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Real People. Real Life.

P.O. BOX 39 n MARYSVILLE, WA 98270

www.northcountyoutlook.com Vol. 13 No. 01 n September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Students return to local schools By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington Drag Strip Reunion and Car Show attendees Gary Gilfilen, left, and Tim Knibbe talk about Gilfilen's truck at the show on Sept. 7.

Cars on display at Drag Strip Reunion By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Dragsters and other cars were displayed at the Arlington Airport Field as part of the annual Drag Strip Reunion and Car Show on Sept. 7. The 16th year of the

show brought people down to look and talk about cars. "It's going great and it's not raining," said Bill Kinney, one of the main organizers of the event. "We're getting close to 500 cars now." See REUNION on page 2

Summer break is officially over as local schools welcomed back their students for the next year of instruction on Sept. 4. Students said they were nervous and excited to start a new school year. “I’m pretty excited for being a junior. I’m almost done with high school,” said Cheyenne Moog, an 11th grader at Marysville Getchell High School. “I'm looking forward to my new teachers and seeing all my friends again,” she said. Arlington parent Sarah Behrman said that her children were excited to get started again. “They were up early and raring to go,” she said. Parents also had mixed feelings about dropping off their students for another year. “It’s a little bit bittersweet. He’s heading upstairs See SCHOOLS on page 7

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington parent Sarah Behrman, right, walks to Pioneer Elementary with her children Madison Behrman, center, and Connor Behrman during this year’s first day of school on Sept. 4.

Community enjoys Arlington's Harvest Fest By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Bill Thomas, right, tries some jelly from BB's Custom Creations, owned by Barbara Barr, left, during the Arlington Harvest Fest on Sept. 7.

Local Arlington vendors, food trucks and community members gathered for the Arlington Harvest Fest held on Sept. 7. This is the second year that vendors from the Arlington Farmers Market and food trucks have gathered in the evening to put on an end of summer event. The Harvest Fest is organized by the Stilly Valley Chamber of Commerce. "It's going fabulous. We have a huge farmers market, a bunch of food trucks and the crowd is really starting to pick up," said

Jennifer Egger, executive director of the chamber. The Harvest Fest is meant to provide a community event for the end of summer where people can gather and have fun, said Egger. "This is a great way for us to wrap up the summer and all the fun activities that we have here. We just wanted there to be one more opportunity for the community to get together, eat some great food, hang out and check out some of our local breweries."

See FEST on page 2

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Local News

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

s ’ h a e L eads L Check out these upcoming local events!

SEPTEMBER 22

Washington State Fair Now through September 22 (Closed Tuesdays & Sept. 4) Hours Vary Washington State Fair Events Center, Puyallup www.thefair.com

12

NWB Pop-Up @ Snohomish Farmer’s Market September 12, 3pm - 7pm Cedar and Pearl, Snohomish Facebook.com/snohomishfarmersmarket

12

Disaster Movie Night: Twister September 12, doors open 6pm Marysville Opera House marysvillewa.gov

13

‘Glow Skate Party’ at Skagit Skate September 13, 7pm - 10pm Skagit Skate, Burlington skagitskate.com

14

Mount Vernon Farmer’s Market September 14, 9am - 2pm Riverwalk Park, Mount Vernon mountvernonfarmersmarket.com

14

Art in Legion Park September 14, 10am - 6pm September 15, 10am - 4pm Legion Park, Arlington arlingtonartscouncil.net

14 September 14, 10am - 1pm Touch-A-Truck

Asbery Field, Marysville marysvillewa.gov

15

NW Viking Festival September 15, 9am - 4pm Sauk-Suiattle Powwow Grounds, Darrington norsebynorthwest.org

FEST Continued from page 1

Local vendors sold a variety of items including honey, flowers, jellies, pastries and artwork. Attendee Bill Thomas said his wife is one of the vendors and he is enjoying the event. "I'm having a good time," he said. Barbara Barr, owner of BB's Custom Creations, said she has been able to talk to a lot of potential customers at the Harvest Fest. "It's been very good. I have had a lot of success here. There is a good mix of people coming down here," she said. Local bands Kings of Ha-

REUNION Continued from page 1

Many of the cars at the show participated in the races that were held at the Arlington Airport in the '60s. "I love the history part," said Kinney. Because of that the show has a lot of dragsters and racing cars, in addition to

waii and Shameless Hussy played at the Legion Park stage during the event. Local Theresa Santos said she wanted to come down and see the event because of the opportunity to listen to the music. "Someone told me Shameless Hussy was playing," she said. "We've been wanting to come see them when they play at the Mirkwood [Public House], but haven't yet." A beer garden and a food truck provided refreshments and dinner for many at the event. Egger said that the event is meant to be a familyfriendly way to end the summer. She said it was good just the standard variety of cars. "People like the mix of race cars and every other car. You can't go to a regular show and see the drag cars. Throughout the day they'll fire them up and you can smell the nitro methane," said Kinney. Many people come down because they are car enthusiasts. "So far I love it. We're from Bellingham and we

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Theresa Santos, left, and Mike Santos look at one of the vendors at the Arlington Harvest Fest on Sept. 7. to provide Arlington locals a place to come to. "I think that the people in our community love any excuse to get together and hang out. When you throw in good music and good

decided to come down and check this one out," said attendee Don Ligocki. He said he has cars from 1961, 1962 and 1963. "I only need one more to complete the early '60s," he said. Attendee Kim Thornadtsson said she has loved cars since she was a teenager. "I had a Chevy '63 when I was in my twenties, an Impala Super Sport. Loved it, but life got in the way and it had to go," she said. "My poor husband had to listen to the sad story of the lost '63, so for my 63rd birthday he bought me one." Attendee Gary Gilfilen said he enjoys coming to the Arlington show. ""I think it's a great car show … I've been showing cars since I was 19, a little over 40 years," he said. "You get to talk to the nice people and I get to tell the same story many

food then that's a winner," she said. More information about the Stilly Valley Chamber of Commerce and their events is available at stillvalleychamber.com.

____

People like the mix of race cars and every other car. You can't go to a regular show and see the drag cars. Throughout the day they'll fire them up and you can smell the nitro methane.

____

Bill Kinney

times," he said. This year featured a memorial ceremony for frequent car show participant Jim Green. "His granddaughter is going to ride in with his car. They're going to push it through the crowd," said Kinney. The event is run by volunteers and is meant as a fundraiser for local organizations. "Nobody keeps any money off this. Obviously there's a few expenses, such as renting the field," said Kinney. Kinney started the event as way to help the local Arlington Boys & Girls Club. "I started it 16 years ago with Jim Howell, who left us a couple of years ago, as a fundraiser for the Arlington Boys & Girls Club. We're getting close to $150,000 we've donated to the club and other charities throughout the years," he said.

Share your news! Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send your information to North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or e-mail the information to: editor@northcounty-outlook.com.

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Communities

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September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

Eagle Scout project helps Strawberry Festival By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Jeff Thomas is Marysville's new Community Development Director.

Marysville welcomes new Community Development Director Welcome to Jeff Thomas, Marysville's new Community Development Director. Thomas previously was Community Development Director for the cities of Sammamish and Bellingham, and has private and public sector planning experience. "We believe Jeff will be an amazing leader for the department," Chief Administrative Officer Gloria Hirashima said. "The city is poised for continued growth and we need strong leadership to guide complex land use decisions, planning and public policy." Thomas said, “Coming to Marysville is a great opportunity to help the city implement a lot of great planning work already underway.” As the second largest city in Snohomish County and one of the fastest growing cities in the state, Marysville is planning for continued growth. Today Marysville has about 70,000 residents and is projected to add another 19,000 by 2035 with the need to accommodate homes and city services for new residents. In addition, city priorities for economic development include the attraction of new businesses to the Cascade Industrial Center in north Marysville and the redevelopment of the city’s Ebey Waterfront area. Thomas has been on the job in Marysville since Aug. 12. He replaces Dave Koenig, who retired in June after serving four years with the city. Thomas earned a Master of Public Administration from Seattle University and a bachelor’s degree in Geography from University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

Local Eagle Scout Lee Hall built and installed multiple shelves for the new Strawberry Festival office in downtown Marysville for his Eagle Scout project this summer. “I built three shelves for the Strawberry Festival to help with their storage,” said Hall. Hall said he talked to Strawberry Festival volunteers to find out what he could do to help. “I came here and gave them some calls and they said they could use some shelves so I got to work,” he said. The large shelves help to store a lot of the materials that festival volunteers keep between festivals. They were built from scratch by Hall and his troop and took about a

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Real People. Real Life.

month and half to finish. “I went to E&E Lumber and I got the supplies. I got them for a very good deal because I talked about how it was for an Eagle Scout project,” he said. Hall had a lot of help from his fellow Scouts and family members. “I got tons of support,” he said. “My dad, mom, sisters and my entire troop.” He said he enjoyed helping to build the shelves with his fellow Scouts. Eagle Scout projects are meant to be collaborative to help show Scouts how to help the community. “They helped screw down the plywood and sand the entire thing,” and helped to make sure that they were stable and able to hold a good amount of weight. “Three of us could stand on top of the shelf and it wouldn’t fall down,” he said. Hall’s fellow Scouts also

helped to move the shelves to the Strawberry Festival office. “We had one 10-foot trailer and it just barely fit in there,” with about half an inch of leeway, Hall said. “We moved each one individually to here and brought them to this spot,” he said. Each shelf weighed about 400 pounds, so it wasn’t an easy task. “We moved them with brute force. We had about six kids and two adults,” said Hall. Hall said he has been to the Strawberry Festival and their parade many times and wanted to give back to the community by helping them. “I like everyone’s attitude and the tone of the parade. Everyone’s very friendly,” he said. “Strawberry Festival is very important to this com-

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville Eagle Scout and Marysville-Pilchuck High School student Lee Hall in front of the shelves he built for the Marysville Strawberry Festival offices. munity so I thought I would help them out,” he said. Overall, Hall said he enjoyed being able to help the local organization out. “I liked being able to

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help out the community,” he said. “It was a lot of fun being hands on and knowing I can build these kind of things if I need to,” he said.


4

Sports

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Chargers fall to Shorecrest 14-12 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville Getchell football team opened their season with a matchup against the Shorecrest Scots on Sept. 6. The Scots received the

kickoff and began marching down the field as the Chargers started to slow down their run. However, after only gaining a few yards in back-to-back attempts, Shorecrest took a shot over the top and were taken down

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Josiah Koellmer, Chargers’ junior quarterback, drops back and looks to pass late in the game against Shorecrest at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Sept. 6.

on the one-yard line. After scoring within the first four minutes of the game, the Scots were up 7-0. Marysville Getchell couldn’t get their offense going and were forced to punt shortly after. Before the end of the quarter, Shorecrest scored once again with a run to lead 140. Through the rest of the half the Chargers defense caught fire, forcing two turnovers and keeping the Scots at 14 points. Marysville Getchell came out as a completely different team in the second half as they found a rhythm in their ground game and marched down the field. They found a hole in the Shorecrest defense and scored on a long 36yard run. After a blocked PAT they closed the gap, 14-6. Immediately after, the Chargers forced a turnover and scored on a short run, followed by a failed twopoint conversion. For the rest of the game both teams fought back and forth, but neither of them were able to get into the end zone. Shorecrest ended up walking

away with the 14-12 victory. When asked about the team’s response after falling behind early, Chargers’ Head Coach Davis Lura said, “the great thing about being at this school is that our tradition is to work hard, no matter the score, and have great character. I think we showed that tonight.” The Chargers’ two-way starter junior Cheron Smith dominated on both sides of the ball all game. He led the team with 100 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown on offense to go along with a game-high 11 tackles and a tackle for loss. Three more big-time players were seniors Phillip Melomey, Garrett Devereux and junior Landyn Olson. Melomey, receiver/linebacker, rushed for 54 yards and a touchdown to go with his two tackles. Devereux, receiver/safety, finished the game with four tackles, a fumble recovery and a pass deflection. Olson, receiver/ defensive back, made plays all over the field as he had two receptions, 30 receiving

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Chargers’ junior fullback Cheron Smith breaks out to the right side as he looks for the first down against Shorecrest at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Sept. 6. yards, three tackles, a forced fumble and an interception. “We ran the ball better than we’ve ever done at this school. The most important thing for us tonight was to stay patient and let our

ground game open up everything else,” said Coach Lura. The Chargers' next home game will be against the Ferndale Golden Eagles on Friday, Sept. 20, at 7 p.m.

High School Fall Sports Marysville Getchell Chargers CROSS COUNTRY

FOOTBALL

Sept. 13

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Stanwood

Away

StanHS

BOYS TENNIS

Sept. 12

Match begins at 3:30 p.m.

Oak Harbor

Away

Sept. 12 Mountlake Terrace Sept. 14 Everett Sept. 17 Meadowdale *Match begins at 1 p.m.

Home Away Away

Meet begins at 3:45 p.m.

Sept. 11 Arlington Away Sept. 14 Sehome Invitational Away *Meet begins at 9 a.m.

Sept. 17 MGHS Lincoln* EdStad

RvrMdws Civic*

Away

FPP

VOLLEYBALL

Sept. 12 Sept. 17

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

Mountlake Terrace Meadowdale

Away Home

Meet begins at 9 a.m.

Civic

VOLLEYBALL

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

Sept. 13 Sundome Invite Sept. 17 La Conner *Match begins at 8 a.m.

Away Home

SunDome* LWHS

FOOTBALL

Sept. 13

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Bellingham

Home

Sept. 12 Lynnwood Home M-PHS Sept. 14 ASC High School Cup Away Academy Sp* Sept. 17 Edmonds-Woodway Away EWHS *Match begins at 8 a.m.

GIRLS SWIM

Sept. 17

LWHS

Match begins at 4 p.m.

Sept. 14 Granite Falls Sept. 17 Meridian *Match begins at 4 p.m.

Home Away

Meet begins at 2:30 p.m.

Cascade

Matches begin at 4 p.m.

Home Away Home Home

Away

FPP

Sept. 13

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Oak Harbor

Home

QuilCedaS

BOYS TENNIS

Sept. 11 Sept. 16

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Lynnwood Mariner

Away Away

LynnHS MarHS

GIRLS SOCCER

Matches begin at 7:30 p.m.

Sept. 12 Lynnwood Away Sept. 14 Mariner Home Sept. 17 Edmonds-Woodway Home *Match begins at 1 p.m.

LynnHS M-PHS* M-PHS

Arlington Eagles LWHS* MHS

FOOTBALL

Sept. 13

Game begins at 7 p.m.

Squalicum

Home

CROSS COUNTRY ArlHS

BOYS TENNIS

BOYS TENNIS

Sept. 12 Bellingham Sept. 13 Everett Sept. 16 Sehome Sept. 17 Mariner Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

M-PHS Civic*

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

GIRLS SOCCER

CROSS COUNTRY Sehome Invitational Away

Sept. 11 Marysville-Pilchuck Home Sept. 14 Sehome Invitational Away Meet begins at 9 a.m.

MlkTerHS MGHS

Lakewood Cougars

Sept. 14

Meet begins at 3:45 p.m.

VOLLEYBALL

Meet begins at 2:30 p.m.

Cascade

FOOTBALL

CROSS COUNTRY

GIRLS SWIM

OHHS

GIRLS SOCCER

Matches begin at 7:30 p.m.

Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks

LWHS Clark* LWHS LWHS*

Schedules subject to change. For more info, visit www.wescoathletics.com or www.nwcathletics.com.

Sept. 12 Sept. 16

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Everett Glacier Peak

Home Home

Matches begin at 7 p.m.

Cedarcrest Shorecrest

Away Home

CdrcstHS ArlHS

RvrMdws Civic*

GIRLS SOCCER

ArlHS ArlHS

VOLLEYBALL

Sept. 12 Sept. 17

Meet begins at 3:45 p.m.

Sept. 11 Arlington Home Sept. 14 Sehome Invitational Away *Meet begins at 9 a.m.

Matches begin at 7:30 p.m.

Sept. 12 Cedarcrest Sept. 14 Lynden Sept. 17 Shorecrest *Match begins at Noon.

Home Away Away

Proud to Support Our Student Athletes 7 Lakes Gifts Action Sports Albertson’s-Marysville All Creatures Vet Clinic Altitude Trampoline Park American Distributing Arlington Electric & Solar Arlington Hardware Arlington Muffler & Brake Arlington Pediatric Dentistry Awning Builders A-Z Transmissions Beef Jerky Outlet Big Foot Music Bleachers Grill Bob’s Burgers and Brew Brown’s Plumbing Bud Barton Bundy Carpet C Don Filer Insurance

Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Clinic Chinook Lumber CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E&E Lumber East Valley Sand & Gravel Edward Jones-Andy Smith Edward Jones-Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Gary Wright Realty Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance H&M Electric Heritage Bank-Marysville Hibulb Cultural Center Honda of Marysville

Judd & Black Julie’s Licensing Kuhnle’s Tavern Lake Goodwin Store/Resort Langabeer, McKernan, Bennett & Co. Les Schwab-Marysville Les Schwab-Smokey Point Locals Espresso Marysville Awards Marysville Care Center Marysville Laundry Station Marysville Orthodontics Marysville Travel & Cruise Marysville-Everett Ceramic Tile Maxi’s Chinese Restaurant Mirkwood Public House Mountain View Rehab Mountain Loop Motorcars North County Outlook Noble Palace

NW Diesel Pacific Propane Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pilchuck Rentals Port Gardner Bay Winery Port of Subs-Tulalip Reaction Physical Therapy (Arlington|Smokey Point) Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Riverside Topsoil Roy Robinson S&S Roofing LLC Schaefer Shipman Shaklee Silvana Plumbing Skagit Regional Clinics Sleep Advantage-Alan Erickson, DDS

Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning Sno-Isle Natural Food Co-op Sonic Burger-Marysville Soroptomist Int’l of Marysville Stanwood Redi-Mix Stilly Auto Parts Stilly Diner Stilly Sand & Gravel Strawberry Lanes Stryker Brothers Tall Guy Small Guy The Creamery The Shop-Arlington The UPS Store-Tulalip Tulalip Tribes Unique Interiors Village Licensing Who’s on First Sports Cards Wild Birds Unlimited

ArlHS Bender* ShrlnStd


Sports

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

5

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Seniors lead Tomahawks on the pitch By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

After a down year last season, the Marysville-Pilchuck girls soccer team is looking to bounce back to the top half of the division. The Tomahawks opened up last year with a win but began to have up-anddown performances as they

finished with a division record of 3-10-1 and an overall record of 4-11-1. They finished the season with a rough stretch as they went 1-4 over their final five matches. In the offseason, Marysville-Pilchuck graduated five seniors including their long-time star and 2018 Fiji National Team member Trina Davis.

“We have a team that’s played together a lot and a good mix of freshmen. We have some really strong forwards, but we’ll be starting some young players, so we just need to get them up to speed. Right now, we’re just trying to ramp things up and I think we’ll be competitive,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Tomahawks’ sophomore defender Cadence Jackson, right, pushes the ball upfield as sophomore mid Meaghan Connelly, left, stays close at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Sept. 6.

Paul Bartley. Going into this season the Tomahawks will have a strong senior class led by their captains Mackensie Connelly, Kaila LinayaoBeau and Brynn Pilkenton. Connelly, forward, will be the team’s main scoring threat as she is one of the best strikers in the division and was an Honorable Mention All-League member last season. LinayaoBeau, mid, will organize the offense of MarysvillePilchuck as she will be looked at as the distributor. Pilkenton, defender, is going to be the leader of the defense with a lot of youth behind her. Last season she also finished as an Honorable Mention All-League member. Alongside the other seniors, Veronika Taylor will also be a huge contributor on the defense as she closed out the year as the final Tomahawk to be an Honorable Mention All-League player. If you want to come out and cheer on the Tomahawks their first home match of the season will be against the Mariner Marauders on Saturday, Sept. 14, at 1 p.m.

Arlington volleyball looks to improve on last year's success By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Arlington volleyball team is working hard in the gym as they are projected to be one of the best teams in the area. With a young squad last season the Eagles were very successful as they held a 10-4 division record and an overall record of 10-6. After a strong

regular season, they fell short in the 3A District Playoffs with back-to-back losses that ended their season. During the offseason, Arlington only graduated two seniors from the team and are looking forward to a strong start behind an experienced roster. “We came into this season with 12 returners essentially, so we were able to hit the ground running from the

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Hailey Wood, Eagles’ junior defensive specialist, gets the difficult dig during practice at Arlington High School on Sept. 5.

first day. It’s a huge advantage because we are able to start refining our game at an earlier stage of the season. These girls are really hungry, and they are ready to redeem what we think last year could have been,” said Arlington Head Coach Whitney Williams. With three seniors on their front line, the Eagles will be a force this season behind their size and athleticism. Their two seniors on the outside will be Arianna Bilby and Reese Talbot. Bilby has a reputation as being one of the best hitters across the league, finishing the 2017 season as a First-Team All-League member. Talbot has been placed all over the court and has made a lot of plays above the net as she was an Honorable Mention All-League member in 2017. In the middle, Julia Parra is going to be huge on the defensive end as she was recognized as an Honorable Mention All-League last season. Behind their upperclassmen, the Eagles will have a roster full of six juniors and three sophomores who have all played at the varsity level. “We have a really unique group this year and all of them take ownership of their roles. We only have three seniors this season, but from top to bottom there is a lot of experience and talent,” said Coach Williams. If you want to support the Eagles their first home match of the season will be against Shorecrest Scots on Tuesday, Sept. 17, at 7 p.m.

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Brynn Pilkenton, Tomahawks’ senior defender, launches one into the corner of the net during penalty kick drills at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Sept. 6.

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Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County

Wednesday, September 11, through Tuesday, September 17 Wednesday, September 11 Sunrise 6:40 am • Sunset 7:29 pm

Sunday, September 15 Sunrise 6:45 am • Sunset 7:21 pm

Thursday, September 12 Sunrise 6:41 am • Sunset 7:27 pm

Monday, September 16 Sunrise 6:47 am • Sunset 7:19 pm

3:39 am 10:31 am 5:30 pm 11:40 pm

4:25 am 11:09 am 5:52 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide

8.8 ft 0.3 ft 10.4 ft 4.4 ft

9.0 ft 0.4 ft 10.4 ft

Friday, September 13 Sunrise 6:43 am • Sunset 7:25 pm Full Moon 12:06 am 5:05 pm 11:45 am 6:10 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

3.9 ft 9.1 ft 0.6 ft 10.3 ft

Saturday, September 14 Sunrise 6:44 am • Sunset 7:23 pm 12:30 am 5:43 am 12:18 pm 6:30 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

3.5 ft 9.3 ft 1.0 ft 10.3 ft

12:55 am 6:22 am 12:51 pm 6:53 pm

1:23 am 7:01 am 1:25 pm 7:18 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

2.9 ft 9.3 ft 1.5 ft 10.3 ft

2.4 ft 9.4 ft 2.1 ft 10.3 ft

Tuesday, September 17 Sunrise 6:48 am • Sunset 7:17 pm

1:55 am 7:44 am 2:01 pm 7:46 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

1.8 ft 9.4 ft 2.9 ft 10.2 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Habitat for Humanity store opens in Arlington By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

need be and turn around and sell it," he said. The store in Smokey Point will sell building materials, furniture and appliances, as well as accept donations of those items. "About the only thing we don't do are dishwashers, mostly because there's a lead standard that's about five-year-old that the older ones no longer meet," said Johnson. Once they start receiving dishwashers that do meet the new standards they'll be available at the store, he said.

Habitat for Humanity of Snohomish County opened a new thrift shop in Smokey Point on Sept. 7. This is the third store they have opened in the county to raise funds. It is located at 17020 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington. "The stores are a fundraiser for us," said Roger Johnson, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Snohomish County. "People donate usable furniture or building materials and we clean it up if

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There are other outdated items that the store doesn't carry, like traditional entertainment centers meant for big boxy televisions. "No one wants them anymore," said Johnson. The Habitat for Humanity stores offer a thrift shop experience focused on items for the home, and many of the stores have repeat customers who like looking for 'treasure' each week, said Johnson. "The public gets good quality stuff to do home projects with. I've known several cases where people started a project, like a kitchen remodel, here because they can get kitchen cabinets here for cheap," he said. The profits from the thrift store go toward local projects. "The proceeds are used to support our work here in Snohomish County," said Johnson. "We're a Snohomish County affiliate so our work is here." Currently the organization is working on projects like a home in Gold Bar and a community of homes in south Everett. "We're working on the permits and civil engineering for a 25 home property in Everett," said Johnson. The organization uses a model where the homeowners help build their homes. "The homeowners put in

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Local officials and Habitat for Humanity staff cut the ribbon to the nonprofit organization's new Smokey Point store on Sept. 7. From left, Arlington Mayor Barbara Tolbert, assistant manager Michelle Johnson, executive director of Habitat of Humanity of Snohomish County Roger Johnson and store manager Kelli Henderson. 500 hours of sweat equity building their projects, usually their own homes," said Johnson. "They all know each other by the end of the project so it really sets them up to be a community," he said. The program model has been successful in building homes that people will be able to build a future in, said Johnson.

"In 25 years we've now had four pay off their mortgages and none have sold their homes. They're all still in them," he said. The program provides affordable mortgages to help people afford homes they might not be able to otherwise. "Their mortgage is tailored not to go over 30 percent of their income … a

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lot of people think we give away homes and we don't," said Johnson. Johnson said that Habitat for Humanity is excited to be a part of the Arlington community now. "It's taken us two years to get it off the ground with lease negotiations and permits, but we're glad to be here. Arlington is a good community," he said. More information about the local Habitat for Humanity organization is available at habitatsnohomish.org.


Communities

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7

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Meet emergency management officials at movie night By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville will host a free showing of the 1996 film “Twister” and offer a chance for locals to connect with the city’s emergency management team on Sept. 12. The film follows a group of storm chasers who investigate a tornadoes in Oklahoma. The free event will be held at the Marysville Opera House at 1225 3rd St., Marysville. Doors open at 6 p.m. The film starts at 6:30 p.m. The film is recommended for those 6-years-old and up.

SCHOOLS Continued from page 1

and is a third grader now,” said Arlington parent Stephanie Jean-Louis. Behrman said the new year has brought changes and transition as well. “It’s weird because my older daughter is going to Haller, so this is the first time it’s not all three of them,” she said. “Madison [Behrman’s other daughter] gets to be in fifth grade this year so it’s pretty exciting.” To help with changes and transition the Marysville School District tried something a little new this year by having most of their secondary schools have only sixth and ninth graders for the first day. At local middle schools upperclassmen in WEB (Where Everybody Belongs) helped the new students on the first day, and at high schools upperclassmen from the Link Crew did the same thing. “Last year we were getting feedback from community members and students about the challenges of transitioning,” said Rod Merrell, executive director of secondary schools at Marysville School District. “We wanted to be very intentional about what that transition looks like this year,” he said. Merrell convinced the school board to try a day just for sixth and ninth graders this year. “The research shows that these programs are effective in allowing sixth and ninth graders a day where they are the only ones there,” said Jason Thompson, Superintendent of the district. “They build relationships and hopefully reduce bullying … and they get connected to a mentor,” he said. Merrell said this could become a program they do next year as well. “Our hope is to give an update to the board later and bring this back again next year. We were very lucky that the board was supportive of trying something a little out of the box this year,” he said.

City officials wanted to show the film as a way to get out into the community. “We want to connect with the community as often as possible,” said Jenn Brown, Emergency Preparedness Coordinator for the city. Brown is still fairly new to the job which she started earlier this year. “This is an excellent time for me to meet the community,” she said. City officials like Brown will be able to talk to attendees about a number of issues related to disas-

Marysville and Arlington school officials said the first week went well. “From my perspective the first day went very well,” said Thompson. “The schools were operating like they hadn’t missed a beat.” Arlington Superintendent Chrys Sweeting rode one of the district’s buses with students for the first day. “We had a very exciting start for the first week,” she said. “It was very positive and staff and students were excited to be back." District officials are also excited for new and continuing programs at their schools. Both Marysville and Arlington will continue expanding opportunities for career and manufacturing instruction. The Regional Apprenticeship Pathways program is hosted in Marysville but serves students across the region and offers a new preapprenticeship program that connects directly with

ter preparedness. “We can talk about what we can do to prepare,” she said. “We’ll be available before and after the film for anyone to talk with us.” She hopes that people begin to have an overall emergency plan and build emergency kits for their car, for home and for work. “If something occurs at home or at work we want to make sure you’re better prepared,” she said. Preparing for a disaster is one of the most important parts of recovery if something happened in Marysville. “Oftentimes most people be-

regional apprenticeships. “We’ve heard clearly from our community that they want opportunities for our students,” said Thompson. Arlington schools are looking at similar initiatives. “We’re looking to increase our career, vocation and STEM education,” said Sweeting, who added both middle schools will have programs this year. “We’ll have a lot of activities going on at Haller Middle School,” she said. “We also want to build connections with industry to help open doors for students,” she said. Both districts are making efforts to improve inclusion as well. “Our early learning campus has been merged into a inclusion model,” said Tracy Souza, executive director of human resources at the Marysville School District. Pre-school students with

developmental disabilities and those without disabilities are now all on the same campus. Souza said research shows how that helps with empathy for most students and helps those with disabilities as well. “Typical developing children get that understanding and acceptance of those who have that delay or that need specially-designed instruction,” she said. Sweeting said that Arlington schools are working on culturally responsive practices as well. “We want teachers to have an awareness of the variables that can affect a student’s learning, such as poverty, trauma or institutional racism,” she said. “We want better understanding and awareness to help us understand the learning needs of students.” Both districts also have community committees that will work on important

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lieve that resiliency comes from how you respond to disaster,” she said. “What the research show and what I believe is that resiliency comes from how you prepare and the steps you take to lessen the negative outcomes.” People can learn about how the city can help them prepare for a disaster as well at the event. “We’re here to help you prepare and help you recover,” said Brown. Additionally, Brown also hopes to learn what the community needs. “I want to hear what they want

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from us as well,” she said, “where the strengths and gaps of the community are when it comes to disaster preparedness.” Brown said that it will be a family oriented film night and hopes that people come out to meet their local officials. “I’m really excited for the film, it’s one of my favorites. It’s actually one of the reasons I do what I do,” she said, as she saw the film in high school and was inspired to pursue a career related to disasters. Popcorn and refreshments will be available for a suggested donation at the event.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington parent Stephanie Jean-Louis, left, walks to Pioneer Elementary with her son Thomas Jean-Louis during this year’s first day of school on Sept. 4. questions for the schools. Arlington has two committees starting up that will consider whether to increase the amount of professional development days for teachers and whether to start school later in the day to improve student outcomes.

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8

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Opinion

n GUEST OPINION

Reducing waste a priority for Snohomish County

Reducing waste is a top focus of the Snohomish County Council. There are multiple ways we have been working to reduce or eliminate waste in our county. The first is in our annual county budget, where we strive to increase efficiency by stretching your tax dollars to ensure that you are getting the most “bang for your buck” in terms of county services. This is reflected in our past two county budgets, where we have worked to increase efficiency and reduce waste in order to avoid increases in general levy property taxes for local residents. We also make a priority of reducing physical waste in Snohomish County. We are blessed to live in a place with such beautiful natural scenery, from the Puget Sound to the Cascade Mountains and everything in between. This is one of the biggest draws to Snohomish County and so it is important that we work to conserve it. An initiative I have been working on over the last several months looks to increase access to our local businesses and encourage a healthy lifestyle while reducing the amount of plastic we discard. This effort is called “Snohomish County Tap”. Snohomish County Tap is a partnership between my office, Zero Waste Washington, the Snohomish Health District, and

Nate Nehring

TapApp. TapApp is an app which identifies businesses and other public locations that will refill a reusable water bottle at no charge. The app can show users the locations closest to them which provide free water bottle refills. The partnership between these groups is bringing this effort to Snohomish County with branding and a large stakeholder group to spread the word and encourage more people to ditch plastic water bottles and use reusable water bottles instead. On June 4th, a large group of stakeholders from local Chambers of Commerce, business, local government, community groups, and schools met to discuss this effort. At the meeting we had presenters from Zero Waste Washington, the Snohomish Health District, and Economic Alliance of Snohomish County to talk about the benefits of a program like this. This initiative to encourage reusable water bottles at local businesses and public

places helps conserve our beautiful surroundings, encourages healthy living, and provides greater opportunity to access local businesses. We are working with our partners to provide decals to the businesses and locations who participate and water bottles with the Snohomish County Tap logo to spread the word and encourage reusable water bottle use. I am encouraged by the support and enthusiasm we have seen so far. We are working on a kickoff event which will include a community service component to start the program and get the word out about our effort. Information about that event will be available in the coming weeks. It is always great to work with partners like those involved with Snohomish County Tap. When we can come together to do good work that can benefit everyone, improve public health and reduce waste, it is a win-win-win. I look forward to seeing this program move forward and the benefits it can bring. Nate Nehring is a member of the Snohomish County Council and represents District 1 which includes Arlington, Darrington, Granite Falls, Marysville, Stanwood, and unincorporated north county. He can be reached by email at Nate.Nehring@snoco.org or by phone at (425) 388-3494.

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Our Favorite Quotes "When the seasons shift, even the subtle beginning, the scent of promise and change, I feel something inside me. Hopefulness? Gratitude? Openness? Whatever it is, it's welcome." Author ­— Kristin Armstrong Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

&

RAVE RAVE: Thanks to everyone who helped put on last weekend's Harvest Fest. We really enjoyed it and it was a fun way to wrap up the summer. RAVE: The Drag Strip Reunion and Car Show at the Arlington Airport was great again this year. It's a wonderful way to celebrate the history of racing at the airport and a great opportunity to see a wide variety of

cars. Thanks to the organizers and everyone who brought their cars out to display so that we could enjoy them.

RAVE: Thanks to the city of Marysville for keeping the Spray Park open until Sept. 15. Hopefully the weather will cooperate and it will be sunny and warm so that we will be able to enjoy it a few more times before it closes.

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Real People. Real Life.

North County Outlook is published every Wednesday and mailed direct to households and businesses in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address below. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher. News Deadline: Friday 5PM before publication editor@northcountyoutlook.com

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Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Staff Writers .....Christopher Andersson, Andrew Hines Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson Contributing Writers .......Steve Smith, The Tulalip Chefs

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P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 1331 State Ave. #A • Marysville, WA (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 www.northcountyoutlook.com

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Weekly Puzzle CLUES ACROSS 1. Google certification 4. Cloths spread over coffins 9. Disorderly 14. “Star Wars” hero Solo 15. Toward the rear 16. The order of frogs 17. Alternative pain treatment (abbr.) 18. “Wolf of Wall Street” star 20. Evoke 22. Units of metrical time 23. Helps to predict eclipses 24. Some say they attract 28. Pitching statistic 29. Baseball box score (abbr.) 30. Force unit 31. Repaired shoe 33. English theologian 37. Commercial 38. Exchange money for goods or services 39. Give off 41. One from Utah 42. Computer department 43. Begets 44. English navigator 46. C C C 49. Of I 50. Pouch 51. Add notes to 55. A way to fall into ruin

58. Cunning intelligence 59. Blood disorder 60. Disgraced CBS newsman 64. Tax collector 65. Type of grass common to the Orient 66. Cosmic intelligence 67. No (Scottish) 68. People who rely on things 69. Stairs have them 70. Mathematical term (abbr.) CLUES DOWN 1. Clarified butters 2. Primitive Himalayan people 3. Completely 4. Steep cliffs along the Hudson River 5. Assist 6. Language spoken in Laos 7. Type of screen 8. An attempt to economize 9. Volcanic craters 10. Still outstanding 11. Takes responsibility for another 12. California think tank 13. Former Rocket Ming 19. A pigeon noise

21. Central part of 24. Academy Award statue 25. Distinct unit of sound 26. Relative on the female side of the family 27. Passover feast and ceremony 31. The brightest star in Virgo 32. Made with oats 34. Subjects to laser light 35. Beloved Hollywood alien 36. Neatly brief 40. The Great Lakes State (abbr.) 41. Soon to be released 45. Swiss river 47. Become involved in 48. More dour 52. They’re on floors 53. Boxing’s GOAT 54. Swarms with 56. Quantum mechanics pioneer 57. Facilitated 59. As fast as can be done (abbr.) 60. Regional French wine Grand __ 61. Owns 62. Tell on 63. Precedes two


Communities

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Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

Bryan-Goforth has lived with a root cellar for 20 years and can offer practical advice and information. No experience necessary. Registration is encouraged. Held Thursday, Sept. 12, beginning at 6 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave

Submit your events via email to:

COMING EVENTS

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com September 11 - September 17 Friends of the Arlington Library Book and Bake Sale: Great books and baked goods available at bargain prices. Something for everyone. Proceeds support the Arlington Library. Held Tuesday, Sept. 10, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Wednesday, Sept. 11, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Grant Writing Workshops: Grant Writing Worshops will be held at the Marysville library Thursdays, Sept. 12 & 19, 2-3:30 p.m. This two-part grant writing workshop helps you perfect your ability to craft proposals that effectively and successfully deliver your organization’s message to potential funders. Session One: Crafting Proposals That Pack a Punch (Sept. 12). Session Two: From Budgets to Attachments, Character

Classified: Events/Festivals

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

Classified: Announcements

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855-4154148. ATTENTION: OXYGEN USERS. Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed lowest prices. Call the Oxygen Concentrator store: 844-495-7230.

Counts, and Balancing Stats with Stories (Sept. 19). Presented by Debra Jensen, a Seattle area nonprofit consultant and freelance grant writer. Please preregister as space is limited. Marysville Library is located at 6120 Grove St. For more information call 360-658-5000. Freezing, Drying & Root Cellaring: Time to preserve your harvest with the WSU Extension. Learn about food storage and preservation methods including freezing, dehydration, and using root cellars or microclimate storage in your home. Instructor Jennifer

Teens Make It - Collage Buttons: Who wants to make some personalized buttons to jazz up your backpack? We'll have oodles of old magazines to cut up and art supplies on hand to create unique collages that you can pin to things. Held Thursday, Sept. 19, beginning at 3 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Estate Planning & Strategies for Sustainable Retirement Income: Estate planning and retirement planning are closely related, but it is important to know the difference and plan for both. Join us for this informative session and start your planning today. This class is offered by the Society for Financial Awareness.

Classified: House Cleaning

HOUSECLEANING: Disabled veteran seeking families in need of housecleaning, move-ins and move-outs preferred. Reliable, trustworthy service. $241.00 first three hours. Please call Ray at 206-751-0939.

Classified: Help Wanted

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details, 855-635-4229. STILL PAYING TOO much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 866-6856901.

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Real People. Real Life. P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 classifieds@northcountyoutlook.com

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK Registration is encouraged. Held Monday, Sept. 23, 6-7:30 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Fall Sensory Play Day: Playing is a great way to get ready to read. Join us for a special day of sensory activities and hands-on fun that encourages early learning. For ages 18 months to 5 years. Caregiver required. Supported by Friends of the Arlington Library. Held Wednesday, Sept. 25, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Waggin’ Tales: Read a tale or two with Arlington's favorite registered therapy pets. For children and families. Held Saturday, Sept. 28, beginning at 11 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Bluegrass Boogie Fundraising Event: The Stillaguamish Senior Center is hosting a Bluegrass Boogie Fundraising Event on Saturday, Sept. 28, 6-9 p.m., gesturing the Cliff Perry Band. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.. Tickers are $30 or $25 if a member of the center. A chuckwagon dinner will be served and there will be a no host winds and beer bar. Raffle ticks will be sold for more than 30 items. Must have Tickets to attend. Tickets available at the center. The Stillaguamish Senior Center is at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd. Learn to Square Dance: Come learn to Square Dance, beginning Monday, Sept. 30, from 7-9 p.m. at the Totem Middle School Cafeteria, 1605 7th St. NE, Marysville. Get healthy and make new friends dancing to modern upbeat music! No experience or partner is necessary. Experienced dancers will be there to partner and assist in class.

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Your classified ad runs in our print edition (published Wednesdays) and at www.northcountyoutlook.com for one low price!

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Dress is casual and the first lesson is free. For more information, call Eric or Cindy at 425-334-4374 or email squaredancelessons@gmail. com. Visit their website at www.happyhoppers.org.

ONGOING EVENTS

Stillaguamish Senior Center: The Stillaquamish Senior Center at Smokey Point is looking for participants to join them in the following activities whether you are a member or not. Volunteers always needed. Mah Jong Mondays, 1-4 p.m.; Bingo - Tuesdays  and Fridays; Cribbage - Tuesdays, 1-4 p.m.; Popcorn and movie - Wednesdays, 12:45 p.m.; Stamp and Scrap - 1st & 3rd Thurs 10 - 1 Karaoke - 1st & 3rd Thursdays, 1-3 p.m.; Bunco - 2nd Thursday, 1-4 p.m.; and Jam Session - 2nd & 4th Thursdays, 1-3 p.m. Call the center for more details at 360-653-4551.

Age 55 or over? Call RSVP: Sponsored by Catholic Community Services, the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), is looking for people age 55 and over for a variety of volunteer opportunities. Volunteer drivers, Peer to Peer counselors and food bank workers are just a couple examples of what is available. People who volunteer regularly report better health and happiness. You can experience this too. If you have a few hours a week to help someone else, we want to speak with you. For more information please email John McAlpine at johnm@ ccsww.org or call (425) 3746374 or toll free at 1-888240-8572.

Assistance for veterans: Military Veterans seeking help with the VA may contact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will return your call. Post 178 meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.”

TOPS 433 meeting: TOPS 433 meets at Arlington Boys & Girls Club on Fridays, 9:45-10:45. All welcome. For more information go to www.TOPS.org.

Crossword answers from page 8


10

Communities

September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Business & Services DIRECTORY Your Search for Local Services Ends Here AUTO REPAIR

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MATTRESSES

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Talk to the people who build your mattress!

Sue Stevenson, Broker Cell: 425.418.7902 Office: 360.659.1253 ext. 15 Fax: 360.653.3346 suestevensonRE@gmail.com

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Vehicles on display at Touch a Truck By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Kids will be able to get close to garbage trucks, public works vehicles, buses and other large trucks during the city of Marysville’s annual Touch a Truck event. The free event will be held on Sept. 14 at Asbery Field, next to Totem Middle School. It is held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and is free for all ages. Pets are not allowed at the event. The final hour of the event, from noon to 1 p.m., is the quiet hour where no horns will be set off. “Kids of all ages will be able to get up close to these vehicles, get in the driver’s seat and honk the horn,” said Andrea Kingsford, recreation coordinator with the city of Marysville. The event is an opportunity for kids to get into the trucks they normally only see from far away. “So often we see these vehicles working in the city but this is an opportunity to actually get to see them and talk to the workers who drive them everyday,” said Kingsford. A variety of vehicles are scheduled to come down to the event. “We are excited to have a lot of our returning trucks and organizations,” said Kingsford. Those include Marysville School District which plans to bring a school bus and the Snohomish County Sheriff ’s office who plan to bring one of their vehicles. “Marysville Police Department will be there with their Bearcat vehicle,” said Kingsford. A number of trucks from Marysville’s Public Works Department will be out at the event as well, including a street sweeper, a sewer camera truck and one of the city’s garbage trucks. “And that one is normally quite popular,” said Kingsford. Many locals like the event because they

FILE PHOTO

Charles Francis, left, Sophie Francis, center, and Marceleo Francis sit inside one of the city of Marysville’s street sweepers at last year's Touch a Truck on Sept. 8, 2018.

rarely get a chance to see the trucks featured at the event. “Families love the event because it is so unique,” said Kingsford. It’s also a good way to usher in September and the end of summer break, she said. “It’s a great start to the school year.” Games for kids are also available at the event and a number of volunteer organizations help run Touch a Truck. “We have other organizations there such as Camp Fire, the Cub Scouts and Kiwanis, and they all help make the event fun,” said Kingsford. “We will have the Rotary train driving people around the field and families always like that,” said Kingsford. The event is free but attendees are encouraged to bring a donation for the Marysville Community Food Bank which will be there as well. Kingsford wanted to thank all the organizations that support the event or bring their trucks for the kids to see.

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The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: August 28, 2019. Personal Representative: Denis Keith Brannan Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #5598 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01529-31


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September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

11

Concert series returns to Opera House By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Marysville’s local concert series, Live at the OH, returns on Sept. 19 after it’s summer break to bring more music to the downtown Opera House. The series brings music to the Marysville Opera House at 1225 Third St., Marysville, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each week. The cost is $5 at the door. “Live at the OH is just a couple of hours of great, laid-back, local music,” said Lauren Woodmansee, cultural arts supervisor for the Marysville Parks, Culture and Recreation Department. “This is a really fun way to kickstart the weekend,” she said. The series has been going on for three years at the Marysville Opera House, although it was under a different name for its first year. “I think people like that it is local

and it starts at 5:30 p.m. and gets out by 7:30 p.m.,” said Woodmansee. This year the concert series took a summer break because typically the summer performances have had low attendance, said Woodmansee. “We had the summer off because there were a lot of other music events and activities going on,” she said. “What we’ve found is that there are so many other community events that people usually want to go to those,” she said. The concert series returns on Sept. 19. “For our first concert back we are returning with one of our favorites: the Margaret Wilder Band,” said Woodmansee. She said they play a mix of blues, funk and rock and roll. Coming later in the year are The Blues Project with John Carswell on Oct. 17 and Chris Eger and Cory Vincent on Nov. 19. The city of Marysville also involves

some local organizations which use the event as a fundraiser. “Our community partner is the Marysville Kiwanis,” she said. “They have a great selection of beer and wine for $5.” Those funds go back to the Kiwanis Club. “They keep 100 percent of the proceeds which go toward their organization and what they do for the community,” said Woodmansee. Snacks and nonalcoholic beverages are also available at the concerts, said Woodmansee. The event is sponsored by local realty group TEAM Costa, who were one of the first sponsors for events at the Opera House. “They are very much a supporter of live music in Marysville,” said Woodmansee. More information about events happening at the Marysville Opera House and elsewhere in the city is available at marysvillewa.gov.


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September 11, 2019 - September 17, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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n WHISTLING GARDENER

Many choices for late color in your garden As we move loosen up the roots into the fall seaand water them in well. Don’t cut son and our them back until summer bloomers start to fade, it spring (after you see signs of new is encouraging to growth) and plan know that there on pinching them are still quite a By Steve Smith back once or twice few choices for late color in our gardens. before July or they will be 3 The classic fall blooming pe- feet tall. The same is true for rennials are of course mums asters, although they seem to and asters, which sadly seem be a bit more reliable in the to have been relegated to garden. the status of disposability. Beyond mums and asters You will find most mums in you will find other bloomthe seasonal color depart- ers, like sedum 'Autumn Joy’, ment of the garden center Kaffir lilies, toad lilies, hardy rather than on the perennial cyclamen, and even some benches. They are festive repeat blooming shrubs like and, when combined with spiraea and hydrangeas. But a pumpkin and some corn the one plant in my garden stalks, make for an attrac- that speaks fall to me is the tive seasonal display. If you Japanese Anemone. It is decide to plant them after easy to grow and a reliable they have faded, be sure to bloomer that is quite happy

in partial shade or even full sun, provided you don’t let it dry out. The plant itself will reach 3 feet tall by September and will bloom for almost 2 months, starting as early as mid-August. Japanese anemones will spread slowly throughout the garden and can colonize an area if left unchecked. I routinely pull out any unwanted runners so they don’t overtake the rest of my plants. (I have a rule that no plant can have more than its allotted space so that I can enjoy the maximum amount of variety in my yard.) Don’t be afraid to pull out what you don’t want. There are many varieties of Japanese Anemones on the market and most of them are either white or shades of pink. The one in my garden that has brought me years

of enjoyment is a white one called ‘Honorine Jobert’. It has single white flowers with yellow centers and brightens up my shady border quite nicely. Here a few other flavors to try. Wild Swan — This one came out a few years back and is white like ‘Honorine’ but has the added attraction of blue-violet undersides of the petals — which are simply stunning in my humble opinion. Pink Kiss — A floriferous dwarf Anemone growing only about 10 inches tall that is a great choice for pots, small gardens, or the front of the border. Its flower buds are a deep maroon and open to a perfect single pink flower fading to a softer pink with age. Lucky Charm — The

COURTESY PHOTO

The Lucky Charm Anemone is a great choice for late color in your garden. leaves on this selection start off deep purple and change to dark green with the undersides a lighter violet. Flowers are deep rich pink with very dark purple, almost black stems. It grows to a typical 2 to 3 feet tall. All of these selections will be quite happy in a shady border, such as on the north side of the house or in a woodland setting where they get dappled shade. Like

I said above, you can even plant them in full sun as long as the soil is rich, full of organic matter, and never dries out. Have some fun this fall with these tried and true late summer bloomers. You’ll be rewarded for years to come.

Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

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Sept. 11, 2019 North County Outlook  

Sept. 11, 2019 North County Outlook  

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