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Real People. Real Life. www.northcountyoutlook.com

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Vol. 12 No. 26 n

March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Strawberry Festival names Senior, Junior Royalty By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville Strawberry Festival crowned their 2019 Royalty March 2 at the April Friesner Memorial Royalty Scholarship Pageant. Mar ysv i l le-Pi lchuck High School senior Natalia Zieroth will be this summer's Queen while M-PHS senior Brionna Olson and Marysville Getchell High School senior Jael Hudson are the Princesses. Maryfest, the nonprofit organization that runs the Strawberry Festival, provides a $5,000 scholarship to the queen and $3,500 scholarships to the princesses. Emma Abele and Karis Lewis, 10th Street Middle School students, will be the 2019 Junior Royalty members. Queen Natalia Zieroth

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

The 2019 Strawberry Festival Senior Royalty, from left, Princess Jael Hudson, Queen Natalia Zieroth and Princess Brionna Olson. is passionate about golf and has been accepted into the University of Idaho's PGA Management program. "About five minutes

into the campus walk I said 'this is where I want to go to school,'" she said in her speech. However, the program is

very selective and Zieroth needed to improve her golf skills. See ROYALTY on page 2

Nehring presents State of the City By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring talked about public safety and infrastructure at his State of the City Address on Feb. 28. Nehring said that public safety is one of the top priorities of residents in the city, and that last year the city saw a 7.58 percent decrease in reported crime. “There’s a four or five year trend that is slowly trickling down,” he said, as the city’s statistics show a drop since 2014. Burglaries were a big focus for the department, said Nehring, and they have decreased over the last couple of years. Nehring said the credit goes to initiatives the police have undertaken such as the regional property crimes unit, which was a joint project between many local police agencies. “Criminals don’t know

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring delivers the State of the City address on Feb. 28 at the Marysville Opera House.

boundaries … all they’re looking for is an easy place to commit crime,” said Nehring. The city has been looking at ways to reduce the amount of homelessness and addiction as well. “It’s not lost on anybody that we have a drug problem

See NEHRING on page 6

Arlington schools participate in Read Across America Day By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com In honor of Read Across America Day Arlington elementary schools have been spending time emphasizing reading. Read Across America Day was named in honor of Dr. Seuss and is observed on his birthday, March 2. At Arlington’s Presidents Elementary on March 1 students spent half of the day reading in honor of the day. “All week we’ve had different dress-up days for Seuss Days,” said Carol Rahkonen, librarian at the school. “Today is the big culminating day where

we just come in and read for about two and a half hours,” she said. Students were able to pick a book and read in the gym during the school day. “I think they like the extended period of reading, they like wearing and the pajamas and they like being able to spread out on the floor and reading with friends,” said Rahkonen. “It’s really the opportunity to have a good reading time in school,” she said. Presidents Elementary students said they enjoyed the day.

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See READ on page 3

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Presidents Elementary student Kailyn McKinney reads a book during a reading event on March 1 held for Read Across America Day.

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March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Local News ROYALTY Continued from page 1

"I played daily, in the rain and the freezing weather, and even on long summer days … spending hours chipping ball after ball," she said. She was eventually accepted into the program, one of five women accepted, and hopes to one day be involved in the golf industry or be a pro player. Natalia is also involved in community service and is on the editorial staff for her school's yearbook. At the pageant she was crowned as this year's Queen. "I was a little surprised, but definitely very excited to get this opportunity to represent Marysville," she said. She said she enjoys the Strawberry Festival because it brings all of Marysville together. "The parade is very cool to see the whole community get together in one place," she said.

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I was a little surprised, but definitely very excited to get this opportunity to represent Marysville.

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"Thank you for this opportunity and I really appreciate it," she said. Princess Brionna Olson said that she used to avoid social interaction but has enjoyed getting involved at her school. "I wasn't the smartest kid in school or the tallest. I spent a lot of time in the library until my fourthgrade librarian kicked me out because she thought I needed more social interaction," she said in her speech. However, after getting involved in leadership classes she has become a bigger part of her schools. "It was my favorite class

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

The 2019 Strawberry Festival Junior Royalty, Emma Abele, left, and Karis Lewis.

of the day because I really love to help people," she said. At M-PHS she has been part of the DECA Club and was the drama club's stage crew manager for three years. She is also a part-time instructor at Kung Fu Northwest. Brionna was excited to be named as one of this year's Princesses.

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"He was opening the envelope, struggling with it, and I heard the first part of my name and I had tears welling," she said. "I went up there trying not to cry and it was just amazing." Princess Jael Hudson has been involved in ballroom dancing for many years. "I have been a competitive ballroom dancer for many years now and I have taught many people," she said. "It's given me the confidence that I have today and shown me many different people with many perspectives," she said. One day she hopes to open her own nonprofit dance studio. Jael is a member of her school's National Honor Society and volunteers at the local senior center. She is excited to take part in the Strawberry Festival. "It's such a humbling experience to be a representative of Marysville," she said. She hopes to "get new experiences and be able to meet people and interact with different people from Washington state." Junior Royalty member Emma Abele enjoys band, where she plays the clarinet, piano and ukulele, and math, where she is part of her school's Math Olympiad. "I've never been the tallest in my class, but I always try to be the nicest," she said. "I've never done anything like this or been in a festival so this is a big challenge for me," she said. Junior Royalty member Karis Lewis said she enjoys art, band and P.E. at her school. She plays the clarinet. "In my free time I play lots of sports and my favorite one is softball," she said adding she likes playing first base or second base. "Last year my sister was a Princess and she had so much fun and made so many memories," said Karis, so she is looking forward to this summer.


Communities

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March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

Arlington installs safe meeting spots ___ “ By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Arlington locals now have a space downtown in front of the police station that is a designated meeting place for online selling or buying. Officials from the city and police department put up signs and designated a community meeting space in front of the Arlington Police Station where locals can meet. “It’s been on the radar for quite a while,” said Kristin Banfield, communications manager with the city of Arlington. “We’ve had a lot of community interest in a spot like this,” she said. “So we finally got going on making this now." The space can help those who feel nervous about selling something online through the numerous marketplaces that are available through the internet. “A lot of people use online sales now, whether that

READ Continued from page 1

“It’s my first time at reading day because I’m in third grade and I was really excited this morning,” said student Katrina Griffin, who was reading Judy Blume during the day. “It’s fun because we get to learn about how to read and we build up our stamina,” said student Zoie Lofstedt. Other students also enjoyed the chance to relax. “I like how we all get to lay down and read for a long time. We get to finish the books and that is fun,” said student Jacob Todd. Rahkonen said that simple reading time is something that schools don’t have a lot of time for these days. “In today’s world they’re so busy learning academics that this silent reading time is hardly ever able to be done in the classroom, so they treasure this day,” she said. Presidents Elementary

is through Craig’s List, OfferUp or the numerous buy and sell groups that are on Facebook,” said Banfield. “Anytime you are buying or selling with a stranger there’s always an element of risk, so this really helps people feel a lot more comfortable." The feedback from the public has also been very positive so far, she said. “When we announced this on Facebook we got a lot of thank-you’s from residents who said they were often leery about following through with an online sell,” she said. In addition to online selling and buying the spot can also be used for divorced parents for custody exchanges. “The spot can also be used for custody cases, where there can be a child drop off or pick up,” said Banfield. “If the family relationship isn’t the best, this can be a little more comfortable

for the parents to drop off the kids here,” she said. The Community Meeting Space signs are provided by OfferUp, one of the online community marketplaces apps. OfferUp paid for the signs while the city completed in the work to install cameras for the area, making sure they were set up to record the area and that it was brightly lit enough for people in the area. “We didn’t need to enhance the light,” said Banfield, because the light was already pretty strong in that area by the police station. City officials have received many requests for a safe meeting spot location, said Banfield, and now they are able to provide it. “We’ll be able to have a place to direct people,” she said, “and I think it gives folks a little more peace of mind.” Additional safe trade spots are shown at www. safetradespots.com, a data-

has held the reading day for four years now. “This is just to encourage the love of reading and get them excited about it,” said Rahkonen. “Without reading skills it’s very difficult to do anything in this world." Other schools in the district had reading nights or other events during the week and the food service

staff at some schools made some of the food green. “All of our elementary schools are doing something,” said Gary Sabol, director of communications at the Arlington School District. “Reading is a big focus for our schools so we’re really just emphasizing that this week,” he said.

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Any time you are buying or selling with a stranger there's always an element of risk, so this really helps people feel a lot more comfortable.

___

Kristin Banfield

base of community meeting spots that are in front of law enforcement agencies. Arlington isn’t uploaded to the site yet, but should be added soon said Banfield. Other jurisdictions like Marysville are already on the site. “We’re a little late to the party on this one, but we’re happy to have it up now,” she said.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

The signs for the designated safe meeting spaces in front of the Arlington Police Station.


4

Sports

March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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M-P battles for fourth-place finish at State By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville-Pilchuck boys basketball team took on the Kelso Hilanders in the battle for fourth place in the Hardwood Classic, Washington’s State Cham-

pionship Tournament on March 2. From the tip-off both teams began pushing the pace as multiple shots were put up in the first few moments of the game. The Tomahawks relied on their ball movement early as they

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Tomahawks’ junior point guard Luke Dobler goes along the baseline and kicks out for the three against the Kelso Hilanders at the Tacoma Dome on March 2.

found backdoor cuts along the baseline and created open shots from beyond the arc. By the end of the quarter, Marysville-Pilchuck was able to create a little bit of space with a 16-14 lead. In the beginning of the second quarter the Tomahawks started to separate themselves a little more as they outscored the Hilanders 5-3, extending their lead to 21-17. Kelso began to fight back on the back of Shaw Anderson as they took the lead on a huge 16-8 run. Marysville-Pilchuck had a couple of quick scores to close out the half and tied up the game at 33-33. The Tomahawks came into the third quarter with momentum as they found their groove and began to control the game on both ends of the court. They started the half on a 5-0 run and made sure to not give back the lead, keeping the Hilanders at bay for the rest of the quarter. Marys-

ville-Pilchuck went into the fourth up 52-45. In the fourth quarter Marysville-Pilchuck maintained their control and never let the score get closer than their seven-point lead. With their superior athleticism and ability to create second-chance points, the Tomahawks came away with the 71-60 victory. With the win Marysville-Pilchuck took home the fourth-place finish, highest in school history. “So much of what we do hinges on RaeQuan and when he lets the game come to him he is incredible, but when he tries to force plays he can run into some trouble. He’s such a difference maker and the surrounding pieces all stepped up in a big way to put us over the edge. It’s a really special group and a great team effort,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach Bary Gould. See STATE on page 5

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

RaeQuan Battle, Tomahawks’ senior wing, uses the step back and hits the deep three with a Kelso defender in his face at the Tacoma Dome on March 2.

High School Spring Sports Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks

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Communities

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March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

5

Arlington falls to West Seattle in first round at State Tournament By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The Arlington girls basketball team travelled to the Tacoma Dome to take on the West Seattle Wildcats in the first round of the Hardwood Classic, Washington State’s Championship Tournament, on Feb. 27. Arlington came out of the gate strong as they scored quickly from beyond the arc while forcing the Wildcats to take tough midrange shots. The Eagles kept the ball moving at a fast pace and found open areas to take their shots on the West Seattle defense. At the end of the first quarter Arlington held a small lead, 13-9. The second quarter was a complete-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Sierra Scheppele, Arlington’s junior guard, uses her crossover as he moves the Wildcats defense and looks for the pass into the paint at the Tacoma Dome on Feb. 27.

STATE Continued from page 4

The Tomahawks senior wing RaeQuan Battle dominated the game as he had the team-high 25 points going 9 of 17 from the field and 5 of 10 from beyond the arc. Battle also filled the stat sheet with seven rebounds, three assists, one block and one steal. Marysville-Pilchuck’s core three juniors Aaron Kalab, Luke Dobler and Cameron Stordahl stepped up in a big way. Kalab, forward, had a double-double with 16 points and 10 rebounds, as well as two assists. Dobler, point guard, filled the stat sheet with 14 points, two three pointers, nine rebounds, six assists and three steals. Stordahl, wing, put in points late as he scored 12, grabbed four rebounds, dished two assists and grabbed two steals. “I’m so glad I was able to stay at home and we were able to bring this win back to M-P. I love my team and I

ly different story as the Wildcats began to take away the Eagles’ open threes and forced them inside. West Seattle began to click on the offensive end and more than doubled their scoring output from the first as they outscored Arlington 19-8. Heading into halftime the Wildcats established a 28-21 lead. Both teams came into the third quarter scoring back and forth as they battled for momentum. The Eagles worked to draw fouls on the way to the basket with multiple and-one plays against the Wildcat defense. With a couple of minutes left in the quarter West Seattle held a 40-30 lead, but Arlington hit a different gear late as they went on a 5-0 run to enter the fourth down 40-35. The Eagles stayed neck-and-neck with the Wildcats throughout the rest of the half. With a little over a minute left in the game Arlington closed the gap down 46-45. Unfortunately, after a few foul calls and some clutch free throws late, West Seattle was able to walk away with the 50-45 victory. “After the game I told the team that the positive of these games is the incredible experience that they have earned against the top teams in the state. In order for teams to be successful you have to go through it and gain confidence competing at that level. We’re so young and we’re going to be able to be clear about our goals next season and it’s going to pay off for us down the road,” said Arlington Head Coach Joe Marsh. The Eagles were led by their trio of sophomores including Hailey Hiatt, Josie Stupey and Abby Schwark. Hiatt, shooting guard, scored a team-high 16 points on 6 of 13 shooting and hitting three shots from beyond the arc. She also grabbed three rebounds and forced two steals. Stupey, forward, was the second leading scorer for Arling-

have grown up around these guys ever since I was little, they are my brothers. Playing for my coaches and with my teammates is something I’m going to miss, but I’m excited to go out and prove myself at the next level,” said Tomahawks’ star wing and University of Washington commit RaeQuan Battle. Mar ysv i l le-Pi lchuck played in two games in the State Tournament leading up to the battle against Kelso. On Feb. 28 the Tomahawks lost to the O’Dea Fighting Irish, 63-53, but came back and dominated the next round with a win against the Ingraham Rams, 80-68, on March 1. The Tomahawks had some impressive tournament totals from their core starters Battle, Dobler, Stordahl and Kalab. Battle totaled 68 points, 26 rebounds, seven assists, six blocks and three steals. Dobler tallied 38 points, 23 rebounds, 13 assists and eight steals. Stordahl had 42 points, 11 rebounds, three assists and three steals.

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Arlington’s freshman guard Keira Marsh uses her speed to push the ball up the court against the Wildcats at the Tacoma Dome on Feb. 27. ton with 13 points as she hit 9 of 10 from the free throw line, grabbed seven rebounds, four assists and one steal. Schwark, forward, scored five points while dishing one assist and leading the team in rebounds with eight. Arlington’s freshman point guard Keira Marsh had a great game coming off the bench. Marsh scored the thirdmost on the team with eight points, grabbed two boards and took two steals in the second half. With this final game of the season, Arlington finished with an overall record of 17-7 and a league record of 12-1. With only two seniors on their varsity roster and their entire starting lineup returning next season, the Eagles will look to reload and make a run in the tournament next year.

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINESN

Marysville-Pilchuck’s junior wing Cameron Stordahl splits the O’Dea defenders and scores on the layup at the Tacoma Dome on Feb. 28 Kalab put up 41 points, 27 rebounds, eight assists and two steals. In the offseason the Tomahawks will lose fourstar prospect RaeQuan Battle but will return the rest of

their varsity roster. Behind a strong core and another year of experience the Tomahawks will look to threepeat as District Champions and make a run at a State Title.

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6

March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Program helps caregivers By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Locals who take care of their family members dealing with illness can find information about how to support themselves at the “Powerful Tools for Caregivers” program. The classes at the Stillaguamish Senior Center are from March 19 to April 23 and May 21 to June 25 this year. They take place at the center at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington on Tuesdays from 10:30 a.m. to noon. The program costs $25 to cover the book, although that fee can be waived for those in need. Registration is required for the classes. The family caregiver support specialist at the center, Angeles Vesely, said that the focus of the program is to help caregivers. “This class is to help caregivers take care of themselves so they can take care of their loved one,” she said. “You cannot take care of your loved one if you’re not healthy yourself.”

NEHRING Continued from page 1

in this country, a serious opioid problem, and it exists in Marysville, although thankfully not to the level that Seattle or Tacoma has it,” said Nehring. Last year was the beginning of the Embedded Social Worker program, which partners a social worker with a police officer to go out and build relationships with those suffering from drug addiction. “Let’s offer them a way out of that lifestyle,” said Nehring. Putting a social worker out there can be a more ef-

One survey showed that the caregiver often dies before the person being taken care of, and the stress of caregiving is a big contributor to that, said Vesely. “They are more focused on the people that they take care of." Caregivers are often more worried about getting their family member to hospital appointments than going to their own appointments, which is a problem as they get older. Vesely said that people often don’t see themselves as caregivers, but when they come in to the program they see their own problems and experiences. You are still a caregiver even if you’re not getting paid or looking after a loved one, said Vesely. Less men come into the program because they don’t want to be labeled as a caregiver, she said. Some people are experiencing emotions that they don’t know how to handle. “They’re embarrassed to say ‘I’m tired of taking care of my husband’ or ‘I don’t know what to do with my

fective solution than simply arresting a homeless individual, said Nehring. “Jailing those with addiction is a never-ending cycle that never really fixes the problem,” he said. The program began in March but took a couple months to get running. Over the last year they got 46 individuals into a drug treatment program and secured housing for 50 individuals. “Problems still exist. I’m not naive, but we are putting a dent in it,” said Nehring. The city also made progress in forming a Regional Fire Authority, which would

mother,’” said Vesely. The program provides education and training and “knowing how to react in every situation as a caregiver,” said Vesely. There are state services and caregiver support groups all across the county that can help caregivers. “They tell their stories that everyone there can understand,” she said. The classes can also help caregivers connect with resources to learn more about diseases like Alzheimer’s. Topics of the program include how to handle stress and “looking for the early warning signs of stress” and “how to communicate … sometimes they don’t want to talk about the problems,” said Vesely. The caregiver program is paid for by the federal government to help provide support for caregivers across the country. To learn more about the program or to register contact Angeles Vesely at avesely@stillycenter.org or Debbie Cook at dcook@stillycenter.org.

change the Marysville Fire District from a contracted service to different structure. “That’s really something that needs to happen to properly finance and manage our fire services,” said Nehring. “Most cities and entities are going to Regional Fire Authorities,” he added. Expanding street infrastructure and jobs over the next few years is also important for the city, said Nehring. “We know a lot of people with jobs are moving here and commuting, so we’ve got to provide local jobs and road infrastructure,” he said.

The Arlington-Marysville Manufacturing Industrial Center near Smokey Point is close to getting an official manufacturing industrial center designation, said Nehring. “There’s only a handful throughout the Puget Sound … there’s a lot of resistance in Seattle and Tacoma who control most of them and they don’t want to designate another area so it would be a big deal,” said Nehring. The designation would help bring attention and potentially money for infrastructure to the area. That area has been saved by the Marysville City Council for a while in the hopes of attracting manufacturing jobs. “We’ve had a lot of developers come in and want to turn this area into housing and we said ‘no, we have enough areas for housing and we need to preserve some area for a jobs base,’” said Nehring. Upcoming street projects include a new interchange in south Marysville at SR529 and I-5 and the design work for a over-crossing that would go above the trains at Grove Street. An over-crossing at other places is not feasible due to the amount of property the city would have to buy, said Nehring. “At Grove we don’t have to buy up any properties and would drop you right off by the Community Transit Park and Ride,” he said. This is the second year that Nehring has delivered his State of the City to the public at the Marysville Opera House in addition to the Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce. In past years he only gave the address at the chamber.


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Health

March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

7

n Emily’s Wellness Wisdom

Tips for people using the Keto Diet Many people trying to lose weight are looking at keto diets these days. Before you jump feet first into this new way of eating it’s important to know what keto is all about and if it’s a good idea for you to do. Simply stated Keto is short for Ketosis. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, which refers to the state of metabolism the body is in when it uses fat as a primary energy source. In fact, we all do a little ‘ketosis” each night when we sleep. As we fast during the night, our blood sugars drop, and our body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. A keto diet is a low-carb diet where the body produces ketones in the liver that it will use as energy. It's referred to by many different names; ketogenic diet, low-carb diet, low-carb high-fat (LCHF), etc. The current keto fad encourages eating low carb, low to moderate protein, and high fat, which will put your body into ketosis. Bad news for some, eating cheese and bacon all day would not be a great idea. If your goal is weight loss, eating more fat will prevent you from burning your stored fat for fuel. Eating a high-fat diet will keep you in ketosis, but your body will be using the recently consumed fat for fuel. When you want to lose your stored body fat, a high fat keto diet is not optimal. A few common Keto DIY mistakes to avoid: n Not getting in all of your electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, and magnesium. This can lead to feeling faint or lightheaded. n Consuming too many carbohydrates in your vegetables. Be sure to avoid vegetables that are high on the glycemic index. If you aren't sure, look up the vegetable on an online search tool. n Thinking calories matter most. They do matter, but ketosis is not a calories in, calories out diet. It's getting your body into fat

Share your news! Help us tell your neighbors about club activities, fundraising events, meeting schedules and more. Send your information to North County Outlook, P.O. Box 39, Marysville, WA 98270 or e-mail the information to: editor@northcountyoutlook.com.

Emily Countryman

burning mode based more on what you eat. n Not being prepared. Most snack foods are high carb. When you are in a pinch and reach for a “100 calorie” pack of food, you may knock yourself right out of ketosis due to the

carb or sugar intake. The idea of keto sounds simple, but with such specific macros (fats, carbs, proteins) it can be confusing to know what to eat. If you are trying to lose fat with a keto diet, it can be quite challenging to find the proper combination in a DIY meal plan. It takes careful macro planning, meal prepping, timed eating and what seems like an advanced degree in ketosis. An easier way is to do a coached program that has already been designed for you. Ketogenic Diets are based on the science of weight loss and how human physiology responds

COURTESY PHOTO

Many people are using the Keto Diet to lose weight.

to sugar, carbohydrates, insulin and fat storage. Finding someone who is experienced and certified in weight loss coaching and familiar with a ketosis pro-

gram is the best option if weight loss is your goal. Emily Countryman is a board-certified health coach and owner of Ideal Well-

ness located at 2639 172nd St. NE Suite 104 in Smokey Point/Marysville. She can be reached online at www. idealwellnesswa.com or info@idealwellnesswa.com.


8

Opinion

March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

n GUEST EDITORIAL

March is time to embrace health

With Daylight Saving Time and spring just around the corner, we’re excited to step up our activity levels and embrace all the health and wellness activities the Marysville Tulalip community has to offer. Here’s just a sample. City of Marysville Dozens of city parks and some amazing trails for walking and biking offer a range of free outdoor experiences with something for everyone. We’re excited this year to connect Bayview Trail to Centennial Trail and build a new Olympic View Park in south Sunnyside connecting to the Ebey Waterfront Trail. The city also offers many affordable sports, fitness and wellness classes and activities for all ages and abilities. A quick look shows you can sign up for an adult softball league, take a CPR/First Aid class, learn self-defense, practice tai chi/yoga/Zumba and get a massage! Review the many options and sign up for the one that’s right for you at https://apm.activecommunities.com/marysvillewa/Activity_Search. And it’s not too early to plan ahead and mark your calendars for fun outdoor activities coming this spring. Among them are the Kids’ Fishing Derby at Jennings Park on May 4 and Healthy Communities Challenge Day on June 1. Look for more information coming soon. Marysville School District We like to remind our students and families that keeping a healthy body helps to create a healthy mind. Many important factors play into this: n Adequate sleep: children need at least 10-12 hours of sleep per night for healthy brain development. n Schedule/routine: regular bedtimes and wake times and predictable schedules help to instill a sense of security. n Proper nutrition: a blend of fresh fruit and vegetables, along with adequate protein, carbohydrates and hydration are important to healthy body and mind development. n Reduced screen time: research is showing that too much screen time may negatively impact a child’s developing brain. n Social, emotional, mental health: know who your child’s friends are and where they spend their time, monitor social media accounts, and talk together on a regular basis such during family dinner time. n Health and wellness check-ups: regular health and dental check-ups are an important part of your child’s overall health and well-being. n Outdoor activities/fresh air: increased outside play and activities on a regular basis improves overall health and mental wellness.

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Our Favorite Quotes "The longer I live, the more I read, the more patiently I think, and the more anxiously I inquire, the less I seem to know ... Do justly. Love Mercy. Walk humbly. This is enough." Author ­— John Adams Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, Tulalip Tribes Chairwoman Marie Zackuse and Marysville School District Superintendent Jason Thompson. The Marysville and Tulalip community offers many opportunities that support healthy choices. We invite you to challenge yourselves and family members to embrace the beauty of our local community and get moving! Tulalip Tribes The Karen I. Fryberg Tulalip Health Clinic has a new website with many wonderful resources for health and wellness to better yourself mentally, physically and spiritually. One of the award-recognized programs is the Diabetes Care and Prevention Program, which received the 2016 Indian Health Service Portland Area Director’s Award Recognition of Excellence. Every Thursday this month from March 7 through March 28, from 4:30 to 6 p.m., Miguel Arteaga (RN) and Natasha LeVee (PharmaD) will provide information about living a positive life with diabetes and participants share a light meal. If interested, join us at the Karen I. Fryberg Conference Room at the Health Clinic. For more information contact Veronica Leahy, Diabetes Program Coordinator, at 360-716-5642 or Brooke Morrison, Program Administrative Assistant, at 360-716-5617, or go to https://www.tulaliphealthsystem.com/ At the Hibulb Cultural Center every 2nd Thursday of the month, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., a Suicide Survivor Support Group meets. Because wellness is directly connected to mental health, please note the 24-Hour Crisis Line provided by Volunteers of America, 1-800-584-3578. You can also get more information and use the chat services at www.imhurting.org. This monthly column is jointly prepared by the City of Marysville, Marysville School District and Tulalip Tribes about topics of interest to the Marysville Tulalip community.

Weekly Puzzles Fun by the Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. See answers on page 10 .

&

RAVE RAVE: If you haven't seen the Arlington High School Drama Department's production of "Momma Mia" you still have the opportunity to see it this week with performances on March 8 and 9. It's a lot of fun and the students do a fantastic job. Don't miss it. RAVE: Congratulations to this year's Marysville Strawberry Festival Senior and Junior Royalty that was selected last weekend at the April Friesner Memorial Roy-

alty Scholarship Pageant. These wonderful young ladies can look forward to representing our community for the coming year. Thank you to all those who participated, and thank you to those who put on the festival. RAVE: Don't forget to 'Spring Forward' one hour on March 10 as Daylight Saving Time begins. It's also a good time to check the batteries in the smoke detectors in your home.

utlook

Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Real People. Real Life. Staff Writers ..................................Christopher Andersson, Sarah Arney, Andrew Hines North County Outlook is published every Wednesday Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson and mailed direct to households and businesses Directory Ad Sales ............................................. Barry Davis in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address Contributing Writers ........................................Steve Smith, above. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material The Tulalip Chefs, Penny Davis for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher.

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March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Legal Notices

ASD accepting K-11 Highly Capable referrals

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BRUCE C. CALDWELL, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00314-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: JOSEPH EDWARD KELLER, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00282-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EVELYN GRACE HOY, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00315-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HELEN PAULINE BLOODWORTH, Deceased, NO. 19-400316-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILMA CAROL TILLY, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00313-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Personal Representative: Judith Ann Claxton Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Personal Representative: Jolene Inez Martinis Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00313-31

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Personal Representative: Christina Marie White Attorney for Personal Representative: Breanne W. Martin, WSBA #44519 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No.19-4-00314-31

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 27, 2019 Personal Representative: Wendy Lee Christie Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The co-personal representatives named below have been appointed as co-personal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Co-Personal Representative: Thomas Richard Hoy Co-Personal Representative: Priscilla Ann Baker Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00282-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00315-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00316-31

Arlington Public Schools is accepting Highly Capable Program referrals for kindergarten through 11thgrade students through Friday, March 29. Students will be considered for evaluation for possible program participation for the 2019-20 school year. Students who are highly capable may possess, but are not limited to, the following learning characteristics: n Capacity to learn with unusual depth of understanding, to retain what has been learned, and to transfer learning to new situations; n Capacity and willingness to deal with increasing levels of abstraction and complexity earlier than their chronological peers; n Creative ability to make unusual connections among ideas and concepts; n Ability to learn quickly in their area(s) of intellectual strength; and n Capacity for intense concentration and/or focus. Referral forms are on the district website and may be returned to Heather Brown, Teaching and Learning, 315 N. French St., Arlington, WA 98223.

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10

March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

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meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.”

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. Volunteers for Animal northcountyoutlook.com Care Wanted: The NOAH

Submit your events via email to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com March 6 - March 12 Teen Win It Wednesday: Come learn how to play a new board or card game with us, and win a snackish reward in return. Held Wednesday, March 6, beginning at 3 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Declutter Your Home and Decrease Stress: Are you feeling overwhelmed and not sure how to tackle your piles of clutter? Join us to learn how to organize and declutter your home with professional organizer, Monika Kristofferson. Held Saturday, March 9, beginning at 1 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Silvana Fair Annual Auction: Want to bid on homemade cinnamon rolls, fudge, muffins, pies, horsetack, feed, and lots of other great items, come to the Silvana Fair Board Auction on Marc 9 at Viking Hall in downtown Silvana. The Silent Auction starts at 5:30 p.m., and the live auction begins at 6 p.m. Lots of good food will be available at the Snack Bar. Door prize

of $250 will be awarded at the end of the auction. Proceeds from the auction is used to put on the oneday youth fair and provides ribbons, trophies and premiums to the youth of the area. Auctioneers this year is Dave Fenton from Leavenworth & George Magnochi from Carnation. If you have a new item to donate to the auction, call 360-6528682. Friends of the Arlington Library Book Sale: Great books available at bargain prices. Something for everyone! Mar.'s theme is gardening. Proceeds support the Arlington Library. Held Tuesday, March 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Wednesday, March 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Arlington Book Discussion Group: Come join us for a discussion of George Hodgman's "Bettyville," a warm account of his becoming caregiver for his strong-willed nonagenarian mother. held Tuesday, March 12, beginning at 6:30 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Classified: Help Wanted

COMING EVENTS Soil Science and Plant Nutrition - With the WSU Master Gardeners: Learn soil and compost tips from the WSU Master Gardeners. held Wednesday, March 13 beginning at 5 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Grant Writing Workshops: Grant Writing Workshops will be held Thursdays, March 14 & 28, beginning at 2 p.m., at the Marysville Library, 6120 Grove St. This two-part grant writing workshop helps you perfect your ability to craft proposals that effectively and successfully deliver your organization’s message to potential funders. Session One: Crafting Proposals That Pack a Punch (March 14) Session Two: From Budgets to Attachments, Character Counts, and Balancing Stats with Stories (March 28). Presented by Debra Jensen, a Seattle area nonprofit consultant and freelance grant writer. Please preregister as space is limited. For more information call 360-6585000 Class of 1979 Reunion: Marysville Pilchuck High School Class of 1979 40year reunion will be held July 27, 2019, at the Marysville Opera House, 3-10 p.m. and will include dinner and fun. RSVP required by 4/28/2019. Cost is $65 per person. For ticket and more information email classof79-40@hotmail.com.

ONGOING EVENTS

Classified: Events/Festivals PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

Classified: Announcements

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855-4154148.

Assistance for veterans: Military Veterans seeking help with the VA may contact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will return your call. Post 178

Center in Stanwood is looking for volunteers. NOAH offers several volunteer opportunities to help care for their adoptable animals. If you are interested in volunteering go to www.thenoahcenter.org or call 360-6297055. Jam Session for People with Disabilities: Youth and adults of all abilities are invited to Village Music and Arts Friday jam sessions featuring live music by Jon Dalgarn and Voices of the Village. Bring your own instrument or use theirs. Sessions are every Friday, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at 338 North McLeod, Arlington, WA. Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Call Michelle at 360-653-7752 ext. 14 for more information or to sign up. TOPS 433 meeting: TOPS 433 meets at Arlington Boys & Girls Club on Fridays, 9:45-10:45. All welcome. For more information go to www.TOPS.org. TOPS meeting: TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets Friday mornings, 9:30 a.m., at the Marysville United Methodist church, 5600 64th St. NE in Marysville. For more information go to www.TOPS.org. Family Night to Battle Addiction: The Tulalip Tribes Family Services runs their “Family Night” on the last Tuesday of every month. The dinner and discussion night provides information, support and community ideas on how to help loved ones in their battles with addiction. From 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Juanita AnnJones Morales building at 2821 Mission Hill Road, Tulalip. Call 360-716-4400 to RSVP. Al-Anon and Alateen: Families of problem drinkers can find support by calling 425-348-7828 or by going to www.dist23.org. District 23 encompasses most of north Snohomish County and has a directory of 23 meetings in the area, including Marysville and Arlington meetings

Answers from page 8

COURTESY PHOTO

Walker Braillard

COURTESY PHOTO

Do, Braillard named Students of the Month By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville Getchell High School students Tina Do and Walker Braillard were recognized for the work they do at their schools. The two Getchell seniors were given the February Students of the Month award presented by the Marysville Kiwanis and Soroptimist clubs, who honor a boy and a girl each month for their volunteer service and involvement in their school. Tina Do has a 4.0 weighted GPA and plans to attend Western Washington University next year. She will be the first generation in her family to attend college and is the daughter of Vietnamese immigrants. For her entire high school career Tina has been a part of the ASB leadership at her school. During her freshman year she was class president, and then served a year as secretary, a year as vicepresident and is currently the ASB president. As the leader of the school’s student body she helps other leadership students organize and communicates with the student population about events going on at school. Since 2018 she has been a member of the school’s Key Club, a service-oriented club that is the youth branch of the Marysville Rotary. She was named the Outstanding Junior Member last year. Tina also received a Marysville Rotary Club Community Service Recognition Award. At St. Mary’s Catholic Church she has been an

altar server since 2014, including being head altar server since 2015, where she leads and works with about 30 servers. Academically she is also interested in photography and videography and runs her own YouTube channel. Walker Braillard has been involved in student leadership at Getchell for many years as well. Even before officially being part of the ASB there he had put in many hours in the 2017-18 school year helping putting on school events with them. In his junior year he took over the role of ASB Technician. This year he has put in more than 75 hours to help support the events that go on at the school. For the past four years he has also been a part of Getchell’s tennis team. Walker won the Most Inspirational award last year and also made it to subdistricts at the end of last season. Since 2017 he has also been the Getchell girls tennis manager, and plans to return for a third year as manager this spring. “The team in the last two years has had over 30 girls, proving to be a difficult but incredibly fun learning experience,” he wrote. He also spent one and a half years as part of the FBLA Club at the school. During four car washes Walker and his peers helped raise more than $700 for the club, and he participated in the 2016 Winter Bazaar. He placed second in parliamentary procedures, both at the regional conference and the state conference.

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Communities

March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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n WHISTLING GARDENER

What's new for your garden in 2019 Let’s face it, 12 foot tall tree. we all love new Here is what our stuff. We are grower Bailey driven to have Nurseries has the latest version to say about it: of…. you fill in “This beauty is the blank. Every By Steve Smith cloaked in 8-inch spring, automopanicles of frabile manufacturers tempt grant, deep purple flowers us with new models of cars that attract a nonstop pathat have all the bells and rade of pollinators. It’s also whistles and cutting edge a strong rebloomer. Flip technology in hopes that Side® got its name because we won’t be able to resist the greyish olive-green trading in our old junker leaves are dusky purple on for a new and improved the lower surface.” model. Well guess what? There has been a prolifPlant breeders do the very eration of new hydrangeas same thing to us garden- in the last several years and ers, only their new features this spring will be no difare usually things like more ferent. Again, Bailey Nurscompact growth habit, fra- eries has a doozie called grance, disease resistance, ‘Summer Crush’ that is a longer blooming periods, must for my garden. It is double flowers or new and part of the repeat bloomunusual colors and tastier ing series called Endless fruit. Here are some of the Summer and you can recnew introductions I will be ognize them by of their hoping to add to my gar- distinct blue pots. Summer den this coming spring. Crush is described as folVitex Flip Side Chaste- lows: “With a profusion of tree — The genus Vitex is big raspberry red or neon rarely seen in the north- purple blooms, Summer west, primarily because it Crush™ brings floral qualis a heat lover and doesn’t ity blooms to your garden bloom until late summer. or patio container. Not ‘Flip Side’ however, is a hy- only is it drop-dead gorbrid that should perform geous, but it is compact so well in our cooler climate you get a neat, tidy look and provide some spec- throughout the summer.” tacular color in late sum- These big leafed hydranmer, much like the but- geas should be planted in terfly bushes but without morning sun and aftertheir noxious self-sowing noon shade, although my tendencies. Plant it in a wife has managed to get very sunny location and them to perform in full sun plan on cutting it back hard in our garden. every spring, or you can let Shrub roses, like ‘Knock it grow into a small 10 to Out’, ‘Drift’, and ‘Floral

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Carpet’, have been around for decades now and they are very hardy, easy to care for shrubs with rose-like flowers that repeat bloom all summer. But, they rarely have fragrance. Now you can have durability, easy care and fragrance with ‘At Last’ rose from Proven Winners. Here is their sales pitch: “It's the dawn of a new day for roses: At Last® combines all the romance of a fragrant, fullypetaled tea rose with the no-nonsense practicality of a disease-resistant landscape rose. No spraying is required to enjoy a nonstop display of large, sweetly perfumed sunset-orange blossoms from late spring through frost. Handsome,

glossy foliage and a vigorous, rounded habit makes it ideal for use in the landscape or the flower garden. I couldn’t have said it any better myself. One of our major suppliers, Monrovia Growers, is featuring a new compact Beebalm called ‘Bee You’. They describe it as follows: “Deep maroon buds that cover the lush, mintybasil-scented, dark green foliage open to show-stopping, electric violet-purple blooms. This carefree, naturally rounded plant with a uniform habit is truly mildew free.” I might add that Monarda (or beebalm as it is commonly called) will grow in sun or shade and is a total hummingbird

magnet. From Blooming Nursery, in Cornelius Oregon, comes one of my favorite shade perennials, Brunnera. Last year I purchased one called ‘Alexander’s Great’ and for this year I am lusting after ‘Alchemy Silver’. Brunnera have heavily textured, showy silver foliage with forget-me-not flowers in early spring and grow well in shade along with hostas, ferns, and bleeding hearts. Best of all, they are slug resistant. have been so smitten with all the new introductions of coleus that can now grow in sun or shade, and look fabulous in containers where they provide vivid colors from their

leaves. Best of all, the new introductions don’t bloom as much, so you don’t have to pinch them all the time. From Proven Winners is my newest favorite called Colorblaze ‘Golden Dreams’. It sports colorful chartreuse foliage with red veins and will be a must in most of my containers this summer. Truly, this is just the tip of the iceberg. I will share many more new plants in the next few weeks, so you can be on the hunt once spring breaks. Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.


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March 6, 2019 - March 12, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

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Marysville Rotary honors students By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Mountain View Arts and Technology High School students Raechel Gilyeat and Justina Thompson were recognized by the Marysville Rotary Club for the work they do for their community. The Rotary works with counselors from the school district to find students who have done volunteer work and highlights a couple of them each month. “One of the Rotary’s mottos is community service, and we really try to stress that,” said Daryn Bundy, of the Marysville Rotary. “So today we’re here to recognize a couple of students that go above and beyond with their community service." The Rotary hopes to promote volunteer work to other students by recognizing those who do give back, said Bundy. “Because this is sponsored by Les Schwab Tires, we have a check for $100,” that the students also re-

ceive, he said. “We don’t want to promote that we’re paying for community service, but we want to promote it and tell you to keep it up,” said Bundy. Justina Thompson has been volunteering at the NOAH Animal Shelter for the past year and a half. The no-kill Stanwood animal center is one of the major pet adoption centers in the region. “It’s a lot of fun because I get to cuddle with dogs and I love them,” said Justina, who said she started because she was encouraged by her grandmother and because she loves dogs. “My life is centered around dogs." She said that the center does a lot of work rescuing animals. “There are dogs that have come from hoarding situations, or we got a bunch of dogs from a puppy mill once,” said Justina. She volunteers to help ‘socialize’ the dogs, so that they’re more used to standard human interactions. “We’re helping the dogs get

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Raechel Gilyeat with her award in recognition of her community service work on Feb. 28. used to being around people so that way they’re more likely to be adopted,” she said. Raechel Gilyeat does volunteer work through a couple of avenues. “I help the community with my youth group and I volunteer with the SeaFair Marshals," she said. The Marshals help out at a number of festivals in the area by help-

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Justina Thompson, right, receives an award on Feb. 28 from Rotary member Daryn Bundy for her volunteer work at NOAH Animal Shelter. ing to organize parades and help attendees. “They do the Torchlight parade and many others like the Strawberry Festival parade,” said Raechel. “I help them getting everybody situated."

She enjoys being able to support many of the local festivals that the SeaFair Marhsals volunteer at. “I just love helping them out and it actually makes it so there is more volunteers there to help with the parades,” she said.

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