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July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Marysville's summer bash provides fun for entire family By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The city of Marysville brought together children’s music, summer water fun and more activities for families at their second annual Splish Splash Summer Bash. The Comeford Park event on June 26 brings together kids and families for a children’s concert and fun at the local splash pad. Lauren Woodmansee, cultural arts supervisor with the city of Marysville’s Parks, Culture and Recreation Department, said that the event went “phenomenal.” “The day before and the morning of we were a little worried about the weather See BASH on page 11

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Eagle Creek Elementary teacher Kim Allen helps Nevaeh Bembry pick out a book at the Arlington School District’s Books on the Bus program which kicked off for the summer on June 26.

ASD bookmobile travels to local neighborhoods By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Lilly Guerrero plays at the Comeford Park splash pad during Marysville’s Splish Splash Summer Bash on June 26.

Arlington School District’s bookmobile began traveling to local neighborhoods again for the summer on June 26. The Books on the Bus program gives local kids an

opportunity to read during summer break by traveling out to them each Wednesday until Aug. 14. Kids can check out up to three books at the bus to keep until the next week.

See BOOKS on page 2

DABA kicks off summer The Downtown Arlington Summer Kickoff brings county music artist Aaron Crawford to Legion Park By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Country music artist Aaron Crawford performs at Legion Park as part of the Downtown Arlington Summer Kickoff on June 28.

A crowd came out to Arlington’s Legion Park for a free Aaron Crawford concert and to enjoy family activities at the Downtown Arlington Summer Kickoff. The event on June 28 was organized by the Downtown Arlington Business Association. This is the first year that they have organized a concert for the downtown to start off the summer season. “This is just to show the support of the businesses down here for the community. The city does their concert series so we just wanted to give a big one

to kick it off and bring more attention to the downtown,” said Lisa Cisneros, DABA president. DABA brought in nationallyknown country music artist Aaron Crawford for the event this year. They also brought in face painting, giant yard games, a cookie station, a mechanical bull, food trucks, a beer garden, and other food vendors as part of the event. “There’s lot’s of fun stuff here,” said Cisneros. Many families came down because they were excited about the country music concert. “We’re very into the community. We usually go up to Terrace Park but when we found out that Crawford is coming here we were like ‘yes, let’s stop by for the night,’” said local parent Adam Storey.

Storey has been to the Terrace Park music series in the past, and enjoyed seeing one held in the downtown. “I think it’s great that they brought it here downtown where the extra businesses can prosper, plus it’s also easier to get in and out of,” he said. Local parent Samantha Mullis also said she was enjoying the event with her family. “It’s awesome, I love it,” she said. “I like the free country music.” Cisneros said that the event came together well. “I’m so happy about the turnout. There were a lot of people expressing interest in coming but we were worried about the weather, but it’s worked out and we have a good turnout,” she said.

See SUMMER on page 11

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July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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“This is the sixth year of our bookmobile running through our community and our goal is to bring books out to our students and families throughout the summer to really help them keep up with their reading,” said Terri Bookey, director of early learning and categorical programs at the district. The district runs the program so that students don’t let their reading skills slip during the summer break. “As we know, the summer slump is a real thing. If kids are not engaged in some sort of academics we will see a drop in their skills when they come back in the fall,” said Bookey. “By providing these things right in their neighborhood we’re giving kids a way to stay engaged,” she said. Parents said they thought the program was good at encouraging their kids to read. “This is our first year coming to the book bus. We kept trying to come last year

but we were late. But they loved it today,” said local parent Veronica Bembry. Local parent April Bacon said her kids came last year as well. “We really like it. The kids look forward to it,” she said. “I think it’s great because it gets them excited about reading books,” she said. Students who turn in their books get a point for each book they read and are able to spend those points on prizes at the end of the summer. Bookey said they try to make the program enjoyable for the kids. “We’ll play games with them, and this year we added a puppet theater so they can do some puppet shows,” she said. “I think they like the fun of it, and they love seeing their teachers they might see during the school year,” she said. Bookey said that last year went well and they had about 400 students check out books from the program. “It’s been amazing every year and it grows every

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Faith Bembry holds grabs three books at the Arlington School District’s Books on the Bus program which kicked off for the summer on June 26. year,” she said. The collection is hundreds of books large and is sorted by grade level for the kids. Arlington’s bookmobile stops at five neighborhoods each Wednesday: the Mobile Estates on 67th Avenue from 9:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m., Crown Ridge Boulevard and Vista Avenue from

10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., the Timbers Apartments from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m., Presidents Elementary from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. and Eagle Creek Elementary from 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. The district’s Mathmobile also follows the same schedule but visits the neighborhoods on Mondays.

Marysville Salary Commission has new member, two returning ones Longtime Marysville resident Eric Berg, finance director for Bickford Ford, is the newest member of the Marysville Salary Commission. His appointment to complete a vacant term ending in June 2020 was confirmed by the Marysville City

Council on June 24 along with the reappointments of Robert Lovato and Donna Wright to three-year terms ending in 2022. Berg graduated from Marysville-Pilchuck High School, as did his three children. He also attended Everett and Shoreline com-

munity colleges. “I am excited about the growth of our city and I feel that we all need to be involved in keeping it a great place to live,” Berg wrote in his application. The Salary Commission meets annually to review the salaries paid to elected offi-

cials including the Mayor and City Council and determine appropriate salary increases or decreases. Meetings are open to the public and take place at Marysville City Hall. For more information, visit http://www. marysvillewa.gov/319/Salary-Commission.

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July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

CIC gets Council approval By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The Puget Sound’s 10th officially designated Manufacturing Industrial Center will be in the Smokey Point area. On June 27 the Puget Sound Regional Council voted unanimously to approve the designation for the Cascade Industrial Center (formerly known as the Arlington-Marysville Manufacturing Industrial Center before a recent name change). “The Cascade Industrial Center has achieved its designation today and joins our other center at Paine Field,” said Snohomish County Executive Dave Somers. He expects that the area will now be able to bring in more manufacturing jobs. Local officials have planned the area as an industrial center over the last several years. “This is a very exciting

day,” said Arlington Mayor Barbara Tolbert. “This center has been in operation for a number of years but this is a big milestone for it." The Puget Sound Regional Council receives tens of millions of dollars in federal funds each year that can be sent to the local manufacturing centers to pay for infrastructure and other improvements meant for industrial businesses. “Now that we’re recognized we’ll be able to compete for those funds,” said Tolbert. “We’ll be primed to compete for that money." Those federal funds are meant for the specifically designated centers. “The idea is not to spread those dollars around. We want to be strategic and spend those funds in areas that are supported for manufacturing and industry,” said Josh Brown, executive director of the Puget Sound Regional Council. The designation was a

long-time coming for many local officials. “Our cities have worked really hard and we have had requests to rezone the land, but we have kept it as a planned industrial center,” said Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring. The Cascade Industrial Center is largely next to the Arlington Airport in Smokey Point and in north Marysville. The hope for the area is to be a competitive place to attract manufacturing and industrial jobs. Tim Shoultz is a local CEO who has been investing in retail and office space in the county for about six years. “We broke ground in this region last September,” he said. “We believe that the area is ripe for development.” He said that his first development in the Cascade Industrial Center was filled about 90 percent with ten-

ants now. The majority of those tenants are coming from elsewhere, especially southern locations where the rent prices are higher. “There’s a huge amount of price reduction for these tenants,” said Shoultz. Brown said that the regional council has high expectations for the county. “We’re bullish on the region’s future,” he said. “And one of the areas that we have identified as a priority is this Cascade Industrial Center.” He said that the center will be able to accommodate about 25,000 jobs if it fills up. Even without federal funds, Nehring and Tolbert said the cities had already been working on developing the area. A 156th Street interchange is scheduled on I-5 for 2025 and the widening of SR-531 is planned for 2021. The cities have also been

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The boundaries of the planned Cascade Industrial Center that was recently officially designated a Manufacturing Industrial Center by the Puget Sound Regional Council working to quicken their permitting process. “We’ve been implementing a predictable and streamlined permitting process,” in Arlington, said

Tolbert, and Marysville adopted a similar program. More information about the Cascade Industrial Center is available at marysvillewa.gov/786.

Drive collects school supplies for kids The community’s help is needed to make sure hundreds of Marysville and Tulalip students have the tools they need to succeed. To help local children a School Supply Drive is currently underway. During the supply drive, which began July 1, community members can drop off critically needed school supplies to be distributed to the area’s most at-risk children. Every notebook and pencil can make a crucial difference for these kids in the upcoming school year. Backpacks, pencils, paper and binders are among the most needed supplies. Find a general school supply list at https://bit.ly/msdsupplies or pick one up at the Marysville School District Service Center, 4220 80th Street NE.   You can drop off school supplies at any of the following locations through Aug. 9:

n City of Marysville Parks, Culture and Recreation, 6915 Armar Road. n Marysville Community Food Bank, 4150 88th Street NE. n Marysville School District Service Center, 4220 80th Street NE. n Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce, 8825 34th Avenue NE, Suite C. n Tulalip Tribes Youth Services, 6700 Totem Beach Road. n Any Marysville Fire

District Station. n Marysville Library, 6120 Grove Street. n HomeStreet Bank, 1238 State Avenue. n Heritage Bank, 1031 State Avenue. n ProAction Physical Therapy, 6618 64th Street NE, Suite D. “We are very thankful to our Marysville and Tulalip community partners for taking the lead to support our students and families in need through the School Supply Drive,” said Marys-

ville School District Superintendent Jason Thompson. “This is yet another way that our community shows love and care for our youth and its citizens.” If you are the parent or guardian of children in need of school supplies for the upcoming year, pick up an application from your child’s school or one of the following locations: Marysville School District Service Center, Salvation Army, Marysville Community Food Bank, city of Marys-

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Sports

July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Chargers host basketball camps By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

FILE PHOTO

Jonathan Sahatdjian gets up high as he clears the practice hurdle during last year's camp at Lakewood High School on July 12, 2018.

Marysville plans summer camps By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com With the summer in full swing, Marysville Parks, Culture and Recreation is offering their Summer Sports Camps throughout July and August. There are three more youth camps left for the season including the Ultimate Sports Track and Field, Ultimate Sports Basketball and Tennis for Youth. “These camps fall in line with our mission to offer low-cost camps to the kids, provide them with opportunities to develop and have a lot of fun. The low-cost is the biggest part for me because we’ve been very successful in giving everyone in the community a chance to participate in what we offer,” said Marysville City Athletic Director Dave Hall. The Track and Field Camp, for kids ages 7–15, will be held July 8–11, from 9 a.m. to noon, at Lakewood High School. The cost for each participant will be $95. The camp is run by the Cougars’ award-winning coaching staff including cohead coaches Jeff Sowards and Monica Rooney, as well as Lakewood High School athletes. The goal of the camp is to work on proper techniques across multiple events including running,

throwing and jumping. On the final day there will be a track meet where each of the campers can compete against each other. The Basketball Camp, for ages 7–15, will be held from July 15–18, from 9 a.m. to noon,. at the Cedarcrest Middle School Gym, and will cost $95 per participant. The Snohomish County Basketball franchise, Washington Sabers, will be running the camp. They will be covering techniques such as ballhandling, shooting, passing free throws, rebounding, individual/team defense, triple threat and sportsmanship. The Tennis Camp, for ages 5-17, will be held from Aug. 5–8 and have four sessions from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Totem Middle School, and costs $27 per participant. The lessons will be directed by Mountlake Terrace Head Coach and Forest Crest Athletic Coach Daniel Brzovic. The camp will focus on the fundamentals of the sport and strategies for playing both singles and doubles. If you are looking for more information on the camps, you can find it at https://marysvillewa. gov/958/Summer-Camps or email Athletic Director Dave Hall at dhall@marysvillewa. gov.

FILE PHOTO

Player-Coach Keegan Bach hands the baton to camper Payton Langum during the 4 x 100-meter relay during last year's camp at Lakewood High School on July 12, 2018.

Marysville Getchell hosted their boys and girls youth basketball camps at the Marysville Getchell gym from June 24-27. Over the four days, the Chargers brought in two separate age groups including K–5th grade, from 9–10:30 a.m., and 6th–8th grade from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For the first time ever, both of the camps combined as the girls and boys practiced and competed side-by-side. “I think it’s huge to have these camps, not just for the kids in the area but also for our players to give back through coaching. It’s really special to let these kids connect with our older players and build relationships that they can use for inspiration,” said Marysville Getchell Girls Head Coach Shannon Grandbois. During the camp, Marysville Getchell’s head coaches and a collection of varsity players led the campers through multiple drills and competitions. The drills consisted of group exercises involving ball-handling, ball move-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Seventh-grader Jase Barnett, left, dribbles the ball up the court while sixth-grader Maverick Vaden, right, defends during one-on-one drills at Marysville Getchell High School on June 26.

ment, and fundamental play, as well as live scrimmages of 1-on-1, 3-on-3 and 5-on-5 games. “Our main goals for camp are to have fun, get better at basketball and show love for the game. I want to get these kids to have fun playing basketball and fall in love with it. It’s great to get to know the kids throughout the community and help them get

to know our program,” said Marysville Getchell Boys Head Coach Corby Schuh. Later this summer, the Chargers’ boys basketball program will be offering another camp for high schoolers, grades 9th– 12th. The camp will be on July 22–25, from 10 a.m. to noon, and will cost $40 per participant. This will give young athletes a chance to get a head start on the

season, compete alongside some of the best players in the district and get instruction from the Chargers’ varsity coaching staff. If you want to learn more about the Chargers’ camps, you can check out their information at https://www. msd25.org/o/district/page/ athletic-booster-clubs or email camp coordinator Debby Ford at mghsboosters@gmail.com.

Lakewood Cougars will hold annual passing tournament By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The 12th Annual Cougars Championship Passing Tournament and Lineman Challenge will be held on July 27. The Cougars’ 7-on-7 tournament has become one of the biggest offseason football events in the area as they bring in some of the biggest schools in Washington to compete. The competition will be held at Lakewood High School, with the games starting at 9 a.m. and lasting until the evening with the final championship game. The cost of team entry will be a $325 fee and include both the Passing Tournament and Lineman Challenge. “It’s been really fun to watch this grow from only five schools in the first year to over 20 schools now. We count on a ton of volunteers that help us out and we wouldn’t be able to do it without all of their help. It brings pride to our community because as a small 2A school we are able to bring some of the biggest schools in the state to compete here,” said Lakewood Head Coach Dan Teeter.

One of the separating factors of the tournament is that it requires the use of helmets and mouthguards in order to prevent injuries. This is a positive feature in preparing to play with limited vision as well as taking into account head trauma. Each game throughout the day will be setup into a 36-minute running clock, two 18-minute halves, and will be settled in overtime in a Kansas City Tie Breaker format. The tournament will be set up as a round-robin where each team is placed into fourteam divisions. The results of the three games will determine seeding into both the championship and consolation brackets. “I think this tournament allows them to come out to learn the schemes, work on timing and we get to see them compete. I don’t care if they are competing in baseball, basketball or any other sport; as long as they are working together and developing that chemistry then I support it. It’s all about working to become a better athlete in order to get ready for the fall,” said Coach Teeter.

FILE PHOTO

Lakewood quarterback Jared Taylor throws a bullet into the flats at Lakewood High School during last year's Championship Passing Tournament and Lineman Challenge on July 28, 2018.

The Cougars also developed the Linemen Challenge that allows the offensive and defensive linemen to compete for a trophy. The events include a tugof-war, bench competition

at 185 lbs., a tire-flip relay and more. If you are looking for more information or want to register you can contact Dan Teeter at dteeter@ lwsd.wednet.edu.


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July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

First Street Bypass work underway ____ “ By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Construction for Marysville’s First Street Bypass began in May and will continue through the next year and a half. The bypass will extend First Street so that it can connect to 47th Avenue, providing another east-west connection for the downtown Marysville area. "We've basically finished up our first month of work on the First Street Bypass project,” said Steve Miller, Marysville project manager for the First Street Bypass. "We're building some ground improvements to support the new roadway that will be going in between Alder Avenue and 47th Avenue,” said Miller. Marysville city officials had planned for a First Street Bypass for several years but decided to commit to the project with upcoming changes to SR-529. "It will be a limited access road to allow more traffic to move east from the downtown area,” said Miller. A new interchange from Interstate-5 will allow commuters to get off of the freeway onto SR-529 before it leads into Marysville. "People will be using the new intersection and we expect that project to be completed in the next few years,”

We're trying to reduce congestion on Fourth, especially to reduce the delays that result from the train traffic from the BNSF line.

____

Steve Miller

said Miller. With more traffic expected from the interchange in the downtown, city officials hope to build an additional route eastward for commuters. The additional road in the downtown area could also divert some of the traffic that typically takes Fourth Street right now. "We're trying to reduce congestion on Fourth Street, especially to reduce the delays that result from the train traffic from the BNSF line,” said Miller. The road is planned to become an arterial that includes bike lanes and a shared-use path on one side of the street. Utilities and power lines are expected to be moved underground along First Street during the project.

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The plans for the finished First Street Bypass from the city of Marysville. There will be five lanes on the road between State Avenue and Alder Avenue until it is reduced to two lanes from Alder Avenue to 47th Avenue. The city of Marysville purchased many of the

homes along First Street to begin the project and acquired one house through eminent domain, which the city paid $277,500 for. Altogether the project is expected to cost around $12 million.

"This project is being built with city funds,” said Miller. If contractors keep up with the current timeline they expect to finish in 2020, he said. "We expect to be done by

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the end of next year.” He said so far the work has gone well. "We are off to a good start,” said Miller. ”Our contractor has been very competent so far and we are pleased with them.”


6

Health

July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n Emily’s Wellness Wisdom

What you should know about healthy hydration Emily Countryman

Are your electrolytes in balance? As the hotter days draw near and we start to sweat more, we usually need to hydrate more. But did you know

that sometimes plain water just doesn't cut it? If our electrolytes are out of whack, we need to restore them. First, we need to understand what the crucial

electrolytes are, and some symptoms if we have an imbalance. The best way to really know is to have a metabolic blood panel done by your physician. Each electrolyte plays an essential role in the function of our body. Some of the most common electrolytes and their role in our bodies are: Calcium Calcium is best known for supporting healthy bones, but it's also an essential element in helping with muscle contractions and blood clotting. Some signs you could be low in calcium are weakness and muscle spasms. Signs your calcium is too high are kidney stones, abdominal pain, and depression. Magnesium Magnesium helps with proper heart rate, nerve function, digestion, and reducing anxiety. Typically, most people have low magnesium levels and may notice symptoms like constipation, anxiety, trouble sleeping, and muscle cramps. Those on certain

FILE PHOTO

When it comes to staying properly hydrated, sometimes plain water just doesn't cut it. blood pressure medications tend to run lower in magnesium as well. Phosphate Phosphate is closely tied to calcium, and low phosphate levels are seen when calcium levels are low. Some symptoms of low phosphate are breathing difficulties, muscle weakness, and fatigue. This is a less common electrolyte to be deficient in, but can happen if someone is malnourished, has alcoholism or a kidney disorder. Potassium Potassium is best known for keeping blood pressure

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levels steady. Too much potassium can be very dangerous as it can cause heartbeat irregularities and is commonly associated with kidney failure. Someone with low potassium may experience headaches and other dehydration symptoms. Sodium Sodium is responsible for the fluid control in our bodies. Too much sodium is typically linked to dehydration because there is too little water. This can happen when we aren't drinking enough or are sick and have had diarrhea or vomiting episodes, as well as any excess sweating. Some signs our sodium is too low are frequent headaches and feeling lightheaded or dizzy. Getting in added water is always a great idea, just remember to add the electrolytes especially if you have been exercising, sweating or sick. It’s a great idea to add an electrolyte drink to your day, but be careful not to add one that's also full of sugar, like many common sports drinks. There is no need for all of that added sugar and many electrolyte water enhancers taste great without them. Look for some that are full panel, meaning they have most of your body's electrolytes rather than just sodium or potassium. Unless of course you are too high or too low on any one specific electrolyte and need to boost that one up.

Emily Countryman is a board-certified health coach and owner of Ideal Wellness located at 2639 172nd St. NE, Suite 104 in Smokey Point. She can be reached online at www.idealwellnesswa.com or info@idealwellnesswa.com.

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Communities

July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Marysville offers free Music & Movies series

By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Free family concerts and movies will return to Jennings Park this July as part of their annual summer series. The Music & Movies series begins in early July and will continue through August. Concert Series The city of Marysville will bring three children’s concerts to the park and five family concerts. “It’s always fun seeing the concerts in Jennings Park,” said Lauren Woodmansee, cultural arts supervisor with the city of Marysville’s Parks, Culture and Recreation Department. “We have a great space for them,” she said. Concerts are held at the Jennings Park Pavilion area. “The beautiful pond is right there in the backdrop and there’s two different playgrounds for the kids nearby,” said Woodmansee. She said that the concerts make for good picnic locations for families. “People just like to bring their big picnic lunch or dinner.” Children’s concerts begin at noon on Wednesdays. Eric Haines will play July 10, the Brian Waite Band will play July 24 and Recess Monkey will play Aug. 7. Family concerts begin at 7 p.m. on Fridays. On July 12 local country, blues and rock group the Harvey Creek Band will perform. Guitarist and vocalist Chris Eger will bring his blend of blues and rock to the park on July 19. The Lynnwood School of Rock will give a performance on July 26. The Aug. 2 show will feature the Jukehouse Hounds, an American roots band that features a cross-section of classic tunes. The final performance on Aug. 9 will feature the Jimmy Wright Band which play oldies and classic rock. Concerts are sponsored by Roy Robinson, Puget Sound Pediatric Dentistry,

Share your news! Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send your information to North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or e-mail the information to: editor@northcounty-outlook.com.

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Team North County Your Partners in Real Estate MacPherson’s Realty RHB Dan Nelson: Dan is a seasoned Real Estate Broker who specializes in commercial and residential properties in the Pacific Northwest. Partnering with an experienced broker will help you understand the complexities of a changing market and avoid potential problems before they occur. Dan uses his knowledge of the local market, as well as practiced negotiation techniques, to obtain your real estate goals.

FILE PHOTO

Whiskey Fever kick off Marysville’s Sounds of Summer concert series last year on July 13, 2018 at Jennings Park. Sonic and Windermere Real Estate. “All four of those agencies provide the funding necessary to put on these shows,” said Woodmansee. Movies Series The Saturday movie series from the city will be shown near the Jennings Park ball fields. “They start at dusk so that can be pretty variable,” said Woodmansee, although that is typically around 9 p.m. Marysville Kiwanis provides free popcorn at the events. The city also plans to bring activities to this year’s films. “New this year is that be-

fore the start of every movie we’re having some special activity related to the movie,” said Woodmansee. The city will show “A Dog’s Way Home” on July 13 and local group Save-aMutt will hold a dog food drive at that time. “Wreck-It-Ralph” sequel “Ralph Breaks the Internet” will be on the screen on July 20. “The WhistleStop Sweet Shop will be helping kids make some candy cars,” said Woodmansee. Transformers film “Bumblebee” will be shown on July 27 with a Volkswagen car show with some classic and modified cars on display.

On Aug. 3 the movie series will show “The Incredibles 2” and kids are encouraged to dress up like a superhero for the event. Finally, “The Karate Kid” will be played on Aug. 10 with some karate demonstrations and activities from local business Kung Fu 4 Kids. The city also plans to hold an Instagram contest each week as part of the movie series. “Kids will be able to participate on Instagram by taking a picture of the week’s special clue,” said Woodmansee, and the winner will receive a VIP space at the event with some gifts as well.

Contact Dan: Cell: 425-422-5869 email: nelson.dan92@gmail.com Sue Stevenson: As a business woman, Sue is very involved in her community. She still believes in the importance of face to face meetings and honest, open dialog. As a real estate professional, she recognizes and appreciates the trust her clients place in her, working tirelessly to achieve the best possible deal, whether buying or selling.

Contact Sue: Cell: 425-418-7902 email: suestevensonre@gmail.com

Colleen Gilleland: With an extensive background in customer service, Colleen has an unparalleled dedication to her clients. Her goal is to do right by her customers in every way, from listening to their needs to going above and beyond in helping them achieve their goals. She will accomplish this through constant communication and by being accessible whenever you need her. Contact Colleen: Cell: 425-446-2100 email: colleen.northcounty@gmail.com


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July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

Arlington Street Fair returns July 12-14 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The Arlington Street Fair will return to downtown Arlington July 12 to 14 this year with full list of vendors. The event is put on by the Downtown Arlington Business Association (DABA). “We have nearly 200 vendors who will be attending. We have some returning favorites and quite a few new ones,” said Jeri Rugtvedt, DABA member and the main organizer for this year’s event. Vendors selling everything from handcrafted art to commercial toys typically fill up Olympic Avenue during the event. “It is a very good size, though, and I’ve had a lot of vendors tell me that they are excited to come back because it’s huge and fun,” said Rugtvedt. Many people like the large number of different items that are available at the street fair, she said. “There’s definitely a va-

riety of vendors. There are some commercial vendors, including some that are returning this year and some new ones. We have a lot of handmade vendors, and some very unique handmade items,” said Rugtvedt. The Arlington Street Fair also usually has a number of items that people won’t be able to find elsewhere, she said. “If I had the money I would be shopping at every booth because they all have something unique that nobody else has,” said Rugtvedt. Many visitors also like the community, and vendors enjoy coming down to talk with people about the items they’re selling. “They get to meet a lot of new people, too, and end up having returning clients,” said Rugtvedt. “It’s a really great place to meet up with people." Many of the nonprofit organizations will be bringing activities for the kids and the Arlington Street Fair will bring back its bouncy house like it had

last year. Some vendors will also be giving live demonstrations, such as Rain City Fitness. New this year will be a roving entertainer at the fair. “They’re going to start down at the north end and walk the street playing their instruments,” said Rugtvedt. Radio station KAFE 104.1 will be broadcasting for a couple of days during the festival as well. Finally, there will be bands playing throughout the festival days at Legion Park during local food bank benefit concert Kornstalk. “Kornstalk Festival is partnering with us so they’re providing all the music and entertainment throughout the weekend,” said Rugtvedt. The Street Fair will be open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. More information about the fair is available at arlingtonwa.org.

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Kornstalk benefits food bank ____ By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The benefit concert Kornstalk will return to downtown Arlington from July 12 to 14 to collect food and raise funds for the Arlington Community Food Bank. The three-day concert is free and will be held at the Legion Park stage. “We have a good lineup of music,” said Sarah Lopez, community revitalization project manager with the city of Arlington. “We have a lot of country music to go with the theme,” she said. This is the second year that the benefit concert will be held for the community in downtown Arlington and is meant to help the local food bank. It began as something local musician Johnny Green put together at his house each year, but they moved it to the stage Green and other local volunteers helped build at Legion Park. “I think it went pretty well last year. It’s growing. It was the first year so it was a little slow,” he said. Green said he looks forward to collecting for the

food bank. “We will be raising funds for the Arlington Community Food Bank and people are encouraged to bring a can of food or some money,” said Lopez. Bands were brought in through the city’s hotel/ motel tax fund and some are local bands that helped to organize last year’s event as well. On July 12 there will be four bands playing. That includes the Old Time Fiddlers from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the Dan Canyon Band from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., the Pack String from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and the Wild Turkeys from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The next day will involve five performances, and that includes the play for kids Purrlie’s Mission to the Milky Way for Kids from 11 a.m. to noon, Derringer Darlingtons from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., the Moon Sirens dance group from 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., the Rachelle Wright Band from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., and the Classic Roads Band from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The final two performances on July 14 will be A Well Known Stranger from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and

We enjoy exploring the shoreline.

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

Hey! Look at that! You never know what you’ll see in the sky, on the shore and even in the sand when you go to the seashore. What you see may depend on whether the tide is going out or coming in. Study the area where the land meets the sea. Is it rocky with waves crashing or is it a long stretch of white sand peacefully meeting the water? You might watch little crabs hiding and scurrying in the rocky areas. Different kinds of shells might be easier to find along sandy stretches. It’s fun to find driftwood too!

Cool! A blimp.

We will be raising funds for the Arlington Community Food Bank and people are encouraged to bring a can of food or some money.

____

Sarah Lopez

Voices of the Village from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. This year’s Kornstalk features a longer lineup and an extra day. “We’re extending it further into the evening than usual,” said Lopez, so people can come to the festival after browsing through the downtown area at the end of the night. Kornstalk is also happening at the same days as this year’s Arlington Street Fair. “I worked with Sarah when we were putting the stage together and she asked if we had thought about the Street Fair, so we thought we could combine the two, sort of get some more attention,” said Green.

What have you seen at the seashore? Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2019 V11-26

At Sea and Shore 1

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animals Read the clues to fill in our seashore and ocean crossword puzzle: 1. five vast ________ link across the planet, covering about 71% of Earth’s surface 2. tidal pools are home to many ________ things: seaweed, seastars, snails, crabs, etc. 3. tide ________ are rocky; some may be seen separately at low tide 4. a _________ beach is one that is natural, untouched by people 5. energy from strong winds on the surface of the ocean causes ________ to form 6. ________ have explored only about 5% of the world’s oceans 7. the ocean is mostly made up of ________, but there are many elements: sodium, chlorine, magnesium, calcium and more 8. tides are the result of the gravity of the ________ pushing and pulling the ocean 9. the ocean is Earth’s largest habitat, with _______ such as whales, sharks, sea lions 10. coastline; where the land meets the ocean 11. a ________ resort is a place built for people to have fun and be active 12. grasses and bushes anchor the sand __________ and keep the beach stable 13. many kinds of ________ live by the ocean: seagulls, sandpipers, albatrosses

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Opinion

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

Our Best Friends Kira

July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Our Favorite Quotes "Watching everybody have such a fantastic time, loving life, loving America — I wish that was the feeling year-round, that it didn't take the Fourth of July for us to be like, Yeah, America is awesome." Author ­— Tim Kennedy

&

RAVE RAVE: A big thank you to the city of Marysville for holding last weekend's Splish Splash Summer Bash. There was a lot to do and it was a lot of fun for my entire family. Over the past few years the city has really made a lot of great improvements to Comeford Park and it is a great place to take my family. RAVE: Kudos to the Downtown Arlington Business Association and all of the

sponsors for putting on the Downtown Arlington Summer Kickoff. We really enjoyed the Aaron Crawford concert. It was a fun and I hope they will do it again next year.

RAVE: I hope everyone has a safe and Happy Fourth of July. I'm really looking forward to attending Marysville's July 4th celebration — it will be nice to be able to see a fireworks display without having to leave town.

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

Kira is a 14-year-old rescue dog. She has been the Best Friend of Juliann & Lee Fowble for 4 months and she looks and acts like a puppy.

Send us photos of you and your pet The North County Outlook has a weekly feature titled Our Best Friends. Community members can send us photos of them with their pets and we will elect one to run in that week’s issue. To submit a photo, please send it to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com. Please include the names of the people and pets in the photo.

North County Outlook is published every Wednesday and mailed direct to households and businesses in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address below. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher. News Deadline: Friday 5PM before publication editor@northcountyoutlook.com

Printing and Direct Mail Services provided by Skagit Publishing

Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Staff Writers .....Christopher Andersson, Andrew Hines Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson Contributing Writers .......Steve Smith, The Tulalip Chefs

Ad Deadline: Thursday before publication 4 PM sales@northcountyoutlook.com

P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 1331 State Ave. #A • Marysville, WA (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 www.northcountyoutlook.com

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Weekly Puzzle CLUES ACROSS 1. Bridge building degree 4. Catches 9. A heavy type of music 14. Original “Twilight Zone” host Serling 15. Rodent species 16. Finnish lake 17. Street (abbr.) 18. Home of the US Naval Academy 20. It held a convention once 22. Makes a loud, ringing sound 23. Cave 24. Lessening of something 28. MJ’s nickname “__ Jordan” 29. One’s way of doing things 30. Wings 31. Quotes as evidence for 33. Acts glumly 37. A man’s title 38. It comes first 39. Edible mollusk 41. Resembles a pouch 42. He/she checks your health 43. Nobel Prize-winning biochemist 44. Stop momentarily 46. Formerly (archaic) 49. Commercial

50. White vestment worn by clergy 51. Island people of the Mediterranean 55. Prices 58. On a line at right angles to a ship’s length 59. Where boats are parked 60. One who values reason 64. It might be on your driveway 65. Small Iranian village 66. Used to emphasize 67. Mathematical term (abbr.) 68. Long necked birds 69. Eyeglasses 70. When you hope to get there CLUES DOWN 1. Portuguese district 2. An assembly of witches 3. Having few teeth 4. The act of going across 5. Nepalese dynasty 6. “Bye Bye Birdie” actress __-Margaret 7. What the princess found beneath her mattress 8. Pennsylvania transit organization 9. Winnie the Pooh creator

10. Riddle 11. Grads wear one 12. Body part 13. The top of a pot 19. A type of meal 21. Lake __, one of the Great 24. Capital of Jordan 25. A type of logic 26. Khoikhoi peoples 27. A fixed time of prayer in Christian liturgies 31. Arrives 32. Lemur 34. Small bodies of still water 35. __ route 36. Breaks apart 40. A type of line 41. Caption that translates 45. Winged 47. Criticize severely 48. Leg bones 52. Monetary unit 53. 007’s creator 54. Accumulate 56. Establish by law or with authority 57. Breed of goat 59. Millisecond 60. Mock 61. Make older 62. Some don’t want to be given any 63. Wrath


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Communities

July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Legal Notices

tions for the Harmon Eye Clinic are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday.

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include ONGOING EVENTS contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You Assistance for veterans: can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. Military Veterans seeking northcountyoutlook.com help with the VA may contact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will return your call. Post 178 meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.”

Submit your events via email to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com Stop Sweet Shop. Bring blankets and lawn chairs for seating. No pets or personal fireworks including sparklers, please. Alcohol, tobacco and vaping are not allowed on school property, including parking areas.

July 3- July 9 Marysville 4th of July: Marysville-area residents and families no longer need to leave town to enjoy a professional Independence Day fireworks show. New this year, the city of Marysville presents a family-friendly 4th of July program at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. Gates open at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 4, with lawn games, fun activities and live music until dark, followed by a professional fireworks show choreographed to music starting about 9:45 p.m. Admission is free; bring cash to buy snacks and desserts from Marysville Kiwanis and Whistle-

in Marysville. The forum is sponsored by Indivisible Marysville Class of 1979 Reunion: Marysville Pilchuck High School Class of 1979 40year reunion will be held July 27, 2019, at the Marysville Opera House, 3-10 p.m. and will include dinner and fun. RSVP required by 4/28/2019. Cost is $65 per person. For ticket and more information email classof79-40@hotmail.com.

The Incredible Race: VBS, Arlington “The Incredible Race” will be held July 9 -12, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at Atonement Free Lutheran Church, 6905 172nd St NE. Ages 4 through 6th grade. This program is free. For more information call 360- 435-9191. Register online: http://www.aflchurch. org/index.php/programs/ children-s-programs/vbsform-signup-2.

CUBA! – Underwater photography by Carl Baird: During May and June, you are invited to view underwater photographs of ocean animals from the “Gardens of the Queen”, Cuba. Christopher Columbus named this chain of remote coral and mangrove islands to honor the Queen of Spain, Isabella I.  Cuban underwater photography can be seen in the entry area to The Harman Eye Clinic, 903 Medical Center Dr., Arlington.  Contact & Directions: https://www.20better.com/ contact/.  Hours of opera-

COMING EVENTS Meet The Candidates: Meet the Candidates for Marysville and City Council at a nonpartisan forum to learn more about the candidates. The forum will be held July 23, 6:30 to 8;30 p.m., at the Red Curtin Arts Center, 9315 State Ave. #J

In Home Caregivers

Are Needed in Your Community Benefits Include:

• Starting wage $15.50hr$17.75hr (depending on experience and certification). • Additional $1.00/hr for weekend work • Up to $1.50/hr more for client specific care needs • Time and a half for all holidays • Mileage and travel reimbursement • Paid training and certification • Paid Leave • Excellent Medical, Dental, Visioneven for part-time work...

Volunteers for Animal Care Wanted: The NOAH Center in Stanwood is looking for volunteers. NOAH offers several volunteer opportunities to help care for their adoptable animals. If you are interested in volunteering you can go to their website at www.thenoahcenter.org or call 360-6297055. Jam Session for People with Disabilities: Youth and adults of all abilities are invited to Village Music and Arts Friday jam sessions featuring live music by Jon Dalgarn and Voices of the Village. Bring your own instrument or use theirs. Sessions are every Friday, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at 338 North McLeod, Arlington, WA. Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Call Michelle at 360-653-7752 ext. 14 for more information or to sign up.

Classified: Help Wanted

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(425) 212-9571

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: JANE HOLT, Deceased, NO. 19-4-01090-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

In Re: No. 19-3-00936-31 Petitioner: Aurea Lopez Garcia Summons Served by Publication To Modesto Ortiz Lopez, the other party has asked the court to approve or change a Parenting Plan or Residential Schedule. You must respond in writing if you want the court to consider your side. Deadline! Your Response must be filed and served within 60 days of the date this summons is published. If you do not file and serve your Response or a Notice of Appearance by the deadline: (1) No one has to notify you about other hearings in this case, and (2) The court may approve the requests in the Petition without hearing your side (called a default judgment). Follow these steps: 1. Read the Petition and any other documents that were filed at court with this Summons. Those documents explain what the other party is asking for. 2. Fill out a Response on this form: FL Parentage 332, Response to Petition for Parenting Plan, Residential Schedule and/or Child Support. You can get the Response form and other forms you need at: • The Washington State Courts’ website: www.courts.wa.gov/forms • The Administrative Office of the Courts – call: (360) 705-5328 • Washington LawHelp: www.washingtonlawhelp.org, or • The Superior Court Clerk’s office or county law library (for a fee). 3. Serve (give) a copy of your Response to the person who filed this Summons at the address below, and to any other parties. You may use certified mail with return receipt requested. For more information on how to serve, read Superior Court Civil Rule 5. 4 File your original Response with the court clerk at this address: Superior Court Clerk, Snohomish County, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA 98201 5. Lawyer not required: It is a good idea to talk to a lawyer, but you may file and serve your response without one. Attorney for Petitioner: Stacie L. Naczelnik WSBA#45267 Address for Mailing or Service: 2150 N. 107th St, Suite 440, Seattle, WA 98133

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: June 26, 2019. Personal Representative: Craig Holt Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service:, P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-01090-31

Submit Legal Notices to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com

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Sunday, July 7 Sunrise 5:17 am • Sunset 9:09 pm

Thursday, July 4 Sunrise 5:15 am • Sunset 9:11 pm

Monday, July 8 Sunrise 5:18 am • Sunset 9:09 pm

Friday, July 5 Sunrise 5:15 am • Sunset 9:10 pm

Tuesday, July 9 Sunrise 5:19 am • Sunset 9:08 pm

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Superior Court of Washington County of Snohomish

Wednesday, July 3, through Tuesday, July 9

Apply at: Catholic Community Services, 1001 N. Broadway, Suite A12 Everett, WA 98201

L E A H P I L M O L L U S K S O T P

LEGAL NOTICE

Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County

Minimum Requirements:

• Must be 18yrs of age or older. • Must have current Driver’s License, Auto Liability Insurance and a reliable vehicle • Must be able to pass a Federal Criminal History Background check...

C S H L O M A O F E J A V I U A C J

LEGAL NOTICE

2:09 am 6:37 am 2:00 pm 9:02 pm

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Saturday, July 6 Sunrise 5:16 am • Sunset 9:10 pm 3:04 am 7:36 am 2:48 pm 9:45 pm

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Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

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4.8 ft 8.8 ft -0.8 ft 11.8 ft

3.9 ft 8.1 ft 0.6 ft 11.6 ft

1.8 ft 7.6 ft 2.2 ft 11.5 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


Communities

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BASH

Continued from page 1

but it ended up cooperating,” she said. “There was a great turnout and it was just an amazing event." The event filled the park with families that came out for an afternoon of music and games. “Everybody had a great time. It’s a gorgeous park with a great splash pad and all the extra activities were just a bonus,” said Woodmansee. Seattle kids’ music group Brian Vogan and his Good Buddies performed at the event while kids ran through the splash pad and the park’s playground. “Tons of kids were up and dancing for the concert,” said Woodmansee. Local organizations also brought activities for the children. “We had several organizations and vendors that

provided face painting, a coloring contest, bag tosses and other games,” she said. Parents said it was a fun event for their kids. Local parent Justine Brunk said she brought her daughter back after coming to last year’s Splish Splash Summer Bash. “We love it. She’s been asking all year long to come back because we came last year,” she said. “It’s so much fun and we love that it is free for the kids. Plus it’s energetic and gets them outside and doing something,” Brunk said. Woodmansee said that Marysville officials see it as a great way to kickoff the summer. “I think that the families like that it was free as well,” she said. The only thing that cost money were some of the small concessions provided, she said. The event started last year at the suggestion of sponsor

SUMMER Continued from page 1

“As it’s gotten later there’s been more people,” she said. Many families were having a good time at the event. “I think it’s great. We’re having a

July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

11

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Sophie Brunk dances to Brian Vogan and his Good Buddies during Marysville’s Splish Splash Summer Bash on June 26. and local business Puget Sound Pediatric Dentistry. “They actually suggested it last year because they wanted to start off our children’s concert series with

lot of fun,” said Cisneros. “I think they like that it’s outdoors, and there’s a lot of different things to see and taste." DABA may make the Downtown Arlington Summer Kickoff an annual event. “I would say that this is a success so we will probably be looking at it next

something bigger,” said Woodmansee. The dentistry sponsored the event again this year and brought some prizes to raffle off as well.

year,” she said. The event was sponsored by local businesses Windermere Arlington, Caliber Home Loans, S&S Roofing and Olympic Escrow. “Thank you to all the sponsors and the community for coming out,” said Cisneros.

Volunteers Needed!

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• Lawn Maintenance • Pruning • Senior Discounts • Roof Cleaning Ron Collins, Owner USMC Veteran

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Mailbox Rentals Notary Service Pack & Ship Freight Services

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REAL ESTATE Sue Stevenson, Broker Cell: 425.418.7902 Office: 360.659.1253 ext. 15 Fax: 360.653.3346 suestevensonRE@gmail.com

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Advertise Your Message Here for as Little as $25 per Insertion! Call Leah Today! 360-659-1100 leah@northcountyoutlook.com


12

July 3, 2019 - July 9, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n WHISTLING GARDENER

The July To-Do List July is a very als, and vegetables busy month for — maybe not so me in my garden much for shrubs and it should be and trees assumfor you as well. ing they are estabThis is the month lished and were I like to put the fed back in the By Steve Smith finishing touches spring. When it on everything, so all I have comes to annuals, especially to do for the rest of the sum- if they are in containers, it is mer is water and enjoy the hard to beat a soluble fertilfruits of my labor. Here are izer like Sea Grow. For plants some things we should all be in the ground, I still prefer focused on. the organics because they PLANTING: This is al- have microbes and humic ways at the top of my list, acid added to them, both of although I tend to run out of which improve the overall room by July. Growers have long term health of the soil. lots of new crops ready and PRUNING: Early July is are shipping them weekly, so really the last time to do any plan on a trip to the garden significant pruning until the center every couple of weeks fall, so don’t miss the opporto see what’s new. tunity to trim up the hedges, FEEDING: This is so thin out the fruit trees, and critical for annuals, perenni- cut back any bloomed out

perennials from spring. Some perennials, like delphiniums, will re-bloom in the fall if cut back right after they finish blooming. Keep your annuals deadheaded and fertilized and they will bloom all summer long. STAKING: I like to think that if I plant enough plants close together they will hold each other up, but it doesn’t always work. All it takes is one windy and wet day to knock everything flat on the ground. You can buy all sorts of contraptions to help hold them up, but they don’t work if you leave them in the garden shed. Get them installed before the calamity strikes, because you know it will sooner or later. INSECTS AND DISEASES: Watch for damage

and only spray when you know what you are dealing with. Most insect issues can be tolerated without any serious consequences. Slugs can get enormous by July and eat an incredible amount of foliage in one evening. Spray a little water over the garden around 8 p.m. and the slugs will magically appear at which time you can use whatever preferred technique you like to do them in. For mildew on shrubs and trees, the best strategy is to prune out diseased branches and fertilize. For roses, perennials, annuals and veggies it is best to be proactive and apply a fungicide as a preventative. WATERING: I talked about this last week, so go back to my blog (www.sun-

July can be a very busy month in your garden. nysidenursery.net/blog) if you need to review. Bottom line, don’t let water become the limiting factor in the success of your garden. POLLINATORS: Attracting bees and other pollinators into our gardens has become a top priority for all of us gardeners. Don’t worry too much about what kinds of flowering plants you need, just make sure you have lots of flowers in your garden and the pollinators will come. We can all work together to help these valuable

COURTESY PHOTO

creatures by using pesticides sparingly and wisely and incorporating into our gardens a wide diversity of plants that bloom when pollinators are active. If you stay on top of these chores you should be able to enjoy your garden for the next two months with minimum effort.

Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville, WA and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

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July 3, 2019 North County Outlook  

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