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Evergreen State Fair

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The Evergreen State Fair in Monroe 2019

By Nathan Whalen nathan@northcountyoutlook.com

When the Tillman family started farming in the early 20th Century, they had a cow, a pig, a chicken and a big garden. As development came, they have been farming from the same location east of Arlington. "It's pretty mind-boggling, it really, really is," said Donald Tillman, 85. He noted the area had more than 70 family-sized fair farms. "I'm the only one left." The Tillman family will be honored during the Evergreen State Farm in Monroe when they will be named a Snohomish County Centennial Farm. "They are the basis of our agriculture community in Snohomish County," Linda Neunzig said of families like the Tillmans. She is the agriculture coordinator in the Snohomish County Executive Office and acts as a liaison between farmers and county government. "They normally start with a small settlement and the grow, and grow, and grow," Neunzig said. In 2018, the Bartelheimer family of Snohomish was recog-

nized for spending at least 100 years in farming. The Centennial Farm recognition is given to farms that have been operated by the same family on the same land for at least 100 years, Neunzig said. The Tillman family will be recognized during the Evergreen State Fair's opening ceremonies with a reception to follow and fair-goers can learn about the Tillman family and their farm thanks to a large display placed at the entrance to the fair. Tillman's father, Carl, settled in the Arlington Heights area after emigrating from Sweden. The families farm consisted of a one-room cabin on 40 acres of land. The house lacked electricity or running water and has an outhouse. Originally they grew fruit, but switched to a dairy, because they found it to be more prosperous, according to a Tillman family history on the Evergreen State Fair website. When Don was 15, he took over running the farm after his father died. "I didn't know much to start with and I don't know much now," Tillman joked. He said

COURTESY PHOTO

Donald and Anna Tillman at their Arlington Heights farm. he didn't socialize as he worked on the farm to pay the debt off. He also worked at another farm and, when he turned 18, worked the graveyard shift at a plywood company. He earned his GED, and,

thanks to the help of county extension agents, learned about fields, soils, rotational grazing and seed variety, according information from the Evergreen State Fair. Tillman served in the Korean War where he served as a medic

and he married his wife, Anna, in 1960. They had three children — Diane, John and Carol. The family is still involved with the farm. "We're still farming. We're still active," Don Tillman said.

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August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Evergreen State Fair honors Arlington family

Evergreen State Fair Pages 6-11

Vol. 12 No. 50 n

August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Aviation enthusiasts gather at annual Arlington Fly-In By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Isabella Coronado and Suzi Quillen, owner of Perfectly Knotty, right, vacuum seal a foam football in a care package to be sent to a Navy unit on duty on Aug. 15.

Project puts together packages for sailors By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Since 2010 Arlington's Suzi Quillen has been filling boxes of goodies to send out to Navy members on duty. These days she runs the downtown Arlington store Perfectly Knotty and contin-

ues the project by collecting donations at her store. She put together her most recent boxes on Aug. 15 but the project goes back many years. “My friend’s husband was in Afghanistan and it

See PACKAGES on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Jaxon Cupp, right, and Hendrix Cupp sit in an airplane at the annual Arlington Fly-In on Aug. 17.

Planes, drones, hot air balloons and much more came to the Arlington Airport as part of the annual Arlington Fly-In for pilots and local families. The event was held Aug. 16 to 18 this year. The aviation themed festival is usually one of the largest gatherings of small planes in the country each year and is meant to teach families about flight. “We’re really focused on all ages learning all things aviation,” said Kristin Banfield, a volunteer for the Arlington Fly-In. Families frequently come down to the Fly-In to meet with pilots and see pieces of aviation history. "We just got here, but we come every year. It's a great

See FLY-IN on page 15

Sales held across city for All Marysville Garage Sale By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Abraham Cardenas browses some of the items available at a garage sale that is part of the All Marysville Garage Sale on Aug. 17.

More than 100 local homes took part in the All Marysville Garage Sale this year from Aug. 16 to 18. The final count for the weekend was 118 garage sales across the city for the annual event which provides a weekend of bargain hunting for people all around the area. This is the third year the event has been held in Marysville. Dawn Danley, a community member and owner of Cee's Hair Cuts, said this was the first year she had participated and was excited to get her stuff out of storage.

"It's absolutely awesome," she said. "I just can't believe the amount of cars, it's been continual." She was happy that a city garage sale was being organized locally. "We knew Everett had one, but we had no idea Marysville had one until this year," she said. "But we heard about it this year and we've been going through our stuff and we're ready for tomorrow." Community members also came out to shop around during the weekend. "It's really cool. I like it so far and I'm having a good day," said local Nikki Wagner.

See SALE on page 15

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Local News

August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Follow us on Twitter: @NCOutlook

Plane crash in M'ville kills pilot By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com There was one fatality after a plane crash in north Marysville on Aug. 14. Officials from the National Transportation Safety Board are currently investigating the crash. The small plane crashed into an empty field in Marysville at approximately 6:55 p.m. according to Peter Knudson, public affairs officers with the National Transportation Safety Board. “The plane took off from Frontier Airpark [a small

Lake Stevens airport] and was in the air for about 10 minutes,” said Knudson. It spent some time circling Arlington Airport before crashing a mile south of the local airport. “We had an investigator out there that evening and he documents the scene,” said Knudson. “All components of the plane were accounted for." The airplane was of the “experimental home-built” category, said Knudson. “The next steps will be for the investigator to lay out a preliminary report which is all of the facts as they currently stand,” he said. That usually happens within a week or two of the incident. After that officials will begin an extensive investigation into the probable cause of the crash.

“An easy way to think about it is that we are mainly looking at three things,” the pilot, the machine and the operational environment, said Knudson. “We look at each of those three and start ruling out the unlikely causes first,” he said. For the ‘machine’ investigators look the history of the aircraft. “We look at the maintenance record,” said Knudson. “We look for indicators of pre-crash failure.” This plane appears to have been a “fairly newly built machine,” he said. Officials also look at the skills of the pilot. “We find their certifications and their ratings, and the recency of their flight experience,” said Knudson. Other potential reasons for the crash such as toxicology are looked into. “And

that is standard for all crashes,” said Knudson. A 72-hour background check is given to look for any possible cause for pilot error as well. “And that is to look for issues like fatigue or health problems that could have affected the pilot,” said Knudson. For the environment, officials look at how radio communications and weather were on the night of the flight and they look at the purpose of the flight. After gathering all the info of potential causes the National Transportation Safety Board sends in a final report, which usually takes about 12 to 24 months, said Knudson. “In the report we determine the probable cause and also any potentially contributing causes,” he said.

PACKAGES

one. It just depends on how much stuff I’ve got available,” she said. People from the community also come in to the store to help her assemble the packages. “I love this because I was an ombudsman for my husband’s command back in the day and we did this all the time,” said Terri Strauss, who is involved with the local American Legion. “It was nice to know that she was doing this in town." Quillen sometimes buys the items for the gift boxes herself and sometimes gets them donated. She accepts a wide variety of items, although food has to be carefully considered. “Food items I like to have

factory packaged and not homemade,” she said. “It can take six weeks before they get these. Sometimes these boxes get bashed and squished and all kinds of things,” she said. Because the boxes are often sent to areas that are excessively warm that limits some of the food options as well. “We don’t do things that will melt — taffy, chocolate, gum,” said Quillen. Condiment packages are often appreciated as a food item. “A lot of these are things people get from their ‘to-go’ food at a restaurant,” she said. Quillen also keeps a number of personally written items for the Navy members to open as part of the box. “Cards and letters are always appreciated,” she said. “When we have our American Legion Riders dinners, I take these cards around and have people sign them for her,” said Strauss. Foam footballs, travelsize games, puzzle books and T-shirts are also frequently included as part of the boxes. Quillen said she enjoys keeping the boxes going out each year. “I was not able to serve in the military because of a medical condition but I’ve always been patriotic,” she said. “I love being able to have little ways for them to know they’re appreciated.” Sometimes she gets emails of appreciation in response depending on how busy the unit is, she said. This February she also was surprised to receive a wooden plaque from a military unit thanking her. “It is made out of a local wood from where they are stationed,” she said. For more info or to donate money to the project go to perfectlyknotty.com/ sailorboxproject.

Continued from page 1

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just started as a joke. I was going to send him some stupid stuff from home, but he came home before I sent it,” said Quillen. “And I’ve just continued doing it since then." The boxes are now usually sent out a couple times each year, she said. They contain food, books, games, playing cards and thank you notes from the community, among other items. The boxes are not sent to individuals but to entire units. “Sometimes I’m really regular in sending out the packages and sometimes it’s a while before I send another


Communities

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August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

Annual conference brings genealogists together By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Hundreds of genealogy enthusiasts gathered as part of the Northwest Genealogy Conference held in Arlington Aug. 14 to 17. For people in the Puget Sound region it is the biggest conference for genealogical information that is easily accessible. “We love this conference because it is one of the ones that is the best of its type north of Sacramento and west of the Mississippi River,” said Gordon Chisholm, who is with the Heritage Quest Research Library. “It has some of the best speakers in this area,” he said. This is the sixth year that the Stillaguamish Valley Genealogical Society has put on the event. “We have close to 400 people coming through our doors, between registrants, vendors, volunteers and speakers,” said Lisa Bartlow, co-chair of this year’s event and a member of the local society. People come from all

over the U.S., said Bartlow. “It’s wonderful. There’s the usual excitement and we have a lot of people coming back. Also, there are a lot of people coming for the first time and they’re amazed at how much we do,” she said. The conference is good for bringing people together, said Bartlow, as genealogy can often be an isolating pass time. “Genealogy tends to be a solitary hobby and it’s wonderful to meet and network with people who have similar interests,” said Bartlow. Many of the attendees have been practicing genealogy for a long time, such as Joyce Frey with the Heritage Quest Research Library, who has been researching her family for 60 years. “I started very young. My grandfather was a great storyteller,” she said. She enjoys the hunt for more clues which help her find out more about her family, she said. “When I figured out what to do with the information, I wanted that detective work to find out where they came from, what they

did, why they chose this city to move to. The family stories are the most exciting part to me,” she said. Frey has also learned more about how her own family intersects with history. “I didn’t like history when I was a kid, but I can’t get enough of it now as it pertains to family,” she said. She has learned things such as how her grandfather quit the railroad company PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON after the Jonestown flood. Joyce Frey, of the Heritage Quest Research Library, left, talks about one of the new tools availChisholm also said find- able to researchers and genealogists with Horace Foxall Jr. at the Northwest Genealogy Coning out how our families ference in Arlington on Aug. 16. traveled through history is one of the best parts about genealogy. “We want to know who our ancestors were. We Hundreds of design, color and glass combinations. want to know what they did and who they were,” he said. Bartlow has also learned a lot of information to help her with her search from the conference itself. Over 88 years of experience “You pick up hints and Monday - Friday 8 am to 5 pm clues and different ways to research, so it’s very valuable,” she said. 1-877-289-8444 • www.budbartons.com More information about 805 Cedar Avenue • Marysville the Stillaguamish ValleyB:10” Genealogical Society is T:10” available at stillygen.org.

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The corresponding Annual Percentage Yield (APY) for this offer is 2.00%. The Special Rate will be applied to the enrolled savings account for a period of 12 months, starting on the date the account is enrolled in the offer. However, for any day during that 12 month period that the daily account balance is less than the $25,000, the enrolled account will not be eligible for the Special Rate and will instead earn the applicable Standard Interest Rate for a Platinum Savings account. As of 05/31/2019, the Standard Interest Rate and APY for a Platinum Savings account in OR and WA with an account balance of $0.01 and above is 0.05% (0.05% APY). Each tier shown reflects the current minimum daily collected balance required to obtain the applicable APY. Interest is compounded daily and paid monthly. The amount of interest earned is based on the daily collected balances in the account. Upon the expiration of the 12 month promotional period, then-current Standard Interest Rates apply. Minimum to open a Platinum Savings account is $25. A monthly service fee of $12 applies in any month the account falls below a $3,500 minimum daily balance. Fees may reduce earnings. Interest rates are variable and subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo may limit the amount you deposit to a Platinum Savings account to an aggregate of $1 million. 2. Available in-branch only; you must speak with a banker to request the special rate. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is effective for accounts opened between 07/08/2019 and 08/30/2019 and requires a minimum of $25,000 in new money brought to Wells Fargo. “New money” is money from sources outside of the customer’s current relationship with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. or its affiliates (which includes deposit, brokerage and loan/credit accounts). Public Funds and Wholesale accounts are not eligible for this offer. APY assumes interest remains on deposit until maturity. Interest is compounded daily. Payment of interest on CDs is based on term: For terms less than 12 months (365 days), interest may be paid monthly, quarterly, semi-annually, or at maturity (the end of the term). For terms of 12 months or more, interest may be paid monthly, quarterly, semi-annually, or annually. A penalty for early withdrawal will be imposed and could reduce earnings on this account. Special Rates are applicable to the initial term of the CD only. At maturity, the special rate CD will automatically renew for a term of 6 months, at the interest rate and APY in effect for CDs on renewal date not subject to a Special Rate, unless the Bank has notified you otherwise. 1., 2. Due to the new money requirement, new accounts may only be opened at your local branch and you must speak to a banker to request the special rate offers for both new and existing accounts. Wells Fargo reserves the right to modify or discontinue the offer at any time without notice. Minimum new money deposit requirement of at least $25,000 is for this offer only and cannot be transferred to another account to qualify for any other consumer deposit offer. If you wish to take advantage of another consumer deposit offer requiring a minimum new money deposit, you will be required to do so with another new money deposit as stated in the offer requirements and qualifications. Offer cannot be: • Combined with any other consumer deposit offer. • Reproduced, purchased, sold, transferred, or traded. 3. The Portfolio by Wells Fargo program has a $30 monthly service fee, which can be avoided when you have one of the following qualifying balances: $25,000 or more in qualifying linked bank deposit accounts (checking, savings, CDs, FDIC-insured IRAs) or $50,000 or more in any combination of qualifying linked banking, brokerage (available through Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC) and credit balances (including 10% of mortgage balances, certain mortgages not eligible). If the Portfolio by Wells Fargo relationship is terminated, the bonus interest rate on all eligible savings accounts, and discounts or fee waivers on other products and services, will discontinue and revert to the Bank’s then-current applicable standard interest rate or fee. For bonus interest rates on time accounts, this change will occur upon renewal. If the Portfolio by Wells Fargo relationship is terminated, the remaining unlinked Wells Fargo Portfolio Checking or Wells Fargo Prime Checking account will be converted to another checking product or closed. © 2019 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Deposit products offered by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Member FDIC.


4

Sports

August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Fun Fits finish season as champions By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The Marysville Parks, Culture and Recreation Department’s Adult Softball League held their championship game between Fun Fits and first-year team Pitches Be Trippin’ on Aug. 18. Both teams came out hot for the big game as Fun Fits opened up the top of the first inning with four runs, while Pitches Be Trippin’ closed out the same inning with four runs of their own. Fun Fits nearly doubled their score in the second inning, as they put up three runs and earned a slight lead of 7-6 y the end of the inning. Over the next two innings Fun Fits separated themselves from the competition. In the top of the third they scored five runs and then exploded for 11 more runs in the fourth. Pitches Be Trippin’ only scored one run in the bottom of the third and barely held on with four runs in the fourth. Unfortunately, the game was cut short due to the

mercy rule and Fun Fits ended their season as the champions by a score of 23-11. “I’ve been a softball fan my whole life and I love being out here on the field. We had a really good team this year and the biggest thing for us was to just come out here and have fun. We pulled a team together out of nothing and it feels great to walk away as the champs,” said Fun Fits Captain Michelle Richmond. League Champion Fun Fits were led by their Captain Michelle Richmond, Ty Holm, Paul Schafer and Toby Simcox. Richmond finished going a perfect 3-3 with three singles, two runs and two RBIs. Holm earned three hits, two of which were inside-the-park home runs, along with two runs and five RBIs. Schafer was consistent from beginning to end going 4-4 at the plate with four singles and four runs. Simcox alternated throughout the game but made an impact with two hits, one inside-the-park home run, two runs and three RBIs. “Most of us have kids in base-

ball or softball, we’re always coaching and playing with them, but we decided that we wanted to play too. We’d love to play more games, but it was a lot of fun coming out here, putting a team together and competing with other people from the community,” said Pitches Be Trippin’ Captain BJ Winn. Pitches Be Trippin’ were led by their captain BJ Winn, Brian Keller, Suzie Winn and Ken Steenis. BJ earned four hits with four at-bats including three singles, a double, two runs and two RBIs. Keller also went perfect at the plate with three singles, one double, one run and an RBI. Suzie led the team in RBIs with three, as she had three singles and a run. Steenis went 3-3 at the plate with one double, two singles, one run and two RBIs. This season of the Summer Adult Softball League is over but if you want to learn more about what Marysville Parks, Culture and Recreation has to offer you can check it out at https://marysvillewa.gov/147/ Parks-Culture-Recreation.

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Fun Fits captain Michelle Richmond rounds second base and sprints to third against Pitches Be Trippin’ at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Aug. 18.

M'ville Youth Football gears up for season By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Jaxson Lopez takes the sweep to the outside as the defenders look to take him down at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Aug. 16.

With fall just around the corner, people from all over the country are getting ready for football season. Marysville is no different as the Marysville Youth Football League has begun practices and will be playing on the gridiron soon. The MYFL has been gearing up for this next season as they held their camp in late July and kicked off their first practice on July 29. The league covers a wide range of ages, 5 to 14, and is open to all young athletes from the Marysville and Tulalip areas. “The season is looking good so far and they’re out here working hard. They are getting really excited as we get closer to playing against other teams and showing what they can do out there on the field. The biggest thing we want to focus on at this age is making sure that they know how to tackle properly to minimize any injuries or accidents. It’s all about fundamentals at this level, so we start with tackling and then get into how to properly take handoffs and things like that,” said MYFL President Tyler Hodgin. The teams in the MYFL got their first

taste of action last weekend as they held their jamboree at Snohomish High School from Aug. 17-18. This was their last chance to put it together on the field before the regular season opens up on Aug. 24. “I love working with the kids. There is not a price you can put on seeing the excitement of a kid after they make a big play or accomplish something for themselves. After stepping up as President, my whole life is youth football and I’m happy to do everything I can to give back to these kids,” said Hodgin. This season, Hodgin has taken on the role of MYFL President for the first time and has put an emphasis on player safety and development. Registration for this year is currently closed, but that doesn’t mean you can’t plan for next season. The registration fee is $230 for the first player, $180 for each additional player, and opens up in March. If you want to learn more about the MYFL then you can check out their website at https://marysvilleyouthfootballleague. sportssignup.com/site/ or email Krissy Hodgin at marysvilleyouthfootball@yahoo. com.

Gleneagle Classic will be held Aug. 24 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The first Gleneagle Classic will be held at the Gleneagle Golf Course in Arlington on Saturday, Aug. 24. The list of participants is filling up quickly but if there are any open spots you can register at the event starting at 8 a.m. The tournament itself will begin with a 9 a.m. shotgun start with groups of four playing alongside each

other throughout the day. There will be an $80 entry fee per player which includes the entry to play, golf cart and lunch, with all proceeds going to support the Gleneagle Community Foundation. “We were looking at different ways to fundraise and it only made sense to include the golf course since our community is built around it. From the very beginning the golf manager, men’s club and other members supported

the idea of the tournament. It just made sense to make an event that encompassed different aspects of the community,” said Gleneagle Community Foundation President George Brain. Alongside the golf tournament there will also be a long list of raffles, auctions and other fun activities provided by local businesses sponsoring the event. Some of the prizes included are a brand-new car for a Hole-in-One, provided

by Dwayne Lane’s Arlington, and a Stay and Play Package at the Angel of the Winds Casino Resort. “I’ve been very involved with the community for the last few years, and I love to spend time giving back to the people that have been so welcoming since I’ve moved here. It’s a great cause and I don’t know how you could not be excited to invest time in causes that help everyone around you,” said Brain. The Gleneagle Com-

munity Foundation is a nonprofit organization that was established in 2018 with the intent to bring more art to Gleneagle, and the surrounding areas in Arlington. They work with their volunteer community to enact positive change in the area including working with the food bank and other local fundraisers. As the foundation grows, they are also planning on establishing an annual scholarship for students pursuing secondary

education at a college or trade school. If you want to pre-register you can email gleneaglecf@gmail.com, call or text 206-954-5739 or contact Bill Banfield at gleneaglemensclub@gmail.com. Or if you want to stay up to date on the Gleneagle Community Foundation you can check out their Facebook page at https://w w w.facebook. com/The-GleneagleC ommunity-Foundation-2193462217410084/.


Communities

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August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

5

Hibulb curator recognized with award By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com This August the Washington State History museum recognized Tessa Campbell and Fred Poyner IV for their work helping to create the Interwoven oral history project. The Interwoven project helps to tell the story of those with Nordic and Native heritage that are from the Pacific Northwest. As a result of their efforts Poyner and Campbell received the 2019 Peace and Friendship Award. Campbell, a senior curator with Tulalip’s Hibulb Cultural Center, said that the award was a surprise to her. “The Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle, located in Ballard, wanted it to be a

Pet

surprise,” she said. Poyner applied for the award for himself and Campbell. “It was a joint project that we worked on together,” said Campbell. “The Nordic Heritage Museum applied for a grant for an oral history project. It was for an oral history project about individuals in the Pacific Northwest area that have Nordic and Native American history,” she said. The museum officials were looking for a unique project to undertake. “To their knowledge there wasn’t a project about oral Scandinavian, Nordic, Native history,” said Campbell. In 2018 a symposium was held at the Nordic Heritage Museum and in 2019 one was held at the Hibulb Cultural Center.

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Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County

Wednesday, August 21, through Tuesday, August 27 Wednesday, August 21 Sunrise 6:11 am • Sunset 8:11 pm 3:56 am 9:35 am 3:41 pm 9:46 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

2.5 ft 8.2 ft 3.4 ft 10.1 ft

Thursday, August 22 Sunrise 6:12 am • Sunset 8:09 pm 4:41 am 10:39 am 4:26 pm 10:22 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

2.0 ft 8.0 ft 4.5 ft 9.8 ft

Friday, August 23 Last Quarter Sunrise 6:14 am • Sunset 8:07 pm 5:32 am 11:57 am 5:23 pm 11:03 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

1.5 ft 8.0 ft 5.6 ft 9.5 ft

Saturday, August 24 Sunrise 6:15 am • Sunset 8:05 pm 6:29 am 1:29 pm 6:42 pm 11:54 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

1.0 ft 8.3 ft 6.4 ft 9.3 ft

Sunday, August 25 Sunrise 6:17 am • Sunset 8:03 pm 7:29 am 2:58 pm 8:12 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

0.3 ft 8.9 ft 6.7 ft

Monday, August 26 Sunrise 6:18 am • Sunset 8:01 pm 12:53 am 8:27 am 3:58 pm 9:25 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

9.3 ft -0.4 ft 9.6 ft 6.5 ft

Tuesday, August 27 Sunrise 6:19 am • Sunset 7:59 pm

1:55 am 9:33 am 1:42 pm 10:19 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

9.5 ft -1.1 ft 10.2 ft 6.0 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.

“Both events were well attended and we received a lot of publicity,” said Campbell. “It was very successful and they are going to continue the project at a national level. They’re hoping to interview people in the midwest because there are a lot of tribes and Norwegian people that live there,” she said. The project helped to look at the intersection of two identities and tell the stories of those experiences. “There are a lot of people who have interesting stories about growing up in both cultures,” said Campbell. “It’s interesting to learn, for me, how identity is personal and people can take parts of their identity, their language and their food, and it comes together like putting the pieces of a puz-

zle together,” she said. There were also many similarities between the two cultures that made them similar. “The Norwegians also come from a strong fishing community and they also build their own boats and we built canoes,” said Campbell. Both cultures also often celebrated the art that their people had made, and some of the people who were interviewed had influences of both Native and Nordic styles. “You can just see it in his artwork,” said Campbell. She encourages people to come down to Tulalip’s Hibulb Cultural Center and to Ballard’s Nordic Heritage Museum. “If anybody hasn’t visited the Hibulb Cultural Center

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Hibulb Cultural Center senior curator Tessa Campbell in front of one of the museum’s current exhibits about Coast Salish wool on Aug. 9. or the Nordic Heritage Museum, I think it is good to visit both of them,” she said.

More information about the local center is available at hibulbculturalcenter.org.


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August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Evergreen State Fair

www.northcountyoutlook.com

The Evergreen State Fair in Monroe 2019

Evergreen State Fair honors Arlington family By Nathan Whalen nathan@northcountyoutlook.com

When the Tillman family started farming in the early 20th Century, they had a cow, a pig, a chicken and a big garden. As development came, they have been farming from the same location east of Arlington. "It's pretty mind-boggling, it really, really is," said Donald Tillman, 85. He noted the area had more than 70 family-sized fair farms. "I'm the only one left." The Tillman family will be honored during the Evergreen State Fair in Monroe when they will be named a Snohomish County Centennial Farm. "They are the basis of our agriculture community in Snohomish County," Linda Neunzig said of families like the Tillmans. She is the agriculture coordinator in the Snohomish County Executive Office and acts as a liaison between farmers and county government. "They normally start with a small settlement and then grow, and grow, and grow," Neunzig said. In 2018, the Bartelheimer family of Snohomish was recog-

nized for spending at least 100 years in farming. The Centennial Farm recognition is given to farms that have been operated by the same family on the same land for at least 100 years, Neunzig said. The Tillman family will be recognized during the Evergreen State Fair's opening ceremonies with a reception to follow and fair-goers can learn about the Tillman family and their farm thanks to a large display placed at the entrance to the fair. Tillman's father, Carl, settled in the Arlington Heights area after emigrating from Sweden. The family's farm consisted of a oneroom cabin on 40 acres of land. The house lacked electricity or running water and had an outhouse. Originally they grew fruit, but switched to a dairy farm because they found it to be more prosperous, according to a Tillman family history on the Evergreen State Fair website. When Donald was 15, he took over running the farm after his father died. "I didn't know much to start with and I don't know much now," Tillman joked. He said

Donald and Anna Tillman at their Arlington Heights farm. he didn't socialize as he worked on the farm to pay the debt off. He also worked at another farm and, when he turned 18, worked the graveyard shift at a plywood company. He earned his GED, and

thanks to the help of county extension agents learned about fields, soils, rotational grazing and seed variety, according information from the Evergreen State Fair. Tillman served in the Korean War where he served as a medic

COURTESY PHOTO

and he married his wife, Anna, in 1960. They have three children — Diane, John and Carol. The family is still involved with the farm. "We're still farming. We're still active," Donald Tillman said.


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Evergreen State Fair

August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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The Evergreen State Fair in Monroe 2019

Evergreen State Fair Schedule of Events Explore and celebrate Snohomish County’s shared, rich agriculture heritage, delicious food and drink, entertainment, artisan goods, and carnival rides by enjoying the Evergreen State Fair in Monroe. See a beekeeper, goat milker, expert ax thrower, soon-to-be urban farmer extraordinaire, champion pie eater, master of chicken agility, or soaring high above the fair on the Ferris wheel. Enjoy the wonder of experiencing something new, the sweet nostalgia of revisiting old favorites and the beauty of sharing all of this in community. All are welcome to wonder and wander at the fair. New beer and wine gardens Beer and wine will be allowed in the grandstand section of the concert venue. There will be a family section for those who would like to sit in that section with no alcohol. All grandstand seats are festival seating and are only $20-$30, including fair admission. Reserved VIP floor chairs and bleachers will have access to the beer and wine garden for the second year in a row. All tickets can be purchased at EvergreenFair.org. In order to enhance the fairgoer experience, beer and wine gardens will be available to guests 21+ every day of the fair, including at concerts and Speedway events. First Building Listed on Snohomish County Register of Historic Places The Shannahan Cabin, a favorite for 50 years when it was relocated on the fairgrounds, will be awarded the first building to be listed on the Snohomish County Register of Historic Places with a Plaque Unveiling on Aug. 22 at 11:30 a.m. in Frontierland. The Shannahan

Cabin is a log cabin built by an early Snohomish County settler, Robert Shannahan. The cabin is representative of Snohomish County’s pioneer heritage and is one of the only remaining intact pioneer cabins in the county that is accessible to the general public. Back by popular demand n Maker’s Market – The popular Maker’s Market expanded and moved into the north section of the Grandstands. See local artisans at work making and selling one-of-a-kind art works and craft goods. Artists rotate throughout fair time. n Duck Races — The crowd loving Great American Duck Races are back this year. Daily races will be held at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. and are free with gate admission.

Thursday, Aug. 22 — Opening Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Gate special: Free admission with donation of three cans of food per person before 3 p.m. Sponsored by BECU. Friday, Aug. 23 — Agriculture Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Saturday, Aug. 24 — Race Day  Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Sunday, Aug. 25 — Dia de la Familia Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday, Aug. 26 — Senior Citizen's Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Gate special: Free admission for senior citizens age 62 and older. Tuesday, Aug. 27 — Two for One Tuesday Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Gate special: Buy one gate admission, get one of equal value for free before 2 p.m. Sponsored by Black Pine Spas. 

Wednesday, Aug. 28 — Family Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Family special: $30 gate admission up to 4 people all day.

Thursday, Aug. 29 — Kid's Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Gate special — Free gate admission for children 12 years and younger.

Friday, Aug. 30 — Military Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Gate special: Free gate admission for active or veteran military personnel and immediate dependents (proper identification required). Sponsored by Black Pine Spas and Northwest Chevy Dealers.  Saturday, Aug. 31 — Rodeo Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.  Sunday, Sept. 1 — Demo Derby Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 

Monday, Sept. 2 — Labor Day Fair hours — 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Carnival hours — 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.  Gate special: Discounted admission for everyone. Sponsored by Comcast.


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August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Evergreen State Fair

www.northcountyoutlook.com

The Evergreen State Fair in Monroe 2019

Evergreen State Fair Concert Schedule The grandstand will be bumping for five nights throughout the Evergreen State Fair in Monroe with an eclectic mix of rock, country, Christian, and hip hop performances scheduled. Five concerts are on tap starting with Switchfoot on Aug. 26 and wrapping up with Aloe Blacc on Aug. 30. Tickets can be purchased at www.evergreenfair.org. For the first time, beer and wine will be

allowed in the grandstand section. A family section is available for people who want to sit in an area without alcohol. All grandstand seats are festival seating and are only $20-$30, including fair admission. Reserved VIP floor chairs and bleachers will have access to the beer and wine garden for the second year in a row. All tickets can be purchased at the fair's website at EvergreenFair.org.

Switchfoot Monday, Aug. 26 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $30-$60 After 10 albums, multiple hit singles, millions of records sold, a Grammy award and 20 years of touring, in late 2017, Switchfoot decided to take a long deserved, much needed hiatus. Their goals? To think on difficult, important questions about the band and themselves personally, including: “Why are we doing this?” The answers weren’t long in coming and are musically evident in the 14 remarkable songs that make up the 2019 release of "Native Tongue" a creative juggernaut spawned by singer Jon Foreman’s realization that the answer to “why?” was to “pursue joy.” "Joy" became the paramount goal in his life and music. "Native Tongue" marks the 11th record since the band's 1997’s debut, "The Legend of Chin," which started Switchfoot on a path of critical and fan acclaim for albums including 2003’s multi-platinum breakthrough "The Beautiful Letdown," the Grammy awardwinning "Hello Hurricane" (2009), and "Fading West," which was also the name of a documentary on the band. Brett Young Tuesday, Aug. 27 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25-$70 Delivering four consecutive No. 1 platinum-certified hits, Brett Young was recently named American Society of Compos-

ers, Authors and Publishers 2018 Country Songwriter-Artist of the Year for his “melodic craftsmanship”(Billboard), and his triple-platinum hit “In Case You Didn’t Know,” which received the top honor at the BMI Country Awards as its Song of the Year. Young has also garnered nominations from ACM, Billboard, Teen Choice, CMT and CMA Awards as he continues to rack up nonstop hits as “one of country music’s most reliable new hitmakers”(Tennessean). www.brettyoungmusic.com/. Newsboys with special guest Adam Agee Wednesday, Aug. 28 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20-$55 Sponsored by ChildFund and produced by Premier Productions in partnership with the Newsboys, the summer leg of the “Newsboys United Tour” includes a special appearance by singer/songwriter Adam Agee. One of the most influential bands in Christian music history, Newsboys have sold more than 8 million records. Newsboys’ signature songs include “We Believe,” “He Reigns,” “Miracles” “Born Again.” Their platinum-certified mega hit, “God’s Not Dead,” inspired one of the most popular Christian film franchises of all time, Pure Flix’s God’s Not Dead and God’s Not Dead 2. Find more information at www.newsboys.com/and www.adam-agee.com/.

See CONCERTS on page 10

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The Evergreen State Fair in Monroe 2019

Take the bus to the Evergreen State Fair Avoid gridlock and parking hassles at the Evergreen State Fair by taking the bus. Community Transit this year has added additional evening trips to get both workers and fairgoers home from the Fair, which runs Aug. 23 through Sept. 2 at the fairgrounds in Monroe. Community Transit has direct bus service to the Fair from Everett in the west and Gold Bar in the east. During Fair hours, buses will take you directly to the West Gate entrance. Bus schedules are available at www.communitytransit. org/Schedules. Community Transit has also extended last trip times from the Fair so people can take a bus home after the Fair ends for the night. The Fair closes at 10 p.m. daily and the carnival closes at 11 p.m. daily. The Fair and carnival will both close at 7 p.m. on Labor Day. The last trips leaving the fairgrounds are: n Weekdays – 11:37 p.m. to Everett; 11:20 p.m. to Gold Bar n Saturdays – 11:43 p.m. to Everett; 11:40 p.m. to Gold Bar

n Sundays – 11:34 p.m. to Everett; 11:35 p.m. to Gold Bar n Labor Day – 8:34 p.m. to Everett; 8:35 p.m. to Gold Bar The fairgrounds are served by Community Transit Routes 270 and 271 Monday through Friday, running every 30 minutes during the morning and evening peak hours, and every hour the rest of the day. Route 271 serves the fairgrounds Saturday, Sunday and Labor Day. Taking the bus is easy Taking the bus to the

Fair is easy. Adult fares are $2.50, youth fares (6-18) fares are $1.75 and Reduced Fares (Senior/Disabled/ Medicare) are $1.25 with a reduced fare card. Please bring exact change if paying with cash. If you don’t want to deal with cash, use an ORCA card. You can buy a monthly pass or load money directly onto an ORCA card, then just tap and ride. With an ORCA card, you get a two-hour transfer with your ride. Get an ORCA card at a participating Safeway or QFC store; if you want

to buy a youth or reduced fare ORCA card, visit the RideStore at Lynnwood Transit Center. Learn more about ORCA at www.communitytransit.org/ORCA. People with limited incomes may qualify for reduced fares through ORCA LIFT. Learn more about ORCA LIFT at www.communit yt ransit.org/OR-

CALIFT. Park for free Free parking is available at park & rides throughout Snohomish County. If you Ride Routes 270 and 271, you can park at Everett Station, 3201 Smith Ave., or at the Gold Bar, Snohomish or Sultan park & ride lots. Riders will need to walk out to Avenue D to

catch the bus outside the Snohomish Park & Ride. Many other routes connect to these routes in Everett or Snohomish. Use the online Trip Planner at www. communitytransit.org/ TripPlanner or call Customer Service at 425-3537433 (RIDE) to plan a bus trip from anywhere in the county.

Port Gardner Bay Chris Covington, P.e. - Winemaker Linnea M Covington, Ph.D - Co-owner 3006 Rucker Avenue Everett, Washington

425.339.0293 wine@portgardnerbaywinery.com


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August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Evergreen State Fair

www.northcountyoutlook.com

The Evergreen State Fair in Monroe 2019

CONCERTS Continued from page 8

Born to be Wild Tour with special guests Jack Russell and Mike Pinera Thursday, Aug. 29 7 p.m. Tickets: $20-$40 Featuring former members of Steppenwolf (1977-1980), John Kay and Steppenwolf, The New Steppenwolf and other allstar players paying tribute to the band that brought you the hits “Born to be Wild,” “Magic Carpet Ride,” “Pusher,” and many more. n Glen Bui-Guitar (Steppenwolf 1978/80, Steppenwolf Revisited) n Danny Ironstone-Keyboards (John Kay and Steppenwolf — 1980/81, Steppenwolf Revisited) Danny has toured and wrote songs for countless famous artists and bands. n Bryan Knapp-Drums (Steppenwolf Revisited, Iron Butterfly) n Dillon Smith-Vocals (Steppenwolf Revisited, n Dillon Cash Band /Johnny Cash Tribute) n Jack Russell-Vocals (Great White)

Will do some songs from his hits too. n Steve Unger-Bass (Metal Church, Steppenwolf Revisited) n Mike Pinera (Singer-songwriter and guitarist) — former bands: Iron Butterfly, Alice Cooper, Blue Image and Ramatam. Aloe Blacc Friday, Aug. 30 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25-$70 Raised on salsa, merengue, and cumbia, Blacc fell in love with hip-hop as a kid and started writing rap songs when he was nine. With his lyrics drawing influence from socially conscious artists like KRS-One, he put out his first hip-hop mixtape at age 17. Later developing a fierce admiration for such soul musicians as Donny Hathaway and Marvin Gaye, he also discovered an affinity for folk-rock singer/songwriters during his college years. In creating his upcoming album, Blacc has kept focused on making music meant to inspire a positive shift in mindset. “When things happening in the world seem so terrible and dark, it’s so easy to get stuck in all the negative,” he says. “But I try to do whatever I can to help people out of that. I want my music to be the light.” Find more information at www. aloeblacc.com/.

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August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Communities

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Elemental Cider opens in Arlington By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The hard cider company Elemental Cider and their taproom have moved to Arlington. The company was originally in Woodinville, but opened their doors for the first day of business in their new location on Aug. 16 at 6015 180th St. NE #101, Arlington. Their taproom has both indoor and outdoor seating and a selection of alcohol and food. “We will have cider, beer, wine, soda and pizza,” said Nathan Timke, regional sales manager for Elemental Cider. “And the menu will expand the longer we are here, but it will start out with pizza,” he said. The business will be kidfriendly and dog-friendly, said Timke. They plan to add some potential entertainment features like pool tables and bocce balls to the Arlington location as well, he said. Owner Brian Callahan said he has been making cider for a while now. “We started in 2012 as a winery, and we did wine

and cider and pizza. We ended up getting away from the wine side since then and have just made cider since 2014,” he said. Their cider is sold and available around the Puget Sound region. They decided to move to Arlington because they needed a bigger space, said Callahan. “We were in Woodinville, which was a big winery hub, and we just couldn’t find space down there that we liked. It was either too big or too small, so we researched some of the emerging markets and saw that Arlington had some of the biggest growth trends,” he said. Timke said that the new location will work well for their business. “We needed more space and Woodinville is pricey,” he said. “We were able to get this great facility and in Woodinville we didn’t have space for the food." The location is near Skookum Brewery who have a similar tasting room setup less than a block away. “We’ve partnered with Skookum and had a permanent handle over there for a number of years,” said Callahan.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Owner Brian Callahan behind the bar of the Elemental Cider taproom at the business’ new Arlington location which opened on Aug. 16 He said he enjoys being a part of the growing hard cider market. “Cider is just such an emerging market. It’s not really fully developed yet, but it’s very in-line with beer in terms of the consumer. So it’s been fun to be innovative,” said Callahan. Timke said that the cider is crisp, clean and tart. “One of the reasons everything is so clean and clear is the filtration process we use,” he said. “And that also adds to the consistency.”

“Our cider is super approachable. Super clean, super crisp and it’s a little more acidic than most ciders on the markets. The juices punch through really well,” said Callahan. Timke wanted to thank everyone who stopped by for the grand opening day on Aug. 16. “The Arlington community has been very welcoming,” he said. The current schedule for the taproom is from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, and from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sunday. More information about the local business is available at elementalhardcider. com.

Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: NAIDA CLAIRE BALAM, Deceased, NO. 19-4-01377-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: August 7, 2019. Personal Representative: Ricky J. Balam Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01377-31.


Opinion

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n BEING FRANK

Tribes outraged by EPA move to roll back water quality standards

Treaty Indian tribes in western Washington are outraged that the Environmental Protection Agency is advancing the agenda of a small group of industrial polluters to undermine public health, science and decades of hard work by rolling back the water quality standards that we have been implementing for almost three years. The 2016 standards were supposed to make sure that seafood from Washington waters was safe for everyone to eat. EPA’s reversal no longer ensures that the human health criteria adequately protect Washington fish and shellfish consumers — including tribal members — from exposure to toxic pollutants. Our health should not be unjustly jeopardized by increased levels of known dangerous pollutants like PCBs and dioxins that accumulate in the environment and cause real harm to people, orcas, salmon and the entire ecology of the region. PCBs and dioxins are the source of most public health warnings in our state regarding fish and shellfish consumption. Industry wants to make this issue about select groups of people like tribes, Asian and Pacific Islanders and others who consume more fish and shellfish than other residents. The truth is that this issue is about all of us and

Lorraine Loomis

everything we depend on. Under the federal Clean Water Act, tribes and states — not the federal government — are responsible for setting water quality standards under their jurisdictions. EPA is allowed to revise existing standards only when they are deemed not strong enough. That’s not the case here because our current standards are among the most protective of human health in the nation. That’s why we will fight this move with everything we have. We will stand with all 29 federally recognized tribes in Washington, the entire Democratic congressional delegation, the governor, attorney general’s office, environmental groups and others who oppose EPA’s actions. Tribes applaud Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson for filing a lawsuit challenging EPA’s decision to roll back our water quality standards. “Trump’s EPA cannot change important water quality protections at the

whim of industry interests. It’s not only disruptive to Washington’s environmental efforts over the past two years, it’s a clear violation of the Clean Water Act,” he said in announcing the lawsuit. PCBs and dioxins are known carcinogens and we are going to have to deal with them one way or the other. The question is whether we want to do that when they’re still in the water or after they have entered our bodies and those of the fish, shellfish, orca and other species we are working so hard to protect. Why are polluting industries trying to poison all of us? Simply for their short-term economic profit. In the process, EPA’s decisions threaten the integrity of the entire Washington seafood economy. Industry and EPA should be ashamed of their actions. It is unconscionable to knowingly allow more cancer-causing and other toxic chemicals to be released in our waters. Being Frank is a monthly column written by the chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chair, the column represents the natural resources management interests and concerns of the treaty Indian tribes in western Washington.

August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

13

Our Favorite Quotes "There is nothing I like better at the end of a hot summer's day than taking a short walk around the garden. You can smell the heat coming up from the earth to meet the cooler night air." Author ­— Peter Mayle Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

n LETTER TO THE EDITOR Re-elect Barb Tolbert

The mayoral election that's just around the corner will be important for the future of Arlington. The area is in rapid growth and leadership is key to a successful future. I believe Barb Tolbert should be re-elected by Arlington. Tolbert has led Arlington very well and ushered the city into a prosperous time. With new businesses moving in, and previous ones thriving, there's no doubt Tolbert understands the local economy. She carries some big name endorsements and has years of experience. The City Council, in general, has done well to curb crime, prevent increasing water/sewage costs, maintain responsible budgeting, improve parks and business areas, increase job opportunities, and overall making Arlington a fun place to be. With Tolbert leading the Council there's no ques-

tion that she plays a major role in these accomplishments Local news station Q13 Fox recently had a feature explaining how Arlington is approaching homelessness differently than other cities, and it's working. Arlington, led by Tolbert, is an example to other cities that are struggling with local problems. Recent skepticism aimed at Tolbert and the Council is unwarranted. The city has done a great job at maintaining the downtown area and keeping it small business and family oriented. The best way to see/understand the decision making of Tolbert and the Council is by going to a City Council meeting. Come join me and other residents at the meetings. Avery Hufford Arlington

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Communities

August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

Submit your events via email to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com August 21 - August 27

Apologetics Forum: Meeting on Friday, Aug. 23 at 7 p.m. at the Atonement Free Lutheran Church, 6905 172nd St. NE, Arlington, WA. Ron Payne, Creation Speaker and Tour leader, speaks on Lake Missoula Flood, a Message of Catastrophe. Details at ApologeticsForum.org. Refreshments plus resources at meeting.

COMING EVENTS

Bluegrass Boogie Fundraising Event: The Stillaguamish Senior Center is hosting a Bluegrass Boogie

Fundraising Event on Saturday, Sept. 28, 6-9 p.m., gesturing the Cliff Perry Band. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.. Tickers are $30 or $25 if a member of the center. A chuckwagon dinner will be served and there will be a no host winds and beer bar. Raffle ticks will be sold for more than 30 items. Must have Tickets to attend. Tickets available at the center. The Stillagumish Senior Center is at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd.

tact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will return your call. Post 178 meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.” Volunteers for Animal Care Wanted: The NOAH Center in Stanwood is looking for volunteers. NOAH offers several volunteer opportunities to help care for their adoptable animals. If you are interested in volunteering you can go to their website at www.thenoahcenter.org or call 360-6297055.

ONGOING EVENTS Assistance for veterans: Military Veterans seeking help with the VA may con-

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HOUSECLEANING: Disabled veteran seeking families in need of housecleaning. Reliable, trustworthy service. Please call Ray at 206-751-0939.

Jam Session for People with Disabilities: Youth and adults of all abilities are invited to Village Music and Arts Friday jam sessions featuring live music by Jon Dalgarn and Voices of the Village. Bring your own instrument or use theirs. Sessions are every Friday, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at 338 North McLeod, Arlington, WA. Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Call Michelle at 360-653-7752 ext. 14 for more information or to sign up. PS 433 meeting: TOPS 433 meets at Arlington Boys & Girls Club on Fridays, 9:45-10:45. All welcome. For more information go to www.TOPS.org. TOPS meeting: TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets Friday mornings, 9:30 a.m., at the Marysville United Methodist church, 5600 64th St. NE in Marysville. All are welcome. For more information go to www.TOPS.org. Al-Anon and Alateen: Families of problem drinkers can find support by calling 425-348-7828 or by going to www.dist23.org. District 23 encompasses most of north Snohomish County and has a directory of 23 meetings in the area, including Marysville and Arlington meetings.

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FLY-IN Continued from page 1

event for the whole family. The kids really enjoy seeing all the planes," said local parent Kristen Dollison. "It just brings the community together," she added. Many families come down for the fun time for kids. "This is our first time here and it's been perfect," said local parent Marisa Betz. "We wanted to come down for the kids. They're having a great time." Families also like the mix of activities that are available throughout the Fly-In. “They have a wonderful air show and a mix of things. Warbirds, a military camp with re-enactors and a lot of homebuilt airplanes or airplanes that have been restored, and those are just cool to see,” said Larry Simburger, who organized this year's hot air balloon section of the festival. The event also brings

many in the community together. “Other than that it’s just a gathering of the community. There is a lot of people who have put a lot of time and effort into this and they love it, we all love it,” said volunteer Dave Wold. He has been with the event for about 15 years and said that he enjoys being a part of the Fly-In. “When you do it year after year it becomes almost a family of volunteers,” said volunteer Debbie Wold, Dave's wife. “You go a whole year without seeing everybody and then you’re all hugging,” she said. Simburger said after the great reception to last year's hot air balloon shaped like a birthday cake, the balloon section of this year's festival was increased. Three special hot air balloons were brought along with other regular balloons and a balloon glow was held during the evening.

SALE Continued from page 1

Although some of the shoppers hadn't heard of the event. "We just came out because of this one, but now we know there's more we might go around," said local Abraham Cardenas. He said he thought the idea of the All Marysville Garage Sale was a good one. "I think it's smart because it creates a day for people to just go out and hit a lot of garage sales," he said. "Instead of going out and maybe hitting one, having a whole day for them makes sense." Community member William

“It’s a lot of fun to see people’s eyes light up and they don’t often know much of how hot air balloons operate,” said Simburger. A cartoon bird, an anthropomorphized clock and a butterfly balloon were part of this year's festival. “People love them. This is inflated, animated art that is larger than life,” said Bob Romaneschi, owner of the butterfly hot air balloon and local business Ballooning Snohomish. “There’s so many balloons now that bring life to so many characters,” he said. Romaneschi took his first hot air balloon ride after he bought his first house. “The realtor was using a balloon for advertising and we jokingly said ‘if we bought a house would you take us for a balloon ride,’” he said. Since then he's only gotten more involved and started his own business, and said he enjoys giving people hot air balloon trips around

Frankhouser is the main organizer for the event. He said he enjoys the event because it gets community members connected. “A big part is just being able to meet your neighbors,” said Frankhouser. “These days it can be hard to get out so it’s good having people just in their neighborhoods allowing them to chat." Frankhouser partnered with local businesses to put out more advertising this year, including the Fahlman Property Group and the WhisteStop Sweet Shop. The advertising went around to other nearby places around the county such as Lake Stevens. “This also brings people outs of the

the town of Snohomish. “There’s no tipping, rocking or swaying so you get a feeling like you’re floating above the trees,” Romaneschi said. This year saw the date of the festival move back from mid-July to mid-August. There were a few reasons for the move. “First, it was combined with a lot of other events that we were doing in Arlington at the exact same time,” said Banfield. That put a big workload on local volunteers and city staff for the month of July. Secondly, the mid-August date is better for families. “In July, being so close to the longest day of the year, a lot of our events that had to be done in the evening were happening really late,” said Banfield. “That was frankly too late for a lot of little kids.” More information about the annual event is available at arlingtonflyin.org.

Marysville area into town,” said Frankhouser, which is good for the community. He said many of the people who held garage sales during last year's sale returned this year to put on another sale. “We definitely had some people call up in the spring because they wanted to sign up as early as possible," he said. “I like just the excitement of the community members wanting to sign up.” Those who registered their sale for at least one day of the event got put on an online map to help guide people to various garage sales. More information about the event is available on their website at marysvillegsale.com.

August 21, 2019 - August 27, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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n WHISTLING GARDENER

It's time to plant some fall veggies Last week I once again be mentioned that stocking vegetable August was a starts for planting good time to into our raised plant all sorts of beds (or wherplants, but I failed ever it is that you to mention veg- By Steve Smith grow your vegetables. It might gies). If you have seem hard to imagine that in any room in the garden afthe heat of August we would ter you have pulled out your be planting vegetable crops peas, onions, beets, lettuces, that thrive in the cooler time zucchini (yes, by late August of the year, but in reality this you should be sick and tired is the time to get them estab- of zucchini and ready to lished. It won’t be long be- yank it up), you can plunge fore the day and night tem- in some new transplants and peratures of September will in 6 to 8 weeks you will be mimic those back in March eating fresh produce from and April, which are the per- the garden once again. You fect conditions to grow all can also direct-sow root of our root and shoot crops crops, like carrots and beets, like lettuce, cabbage, broc- and harvest them later in the coli, carrots, kale, garlic, and winter or early in the spring. chard, to name just a few. Like any time we put new Before the end of this plants into the ground, it is month, garden centers will essential to amend the soil

with compost and enrich it with an organic fertilizer. Remember that whatever you had growing in that space consumed the nutrients in the soil and when you harvested it you removed those nutrients with the plant. In addition to compost and fertilizer, I also like to add some earthworm castings, some lime and a product called Azomite (this is a natural mineral product mined in Utah) that is rich in micronutrients. The bottom line is that it is incredibly important to get those new plants off to a good start and growing well before the soils cool down too much —adding lots of good food is the secret. Once your crops are planted you should be in good shape during the

months of September and October, but watch out when we get into November because we could have some serious frosts. A “frost blanket” is an inexpensive item that can be purchased at any garden center and when applied over the top of a crop will add at least 5 degrees of protection. You can also create temporary structures out of PVC pipes and cover them with clear plastic that will capture the heat from the sun and keep things growing nicely. Be sure to keep the ends open on the cloche to let air pass through (you can close them at night) and don’t forget that you will have to water inside, since the plastic cover will deflect the rain. Growing a fall crop of veggies is largely a race

COURTESY PHOTO

The are a number of vegetables that can be planted in August. against time and while we have no control over what Mother Nature will throw at us, if we plant early, prepare our soil and have some frost protection ready, then we should be able to expect a reasonable return on our efforts. It’s really no different than when we plant a cool season crop in the spring and hope to get it growing and harvested before it gets too hot. If you were success-

ful in the spring, then you should be successful in the fall. And if you didn’t get the outcome you wanted or haven’t tried growing veggies before, it’s a fun experience and practice makes perfect — give it a shot. What have you got to lose?

Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

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