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January 30, 2019 - February 5, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

M'ville schools present Red Hot Jazz Festival By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville high school and middle school jazz programs came together for the annual Red Hot Jazz Festival on Jan. 24. The event was held at the Marysville Opera House this year and serves as a fundraiser for the 10th Street Middle School Music Boosters. “It’s a fundraiser for 10th Street Middle School and goes to support music and our band program. It also just provides a really great opportunity to bring together the jazz musicians in our schools,” said Kamille Norton, president of the 10th Street Middle School Music Boosters. Jazz programs from different schools don’t always have the chance to see each other. “They really like hear-

Point In Time Count assesses local homeless population By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville-Pilchuck High School student Kyle Yund performs his solo during a song at the local Red Hot Jazz Festival on Jan. 24. ing all the other schools. It’s easy to hear your school, but you don’t get to hear all the other schools,” said Marysville Getchell band director TJ Seiber.

Many volunteers came out to Smokey Point on Jan. 23 to help count the local homeless population during the national Point in Time Count. The day is meant to measure homeless populations around the country and specifically counts people who did not have shelter the previous night. “Today we’re doing the Point in Time Count, which is where we go out and count the homeless in our area so that we can assess the need,” said Peggy Ray, program manager at the Arlington Community Resource Center and the north Snohomish County lead for the Point in Time Count.

See JAZZ on page 9

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Volunteer Ryan Berg, right, prepares some chili dogs for locals Katie Stone, left and Chuck Doster at the Point in Time Count event in Smokey Point on Jan. 23.

Sweeting gives State of District Address By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington School District Superintendent Chrys Sweeting talks about local schools at her State of the District Address on Jan. 24.

Arlington School District Superintendent Chrys Sweeting gave her State of the District Address on Jan. 24 and talked about student learning, fostering safe environments and how the district is using the community’s tax dollars. A panel of students also talked about what they liked and didn’t like about their education. Sweeting said the district’s mission is about the kids so their voice should be heard at events like this. Haller Middle School student Stryker Bowdner said he liked the goal-oriented nature of his curriculum.

“Teachers set goals for me so I can achieve them and think about it before going on to the next thing,” he said. Baile Linklater, a Haller Middle School student also said she likes the variety of classes. “The different classes give me a break to think about what I just learned and think about what I should do next time,” she said. The classroom environment was also a positive for the students who spoke at the event. “We always have a fun environment,” said Post Middle School student Quynn Roberson. “For me I like the hands-on projects,." Post Middle School student

Koen Collins also complimented the projects. “One of the things I like is the experiments in science class,” he said, however he noted that the school’s outdated labs could use improvement. “Some of the Bunsen burners aren’t working and they can be very hard to light,” he said. A replacement for Post Middle School is on the district's bond proposal which will be on the Feb. 12 election, and students such as Taylor Marcel said the aging building has problems. “Things are not up to date, such as the heat pumps which are very loud so you can’t hear the teacher

… plus the walls are thin so you can hear teachers talking next door,” she said. Haller Middle School student Grace Davis said that at her school, crowded classrooms sometimes cause problems. “When you have a class with like 36 kids, it’s loud and distracting,” she said. Sweeting also spoke about the four guiding principals of the district: student learning, a safe and caring environment, resource stewardship and community engagement. In terms of student achievement

See SWEETING on page 2

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January 30, 2019 -February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Sweeting said the district has positive trends, although there are still some areas in need of improvement. Many schools across the nation are struggling with math instruction, said Sweeting. “We want to figure out how we can help every student learn about mathematics, and grow and achieve,” said Sweeting. Part of that is encouraging a “positive growth mindset,” where students attribute growth with effort, instead of just something they are innately born with, said Sweeting. The number of credits required to graduate is going up so that the class of

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Haller and Post middle school students talk at a panel during the Arlington State of the District on Jan. 24. From left, Quynn Roberson, Taylor Marcel, Koen Collins and Grace Davis. 2021 will not be able to fail any class if they want to graduate on time. “When you look at our graduation rates there has been some improvement, but it isn’t enough,” said Sweeting. To help students the district is providing the op-

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portunity to gain credits in seventh- and eighth-grade through classes like P.E., algebra and Washington state history. The district is also implementing initiatives focused on helping kids feel safe at school. Part of that is continuing a staff training program to help students with their behavioral issues. “We have to consider the social and emotional behavioral support that is needed for our students,” said Sweeting. About a year ago a community truancy board was formed for the district. “They come together to problem solve when a student is having trouble coming to school. Rather than going to a court to issue a fine, we come together to solve the problem,” said Sweeting. In the last year the district also saw less in-school suspensions and out-ofschool suspensions, said Sweeting, which is important to help keep kids in school. School campuses are also being designed to increase security, most recently with security phones being installed at every school but Post Middle School, and gates and fencing on more campuses. “It’s not that we want people to feel like they can’t come in, we just want some

control of the access,” said Sweeting. District officials also make resource stewardship a priority. “We want to make sure that we’re being good stewards with the resources that we have. We want to use wisely our time, our money, the people in our system and our property,” said Sweeting. The state is moving to a new funding model that will limit local levy amounts. Previously the Arlington School District collected $3.31 per $1,000 of assessed property value in property tax, however that amount will be capped at $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Those lost funds are supposed to be offset by increased funds from the state legislature, coming from property taxes they are levying. “The hard part about that is we have less funds from the local levy,” said Sweeting. The district is currently having a projected budget shortfall that will eat into the district’s reserve fund unless something is changed, said Sweeting. The school board attempts to keep at least one month of operating finances in reserve in case of an emergency. “It may require adjustments and corrections. We’re having conversations about those because we don’t know those will be,” said Sweeting, who added the changes could make up 1 percent to 5 percent of the budget. A lot of the school’s funding could change at the state legislature this year as well, said Sweeting, so changes may not be needed. Finally, Sweeting talked about community engagement. “We need you to engage with us and partner with us. We cannot do this alone,” she said. District officials are hoping to keep track of the number of social media posts this year and see what parents are asking for in terms of engagement. “We’re going to keep track how many Facebook postings, how many Twitter posts we’re making. We’re trying to do more videos to engage people,” said Sweeting.


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January 30, 2019 - February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Marysville hosts MLK Day event By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The city of Marysville recognized Martin Luther King Jr. Day this year at the Marysville Opera House with an event honoring the civil rights leader. Community members watched the 2014 film “Selma,” which depicts the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery voting rights march led by a coalition of civil rights activists including Martin Luther King Jr. JJ Frank, executive director of the Marysville YMCA, introduced the film and led a discussion afterward. “Us doing a disservice to his legacy would be to watch the movie and then go away,” he said. Frank said that the film takes an honest look at America.

COUNT

Continued from page 1

The count is volunteer run and is important for groups that support homeless individuals. “This day is meant for the community to come together and identify the number of homeless individuals here,” said John Cruz, Worksource Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Coordinator. “We give that number to the county so we can get grants and funds to provide for homeless people,” he said. Ray said that funding is more available when you can show how many homeless individuals are in your area. “It’s very important to assess the need because without that, without knowing, as agencies we can’t get funding to come into our centers to help these folks,” she said. “Last year through the Point in Time Count, we were able to house 77 families. That's 162 people. And that’s because we knew the need in the area." Ray helps cover the Marysville, Arlington, Lake Stevens, Granite Falls and Tulalip areas and last year counted more than 100 homeless individuals in those regions. Brandon Calindas was one of those counted last year and he came out this year to volunteer for the event. “I have 90 days of sobriety today and my big inspiration and supporters have been the Arlington Community Resource Center, as well as the Arlington Police Department,” Calindas said. “I just wanted to pay back

“The movie is a very powerful movie. It talks about racism and the fight for black people to get the right to vote,” he said. “What’s good about this movie is that there were good, decent Americans saying ‘this will not define us, we will move forward,’” he said. Marysville officials hoped to offer an event for the diverse members of the local community. “Our ultimate goal is to expand our cultural arts offerings, and while we’re doing that we not only want to be multi-generational but also multi-cultural,” said Lauren Woodmansee, cultural arts supervisor with the Marysville Parks, Culture and Recreation Department. “We have so many groups that are a part of Marysville and we want to

expand our offerings to attract all of them, and also to help us all learn a little more,” she said. Woodmansee said the program went very well. “We’re really pleased with the age groups that showed up. There were some families with three generations of members,” she said. She said that the city asked Frank to come lead the discussion because of his work in the community. “He is so involved in the community, especially with projects promoting diversity, we thought he would be a good fit to lead this program,” said Woodmansee. “The dialogues were diverse and encouraging, and there was a lot of energy,” she said. Frank encouraged working together to move forward as a country.

my support and appreciation." Calindas said he had been homeless for about four years off an on. This last year, he said, the Snohomish County embedded social worker program and the Arlington Community Resource Center had helped him. “They helped me transition and encouraged me a lot to get into treatment and with all the followup,” he said. “Volunteering helps me stay out of my stuff, it keeps me busy and productive and I feel happy about myself today, just being able to participate in this unselfishly,” he said. Ray also helps organize services and resources for homeless individuals during the day. “Besides housing, the three biggest requests are food, laundry and showers, so we try to supply all three of those,” said Ray. Local organizations helped provide showers and food while Smokey Point laundromat Suds ’N Duds provided their space for the day.

"Giving our resources helps homeless people and also encourages them to come down to Smokey Point to get counted," said Ray. “People will actually come to us and we don’t have to go into the encampments and bother their areas and disturb their stuff,” she said. Cruz said he helped people through Worksource last year, although this year he had other volunteering duties. “One of my categories to help is with homeless veterans, so whenever they meet a veteran who is homeless it’s my job to try and help them with resources,” he said. “This helps us be a hand up, not just a hand out, because we can do those wraparound services for people here,” said Ray. Ray wanted to thank everyone who helped during the Point in Time Count. “All our partnering agencies have been amazing. The community has been amazing with all the donations and supporting our community,” she said.

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“Even in the underground railroad there had to be white allies along that path for freedom,” Frank said. “We’re not going to end racism today in one conversation, but this is a start of an ongoing conversation about how we eliminate racism in our communities, and what does it look like in 2019,” he said. He hoped that people of all races could collaborate to build a better future. “When we work together, that’s the way that our communities are stronger,” he said. Woodmansee said she hopes that the event can be a jumping off point for the city to collaborate with other groups and celebrate the different cultures that are a part of Marysville.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

JJ Frank, executive director of the Marysville YMCA, talks at the city of Marysville’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day event.


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Sports

January 30, 2019 -February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Local wrestlers compete in Lady Knights Invitational By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Lakewood Cougars, Arlington Eagles, Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks and Marysville Getchell Chargers girls wrestling teams all competed in the Lady Knights Invitational on Jan. 26. Arlington brought the most wrestlers, 18, out of the local teams and scored 104 points to earn a thirdplace finish out of 42 teams. Lakewood was right behind them as they only had eight wrestlers compete but scored an impressive 79 points for a ninth-place spot. Both Marysville teams brought a total of five wrestlers to the invitational with Marysville-Pilchuck scoring three points, placing

40th, and Marysville Getchell going scoreless, tying for 42nd place. “The girls wrestled extremely well, and I think they were able to see what they need to do in order to be successful in the postseason. We’re blessed to have really strong leadership on the team this year and I think they’re going to be ready to go when it comes to their next matches,” said Lakewood Head Coach Dan Hutchinson. The Cougars high scoring output was highlighted by Cassidy O’Hara, Olivia Poulton, Rhyleeann Weinberger and Annistazia Kramer. O’Hara, 125-pound class, earned three consecutive pins through the semifinal round, finishing her opponents in 0:36, 3:18 and

1:24, respectively. In her final match, she was pinned, but still earned a secondplace finish and 24 team points. Poulton, 130, placed fourth with 15 team points after winning her first two matches with early pins in the first rounds. Weinberger, 135, put herself into a good position early with two back-to-back pins but lost her last two matches by decision which put her in fourth-place with 15 team points. Kramer, 140, earned three-pins over five matches and placed sixth for 13 team points. The Eagles had six wrestlers finish in the top five of their weight classes including Vivian Potong, Tailer Cochran, Rose Walthers, Kylie Hinds, Malia Wayman and Alyson Ellingson. Po-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Marysville-Pilchuck’s Chelsey Goeden gets the takedown in the first round against the Cascade wrestler at Mariner High School on Jan. 26.

tong, 110, earned one quick first round pin and a 5-3 decision in the Quarterfinals to place fourth with 13 team points. Cochran, 120, tallied up three victories by pin and lost one match by major decision to finish third and take 19 team points. Walthers, 120, lost her first match of the day but followed it by pinning her next three opponents to place fifth with 14 team points. Hinds, 140, finished her opponent by pin in the Quarterfinal for a fourthplace spot and 15 team points. Wayman, 190, had two quick pins in the Quarterfinal and Semifinal as she finished in second place and earned 22 team points. Ellingson, 235, competed in five matches while earning four victories by pin and placing fifth with 17 team points. “Every time we go out to compete the team bonds a little more and they are always so supportive of each other. It was a good experience for them to go out and wrestle some new competition to get ready for Regionals,” said Marysville Head Coach Andie White. This year the Chargers and the Tomahawks have come together to debut a high school girls wrestling program in Marysville. With such a new program the girls are learning on the go and have been developing throughout the

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Arlington’s Tailer Cochran competes against her Lynden opponent in the quarterfinals at Mariner High School on Jan. 26. regular season. MarysvillePilchuck’s Chelsey Goeden was the only wrestler to score as she earned a pin 1:34 into her second match and also tallied three team points. This invitational was the last match for girls wrestling in the regular season. If you

want to come out and support the teams, the 3A Wesco North programs will be competing in the SubRegional at North Creek High School from Feb. 1-2. Lakewood will be competing in the 2A Sub-Regional at Bellingham High School on the same dates.

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Ashtyn Falor, Lakewood wrestler, starts the second round against Blaine in the top position at Mariner High School on Jan. 26.

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M-P battles Eagles for 60-52 victory By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

Two of the top three 3A Wesco boys basketball teams matched up when the Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks hosted the Arlington Eagles on Jan. 23. Mar ysv i l le-Pi lchuck came out of the tip-off on fire as they rattled off a 10-0 run over the Eagles to start the game. Through the rest of the first quarter Arlington managed to keep the gap at 10 as they finished the quarter down 14-4. In the second quarter the Eagles began to find a groove and matched the Tomahawks as both teams scored 14 more points to go into the half 28-18. Arlington came out as a different team in the second half, opening the half on a 15-4 run and grabbing their first lead of the game with a score of 33-32. The Tomahawks managed to slow down the Eagles by the end of the third quarter but still trailed 38-36. In the fourth quarter both teams answered each basket and played with physicality in the paint. With only a minute left, Arlington trailed by only two points with a score of 54-52. With a couple of technical fouls and the Tomahawks taking advantage of the bonus, Marysville-Pilchuck came away with the 60-52 victory. “This was huge for us to

get a win over a really good team and a really good program. They have so many weapons and competitors on their team, so coming into the second half we knew that they were going to come out hard. You never want to coast at the end of the season and teams like this make sure that we don’t,” said MarysvillePilchuck Head Coach Bary Gould. The Tomahawks biggest contributors came as the big three in Raequan Battle, Luke Dobler and Cameron Stordahl. Battle, senior wing, led the team in points with 19 to go along with two three-pointers, one assist, eight rebounds, two blocks and one steal. Dobler, junior point guard, dropped 13 points, two three-pointers, three assists and four rebounds. Stordahl, junior wing, also scored 13 points while hitting one threepointer and grabbing four rebounds. Mar ysv i l le-Pi lchuck also had Ethan Jackson and Brady Phelps put up numbers off the bench. Jackson, junior center, scored in the double digits with 12 points, as well as hitting one three and grabbing five rebounds. Phelps, junior guard, didn’t manage to put up any points but assisted on four buckets and brought down two rebounds. Arlington’s seniors Anthony Whitis, Griffen Gar-

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Eagles’ senior point guard Anthony Whitis takes the contact from Tomahawks’ junior wing Cameron Stordahl and scores at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Jan. 23. doski, Caden Smith and Josh Gutierrez led the way. Whitis, senior point guard, set the game-high with 21 points, three three-pointers, six rebounds and three assists. Gardoski, senior wing, was the only other Eagle to score in double-digit points with 13, as well as nailing three shots beyond the arc, two rebounds, two assists, one steal and one block. Smith, senior guard, wasn’t able to put up any points but contributed with five rebounds, one assist and one steal. Gutierrez, senior wing, made two three-

pointers on the night, putting up a total of six points. The Eagles’ junior center Will Abram also had a huge night as he was near a double-double with eight points and a game-high nine rebounds. If you want to come out and support the Tomahawks their last home game will be against the Everett Seagulls on Friday, Feb. 1, at 7:15 p.m. Arlington will have their last home game earlier that week as they will host the Oak Harbor Wildcats on Wednesday, Jan. 30, at 7:15 p.m.

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MG dominates MP 62-15 By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The Marysville-Pilchuck girls basketball team hosted their crosstown rival Marysville Getchell Chargers on Jan. 25. Coming into the game the Chargers were the favorites with a strong record of 13-3, and league record of 7-3, compared to the Tomahawks record of 5-12, and league record of 1-10. Marysville Getchell showed why they were favored in this matchup by scoring 18 unanswered points to start off the game. At the end of the first quarter the Chargers led 22-1 and continued their dominance through the second quarter which resulted in a halftime lead of 35-4. In the second half Marysville-Pilchuck managed to almost quadruple their scoring output by putting up six points in the third and five points in the fourth. Even with the increase in offensive scoring the Chargers enormous lead was too much to overcome as Marysville Getchell earned the 6215 blowout victory. “No matter who we face we want to make sure that we maintain our intensity and play a smooth, simple game from beginning to end. We’ve waited a long time for this combination of girls with their strengths on the inside and outside, as well as their incredible chemistry. We are a huge family

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and I think we have all the pieces to put ourselves into a good position,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach Shannon Grandbois. The Chargers were highlighted by big performances from Maddy Grandbois, Mikail Montez, Kortney Crane and Alexus Atkins. Grandbois, junior wing, scored the game-high 18 points and filled the stat sheet with two threepointers, five assists, four rebounds, three steals and one block. Montez, senior center, put up 15 points while adding on six rebounds and two steals. Crane, junior guard, hit a game-high three three-pointers and scored 11 points, one assist, two rebounds and five steals. Atkins, junior center, came off the bench to score six points, grab 10 rebounds and earn one block. “We've just got to keep fighting and grinding through some injuries here late in the season. This has been a big year for the program and I’m looking forward to continuing that progress into the next season,” said MarysvillePilchuck Head Coach Taylor Stevens. Marysville-Pilchuck was led by their trio of senior starters Miriah Summers, Georgia Bradley and McKenzie Konsor. Summers, senior wing, scored almost all of the Tomahawks points with 11 while grabbing six rebounds, three steals and one block. Bradley, senior center, scored four points in the paint, dished out one as-

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Kiarra Green, Chargers’ senior guard, cuts into the lane and scores against the Tomahawks at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Jan. 25. sist and two rebounds. Konsor, senior guard, couldn’t put any points on the scoreboard but still tallied two assists and two rebounds. If you want to root for the Tomahawks one last time at home this season, their final game will be against the Stanwood Spartans on Monday, Feb. 4, at 7:15 p.m. Or if you want to check out the Chargers their final home game will be against the Oak Harbor Wildcats on Friday, Feb. 1, at 7:15 p.m.


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January 30, 2019 -February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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MSD recognizes four outstanding students By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Native American liaisons with the Marysville School District recognized four local students as the Equity, Diversity and Indigenous Education Students of the Month on Jan. 22. Students Logan McDaniel, Keiden Monger-Johnny, Charley Dick and Evelyn Vega-Simpson were recognized for their academics and work throughout the school year. Liberty Elementary student Logan McDaniel, a member of the Tulalip Tribes, was honored for making progress this year at his school. “He has been amazing. He’s accomplished so many things in the short year and a half he has been at Liberty,” said Pixie Owyen, a Na-

tive American liaison with the school district. “He has been a joy to work with,” she said. Owyen said that McDaniel puts in a lot of effort at his school. “He never gives up on his work. Sometimes it’s a little difficult but he never gives up,” she said. Grove Elementary student Keiden Monger-Johnny was nominated by his teacher for the work he puts in at school. Owyen said that Keiden is a “pleasure to work with.” “He’s the first one to finish and he’s the first to try. He’s learned a lot and he’s done very well,” she said. Keiden also encourages his fellow students a lot, said Owyen. “He’s always been there to show the kids ‘let’s do this, we can do this,’” she said.

The last few years Keiden has made a lot of progress in school and outside of it. “I actually helped coach him in baseball a few years ago and he has come a long way,” said Amy Sheldon, Indigenous Special Education Family Support Liaison at the school. Tenth Street Middle School student Charley Dick was recognized for her academics. “She’s got a 4.0 and has only missed like four days of school,” said Marysville School District Native American liaison Terrance Sabbas. “She’s very active in our culture and very respectful when we meet up with our Native groups,” said Sabbas. Sabbas said that the group wanted to recognize Charley for her effort and work in school.

COURTESY PHOTO

Local students are recognized as the Equity, Diversity and Indigenous Education Students of the Month and gather with their families and Marysville School District officials on Jan. 22. The students, in front holding awards, from left, Keiden Monger-Johnny, Evelyn VegaSimpson, Charley Dick and Logan McDaniel. “We just wanted to lift our hands up to you and tell you to keep up the good work,” said Sabbas. “You’re amazing and we wanted to honor that."

Evelyn Vega-Simpson, a Marysville-Pilchuck High School student, was also honored. Evelyn is a band member and a strong student. “In addition to her outstanding academics, she also takes challenging courses,” said Marysville School District Native American liaison Matt Remle. Evelyn also worked at the Tulalip summer youth employment program last summer. “She was an administra-

tive assistant for the problem gambling department and her supervisors all said she did an awesome job,” said Jessica Bustad, education coordinator with the Tulalip Tribes. Last November Evelyn began a term on the Tulalip Youth Council. “She’s always been active with the youth council and offers great ideas. She takes time to look at all sides of an issue and really takes a realistic perspective,” said Bustad.

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Communities

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7

COURTESY PHOTO

The Marysville-Pilchuck High School DECA Club at this year’s Jan. 19 regional competition.

Nine M-PHS DECA students advance to State Competition By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville-Pilchuck High School DECA Club had success in the Jan. 19 regional competition and nine of their members will be heading to state this year. The international organization focuses on teaching students a number of career and technical skills and holds competitions each year. There were approximately 600 competitions at this year’s regional competition, which was held in Monroe. There are a number of categories and the competitions are divided into “role play” and “presentation.” M-PHS student and DECA member MacKenzie Konsor came in fourth this year in a food marketing role play. “Beforehand you have 10 minutes to get your scenario,” said Konsor. “You have to talk about how you’re going to approach the problem,” she said. M-PHS student Mikayla Kerker gave a presentation about financial consulting this year and came in second. “I got my theme, or my prompt, a couple of months in advance and I’ve been working on it for about two months,” she said. “We present our ideas to the judge. So, for example, my prompt was to help provide a monthly budget for a millennial, along with a savings plan,” she said. Both Kerker and Konsor placed high enough to advance to the state competition, and will join seven other students with the club on Feb. 28 to March 2 to compete in Bellevue. This will be Konsor’s second year going to the state competition. “Last year I didn’t think I was going to make it. It was my first year and I was just trying something new,” she said. “It was a great experience,” she said.

Kerker didn’t qualify for the state competition last time she participated in DECA, but did this year. “It was really fun to get the award and hear that I’m going to state,” she said. The presentation prompt is the same as the regional competition, so Kerker will have more time to work on hers. “It should be exciting because we get to develop our plans a little more,” she said. Although Konsor will have to be ready for a new exercise.

“For role play it’s a completely different scenario, although it is still in your topic and I have food marketing as my topic,” she said. Both of the students said they have enjoyed being part of DECA. “My favorite part about being in DECA is just having a community that supports you no matter what you do,” said Kerker. “Even if you don’t place in state, you still have that community that supports you and just wants you to do your best,” she said.

COURTESY PHOTO

Thirty-two Arlington High School DECA members will be moving on to the State Competition.

Arlington DECA students move on to State Competition

Thirty-two Arlington High School (AHS) DECA students qualified to move on to the state DECA competition after competing on Jan. 12 at the Area 1 DECA Competition at Monroe High School. Sixty-two percent of all AHS DECA students who competed will move on to state. Forty-two medals were received at the Area Competition, the most awards the program has

ever received at the area competition. “Arlington DECA has had one of its best years ever,” said AHS DECA advisor, Tyler Payne. “We had 10 first-place test takers and 32 students who qualified to go on to the state competition. This is the highest number of students that AHS DECA has ever had who qualified to move on to the state competition.” The students spent sev-

eral months preparing for the area competition by taking numerous practice tests, studying practice role plays, and working on prepared presentation events. They also participated in a mock competition where they set up tables with "judges," practiced their competition role plays, and presented their prepared events. The state competition takes place Feb. 28-March 2 in Bellevue.


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January 30, 2019 -February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Opinion

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Our Best Friends

Our Favorite Quotes

Cooper

"The danger of success is that it makes us forget the world's dreadful injustice." Author ­— Jules Renard Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

n LETTER TO THE EDITOR Please join me in supporting Arlington schools In 2000, the community of Arlington passed a school bond. Literally hundreds of community and staff participated in the planning for the facilities needs of the district. Choices had to be made because we couldn’t afford to do it all at once. The oldest and most pressing needs were solved with the 2000 bond. I hope you have been in your schools to see for yourselves how the district and students have taken care of your investment. I have and have never been disappointed. A tour is offered every year and every school has community events open to all. Now you are being asked to approve a new bond on February 12. This is a continuation of those facilities plans with lots of fresh community and staff

input. It was anticipated Post Middle School would need to be replaced, and classrooms added to Arlington High School. If this bond passes, there will be room in the middle schools and high school for the students already enrolled in the elementary schools. What could not have been predicted is the critical need for enhanced security for every school. If this bond issue passes, every student in every school will be safer when the security measures are installed. The bonds to pay for these improvements will not add to our current bond debt, but will replace the bond we passed in 2000 with a slight reduction. I’m voting "Yes." I hope you will too. Linda Byrnes Arlington

utlook

This is Johnny Dragland (8 years old) and his Best Friend Cooper (9 years old). These two are inseparable.

Send us photos of you and your pet The North County Outlook has a weekly feature titled Our Best Friends. Community members can send us photos of them with their pets and we will elect one to run in that week’s issue. To submit a photo, please send it to editor@northcountyoutlook.com. Please include the names of the people and pets in the photo.

Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Real People. Real Life. Staff Writers ..................................Christopher Andersson, Sarah Arney, Andrew Hines North County Outlook is published every Wednesday Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson and mailed direct to households and businesses Directory Ad Sales ............................................. Barry Davis in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address Contributing Writers ........................................Steve Smith, above. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material The Tulalip Chefs, Penny Davis for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher.

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Weekly Puzzle CLUES ACROSS 1. Sheep sounds 5. Turn up 11. Statements of support 14. Spells 15. Evildoer 18. One-time baseball stadium staple 19. Activities 21. WWII-era US President 23. Soft, flexible leather 24. Proverb 28. Wish (Hindu) 29. Injury treatment 30. Red Sox ace 32. “Deadliest Catch” captain 33. Baseball stat 35. Where marine life lives 36. Heartbeat test 39. Signs on the dotted line 41. Atomic #24 42. Bind securely 44. Swiss Nobel Peace Prize winner 46. Fragrant brown bal-

sam 47. Where you were born 49. Sells a ticket for more than its price 52. Where goods are presented 56. Jewish salutation 58. Fruits 60. Poorly educated 62. Microorganism 63. Depicted CLUES DOWN 1. Ballplayer’s tool 2. Hairdo 3. From a distance 4. Belt one out 5. Revising a text 6. More (Spanish) 7. Beloved Spielberg alien 8. BBQ dish 9. Provoke 10. Within 12. Canadian flyers 13. Smugly smile 16. Buffalo 17. Lake in the Kalahari Desert 20. Grab

22. Rural delivery 25. Equally 26. It’s sometimes passed 27. Citizens who are qualified to vote 29. Greek letter 31. Body part 34. Boxing result 36. Newts 37. Predatory semiaquatic reptiles 38. Cockatoo 40. The NFL’s big game (abbr.) 43. Leguminous east Indian tree 45. News reporting organization 48. A nemesis of Batman 50. Legal term 51. Not all 53. A way to greet 54. Knot in a tree 55. Satisfy 57. Russian space station 58. A baby’s mealtime accessory 59. Stitch together 61. __ and behold


Communities

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January 30, 2019 - February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

9

News Briefs Arlington cancels utility rate increase

Arlington’s City Council had good news for its residents, businesses and industries on Tuesday, Jan. 22, when they voted unanimously to cancel a planned 2019 rate increase for water,

sewer and stormwater utilities. Mayor Barb Tolbert called the City Council's 2019 rescinding of utility rates increases for the seventh consecutive year “a clear example of how cost containment and further

implementation of best practices by city staff can result in decreases, rather than increases, for the city's utility customers." Each year the City Council and staff review the utility budget and consider whether an increase in util-

ity rates is needed, based on an adjustment to the Consumer Price Index for the Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton area. Since 2010, the city ordinance has required a mandatory public utilities rate increase each year for

Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR WHITMAN COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARC D. BAILEY, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00004-38, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, (RCW 11.40.030)

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: MARY ELIZABETH NEWLAND a/k/a MARIBETH NEWLAND, deceased, NO. 18-4-02191-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: EDWIN N. BECK, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00049-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: DOROTHY E. STURGEON, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00048-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 16, 2019. Personal Representative: SI NEWLAND, also known as GEORGE SIMON NEWLAND JR Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 16, 2019 Personal Representative: Mark L. Beck Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 16, 2019 Personal Representative: Ann Marie Sturgeon Swannack Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 18-4-02192-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00049-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00048-31

The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having claims against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 23, 2019 Personal Representative: CHARLES CASWELL Attorneys for Personal Representative: IRWIN MYKLEBUST SAVAGE & BROWN, P.S. By: Kelly N. Brown , WSBA No. 4681 Address for Mailing or Service: Irwin, Myklebust, Savage & Brown, P.S. P.O. Box 604 / 1230 SE Bishop Blvd. Pullman, WA 99163-0604 509.332.3502 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Superior Court of Whitman County, Washington, Cause No. 19-4-00004-38

Submit Legal Notices to:

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Arlington residents and commercial customers. However, this is the seventh year in a row that the council’s vote made an exception, maintaining the water, sewer, and stormwater rates unchanged since 2012.

Magical Strings Celtic Gala at the Marysville Opera House Three generations of the Boulding family return to set the stage ablaze with Irish dancing, lively fiddling, soulful songs and dynamic sounds reminiscent of the wild Irish countryside. Celtic harps and hammered dulcimers will sing mysteries accompanied whistles, accordion and concertina. This festive and timeless realm of Celtic mu-

JAZZ Continued from page 1

“I think they have a lot of fan hearing all the other schools,” said Gavin Knowles, Marysville-Pilchuck High School band director. It’s also a chance for the middle schoolers to see what a high school jazz program sounds like. “A chance for the high school kids to show what they can do in a couple years,” said Knowles. “One of the really cool things is seeing jazz grow in Marysville,” said Kristen Michal, treasurer for the 10th Street Middle School Music Boosters. “I like when you see the M-P and Getchell kids play

sic, dance, storytelling and songs will have you jigging all the way home The program will be held Friday, March 15, 7:30-9:30 p.m., doors open at 6:45 p.m. at the Marysville Opera House, 1225 Third St. in Marysville. Tickets on sale now and are $18 per person. To pre-purchase tickets go to: https://apm.activecommunities.com/marysvillewa/ Activity_Search/4349. Online sales will end on March 15 at 4 p.m. Tickets will be sold at the door if still available. There will be General admission seating. For more information please visit marysvillewa. gov or call the Parks, Culture and Recreation Office at 360-363-8400.

after seeing them play in the middle school bands years before,” she said. Students also enjoy coming back to the concert each year. “To see the middle schoolers that we used to be, and knowing that we’ve been in those seats before, is pretty cool,” said Kevin Lockwood, a member of the Marysville Getchell High School jazz program. “It’s cool to hear where they start as students,” said Seiber. The concert was started as a way to provide a concert for middle school jazz programs and has become a big fundraiser for the 10th Street Middle School program. It continues to be a way for middle school programs to get some concert experience. “The middle schools get up and play, some of the students for the first time,” said Seiber. “I love the inclusivity of this event. It’s mainly put together for the middle school performers who may not have a lot of performance opportunities,” said Knowles. Many of the performers also like the more laid-back nature of the concert. “It’s a really good time. It’s pretty low pressure. Today we played a song we haven’t brought to concert yet and it went really well,” said Lockwood. “This is a great thing that they do because it’s really relaxed and it’s a really friendly crowd,” said Seiber. Money raised from the event helps the 10th Street Middle School band program in a variety of ways. “It goes toward instrument repair, purchasing instruments if we need it, and paying for jazz festivals,” said Michal.


10

Communities

January 30, 2019 -February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

Submit your events via email to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com Jan. 30 - Feb. 5

Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs, and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3 to 5 years. Caregiver required. Held Wednesday, Jan 30, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

In Home Caregivers

Are Needed in Your Community Benefits Include:

• Starting wage $15.50hr$17.75hr (depending on experience and certification). • Additional $1.00/hr for weekend work • Up to $1.50/hr more for client specific care needs • Time and a half for all holidays • Mileage and travel reimbursement • Paid training and certification • Paid Leave • Excellent Medical, Dental, Visioneven for part-time work... Minimum Requirements:

• Must be 18yrs of age or older. • Must have current Driver’s License, Auto Liability Insurance and a reliable vehicle • Must be able to pass a Federal Criminal History Background check... Apply at: Catholic Community Services, 1001 N. Broadway, Suite A12 Everett, WA 98201

(425) 212-9571

Own Your Own Power Go Solar: Have you been curious about what it takes to go solar? Eric Hull From Banner Power Solutions will be on hand to answer your questions about solar for the home, business, or farm. Held Thursday, Jan. 31, beginning at 5 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Entry to Apprenticeship: Are you interested in a career and not just a job? The Entry to Apprenticeship Workshop is a good place to begin for information

about a good-paying career in numerous apprenticeable occupations. Held Monday, Feb. 4, beginning at 6 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 19 months to 3 years. Held Mondays, Feb. 4,11 and 25, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Classified: Events/Festivals

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

Classified: Announcements

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855-4154148.

Baby Storytime: Wiggle and giggle with your baby through silly stories, happy songs, rhymes, and activities that inspire a love of reading. Playtime follows. For newborns through 18 months. Caregiver required. Held Tuesdays, Feb. 5 - 26, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

COMING EVENTS Win It Wednesday: Middle and high school students: join us to play a fun new card game, and win a snackish reward just for playing. Held Wednesday, Feb. 6, beginning at 3 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs, and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3 to 5 years. Caregiver required. Held Wednesdays, Feb. 6 - 27, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Irresistible Canvases - Tape Resist Painting: Brighten up your winter with this easy painting hack! Learn to use painter's tape to make beautiful snowflakes, geometric shapes in the style of Mondrian and more.  For

www.northcountyoutlook.com ages 6 and up. Held Saturday, Feb. 9, at 2 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Silvana Fair Annual Auction: The Silvana Fair Board members are making plans for the Annual Auction which will be held on March 9 at Viking Hall in Silvana. The Auction is the main fundraiser for the Silvana Fair which will be held on July 27. The Silvana Fair is family oriented with free admission and free parking. To make a donation of new items, go to www.silvanafair.com. If you hav questions, call 360-618-2076 or 360-652-8682. Class of 1979 Reunion: Marysville Pilchuck High School Class of 1979 40year reunion will be held July 27, 2019, at the Marysville Opera House, 3-10 p.m. and will include dinner and fun. RSVP required by 4/28/2019. Cost is $65 per person. For ticket and more information email classof79-40@hotmail.com.

ONGOING EVENTS Assistance for veterans: Military Veterans seeking help with the VA may contact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will

Classified: Help Wanted

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details, 855-635-4229. WASHINGTON DIVORCE-SEPARATION, $155. $175 with children. NO COURT APPEARANCES. Includes property, bills, custody, support. Complete preparation of documents. Legal Alternatives, 503-772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com.

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Real People. Real Life. P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 classifieds@northcountyoutlook.com

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return your call. Post 178 meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.”

Volunteers for Animal Care Wanted: The NOAH Center in Stanwood is looking for volunteers. NOAH offers several volunteer opportunities to help care for their adoptable animals. If you are interested in volunteering you can go to their website at www.thenoahcenter.org or call 360-6297055.

Jam Session for People with Disabilities: Youth and adults of all abilities are invited to Village Music and Arts Friday jam sessions featuring live music by Jon Dalgarn and Voices of the Village. Bring your own instrument or use theirs. Sessions are every Friday, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at 338 North McLeod, Arlington, WA. Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Call Michelle at 360-653-7752 ext. 14 for more information or to sign up.

Pills Anonymous Meeting: Do you now, or have you ever had a problem with prescription pills. If so, the join the new book study Pills Anonymous Meeting. Held on Mondays, 5-6 p.m., at the Peace Lutheran Church, 1717 Larson Rd., in Silvana. For more information contact Barry at 951212-4080 or Virginia at 360631-5142. Pills Anonymous is a fellowship of mine and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other so they may solve their common problem and help others recover from pill addiction. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using pills.

Age 55 or over? Call RSVP: Sponsored by Catholic Community Services, the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), is looking for people age 55 and over for a variety of volunteer opportunities. Volunteer drivers, Peer to Peer counselors and food bank workers are just a couple examples of what is available. If you have a few hours a week to help someone else, we want to speak with you. For more information please email John McAlpine at johnm@ccsww.org or call (425) 374-6374 or toll free at 1-888-240-8572.

Crossword answers from page 8


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11

January 30, 2019 - February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

ADAC program hopes to give parents resources ____ “ By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The Arlington Drug Awareness Coalition hopes to give parents the resources to prevent child drug abuse at their upcoming community event on Feb. 12. The coalition (ADAC) is hosting the “Empowering Parents” to help raise awareness of drug and alcohol abuse in the local community and what parents can do about it. It is being held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Byrnes Performing Arts Center at 18825 Crown Ridge Blvd., Arlington. “I hope the parents leave feeling empowered to be a part of their children’s lives,” said Jessica Ronhaar, chair of ADAC. She said that sometimes parents feel “lost” or don’t know how

to approach drug and alcohol issues, and the event is meant to help parents have a better picture of what they can do. “This is our new event to help encourage parents to be present in their children’s lives, to know what is going on with them,” said Ronhaar. “Also to know what is happening in regard to drugs in our area." Arlington Police Officer Stephanie Ambrose will talk about what parents can do, and then a panel discussion with officials from the Arlington Police Department, the Arlington Fire Department, Cocoon House, the Arlington School District and Skagit Regional Health will talk and answer questions form the audience. “Parents will be able to ask the panel questions, as well to help

learn about what they want to know,” said Ronhaar. ADAC officials hope that this will give parents resources, practical knowledge and expert opinions on how to handle drug abuse issues with children. An information fair will also be held at the event and will allow parents to get information on healthy youth activities and treatment, and recovery and support services for those dealing with drug abuse issues. “That will provide a lot of health choice options for parents,” said Ronhaar. “Just to be able to know the different resources that are in the area for parents and anyone going through problems with drugs." The fair will be open before the “Empowering Parents” talk from

This is our new event to help encourage parents to be present in their children's lives, to know what is going on with them.

Jessica Ronhaar

____ 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. and afterward from 7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The coalition was formed by school officials, police department members and other community members to help raise awareness of the issue of drug abuse and solutions for today. “ADAC has been working for the past six years now on raising drug awareness about what is going on in this community,” said Ronhaar.

They have held many events throughout the years they have been very active. “These events have helped bring awareness to our community about what the current trends are and how the parents should work to respond to the issues," said Ronhaar. More information about ADAC is available at their Facebook page at facebook.com/arlingtonaware.

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January 30, 2019 -February 5, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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n WHISTLING GARDENER

Learn how to talk 'Garden Center Speak' and that is Nursery professionfine except als tend to use words for the fact that can sometimes be that most confusing. I thought I of our evwould take this opporergreens tunity to give you some on the west insight into this jargon By Steve Smith side are so that on your next visit garden center visit you can either firs, hemlocks, or cebe more efficient with your dars. Add to this group all time and feel more intelli- the exotic varieties of evergent. A typical garden center greens — like cypress, junisells all kinds of plants which per, spruce, cryptomeria, seusually include annuals, pe- quoia, thujopsis, and sciadorennials, evergreen and de- pytes — and it can get a little ciduous woody shrubs, and confusing. All that you need vines and ground covers. It to remember is that these are may not always be obvious what garden centers refer to which is which, or for that as needle-leafed evergreens matter how to use them in or conifers. They are mostly our gardens. Probably the trees but can also be shrubs, most common plant in the or even low growing ground northwest is what we refer covers. to as an evergreen. For most The other typical type gardeners the word “pine” of evergreen that we sell is immediately comes to mind, what we call a “broadleaf ”

evergreen. This is usually a shrub like a rhododendron, azalea or camellia, but could also be a small tree like holly or English Laurel. The leaves are broad, rather than needle-like, and will usually grow in either full sun or shade. They are adaptable and great in many different garden or landscape spaces. Annuals are plants that sprout from seed, grow, flower, set seed and then die, all in one season. While this is technically true, there are many kinds of plants that we as gardeners treat as “annuals” and enjoy for one season and then part company. Geraniums for example will grow into a hedge down in Southern California where I grew up, but in the northwest we treat them as a seasonal pleasure. Even woody

shrubs like lantana or bougainvillea can be used as annuals in our part of the country and then relegated to the compost pile at the end of the season. Some of you may recall me referring to this behavior as a summer love affair. Annuals have many uses but are perfect for adding vibrant pops of color in containers on patios and porches. Perennials are plants that come back every year (at least they are supposed to) and usually die down and disappear for the winter. They can be ground huggers or 6 feet tall giants, shade lovers or sun hoggers, moisture needers or drought requirers and some even can been evergreen and never die back in the winter at all. In other words, they come

There are a variety of colorful conifers. in all shapes and sizes and can provide us with endless hours of entertainment. Perennials are perfect for creating interesting, colorful, ever-changing garden beds. Finally, vines are plants that will climb up a tree or trellis and form a vertical accent in the garden. They can be either evergreen or deciduous, perennial or annual, shade or sun loving, and are a wonderful addition to any garden. They are particularly

COURTESY PHOTO

great for growing on (or covering) fences, arbors, or trellises. Hopefully some insights have been gained on these different plant categories and you’ll feel more confident when perusing for your gardening needs this year.

Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville, WA and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

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