Wash., where he plans to do traveling and boating. “Today’s my last day and I’m going to miss the people that are here,” he said. Longtime Marysville parks employee and former assistant director Tara Mizell will step into the role of director of Marysville’s Parks, Culture and Recreation Department. “He did a fantastic job of developing his team,” said Hirashima. “I’m really pleased with where the department is headed as well,” said Ballew. “It’s been a blessed career. And everyone I work with here has been responsible for our successes."

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Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send nformation to: North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or email the information to: editor@northcountyoutlook.com.

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Tulalip Tribes, MSD and city proclaim Unity and Wellness Month

City of Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and the City Council were pleased to join the Tulalip Tribes and Marysville School District in proclaiming October as Unity and Wellness Month. It’s important that we all come together as a community to promote the awareness of sound mental health and raise awareness around the prevention of domestic violence, substance abuse, bullying and suicide. In support of that goal, the Marysville Police Department and its School Resource Officers continue to bring anti-bullying and suicide prevention programs to our middle schools and high schools. We are pleased to welcome back to the Marysville Tulalip community Marc Mero, a nationally acclaimed speaker on these topics who wowed a standing-room-only public audience when he first came here two years ago. Mero is a former WWE wrestling champion and founder of Champion of Choices, a nonprofit organization that inspires youth to live healthy, successful lives by making positive choices. The public is invited to a community night with Mark Mero at 7 p.m., Oct. 10, at Marysville-Pilchuck High School Auditorium. Mero will also be visiting middle and high schools in

Marysville and Lakewood that week. Tulalip Tribes The Tulalip Board of Directors is very supportive and unanimously voted to adopt the month of October as Unity Month for the fourth consecutive year. This partnership between the Tribe, City of Marysville and the Marysville School District is a testimony to our continued effort to spread the word of connectedness with all of our children and adults to gain awareness of issues that impact us all. This year we continue to focus on suicide prevention through “Life is Sacred” week, week two is domestic violence prevention “Love is Respect”, week three is bullying prevention “Kindness Matters” and lastly week four is substance abuse prevention; “Red Ribbon Week”. Be on the lookout for events and ways for community participation, together we are better. Marysville School District We are proud to partner with The Tulalip Tribes naming the month of October Unity and Wellness month by way of an official Board of Directors resolution and are pleased that the City of Marysville has joined this year. The safety, health, and social-emotional well-being of each student served

in the Marysville School District is our top priority. Unity and Wellness Month during October provides an opportunity for our school district and the Marysville and Tulalip community to raise awareness around bullying, suicide, and substance abuse prevention, and domestic violence. Together, we want to show our youth the importance of respecting one another, showing care and kindness, making healthy choices, avoiding risky behaviors, and being drug- and alcohol-free. We also want to encourage our students if they “see something — say something”. Tell a trusted adult if you hear or see a friend in need of help or support. We are so proud of our students who have reported when they hear or see someone in need of help. They are making a positive difference in the lives of others. We hope you will join us in support of our youth and our combined efforts to create a healthy Marysville and Tulalip community for all to live, learn, play, and grow. This monthly column is jointly prepared by the Tulalip Tribes, City of Marysville and Marysville School District about topics of interest to the Marysville Tulalip community.

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Our Favorite Quotes "Consult not your fears but your hopes and your dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you tried and failed in, but what is still possible for you to do." Author ­— Pope John XXIII Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

&

RAVE RAVE: After witnessing a terrible accident on Firetrail Road on 9/24/2019, I would like to commend our Fire Department, Police, and Medics for their professional aid in a very difficult situation. This needs to be remembered the next time a levy comes up so we can support our emergency responders. RAVE: I want to thank the city of Arlington for putting on the annual Com-

munity Airport Day last weekend. It's great that the community has this opportunity to visit the airport and learn about aviation. I also want to extend a special Thank You to all the pilots who volunteered their time to provide free flights to the kids.

RAVE: Thanks to the city of Marysville for putting on the Princess and Pixie Dust Perfect Party. My daughter and I had a wonderful time.

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North County Outlook is published every Wednesday and mailed direct to households and businesses in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address below. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher. News Deadline: Friday 5PM before publication editor@northcountyoutlook.com

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Weekly Puzzles Fun by the Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. See answers on page 14

Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Staff Writers .....Christopher Andersson, Andrew Hines Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson Directory Ad Sales ..............................................Leslie Buell Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson Contributing Writers .......Steve Smith, The Tulalip Chefs

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Communities

October 2, 2019 - October 8, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3, beginning at 3 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

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www.northcountyoutlook.com October 2 - October 8 Family Chicken Dinner: The Stillaguamish Senior Center will be having it Family Chicken Dinner on Oct. 6 and Nov. 3 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Stillagumaish Senior Center. The dinner includes roaster chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, coleslaw, rool, vegetables and dessert. Cost for the dinner is $8 for se-

niors, $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 years and younger. There will be live entertainment by local musicians. Please bring canned goods for the food bank. The Stillaguamish Senior Center is at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd. Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs and creative activities that prepare young minds for

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the adventures of reading. For ages 3-5. Caregiver required. Held on Wednesdays, Oct. 2-30, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Teen Tech - Spooktacular Minecraft Build Challenge: Think you've got good Minecraft building skills? Come challenge your fellow gamers with a spooky good build and compete for the grand prize. For students grades 6 and up. Please preregister. Spaces are limited; please register to guarantee your computer space. Held Thursday, Oct.

Craft Fair: Glenwood Mobile Estate’s Annual Craft Fair will be Saturday, Oct. 5, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Clubhouse at 5900 64th St. NE (across from the YMCA). There will be homemade items for autumn, Thanksgiving decor and Christmas gifting by the talented and creative residents and invited vendors. There will also be a luncheon fundraiser of potato salad, all-beef hot dogs, and soft drinks or coffee. Cash only. Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories, music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 19 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Held on Mondays, Oct. 7, 21, 28, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Write Now - Promotions and Publicity for the New Author: Join us for the first of two Write Now classes teaching the basics of selfpromotion and marketing for authors. Registration is

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encouraged. Presented by Jaym Gates, author, editor, publisher and the former communications director for the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Held Monday, Oct. 7, 6-7:30 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Friends of the Arlington Library Book Sale: Great books available at bargain prices. Something for everyone. Proceeds support the Arlington Library. Held Tuesday, Oct. 8, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Wednesday, Oct. 9, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

COMING EVENTS Friends of the Arlington Library Meeting: Guests and new members are welcome to join the generous folks who help raise funds for library programs. Held in the Stillaguamish Conference Room at 154 W. Cox Ave. Held Wednesday, Oct. , beginning at 3 p.m. Brews and Brains - Trivia at the Mirkwood: Join your Arlington librarians for trivia night at the Mirkwood Public House, 117 E. Division St. Compete for prizes in teams of up to 6 players over three rounds. All ages are welcome in the venue. Held Thursday, Oct. 1, 7-8:15 p.m.

ONGOING EVENTS Learn to Square Dance: Come learn to Square Dance, held on Mondays, from 7-9 p.m. at the Totem Middle School Cafeteria, 1605 7th St. NE, Marysville. Get healthy and make new friends dancing to modern upbeat music! No experience or partner is necessary. Experienced dancers will be there to partner and assist

ATTENTION: OXYGEN USERS. Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed lowest prices. Call the Oxygen Concentrator store: 844-495-7230.

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in class. Dress is casual and the first lesson is free. For more information, call Eric or Cindy at 425-334-4374 or email squaredancelessons@gmail.com. Visit their website at www.happyhoppers.org.

Binky Patrol: Binky Patrol, which meets at a private home in Marysville, provides quilts and afghans to Snohomish County infants and children who need comfort.Volunteer knitters, quilters and crocheters are needed, as well as donations of fabric, batting, thread or money to buy sewing supplies. In particular, the group is looking for volunteers interested in helping make quilts. All levels of experience are welcome. For more information: call Ernalee Munday at 360-6597198.

Stillaguamish Senior Center: The Stillaquamish Senior Center at Smokey Point is looking for participants to join them in the following activities whether you are a member or not. Volunteers always needed. Mah Jong - Mondays, 1-4 p.m.; Bingo - Tuesdays  and Fridays;  Cribbage - Tuesdays, 1-4 p.m.; Popcorn and movie - Wednesdays, 12:45 p.m.; Stamp and Scrap - 1st & 3rd Thurs 10 - 1 Karaoke - 1st & 3rd Thursdays, 1-3 p.m.; Bunco - 2nd Thursday, 1-4 p.m.; and Jam Session 2nd & 4th Thursdays, 1-3 p.m. Call the Stillaguamish Senior Center for more details at 360-653-4551.

Assistance for veterans: Military Veterans seeking help with the VA may contact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will return your call. Post 178 meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.”

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partment and the fire department,” said Banfield. The event is also known for the free flights from the EAA Young Eagles available to those ages 8 to 17. “I love to see all the little ones and they’re so fascinated by all the airplanes. It’s so cool to introduce them to flight,” said Banfield. Ron Penix brought his granddaughter to the event for her first flight. “This is fantastic that they put this on and go through all the trouble and expense to share their love of flying with the kids,” he said. These days planes and airports are more locked behind security, said Banfield, so kids don’t get to experience aviation like they used to. “People don’t get to be up close and personal to planes anymore. My generation was just able to walk into the airport, watch the airplanes take off and land. Pilots would take you into the cockpit. Now with all the security rules you can’t do that anymore,” Banfield said.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Emily Sompro gets ready for her free flight at Arlington’s Community Airport Day on Sept. 28.

“For kids to be able to be up close to the planes, get to fly and touch the planes is fantastic,” she said. The free flights are primarily provided by pilots from the region. “The support we have from all the local pilots is great,” said Banfield. “They donate their time,

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they donate their fuel and they do this out of the love of flying,” she said. Banfield said the airport staff and city staff appreciate everyone who helps with the event. “Thank you everyone who came out to help and everyone who came out to enjoy,” she said.

Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: SUZAN COLLINS MIDDLETON, Deceased., NO. 19-4-01547-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: October 2, 2019. Personal Representative: Anna Mae Collins Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01547-31.

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Princesses come to Marysville Opera House By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville families and children got to meet princesses at the city's third annual Princess and Pixie Dust Perfect Party on Sept. 29. The event put on by the city of Marysville brings princesses to the downtown Marysville Opera House. "This event is all about the princesses. We use every floor of the Opera House and each floor is decorated specifically for that princess," said Andrea Kingsford, recreation coordinator with the city's Parks, Culture and Recreation Department. "Every year we bring in different princesses so the kids will have an opportunity to meet their favorite,"

Kingsford said. There are also treats and arts and crafts throughout the event for families to enjoy that match the theme of each floor. "We end the event with a giant dance where the princesses all dance on the stage and the dance floor," said Kingsford. The event expanded to two sessions last year and continues to be popular. "It's going amazing. We were sold out with the first session and had so many little happy princesses," said Kingsford. Many families returned to the event after having been to it before. For local parent Christina Nichols and her daughter, it was their second time at the event. "The lines are not long at

all. It's cost effective. I like how they use every level and that they get to talk to all the princesses," she said. Local parents Mandy Ganem and Courtney Rafferty also agreed the event was fun last year. "We loved it enough last year to come back," said Ganem. "I think the princesses were fun and it was fun to interact with them and do all the arts and crafts. It's way more decorated this year than last year that I remember. It's just fun to dress and come out," said Rafferty. Many of the children came dressed up as their favorite princess. "I love seeing how all the dresses come in and seeing how they connect with a certain princess," said Kingsford.

"I think that there are lots of little princesses out there and we wanted to make an event where they can dress up. We had a little prince too, boys and girls are dressing up and getting to feel very special," she said. Kingsford said she enjoys watching the children get to meet some of the princesses that they connect with. "There are families that know certain princess songs by heart and the little ones love to be on the stage and singing at the top of their lungs," she said. The venue is also good for the Princess and Pixie Dust theme, she said. "You feel elegant in the Opera House. It has a very special feel." She wanted to thank the local businesses who supported the event including Reece Construction, Lexar

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Melia Hegr, left, poses for a photo with one of the princesses from business Enchanting Events at the city of Marysville's Princess and Pixie Dust Perfect Party on Sept. 29. Homes and Real Estate Rock Stars. "It's sponsors like that

who help keep these events affordable and possible for us to do," she said.

Profile for The North County Outlook

Oct. 2, 2019 North County Outlook  

Oct. 2, 2019 North County Outlook  

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