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Inside

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Arlington holds Easter egg hunt By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Victoria Steward, who plays Belle in the upcoming Marysville-Pilchuck High School production of Beauty and the Beast, sings during a rehearsal on April 19.

Beauty and the Beast comes to M-PHS stage By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville-Pilchuck High School drama department will present Disney’s Beauty and the Beast for their spring musical this April and May. “This is the classic tale of Beauty and the Beast from Disney converted to a Broadway production,” said Victoria Steward, who is playing Belle in the production. Many of the students said they enjoy stepping into roles they knew from childhood. “I watched Beauty and the Beast as a kid so now to be able to step on stage and be Belle is wonderful,” said Steward. “It’s tough and a little bit scary, because like with any famous story everyone knows it and has a straight idea about it. You worry that if you don’t get it right they may not like it,” said Morgan Reed, a Marysville student who is playing Beast.

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This is the classic tale of Beauty and the Beast from Disney converted to a Broadway production.

Arlington children raced across the Arlington Airport field during the city of Arlington's annual Easter Egg Hunt on April 20. The egg hunt takes place near the Stillaguamish Athletic Club as children are separated into age groups and line up in the field before being released all at once to grab Easter eggs from the grass. Local parents said that their kids enjoyed the local Easter event. "We love it," said local parent Cody Najera. "We were here awhile back, when she [Najera's daughter] was about three years old." Najera said he was looking forward to returning to the event in the future.

"They had a fantastic time, we're going to come back next year," he said. The plastic Easter eggs are filled with candy or with prize tickets that could be redeemed for gift cards to local businesses or for gift baskets, such as art-themed baskets from the Arlington Arts Council. Local grandparent Brenda Martin came to the Easter egg hunt with a couple of her granddaughters. "It's our first time but we had a blast," said Martin. "This one likes the competition and this one is really into the Easter Bunny," she said. The Easter Bunny was available for pictures with the kids before and after the Easter egg hunt and the Arlington See ARLINGTON on page 2

Easter fun at Jennings Park By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

____

Victoria Steward

Assistant director Ashlyn Stoker said she enjoyed being able to bring the play to the M-PHS stage. “It’s really amazing being able to watch something I grew up watching and being such a large part of bringing it to life, especially on the 25th anniversary,” she said. Stoker said that this is the first Disney show that she’s help direct, which has presented a unique set of challenges. See BEAUTY on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arrie Duffer runs across the Arlington Airport field during the city of Arlington's Easter egg hunt on April 20.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Carson Smith picks up an egg in the Jennings Park Master Garden during the Marysville Easter egg hunt on April 20.

More than 12,000 plastic eggs were hidden around Marysville's Jennings Park as part of the Easter egg hunt by the city this year. The annual event was held on April 20. "We are having our annual Easter egg hunt that has been part of the community for many, many years," said Andrea Kingsford, recreation coordinator for the city of Marysville's Parks, Culture and Recreation Department. Parents and kids come to the park to find Easter eggs and meet the Easter Bunny. Local parent Sara Randolph said the event was well organized and fun. "We haven't been here in

two years and it was crazy busy then," she said. Younger children look for their eggs next to the Rotary Ranch while slightly older kids go the Jennings Park Master Garden as part of the event. "The garden has been such a fun venue because it has little hiding places for the eggs and it's so pretty in the garden. It is just so cheerful as the kids are going through," said Kingsford. Kingsford said that the event is a good way for Marysville residents to come out and meet each other as well. "It is such a wonderful event for families to come

See MARYSVILLE on page 6

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April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Local News ARLINGTON Continued from page 1

fire department brought out some of their vehicles for local kids to see as well. The event is put on by the city of Arlington with help from local nonprofit organization Youth Dynamics and the Arlington United Church. In addition to volunteers, the Arlington United Church also provided the refreshments at the event. "I like to see the community coming together, with the church and Youth Dynamics and other people from the community all partnering to do stuff for the families," said Jessica

Ronhaar, executive director of the Stilly Valley Youth Dynamics. She said that the local organizations like to help out with the event to provide children and parents with a fun holiday. "We love to help with the Easter egg hunt because it's great to be out here and help families have a great Easter experience," said Ronhaar. She said she enjoys seeing all the community members who come to the event to give their children a fun time. "I like seeing the families that come out and do stuff together," said Ronhaar. "It's time together and something fun for them to do."

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Alyvia Najera runs across the Arlington Airport field as part of the city of Arlington's Easter Egg Hunt on April 20.

BEAUTY Continued from page 1

“Disney is very meticulous in the way that they want their characters to be portrayed,” she said. “It’s a balance of helping the kids find little things they can add to their own character while staying true to the original Disney tale,” she said. Many of the students enjoyed getting into their characters. “Compared to the film, he’s a lot more humorous in what he does instead of just being cocky. He’s a lot more flashy,” said Rylee Worth, who plays Gaston. Reed said it has been a challenge getting into the mindset of the Beast. “My favorite part is trying to get into his emotional state to get better into the character when I’m on stage,” he said.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Amanda Littell, left, who plays Cogsworth in the upcoming Marysville-Pilchuck High School production of Beauty and the Beast, and Collin Black, who plays Lumiere, during a rehearsal on April 19. Students said that there will be a lot to enjoy with the musical, and many of the classic Disney numbers are part of the show.

“The music is phenomenal. I think that’s why it became so well-known in the first place,” said Reed. There are some additional dance sections of the play as well. “It’s a little different from the cartoon, there’s a few more dance numbers,” said Stoker. “Our choreographer took a long time to get them right and they look really good,” said Worth. Students involved with the play also said they enjoyed being part of the drama department at the school.

“It’s my first play at M-P, but my seventh play total and it’s been super fun and everybody is really supportive about helping each other’s characters,” said Worth. “Being around everybody all the time is awesome. I love this group and it’s so much fun,” said Reed. The play begins showing on April 25, 26 and 27 and continues May 2, 3 and 4 at 7 p.m. at the M-PHS auditorium. In addition there is a matinee on May 4 at noon. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for students and seniors and $5 for children five years of age and younger.

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Morgan Reed, left, who plays Gaston in the upcoming Marysville-Pilchuck High School production of Beauty and the Beast, and Angela Ferguson, who plays LeFou, sing the song ‘Gaston’ during a April 19 rehearsal of the play.


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Communities

Larsen visits CTE programs at Marysville, Arlington schools By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen visited Arlington and Marysville schools on April 16 to tour local career and technical education opportunities for students. He talked to students and stopped by both school districts to look at a variety of programs offered at the schools. Larsen’s first stop was Totem Middle School’s communications program, where he was interviewed live by a couple of the students there. “One of the top things I want to learn about so I can be more effective in Congress is about the career and technical education opportunities that students like you have, so at the federal level we can fund those programs and make them better,” he told the two Totem Middle School students. The two student broadcasters said they have enjoyed working on the morning school news broadcast. “I enjoy it, not just for all the stuff you’re able to do, but it’s helped me work with others with teamwork,” said student Anthony Cabillaje. “It’s very interesting and there are a lot of new things to learn and that I haven’t tried yet, but I feel I’ve grown as a person,” said student McKenna Stewart. Larsen also looked at the school’s graphic design program. Students use either touch-screen tablets or silver drawing tablets to learn Photoshop and graphic design, according to teacher Sandy Chapin. “Two different experiences for them and we switch halfway through,” she said. “It takes a quarter just to learn all the basic Photoshop skills so the second half is where it gets really fun,” she said. Finally, Larsen looked at Arlington High School’s manufacturing classes and talked to students who will compete in the Skills USA state competition. “I’ll be tested on my welding knowledge and skills,” said student Ian Seward. Student Cody Clark is also planning to demonstrate his welding skills at the competition. “I started this class my sophomore year and I didn’t even know what a welder was, but I went to regionals and state last year,” he said, adding he looks forward to going to the state competi-

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington High School students Ian Seward, center, and Hunter Urionaguena, right, talk with U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen about the school’s manufacturing class on April 16. tion again this year. The students are also competing in the community service category for the competition, and will give a presentation about their contributions to Arlington. “We’ve made some metal bike racks for downtown Arlington and we’re presenting those as our community service project,” said Seward. Larsen said he was glad to get a chance to see how the CTE programs are cur-

rently operating. “I want to use my office to send the message that career and technical education is an important part of the education system,” he said. “We need skilled labor and these CTE programs are a foundation to build that skilled labor for the future,” Larsen said. CTE programs are supported in part by federal funding, he said. “There are federal dollars

that help fund portions of career and technical education programs,” he said. Larsen said he has introduced the Youth Access to American Jobs Act to create a stronger path for students into trade jobs. “This would help states connect high school CTE programs with career and technical education programs in colleges and to apprenticeships, to create a clear pipeline for students to get those jobs,” he said.

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Arlington police arrest man after standoff At approximately 9:15 a.m. on Saturday, April 20, Arlington Police responded to a report of a suspicious person at the Arlington Municipal Cemetery, located at 20310 67th Ave. NE. Callers to 911 were reporting the individual was acting unusual and possible gunshots were heard. On arrival, officers located a man and a vehicle in a wooded area at the rear of the cemetery. Officers reported he was acting erratically and ignoring attempts by officers to communicate with him. Based on the man’s conduct and possible presence of firearms, officers backed out of the wooded area and requested assistance from Snohomish County Sheriff ’s Office for additional personnel, Marysville Police Department’s BearCat (armored vehicle), and Snohomish County Fire District #22 (Getchell) with an unmanned aerial vehicle (drone). Snohomish County Fire District #22 personnel were able to deploy the UAV so that law enforcement could observe the man safely and attempt to establish communication. Officers noted that

the man had access to weapons and was clearly in crisis, continuing to act erratically, spray painting his vehicle, and then climbing on top of his vehicle. The man continued to ignore orders from officers. The BearCat was used by officers to safely approach the man to establish communication and bring him into custody. After more than an hour of attempting to communicate with the man and deploying less lethal force twice, the man surrendered and was taken into custody. The man was identified as a 21-year-old from Deming, Washington. After initial evaluation and treatment by personnel from the Arlington Fire Department, officers transported the man to Cascade Valley Hospital for evaluation and assessment. Officers intend to book the man into Snohomish County Jail on multiple charges, including unlawful discharge of fireworks, disorderly conduct, and obstruction. Officers recovered drug paraphernalia, fireworks, and multiple weapons including a knife, throwing stars, and a hatchet at the scene.


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Sports

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Eagles remain undefeated with win over M-P By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The the undefeated Arlington baseball team took on the Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks in a 3A Wesco North matchup on April 17. The Tomahawks had a good start as they earned two hits in the top of the first while shutting out the Eagles in the bottom of the same inning. They continued to ride their momentum by scoring the first run of the game in the top of the second. Arlington answered as they scored a run in the bottom of the inning to tie up the score 1-1. In the third inning the Eagles took their first lead of the game as they shutdown the Tomahawks and scored two more runs to hold the score at 3-1 heading into the fourth. Arlington dominated over the next three innings as they scored eight

runs and finished the game in the sixth inning by a score of 11-1. After extending the lead to 10 runs the Eagles took the victory over Marysville-Pilchuck. “It was a tight ballgame early and it was good for our team to be put in that situation, and then be able to come out to play with that pressure. We have a really deep pitching staff, a deep lineup, and defensively we make plays. I think that separates us from a lot of teams and when you have all of those pieces you can find some success,” said Arlington Head Coach Scott Striegel. The Eagles were led by their strong upperclassmen in Paul Chung, Jack Sheward and Owen Bishop. Chung, senior shortstop, finished the day with one single but recorded one run, an RBI and three stolen bases. Sheward, senior catcher,

had one hit as well to go with one walk, two runs, one RBI, two stolen bases and a double. Bishop, junior outfielder, had a perfect day at the plate as he went 2-2 with two walks, three runs, one RBI, three stolen bases, one single and one double. Arlington also had big contributions from their sophomore duo of Jacob Burkett and Michael Tsoukalas. Burkett, pitcher, started on the mound for the Eagles as he totaled three innings pitched and five strikeouts. Tsoukalas, outfielder, went a perfect 2-2 at the plate with two doubles, one walk and one RBI. “We fought all day but you’re not going to win many games when you leave 11 guys on base. We need to be able to focus on all the little things and right now we aren’t doing that. Once we can hit all of the details then we can start driving

in those runs and finishing games,” said MarysvillePilchuck Head Coach James Day. Mar ysv i l le-Pi lchuck was led by Jordan Justice, Hunter Janisko, Treven Southard and Michael Testa. Justice, junior pitcher, started on the mound for the first four innings as he tallied two strikeouts over that time. He also contributed at the plate with one hit, two walks, a stolen base and a single. Janisko, senior infielder, went 2-3 at the plate with two singles on the day. Southard, junior shortstop, went perfect at the plate going 2-2 with two singles and one walk. Testa, junior catcher, had one walk at the plate but also earned the only run for the Tomahawks on a stolen base. If you want to come out and cheer for the Eagles their next home game will be against the Oak Harbor

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Owen Bishop, Eagles’ junior outfielder, runs to third base late in the game against Marysville-Pilchuck at Arlington High School on April 17. Wildcats on Friday, April 26, at 4 p.m. Or if you want to root for the Tomahawks their next home game will

be against their cross-town rival Marysville Getchell Chargers on Wednesday, April 24, at 4 p.m.

High School Spring Sports Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks

Marysville Getchell Chargers BOYS SOCCER

April 30

Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

Arlington

Home

MGHS

GIRLS TENNIS

April 26 April 30

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Everett Cascade

Home Home

MGHS MGHS

SOFTBALL

April 26

Game begins at 4 p.m. Marysville-Pilchuck Home Match begins at 3 p.m.

Stanwood

Home

April 25 April 25

Meadowdale Away Edmonds-Woodway Away

April 24 April 26 April 29 April 30

Games begin at 4 p.m.

Marysville-Pilchuck Marysville-Pilchuck Arlington Arlington

Away Home Home Away

M-PHS M-PHS M-PHS ArlHS

April 24 April 26 April 29 April 30

April 24 Snohomish April 30 Everett *Match begins at 2 p.m.

Away Away

Games begins at 4 p.m.

Marysville Getchell Marysville Getchell Oak Harbor Oak Harbor

April 26 April 30

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Arlington Lynnwood

Home Home

GIRLS TENNIS

April 26 April 30

Marysville-Pilchuck Kamiak

Away Home

Snoho GC Legion*

April 26 Everett April 30 Stanwood *Match begins at 7 p.m.

April 26 April 30

Home Home

April 24 April 26 April 29 April 30

Oak Harbor Oak Harbor Marysville Getchell Marysville Getchell

Away Home Away Home

OHHS ArlHS M-PHS ArlHS

Meet begins at 3:30 p.m.

Lake Stevens

April 26 April 30

Matches begin at 7:30 p.m.

Oak Harbor Marysville Getchell

Home Away

Home

ArlHS OHHS

ArlHS

April 24 Snohomish April 30 Everett *Match begins at 2 p.m.

TotemMS TotemMSS

MGHS Lincoln*

TRACK

April 25 Mariner April 27 Tomahawk Classic *Meet begins at 11 a.m.

Home Home

QuilCeda QuilCeda*

BOYS GOLF

QuilCeda* QuilCeda

Match begins at 3 p.m.

April 24 Snohomish April 30 Everett *Match begins at 2 p.m.

April 26 April 30

Away Away

Games begin at 4:30 p.m.

Away Away

Snoho GC Legion*

Anacortes Mount Baker

Home Away

GIRLS TENNIS

LWHS MBHS

April 24 April 29

ArlHS MGHS

Snoho GC Legion*

For more info, visit www.wescoathletics.com or www.cascadeathletics.com.

April 30

Match begin at 9 a.m.

Suncadia Invite

Away

Suncadia

BOYS GOLF

April 25 April 30

Matches begin at 3 p..m.

Avalon Sudden Valley

Away Away

Avalon Padden

BASEBALL

April 25

Game begins at 4 p.m.

Ferndale

Home

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Anacortes Blaine

Home Away

LWHS BLHS

BOYS SOCCER

GIRLS GOLF

BOYS GOLF

Match begins at 3 p.m.

TRACK

April 25

Home Away

BOYS SOCCER

BASEBALL

Games begin at 4 p.m.

Away Away

Meet begins at 3:30 p.m.

SOFTBALL

Games begin at 4 p.m.

Stanwood Oak Harbor

April 26 Marysville Getchell April 30 Everett *Game begins at 7 p.m.

Lakewood Cougars

SOFTBALL

TotemMS ArlHSS

M-PHS M-PHS OHHS M-PHS

Game begins at 4 p.m.

BOYS SOCCER

Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

Arlington Eagles Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

Home Away Away Home

SOFTBALL

GIRLS TENNIS

BOYS GOLF

Match begins at 3 p.m.

CdrcrstG

EdStad EdStad

BASEBALL

MGHS

GIRLS GOLF

April 24

BASEBALL

TRACK

Meets begin at 3:30 p.m.

Match begins at 7 p.m.

April 25 Lynden Christian April 29 Ferndale *Match begins at 4:30 p.m.

Away Home

Bender* LWHS

TRACK

Meet begins at 4 p.m.

April 24 League Meet Away April 27 Lakewood Invitational Home *Meet begins at 10 a.m.

Civic LWHS*

LWHS

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Bonefish Grill/Outback Steakhouse Bouquets of Sunshine Bry’s TV BTC Tires Bud Barton Glass Bud Laird, Windermere Bundy Carpet C. Don Filer Insurance Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Center PS CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner DDS Edward Jones, Loren Van Loo Essential Organic Earth Salon Farmers Insurance, Kim Doughty Flowers by George

Gary & Donna Wright RE Prop. Mgmt. Gary’s Gutters Grocery Outlet, Arlington Grocery Outlet, Marysville H&M Electric Halterman’s RV Hot Rod Barber JC Penney, Marysville Judd & Black Kuhnle’s Tavern Leifer Manor Les Schwab, Arlington Les Schwab, Marysville Les Schwab, Smokey Point MacPherson’s Realty Marysville Awards Marysville Everett Ceramic Tile Marysville Kiwanis Club Marysville Travel & Cruise

Moore Moving & Storage, Marysville Noble Palace North County Outlook Pacific Propane Paraiso Mexican Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pratt Pest Port of Subs Puget Sound Pediatric Dentistry Quil Ceda Village Rancho Grande Ray Miller, Our Veteran Leader Rex’s Rentals Roy Robinson RV and Marine Supply S&S Roofing LLC Salish Network Schaefer Shipman Funeral Home

Silvana Plumbing Skagit Bank Skagit Regional Health Sleep Advantage Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning Soroptomist Int’l of Marysville Spark Hot Yoga of Marysville State Avenue Glass Stilly Sand & Gravel Stryker Brothers Auto Repair Tacos Guaymas Tall Guy Small Guy Automotive Toby Barnett, Realtor Wagner Jewelers Who’s on First


Sports

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M-P holds on for win over Eagles Pet By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The Marysville-Pilchuck softball team hosted the Arlington Eagles in a backand-forth game on April 15. The Tomahawks got off to a hot start as they dominated from both sides of the plate early on against the Eagles. Marysville-Pilchuck had two back-to-back fourrun innings while shutting out Arlington through the second. Heading into the third inning, the Tomahawks held a commanding 8-0 lead. The Eagles were able to change the momentum in the third as they earned their first shutout inning over Marysville-Pilchuck. Arlington looked to close the gap in the fourth as they had a four-run inning of their own while keeping the Tomahawks from putting any more on the scoreboard. The Eagles continued to inch closer to M-P with a two-run fifth inning, putting them behind by 8-6 heading into the final two innings. Unfortunately for Arlington, MarysvillePilchuck managed to allow zero runs through the final stretch and walked away with the 8-6 victory. “It was a good win, but we have to do a better job at finishing plays because you won’t win many games

when you give a team extra outs. We did a lot of good things with such a young team and the future is bright for the program,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach Aaron Zachry. The Tomahawks had contributors all over their lineup including Sydney Zachry, Lauren Lewis, Cassidy Phelps and Emily Downing. Zachry, senior catcher, and Lewis, junior center fielder, had the same statline as they each finished the day with two hits, two runs, one RBI, one stolen base, one single and one double. Phelps, sophomore shortstop, led the team with three hits, one run, three RBIs, two stolen bases, two singles and one double. Downing, freshman pitcher, controlled the mound through the first four innings while recording four strikeouts. She also had a perfect day at the plate going 2-2 with two hits, two walks, one run, two RBIs, a double and a home run. “We showed how we could play in the second half of the game. It is a little frustrating to see them start competing late, but I think it also showed their ability to work hard and make it a close one against a very good team,” said Arlington Head Coach Ashleigh Beard.

Brian

The Marysville Getchell baseball team hosted the Everett Seagulls for the final game of their three-game series on April 20. The Seagulls came out in the first two innings and made a huge statement from both sides of the plate. Over the first and second inning Everett scored eight runs while keeping Marysville Getchell off of the score-

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PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Riley Perrine, Tomahawks’ freshman infielder, makes contact and sends one into the outfield against the Eagles at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on April 15. The Eagles were led by their strong junior duo of Madisyn Estes and Tia Langley. Estes, third baseman, had one hit on the day for a triple, one walk and two runs. Langley, shortstop, had the game-high in hits going a perfect 4-4 at the plate for two doubles and two singles. She also accounted for half of the team's runs with two runs and an RBI. Arlington’s young freshman duo of Lexi Eck and Elizabeth Durfee also had a big day against the Tom-

ahawks. Eck, left fielder, finished with two hits, one single, one double and two RBIs. Durfee, pitcher, pitched the entire game against Marysville-Pilchuck while totaling four strikeouts over six innings. If you want to support the Tomahawks their next home game will be against the Stanwood Spartans on Wednesday, May 1, at 4 p.m. Or if you want to come out for the Eagles their next home game will be on Friday, April 26, at 4 p.m. against the Spartans as well.

Chargers fall to Seagulls 15-2 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

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April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

board. Everett continued to keep rolling as they put up three more runs in the top of the third. The Chargers made their first dent in the lead with one run in the bottom of the third inning, as they went into the fourth down 11-1. Over the next two innings Marysville Getchell managed to put up another run, while Everett scored four more runs of their own. After creating a huge lead, the game was cut short as the Seagulls walked away with the 15-2 victory in

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Ryan King, Chargers’ senior pitcher, throws a strikeout in the top of the first inning against the Everett Seagulls at Everett Memorial Stadium on April 20.

the bottom of the fifth. “Regardless of the outcome I wanted to make sure that they stayed in the moment and focused on every part of the game as it came. We have such a young core and the goal is for them to take it game by game and understand the opportunity they have in front of them to finish this season strong,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach Gabriel Rochon. Marysville Getchell had contributions from the young players on their roster including Trevor Loucks, Josiah Koellmer and Cannon Van-Dalen. Loucks, sophomore center fielder, had a great day at the plate as he went 1-1 with a double, two walks and one run. Koellmer, sophomore shortstop, didn’t record a hit but earned one walk and one run. Van-Dalen, freshman third baseman, filled the stat sheet as he went 1-1 with a single, two walks, an RBI and one stolen base. The Chargers also had their seniors Ryan King and Caleb Koellmer make plays for them throughout the game. King, senior pitcher, earned two strikeouts over two innings while also going 1-2 from the plate with a single and a walk. Koellmer, senior right fielder, finished going 1-2 with a single and one stolen base. If you want to come out and support the Chargers their next game will be against Marysville-Pilchuck on Wednesday, April 24, at 4 p.m.

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MacPherson’s RHB Since 1982

Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County Wednesday, April 24, through Tuesday, April 30

Wednesday, April 24 Sunrise 6:02 am • Sunset 8:11 pm

Sunday, April 28 Sunrise 5:55 am • Sunset 8:17 pm

Thursday, April 25 Sunrise 6:01 am • Sunset 8:13 pm

Monday, April 29 Sunrise 5:54 am • Sunset 8:19 pm

3:59 am 8:31 am 3:45 pm 10:58 pm

5:16 am 9:22 am 4:35 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

5.9 ft 9.0 ft -0.4 ft 10.4 ft

6.1 ft 8.2 ft 0.3 ft

2:05 am 9:15 am 1:12 pm 7:41 pm

2:48 am 9:52 am 2:28 pm 8:42 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

10.0 ft 4.8 ft 7.0 ft 2.0 ft

10.1 ft 4.0 ft 7.3 ft 2.3 ft

Friday, April 26 Sunrise 5:59 am • Sunset 8:014 pm Tuesday, April 30 Sunrise 5:52 am • Sunset 8:20 pm Last Quarter 12:04 am 6:56 am 10:27 am 5:32 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

10.1 ft 6.0 ft 7.5 ft 1.0 ft

Saturday, April 27 Sunrise 5:57 am • Sunset 8:16 pm 1:09 am 8:31 am 11:47 am 6:35 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

10.0 ft 5.5 ft 7.1 ft 1.6 ft

3:20 am 10:21 am 3:29 pm 9:34 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

10.1 ft 3.3 ft 7.8 ft 2.6 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

MSD holds Native Art Festival By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Tulalip students and Native students from the Marysville School District got to show their art on April 18 at the annual Native Art Festival. This year’s festival was at the Don Hatch Youth Center and was held in partnership by Tulalip Education officials and the Marysville School District. “The Tulalip student Native American Art Festival has been going on for a long time and it’s an opportunity for us to showcase our Native students and the work that they do,” said Jessica Bustad, positive youth development and leadership manager for Tulalip Education division. Students got to show a variety of different types of art, including sculpture, painting, drawing, photography, digital media and other mixed media projects. “It’s an opportunity for us to inspire them to be creative and use positive forces to express themselves,” said Bustad. Bustad said she enjoys seeing the variety of different art that gets submitted and the new trends that come in every year.

“My favorite part of running this is just seeing the creativity come out of all of the students and seeing how different all the art pieces are every year,” she said. One of the memorable pieces this year was a piece of re-used material, she said. “He [the student] did a beautiful piece made out of recycled water bottles, and that is one thing that we hope to do in the future, is promote recycled art,” said Bustad. The annual festival is a good way to support kids creativity, she said. “I think the kids feel a sense of pride and they take ownership in the pieces that they have created,” she said. Students from kindergarten to 12th grade submit pieces for the annual festival. “I think the kids take a lot out of it because not only are they seeing their own art pieces, but also their peers' art and getting ideas,” said Bustad. Students get to show their art to their parents at the festival as well. “It builds up their self-confidence and they are able to bring their families to show them their art. Even if they didn’t place, their art is still displayed here and it’s just a fun event for

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville student Sequoia Alpine shows her first-place submission to the Tulalip Native Art Festival on April 18.

them,” said Bustad. “I think the families like to come and see all the art and the kids get prizes and the families get prizes. It’s just a fun time to have dinner and enjoy people’s company,” she said. Winners from the festival will have their art displayed at the Hibulb Cultural Center for a two-week cultural exhibit.

Public can review, comment on MSD's proposed math materials The Marysville School District Board of Directors will receive a report from the District Instructional Materials and Curriculum Committee on May 12 recommending adoption of the following instructional materials for grades 9-12 math content courses: PreCalculus, AP Calculus AB, College Algebra, AP Statistics, Math and Society: nPre-Calculus/Author: Blitzer/Publisher: Pearson. nCalculus for the AP Course/Author: Sullivan & Miranda/Publisher: Bedford, Freeman, and Worth. nFinite Mathematics with Applications/Author: Lial et al./Publisher: Pearson. nThe Practice of Statistics for the AP Exam/Author: Starnes & Tabor/Publisher: Bedford, Freeman, and Worth. nA Survey of Mathematics with Applications/ Author: Angel et al./Publisher: Pearson. These recommendations come following the work of the Math Adoption Committee in collaboration of teachers across the Marysville high schools. Currently, the Marysville Math Adoption Committee teachers are piloting materials for other 9-12 math courses with further updates to come on recommendations around Algebra, Geometry and Algebra

2 instructional materials. The materials are available for public inspection at the Marysville School District Service Center, 4220 80th St. NE, Marysville, by appointment, now through May 17, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please contact Tami Rice, Curriculum and As-

sessment Administrative Assistant at 360-965-0018 to schedule an appointment. Public comment on the proposed adoption is welcomed. Written comments may be addressed to Brynn Marcum, Director of Curriculum and Assessment,

4220 80th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270 or emailed to brynn_marcum@msvl. k12.wa.us. Comments will be forwarded to the Instructional Materials and Curriculum Committee, the Superintendent and the Board of Directors.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Jap Caur, left, and Maya Randolph look for eggs in the Jennings Park Master Garden during the annual Marysville Easter Egg Hunt on April 20.

MARYSVILLE Continued from page 1

to. It's great to have the families come into the park and it's fun for families to come see their neighbors," she said. "It is just really good community building." Local parent Christie Smith said she enjoyed the community at the event. "I love community events and that so many people come, and it's a great event for the kids," she said. Many local organizations also come down to the park to provide more to do for kids. "The families love the eggs, the little ones love visiting with the Easter Bunny, they love participating in the activities that the organizations provide and I think they just love the feel

of community while they're here," said Kingsford. Besides the Easter egg hunt, other organizations provide a variety of things for children to do. "We have the bunny hop challenge [obstacle course], we have a free book giveaway, we have the inflatable foosball, we're collecting food for the Marysville Community Food Bank, and we have different games for the kids to play," said Kingsford. Kingsford wanted to thank Marysville Rotary and Steve Fulton State Farm Insurance who are both long-time sponsors of the event and support it every year. "Without them we wouldn't we be able to do the Easter egg hunts," she said.


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Communities

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

7

Allen Creek Elementary celebrates 25th anniversary By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Allen Creek Elementary celebrated it’s 25th anniversary on April 18 with former and current students, parents and teachers coming out for an open house. Community members came down to the event to look at old yearbooks, see slideshows of past events and talk with each other. “We have a lot of former students and teachers that have come out,” said Janelle McFalls, principal of the school. “We knew that 25 years is a big milestone to celebrate and we want to show off our school,” she said. McFalls has been at the elementary school for eight years now and said that the area has lots of homes that people return to. “I think people stick around the area a lot, so we have a lot of people who have kids or grandkids that have been through here,” she said. “It’s nice because we have people that come back to help." Caitlin North is a teacher at the school right now but was also a student. “Allen Creek was always my home,” she said.

“When I was a student I always wanted to teach here just because it was such a great place and a great community,” she said. North said that she was happy to be able to return to the same community she grew up in. “They did so much for me and now I get to give back,” she said. Allen Creek Elementary feels different now for her, she said, but “a lot of stuff is still the same,” as well. “I always joke around with my kids that they could find one of my textbooks,” she said. McFalls said she enjoys working at the school because of the kids, the families and the staff. “To see the kids smile and the parents come and support their kids during all the events is really inspiring,” she said. “My staff works really hard and I appreciate that greatly." Jim Brennick was a board member with the district when the school was built and said that the school has done a good job through the years. “I think it’s done an outstanding job. It’s had a great staff,” he said.

Lakewood drama presents 'Footloose' The students of Lakewood High School bring their enthusiasm and joy of dance to life in their rendition of “Footloose,” a story of a teenage boy recently relocated from Chicago trying to find his way in a small town where he finds himself at odds with most of the town, including a very influential reverend. “Footloose” is powerful story of redemption, inclusion, reputation and significance. They are in their second year of musical theater production at Lakewood High School. Even though they are a small school, their musical program has won many awards for its musical talent while competing

against much larger schools. Directors Emily May, theatrical director and producer, Katy Trapp, musical director, and Ashley Bayha, Choreographer, have collaborated with the students to once again provide a fun night of entertainment. The talented cast will keep your toes tapping in their production of “Footloose.” Performances will be May 2, 3, 4, 10 and 11 at 7 p.m., and May 11 at 2 p.m., in the new Lakewood High School Performing Arts Center 17023 11th Ave. NE, in Arlington. Tickets are available at the door and are $10, and $8 with ASB card. Cash or check only at the door.

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“We’ve had a lot of great people that have come through here and some who have left and moved up the ladder and some who have retired,” he said. The school was built on a good location for a lot of families, he said. “When we were buying the property the sellers wanted $38,000 an acre, and some of the board members didn’t want to pay that, they wanted to pay $35,000,” he said. Brennick said he worked for the PUD as a design engineer and brought up the public records to show how many homes were within a mile and how many homes were planned for the area as well. “And I showed them that at executive session and so we decided to buy it then,” he said.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Allen Creek Elementary pre-school teacher Sarah Stoops, and parent Laura Greig look at old yearbooks from the school at the 25th anniversary celebration of the school on April 18. The school also celebrated turning 25 at an assembly fro students. “We got to announce to the kids as sort of an anniversary present that we’ll be

getting a new playground for the school as well,” said McFalls. The district has received a grant for a new playground and construction is sched-

uled for this summer. “We were able to tie it in so nicely with the celebration,” said McFalls, who said it was good to bring in something new for the school.


8

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

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MSD students connect with opportunities Marysville School District held its seventh annual Opportunity Expo at EvCC on April 18 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The Marysville School District’s seventh annual Opportunity Expo was held on April 18 to give students the chance to learn about colleges, universities and industry opportunities. The district brought more than 100 vendors down to the Everett Community College gym for students to talk to. “We’ve got college, fouryear universities, two-year colleges, tech, trades, businesses, and civic opportunities. We have the whole gamut,” said Jodi Runyon, director of engagement and outreach with the district. “I’ve been really proud of our students. They have been networking and are engaging with the vendors,” she said. Mountain View Arts and Technology High School student Zach Randle said the event was a good idea. “Honestly, I wanted to stay at school and get my learning done, but it’s productive to go here and think about my future,” he said. Randle said he spent most of his time talking with the representative

from Northwest University. “I’ve had my heart set on Northwest for about a year now,” he said. Most juniors from the school district are sent to the expo, along with many AVID students and some seniors as well. Runyon said she hopes students begin thinking about all the possibilities for their life after graduation that are on display at the expo. “The reason we do this is we recognize that we want all of our students to consider their futures,” she said. “It’s part of our district goals, our vision and our mission that we ‘engage, inspire and prepare.’ So this is to prepare them for life after high school,” she said. Because of the variety of options, form Boeing to trade jobs to tech jobs, Runyon said she hopes students find something that they hadn’t considered before, even if they’re not ready to make a final decision about their future yet. “We hope that something resonates with them. They may not be ready today to make a decision, but this helps give them a jumpstart in thinking about it,” said Runyon. “Maybe they walk away thinking ‘I never thought about that but maybe I will consider going into banking or going to Everett Community College,” she said.

The event is a partnership between the Marysville School District and Everett Community College, Washington State University and the University Center. “Everett Community College opens up this gym and allows us to bring in other colleges and universities that may not be directly tied to Everett Community College,” said Runyon. The Tulalip Tribes, the city of Marysville, Boeing and other local organizations come out to talk with students as well. “We want students to see there is a path where they can go here, learn a trade, and then come back to the Marysville and Tulalip community,” said Runyon.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Mountain View Arts and Technology High School student Tianna Bui, right, talks with Alassane Diagne, regional admissions counselor at Eastern Oregon University, during the Marysville School District’s Opportunity Expo on April 18.

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April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Our Best Friends

Our Favorite Quotes

Ruby

"Walking at random through the streets, we came by chance upon the Cathedral of Notre Dame. I shall long remember my first impression of the scene within. The lofty Gothic ceiling arched far above my head and through the stained windows the light came but dimly — it was all still, solemn and religious."

9

Author ­— Bayard Taylor Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

&

RAVE

RAVE: My family attended Arlington's Easter egg hunt and had a great time. Thank you to the city and sponsors for putting on this great community event every year.

RAVE: A big Thank You to the city of Marysville for putting on their annual Easter egg hunt. My kids had a great time. I especially like the format that allows the kids to collect the eggs at their own pace. And I also want to say thank you to all the spon-

sors and volunteers who help make this happen every year. RANT: The traffic in Marysville is getting really bad, especially during the morning and evening commutes. Maybe we should put more attention on improving the traffic problems, and less attention on trying to attract more residential development which would only make the traffic even worse.

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

Ruby is the Best Friend of Debby Zins.

Send us photos of you and your pet The North County Outlook has a weekly feature titled Our Best Friends. Community members can send us photos of them with their pets and we will elect one to run in that week’s issue. To submit a photo, please send it to editor@northcountyoutlook.com. Please include the names of the people and pets in the photo.

North County Outlook is published every Wednesday and mailed direct to households and businesses in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address below. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher. News Deadline: Friday 5PM before publication editor@northcountyoutlook.com

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Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Staff Writers .....Christopher Andersson, Andrew Hines Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson Directory Ad Sales ............................................. Barry Davis Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson Contributing Writers ........................................Steve Smith, The Tulalip Chefs, Penny Davis

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Weekly Puzzle CLUES ACROSS 1. Got paid 7. Sets free 13. Domestic hybrid cattle 14. Quality of one’s character 16. Doctor’s helper 17. Not holding back 19. Type of degree 20. Short but severe 22. 007’s creator 23. Linguistics icon 25. Large integers 26. Upset 28. Former 29. Peyton’s younger brother 30. An Irish dance 31. Title of respect 33. Small lump 34. Baroque musical instrument 36. The third sign of the zodiac 38. The 1st letter of the Hebrew alphabet 40. A group of nine 41. Garment 43. Capital of Yemen 44. One point south of due east 45. Drain 47. Moved quickly

48. Bar bill 51. An idiot 53. Indicates silence 55. Protein-rich liquids 56. Samoan monetary units 58. “__ your i’s, cross your t’s” 59. Forms the bottom 60. Potato state 61. Toy that spins around 64. Barium 65. Type of molding 67. Closes again 69. Sounds the same 70. Come into view CLUES DOWN 1. Nix 2. Indicates position 3. Quantitative facts 4. Strong and healthy 5. Former measure of length 6. Dads tend to be this 7. Parts of a movie 8. An animal’s foot 9. Expression of sorrow or pity 10. Saudi Arabian money 11. One billion gigabytes 12. Smallest musical interval 13. A rugged box (usually

made of wood) 15. Cheese dish 18. An ugly, evil-looking old woman 21. Widely used 24. Makes into pages 26. Afflict in mind or body 27. Set up 30. Toilets 32. “Life of Jesus” theologian 35. A big deal on Wall St. 37. Western Thai people 38. Free from contamination 39. Type of dog 42. Revolver 43. High schoolers’ exam 46. San Diego ballplayers 47. Hit the sack 49. Suitable for crops 50. Red mineral 52. Yellowish-brown 54. Lowest point between two peaks 55. Late TNT broadcaster 57. Thin strip to align parts 59. Swiss wind 62. A way to chill 63. Jewel 66. Rhodium 68. The top lawyer in the land


10

Communities

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Submit your events via email to:

Teens Make-It — Origami Flowers: Join us as we turn old book pages and origami paper into beautiful flowers. Choose from geometric kusudama flowers or paper roses, and make something pretty to give to someone you love. Held Monday, April 29, beginning at 3 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Submit your events online at:

COMING EVENTS

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

editor@northcountyoutlook.com www.northcountyoutlook.com April 24 - April 30

Urban Trails Everett With Craig Romano: Discover your wild backyard. Come take a slideshow trail tour around Western Snohomish County, Camano Island, and Whidbey Island with award winning guidebook author Craig Romano. Held

Wednesday, April 24, 6 7:30 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs, and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3 to 5 years.

Classified: Events/Festivals PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

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DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details, 855635-4229.

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WASHINGTON DIVORCE-SEPARATION, $130. $175 with children. NO COURT APPEARANCES. Includes property, bills, custody, support. Complete preparation of documents. Legal Alternatives, 503-772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com.

Real People. Real Life. P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 classifieds@northcountyoutlook.com

Waggin’ Tales: Read a tale or two with Arlington's favorite registered therapy pets! For children and families. Held Saturday, April 27, beginning at 11 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave

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Benefits Include:

• Starting wage $15.50hr$17.75hr (depending on experience and certification). • Additional $1.00/hr for weekend work • Up to $1.50/hr more for client specific care needs • Time and a half for all holidays • Mileage and travel reimbursement • Paid training and certification • Paid Leave • Excellent Medical, Dental, Visioneven for part-time work...

Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs, and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3 to 5 years. Caregiver required. Held Wednesdays, May 1 and 8, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown: Grace Academy’s production of "You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown" will be May 2, 3 and 4 at beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12. Grace Academy is at 8521 67th Ave.NE.

www.northcountyoutlook.com Teen Girls’ Intro to Self Defense Class: Learn the basics of self-defense and assertive boundary-setting at this free beginner class. This class is open to girls in grades 6-12. Spaces are limited, please register ahead of time. Held Friday, May 3, 6:30 - 8:30 pm., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Mega Flea Market: May 3, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and May 4, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Glenwood Mobile Estates, 5900 64th Street NE, Marysville, across the street from the Marysville YMCA. Bake sale and lunch available. Clothes, electronics, furniture and more great bargains. Swing Into Spring: Mark your calendars for Friday, May 3, and Saturday, May 4, for the Arlington High School Jazz Bands’ 26th annual Swing into Spring Dessert Dance, held in the AHS Commons, 18821 Crown Ridge Blvd., at 7 p.m. Tickets may be available at the door, but it is strongly recommended to purchase your tickets online. The

Classified: Flea Market

Mega Flea Market! May 3, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and May 4, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Glenwood Mobile Estates, 5900 64th Street NE, Marysville, across the street from the Marysville YMCA. Bake sale and lunch available. Clothes, electronics, furniture and more great bargains!

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• Must be 18yrs of age or older. • Must have current Driver’s License, Auto Liability Insurance and a reliable vehicle • Must be able to pass a Federal Criminal History Background check... Apply at: Catholic Community Services, 1001 N. Broadway, Suite A12 Everett, WA 98201

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Your classified ad runs in our print edition (published Wednesdays) and at www.northcountyoutlook.com for one low price!

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ticket price is $15.50, which includes music, dancing as well as dessert and beverages served by the jazz students. The “Easy G Jazz Club” doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the performance begins at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased by going to https://arlingtonsd16. revtrak.net. For more information call AHS at 360618-6300 ex 3035. Talent Show: Got talent? Auditions start for 2019 Marysville Strawberry Festival Talent Show. If you’ve got a show-stopping talent you want to share with the world, start with Marysville. Auditions are coming for your chance to perform in the 2019 Marysville Strawberry Festival Talent Show. If you’re ready to hit the stage, auditions will be from 5:307:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 8, and Friday, May 10, at the Marysville-Pilchuck High School Auditorium, 5611 108th St. NE. The talent show is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 13, during Strawberry Festival Week. The festival organizer is looking for contestants of all ages, solo, or groups in Vocal, Dance, Comedy, Bands, Musical Instruments and other categories. Deadline to enter is May 3. Visit the website at http:/www. maryfest.org and download the application and send it to Director Marcy Giesler 10121 Shoultes Rd. Marysville, WA 98270 Call 360653-6584 if you have any questions. Class of 1979 Reunion: Marysville Pilchuck High School Class of 1979 40year reunion will be held July 27, 2019, at the Marysville Opera House, 3-10 p.m. and will include dinner and fun. RSVP required by 4/28/2019. Cost is  $65 per person. For ticket and more information email classof79-40@hotmail.com.

ONGOING EVENTS Assistance for veterans: Military Veterans seeking help with the VA may contact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will return your call. Post 178 meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.”

Crossword answers from page 9


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April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

11

Dollars for Scholars bingo night set for April 27 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Arlington’s Dollars for Scholars organization will hold their bingo night, the organization's largest fundraiser of the year, on April 27. The event will be held at the Arlington High School Commons from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., with doors opening around 5:30 p.m., according to Holly Sloan-Buchanan, the president for the local Dollars for Scholars organization.

Food will be available for purchase throughout the evening, she said. Cost to enter the event is $15 for adults and $10 for accompanying children. Sloan-Buchanan said that people enjoy coming out to the event for a fun evening with other community members. “People always tell me how it’s a fun night to come out to,” she said. Locals also like to support the organization, which provides scholarships for

Arlington students each year. “We are very blessed because the community is very supportive of us,” said SloanBuchanan. There are also a number of donated prizes for the bingo night, she said. There are a number of $25 gift cards from Arlington stores and from “basically every restaurant in town.” Some $50 gift cards will also be given out for the blackout games. “So, for a $15 admission

we think those are some good prizes from the community,” said Sloan-Buchanan. This is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the local nonprofit group which is meant to support student’s furthering their education. “We provide scholarships for Arlington students, and not just Arlington High School students but Weston High School students as well,” said Sloan-Buchanan. She said that the organization provides scholarships

not just for students going to university, but those going to technical schools or other colleges as well. “Last year we gave out $90,000 in scholarships to 77 students,” said Sloan-Buchanan. The organization is entirely volunteer driven and relies on community support to provide those scholarships each year to Arlington students. “Our missions is to support kids and their futures,” said Sloan-Buchanan.

She said that she values the work that Dollars for Scholars does each year because it helps the kids and the future of our community. “Whether it is in Arlington or elsewhere, the kids are our future,” she said. Dollars for Scholars scholarships are open each year, usually from Feb. 1 to April 1. To learn more about the local organization or how to apply for future scholarships go to www.arlingtonwa.dollarsforscholars.org.

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12

April 24, 2019 - April 30, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n WHISTLING GARDENER

Itoh Peonies — The best of both worlds call herbaceous perenI first fell in love with Peonies back in the nials and not only do early 70’s when I was they have spectacular stationed in Petersburg, blooms, but many of Virginia, with the U.S. them are fragrant as Army. I was driving well. They thrive in full out in the country one sun and hardly ever By Steve Smith afternoon when I came need to be divided. upon row after row of these in- When they emerge in the spring, credible plants covered with pink, I place a “grow through ring” over red or white blooms that looked them to help support the large 4 like carnations on steroids. Next to 6 inch flowers — an established to this little farm was a stand filled clump can sport 20 to 30 flowers. with buckets of these flowers and They appreciate adequate water, a sign that read, “Fresh cut peo- so mulching in the summer helps nies, five dollars a dozen. Put your to conserve moisture and feeding money in the Mason jar please, we with an all purpose organic feroperate on the honor system”. I tilizer before and after blooming paid my five bucks, took my bou- keeps them strong and healthy. quet home, enjoyed it for at least When fall comes along and a week and vowed that someday a hard frost hits the garden, the when I had my own place I would peonies will die back and should grow peonies. It was almost 20 be cut to the ground. It is a good years later before that finally hap- idea to mark where they are in the pened. garden so that when spring arrives These peonies are what we you don’t accidentally break off

the tender emerging new shoots. In addition to herbaceous peonies there are also tree peonies, which aren’t actually trees but are more like a woody shrub. They have flowers that come in colors of yellow, orange, purple and of course red, pink and white and they can reach 9 to 12 inches in size. The plant itself grows to a 4’ by 4’ woody shrub lacking in form and equally as hard to work into your landscape arrangement but the incredible flowers make it all worthwhile. Now here comes the best of both worlds, Itoh Peonies. These are hybrids (called intersectional) between the herbaceous and tree peonies mentioned above. The plants grow 2 to 3 feet tall with sturdy stems that do not need any staking and the flowers are a happy average between the species, measuring in at 6 to 9 inches with a good range of colors. The

plants develop a woody nature by the end of the season, but are actually herbaceous and need to be cut all the way to the ground before spring. Originally introduced in the late 1960’s, recent breeding work has brought us many new commercial varieties. These peonies are not cheap, but they are well worth the investment — they will last for years and you can pass divisions on to your grandkids. Itoh’s are the ‘Yin and Yang’ of the peony world all rolled into one plant and with as many as 50 flowers per plant, no gardener will be able to resist these beauties. Now is the time to buy and plant them, while they are still small and easily removed from their containers. Put them in a rich soil with lots of organic fertilizer and compost, since they will be in that same spot for years to come. Steve Smith is the owner of Sun-

COURTESY PHOTO

Itoh Peonies are a great addition to your garden.

nyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

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April 24, 2019 North County Outlook  

April 24, 2019 North County Outlook

April 24, 2019 North County Outlook  

April 24, 2019 North County Outlook

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