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Vol. 12 No. 27 n

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

New community garden under construction in Arlington By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Arlington’s old community garden location will soon be closed, however the city and other local organizations are coming together to open a new garden this spring. The former garden was located near the Arlington Library on a piece of property that was owned by the city. “We had planned to move the garden this year because the city is going to sell that property,” said Sarah Lopez, community revitalization project manager for Arlington. “We wanted to do it in the winter time,” so the gardening wasn’t affected by the move, she said. City maintenance workers have been constructing See GARDEN on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville School Board member Vanessa Edwards, left, and Marysville-Pilchuck High School student Christopher Hackmann talk at a Coffee with Constituents on March 9.

MSD board members meet with constituents By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Arlington maintenance workers Dan Foster, right, and Ben Stieben shovel dirt into one of the garden beds that will be part of the new Arlington community garden on March 6.

Marysville school board members talked about the move away from SLCs and giving students more time to explore career paths during their most recent Coffee with Constituents on March 9. The school district's program allows community members, parents and students to come talk to school board members in a

laid-back setting, usually in a coffeehouse in Marysville. Some parents at the most recent meeting had concerns about the process to move away from Marysville Getchell High School's Small Learning Communities and that justifications about equity were formulated after the decision had already been made. "While there were some

See MSD on page 15

Getchell students working to make school greener By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Students at Marysville Getchell High School are undertaking a number of projects to push the school and students to change their actions to protect the environments. The Advanced Placement Environmental Science class at the school has a number of students passionate about environmentalism who are trying to enact local change. “We’re trying to switch from plastic straws to paper straws, and maybe from plastic cups to paper cups at the student

store,” said Aubrey Bennett, one of the students in the class. Bennett said that kind of waste causes a big problem when too much of it gets into the environment. “We have a plastic problem, not just in the school, but everywhere. If we can make a difference, even if it’s just at our school, that’s better than nothing,” she said. Other groups are trying to bring other changes to the school. “At our school there isn’t a composting program, and there is a recycling program See GETCHELL on page 3

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville Getchell High School students Samantha Sanchez, left, and Melina Westover gather plastic bottles from the school’s recycling on March 7 to measure how much waste the schools produces in a day.

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March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Local News GARDEN Continued from page 1

garden boxes and putting them at their new location with help from the Arlington School District, which provided the space at 315 N. French Ave., Arlington, next to their administration building and Presidents Elementary. “It’s going really smoothly,” said Lopez, who added they hope to finish the project in the spring so local gardeners can use the location. City workers have put in water lines, constructed garden boxes and filled them with soil donated from the Gayteway Business Park currently under construction.

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A chain link fence around the garden is planned to be installed later as well, said Lopez. “I’m very excited and glad that the city is working so fast to get this ready for the spring,” said Beth Countryman, the volunteer coordinator for the community garden. Community gardens help bring local residents together, she said. “You can grow your own produce while meeting with your neighbors that you might otherwise never get to talk to,” said Countryman. “Anytime you have a community garden it just brings together a diverse group of individuals, young

and old,” she said. They also are a benefit to gardeners who can’t afford a big yard. “With back yards getting smaller a lot of people don’t have the space, so this just gives them a place where they can get into the dirt,” said Countryman. Lopez said there were many residents who enjoyed the former garden. “We’ve had a community garden for years and we know the community appreciates having that space to grow plants and food if they don’t have the space in their own yard,” she said. Countryman said they are happy they were able to find a new location that will make an even bigger com-

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munity garden than before. “Since it’s a much bigger area, that is a lot more potential for more gardening options,” she said. Lopez and Countryman have been working on the design and how the garden will fit within other organizations as well. Currently they have 42 garden beds planned for community members, and some for other groups as well. “We will have a few different areas of the community garden,” said Countryman. That includes an area set aside to grow food for the Arlington Community Food Bank. Another space will be reserved for students from the Arlington School District. “There will be a space for the school, and we’re still working on how that will play out exactly,” said Countryman. “We’ve met with the school district about what the teachers want and what their programs will look like,” said Lopez. Science, botany and other types of lessons could be done with help from the garden, said Lopez. Some of the food grown by the schools may go to the Arlington Community Food Bank as well. Countryman isn’t sure if there will be vacant spots available yet or not, but she has a waiting list for the garden. “Unfortunately we’re not yet at the point where I can place people, so I don’t know if there will be vacant spots left,” she said. If you are interested in a spot on the waiting list for the garden you can call Beth Countryman at 360-4352991.

In the Feb. 27 issue of the North County Outlook, the story “Steelheads prepare for upcoming season” incorrectly listed that the Lacey FC match is on May 28, it is actually on Sunday, May 26. For more information on Snohomish County FC go to www.SnoCoFC. com.

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Communities

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City, MFD to hold RFA open houses By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

Fire District 12 and city of Marysville voters will approve or reject a Regional Fire Authority during the upcoming April 23 special election. The Marysville Fire District will hold two open houses on March 19 and 26 to talk to residents about what a Regional Fire Authority means for fire services in the region. Both of the open houses will be open 4-6 p.m. The March 19 event is at Station 65 at 17500 E. Lake Goodwin Rd., Stanwood. The March 26 event is at Station 62 at 10071 Shoultes Rd., Marysville. Connie Mennie, communications administrator with the city of Marysville, said they wanted to hold one in and outside of the city, "because the Marysville Fire District serves both the city and District 12.” The Marysville Fire District is currently run as a contracted service by the city of Marysville. This means the funds come from two different taxing systems run in

GETCHELL Continued from page 1

but not a lot of kids know about it so a lot of trash ends up in there,” said Getchell student Julia Russell who is working to bring a composting program to the school and has produced signs to encourage proper recycling. “It’s important to re-use the things that we can,” she said. “I think this is important because a lot of non-recylable stuff is ending up in recycling bins,” she said. Getchell student Jawan Smith is also working on educating his fellow students. “What me and my small group are doing is working on an informational video that we want to distribute across the school to inform kids about plastic use, whether that be straws, cups or bottles, and showing how that’s bad for our environment,” he said. Another group is collecting bottles from the school’s recycling and trash to measure just how much waste the school produces each day. They plan to collect again later to see if the class initiatives had made an impact. The Environmental Club at the school has raised about $4,000 to bring water bottle refilling stations to the school and those could be installed at the school this year, depending on other circumstances. “With plastic water bottles we want to eliminate the single-use bottles,” said Smith. “We’d rather have people bringing their own water bottle." Many of the students said that the biggest hurdles for

the city and in Fire District 12. Local officials said that because of increasing call demands the Marysville Fire District has not had a sustainable budget for the last few years and the change to a RFA will allow for them to maintain their current services. Families are invited to the open house events to learn more about the RFA measure or just to learn about their local firefighters. "Kids and community members can climb inside ambulances, meet firefighters and learn about their jobs,” said Mennie. Residents can talk to fire district officials and city officials about what a change to an RFA would mean for them. Mennie said that officials want to show people "how they currently pay for their fire and emergency services and how they will pay if the RFA is approved,” she said. Those changes will be different depending on if you live in Marysville or Fire District 12. "The biggest thing we want to get across is why there is this proposal on

the groups would be getting students to want to help and change their behavior. “The biggest challenge is getting people to want to do it. A lot of high schoolers really don’t care. They don’t see how it will affect them,” said

the ballot,” said Mennie. Information will also be available through handouts and through a short presentation scheduled for 5 p.m. at both events. “The presentation is not required though. These aren't going to be very formal and will be casual,” said Mennie. There are about 12 RFAs in the state of Washington, many of which have formed in the last decade, such as South Snohomish County Fire and Rescue, which was created in 2017 in the Edmonds and Lynnwood region. "It's sort of become the model a lot of growing communities are growing toward,” said Mennie. Mennie said that the public response has been good when interacting with the public. "So far the reception has been pretty positive. A lot of people seem to understand that the last few years our expenses have outpaced our revenues and you can't keep running fire services like that,” she said. More information about the RFA measure is available at marysvillewa. gov/783.

Smith. “The hardest part is educating the other students because a lot of them don’t care as much as our class does and they don’t know what happens when you don’t recycle or compost,” said Rus-

sell. Bennett said that the group is still trying to encourage improvement though. “People don’t like change and a lot of people don’t want to change. But if we can

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

Hatchet attack leaves M'ville man hospitalized On March 2, at around 11:40 p.m., Marysville Police were dispatched to a report of an assault with a weapon at Taco Bell, 616 State Ave., in Marysville. A 32-year-old Marysville man had walked into the parking lot bleeding profusely from head wounds, which he told witnesses were caused by being struck in the head with an axe at Totem Middle School, just across the street from Taco Bell. The victim reported that he met with a male and female on State Avenue, and that together, the three walked to the Totem Middle School campus. While there, the victim stated that he reached into his backpack, and was struck in the head with a hatchet. He was able to escape and get to the nearby restaurant to get help. The two suspects, a male and female, remain at large. The male is described

as white, approximately 19-years-old, around six feet tall and thin, with a pockmarked complexion and long brown hair pulled up inside a beanie cap. He was also wearing jeans and a gray sweatshirt. According to the victim, the male possibly uses the nickname “Lucky.” The female, also estimated to be about 19-years-old and white, has a thin build and long brown hair. She was reportedly wearing dark high heels, stretch pants, and a white Adidas Jacket. The victim is recovering from multiple skull fractures as a result of the assault. Anyone with any information regarding this incident or the identity of either of the two suspects is encouraged to contact Detective Cori Shackleton at 360363-8364 or email cshackleton@marysvillewa.gov, or call 911 and ask to speak with a Marysville Officer.

do it, then we’re going to do it,” she said. Students in the class said they are enjoying working on something that could make a difference in their environment. “I just like knowing that

I’m doing something good and that will last for a while,” said Smith. “It gives me a sense of purpose because I want to do this as a career and this is just one step of doing it everywhere,” said Russell.


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Sports

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

M-PHS softball hosts jamboree By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville-Pilchuck girls softball team hosted a jamboree for local teams including Marysville Getchell, Arlington and Lakewood. With the unpredictable weather recently, each team looked happy to just be out on the field and competing with one another. The jamboree is set up so that each team faces three teams for two innings each. Each inning is a little bit different as they are used to represent game-time situations to get everyone up to speed for the upcoming season. “We’re a lot younger this year, but we still have a lot of experience coming back from last year’s roster. It’ll be a little harder early on, but I think as long as we get some good production from our juniors and seniors we have a chance to get back to State,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach Aaron Zachry. After their incredible run into the State Tournament

last year, the Tomahawks will enter the season with three seniors on their varsity roster including Kelsey Campbell, Sydney Zachry and Lilianne Fischer. Marysville-Pilchuck will look to Campbell to lead the young core in the outfield. Zachry is a vocal leader from the catcher position and will play a key role with the less-experienced pitching rotation. Fischer will be stepping in to pitch for the Tomahawks throughout the season as well as playing her main position, third base, where she earned first-team all-state honors last season. “Our defense is looking really solid so far this year and as long as we are confident swinging the bats I think we’ll be good there too. I expect big things from them, but more importantly they expect big things this season. They should be able to go out and compete with everybody,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach Mike Moran. Marysville Getchell lost two seniors in the offsea-

son but return the majority of their varsity roster that made it into the District Tournament last year. They will be led by their senior infield of Hannah Kranz, Emily Petermeyer, Thea Hatch and Shannon Patton. Kranz, third base, and Petermeyer, second base, will serve as the captains for the Chargers as they will look to lead them on the defensive side of the ball. Hatch, first base and pitcher, and Patton, catcher, will play huge roles at the plate as they return as Getchell’s best hitters. “There were a few things I was surprised by today but I think it was good that we were able to work out some kinks and figure out what we need to work on. With having so many young girls it’s all about building that chemistry and developing that flow out on the field,” said Arlington Head Coach Ashleigh Beard. The Eagles will be led by their big junior class including captain Brooklyn Lamie, Madisyn Estes and Tia Lang-

ley. Lamie will be Arlington’s primary pitcher as she will lead the team with her enthusiasm, and her control from the mound. Estes and Langley will operate in the infield as the cornerstones of the defense and the gold standard for the younger players. “I’m glad we were able to get out here, work out the jitters and put in some work against some other teams. We want to compete in every game, improve every week and focus on facing one team at a time,” said Lakewood Head Coach Travis Boortz. After losing two seniors from last year’s State Tournament team, the Cougars will return with three seniors and a young roster. They will be led by senior captain Olivia Poulton and their young playmakers RileyMae Swanson and Ashtyn Falor. Poulton will be the primary leader of the team and will be expected to play at a high level on both sides of the plate. The sophomores Swanson, pitcher, and Fa-

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Alissa Edge, Tomahawks’ junior infielder, sends one into the outfield against Granite Falls at M-PHS on March 9. lor, catcher, will be asked to step up as young players and force opponents into low scoring outputs. In Marysville-Pilchuck’s next home game they will be hosting the Mount Vernon Bulldogs on Tuesday, March 19, at 4 p.m. If you want to support the Chargers, Marysville Getchell will host the Monroe

Bearcats at home on Thursday, March 14, at 4 p.m. The Eagles will have their first home game of the season against the Cascade Bruins on Friday, March 15, at 4 p.m. If you want to cheer on Lakewood their next home game will be against the Squalicum Storm on Tuesday, March 19, at 4:30 p.m.

High School Spring Sports Marysville Getchell Chargers SOFTBALL

GIRLS TENNIS

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

March 14 Mount Vernon March 15 Kamiak March 19 Archbishop Murphy

Away Away Home

Games begin at 4 p.m.

MVHS KamHS MGHS

March 15 Meadowdale March 19 Mountlake Terrace

Away Home

Home Away Away

BASEBALL

MGHS MVHS LWoodlnd

BASEBALL

BOYS SOCCER

Matches begin at 7:30 p.m.

March 14 Monroe March 15 Mount Vernon March 19 Roosevelt

Games begin at 4 p.m.

LynnHS MGHS

March 14 Lakewood March 15 Arlington March 19 Snohomish

Home Away Home

March 19 Snohomish

Away

M-PHS ArlHS M-PHS

BASEBALL

March 15 Marysville Getchell March 19 Everett

Home Away

ArlHS EvMem

March 14 Shorewood March 19 Oak Harbor

Away Away

ShwdHS OHHS

GIRLS GOLF

Match begins at 3 p.m.

March 18 Everett

Home

Gleneagle

Home Home

SOFTBALL

M-PHS M-PHS

BOYS SOCCER

Games begin at 4 p.m.

March 9 M-PHS Jamboree March 11 Monroe March 12 Sehome *Game begins at 10 a.m.

March 14 Lynnwood Home QuilCeda* March 16 Bellingham Home QuilCeda** March 19 Edmonds-Woodway Away EdStad *Match begins at 7 p.m. **Match begins at 1 p.m.

Home Away Home

M-PHS* MonHS M-PHS

GIRLS TENNIS

Match begins at 3:30 p.m.

March 14 Lake Stevens March 19 Mountlake Terrace *Match begins at 3:45 p.m.

Away Away

CavMH* MlkTerHS

Lakewood Cougars BOYS SOCCER

Match begins at 7 p.m.

SOFTBALL

GIRLS TENNIS

Matches begin at 3:30 p.m.

March 15 Oak Harbor March 19 Stanwood

SnoGC

Arlington Eagles Games begin at 4 p.m.

Games begins at 4 p.m.

Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

GIRLS GOLF

Match begins at 3 p.m.

Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks

Games begin at 4 p.m.

March 13 Squalicum March 15 Cascade March 18 Glacier Peak *Game begins at 4:30 p.m.

Away Home Away

SqualHS* ArlHS GPHS

BOYS SOCCER

Match begins at 7:30 p.m.

March 15 Cedarcrest Away CdrcstHS* March 16 Ferndale Away Phillips** March 19 Shorecrest Home ArlHS *Match begins at 6 p.m. **Match begins at Noon

For more info, visit www.wescoathletics.com or www.cascadeathletics.com.

March 16 Bremerton March 19 Meridian *Match begins at 1 p.m.

Away Home

BASEBALL

BHS* LWHS

Games begin at 4 p.m.

March 14 Marysville Getchell March 15 Sultan March 19 Lynnwood

March 13 Blaine March 15 Squalicum March 18 Lynden

Home Home Away

M-PHS SHS LynnHS

TRACK

GIRLS TENNIS

Match begins at 3:30 p.m.

Away Away Away

Meet begins at 4 p.m.

LWHS LWHS LMS

SOFTBALL

March 14 League Meet

LWHS

BOYS GOLF

Match begins at 2 p.m.

March 18 N. Bellingham

Game begins at 4:30 p.m.

March 14 Granite Falls Away GFHS* March 16 Coupeville Away CHS** March 19 Squalicum Home LWHS *Game begins at 4 p.m. **Game begins at 1 p.m.

Home

Away

NBGC

GIRLS GOLF

Match begins at 11:30 a.m.

March 19 Whidbey Island

Away

WGC

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BTC Tire Center Bud Barton Glass Bundy Carpets Burger King of Marysville C Don Filer Insurance Cascade Veterinary Center Chinook Lumber Arlington CLC Licensing Community Health Center Country Burger Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E & E Lumber East Valley Sand & Gravel Edward Jones Gregory Jensen Edward Jones Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Four Day Fireplace Gary & Donna Wright RE Prop. Mgmt.

Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance Services Gleneagle Golf Course H&M Electric Halterman’s RV JC Penney of Marysville Judd & Black Appliances Kiwanis of Marysville Kuhnle’s Tavern Langabeer, McKernan, Burnett & Co. Les Schwab of Marysville Les Schwab of Smokey Point Locals Espresso Marysville Awards Marysville Bike Shop Marysville Everett Ceramic Tile Marysville Laundry Station Marysville Printing Maxi’s Chinese Restaurant Mirkwood & Shire Cafe

Moore Moving and Storage Noble Palace Pacific Propane of Arlington Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Pilchuck Rentals Port of Subs Tulalip Quil Ceda Village Reaction Physical Therapy, Smokey Point Reaction Physical Therapy, Arlington Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Rising Star Gymnastics Roy Robinson Subaru/Chevrolet/RV RV Marine Supply Schaefer Shipman Funeral Home Shaklee Skagit Bank Skagit Regional Clinics

Sleep Advantage Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning Soroptimist Int’l of Marysville Stanwood Redi-Mix Stilly Diner Stilly Sand & Gravel Strawberry Lanes Stryker Brothers Tall Guy Small Guy Automotive The Creamery The Shop at Mission Motors Toby Barnett, RE Tulalip Tribes Unique Interiors Who’s On First


Sports

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Eagles compete at Bearcat Jamboree Pet By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

The Arlington boys baseball team travelled to the Bearcat Jamboree to take on Monroe and the Ingraham Rams on March 8. The jamboree was set up so that each team played three innings against each other for a total of six innings played. The Eagles started off their day against the Rams as they scored quickly in the first inning. Their pitching was strong as they shutout Ingraham in the first two innings and kept their bats alive, scoring two more runs in the second inning. The Rams managed to cross the plate twice in the final inning, but it wasn’t enough as Arlington took

the 3-2 victory. In the second matchup against the Bearcats, Arlington kept their strong defense and showed off their deep pitching rotation. Through three innings the Eagles shutout Monroe and scored once in the second inning to take the 1-0 win. “These games give us a chance to play against someone other than ourselves. It’s important for our pitchers to see some different hitters and for our hitters to get used to hitting on different pitchers. I think it helps us get some of those early season jitters out early,” said Arlington Head Coach Scott Striegel. Throughout the jamboree Camdon Anderson, Michael Tsoukalas, Owen Bishop and

the Eagles entire pitching staff played amazing. Anderson, senior third baseman, went 2-3 at the plate with three runs, three stolen bases and two singles. Tsoukalas, sophomore catcher, only had one hit but turned that into a double and two RBIs. Bishop, junior outfielder, had two hits of his own with one RBI, two singles and also threw two strikeouts in the final game. Arlington played a total of six pitchers and each one of them threw at least one strikeout to total eight overall. Last season the Eagles were on fire as they went undefeated in league games going 18-0, 22-3 overall re-

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March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

cord, and battling their way into the State Tournament. In the offseason they lost five senior starters but return the majority of their very experienced roster. Behind nine seniors and a long list of talented young players, Arlington looks poised for another successful year. “We need to come out and play well. As long as we take care of the things we can control I think we’ll do really well this year,” said Coach Striegel. If you want to come out and support the Eagles their next home game will be against the Marysville Getchell Chargers on Friday, March 15, at 4 p.m.

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Arlington’s sophomore pitcher Jacob Burkett gets a strikeout in the first inning against Ingraham at Monroe High School on March 8.

Arlington’s junior pitcher Luke Green gets a strikeout against Ingraham in the third inning at Monroe High School on March 8.

Cougars play well at jamboree By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Lakewood boys soccer team hosted the Stanwood Spartans and the Sultan Turks for their annual jamboree to kick off the season on March 7. During the jamboree the Cougars’ varsity lineup was able to play one 20-minute half against each of the visiting teams. The Spartans were up first as Lakewood was able to get aggressive early and force a lot of possessions deep into their opponent’s territory. Stanwood was able to keep the ball out of the net but failed to put much pressure on the Cougars until late in the scrimmage. In the end neither team scored, and the match finished as a tie. In the second scrimmage Lakewood came out and showed off their athleticism as they used their speed to exploit holes in the Turks’ defense. The Cougars scored quickly in the fourth minute of the match, and then struck again in the fifth minute. After going up early, Lakewood kept the pressure on and walked away

with the 2-0 shutout victory. “We have a whole lot of new guys with a short time to gel, but they’ve come together and it was great to see their chemistry out there. Our program, historically, has had trouble with 50-50 challenges but today I’d be hard pressed to point out one time where we lost one of those battles,” said Lakewood Head Coach Nick Anderson. Last season the Cougars went 0-12-1 in league play, 1-14-1 overall, and lost 11 seniors off last season’s varsity roster. Lakewood returns three starting players this year including team captains Tyler Rahberger, senior defender, and Juan Corrales, junior mid. They will rely on their experienced leaders to bring the rest of their young team up to speed early in the season. Lakewood will look to their younger players and some unexpected foreign exchange students to play quality minutes in the starting rotation. Tanner Rahberger, sophomore mid, and Hong Yi-Wu, junior mid, both showed their

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ability to score in the jamboree as they accounted for both Cougar goals. “This team is hungry and they’re ready to get out and show what they can do. They are playing with the fire of someone who wants to earn their spot

on that field. I’m really excited about this group,” said Coach Anderson. If you want to come out and support the Cougars their next home match will be against the Meridian Trojans on Tuesday, March 19, at 7 p.m.

MacPherson’s RHB Since 1982

Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County Wednesday, March 13, through Tuesday, March 19 Wednesday, March 13 Sunrise 7:26 am • Sunset 7:11 pm

Sunday, March 17 Sunrise 7:18 am • Sunset 7:17 pm

Thursday, March 14 First Quarter Sunrise 7:24 am • Sunset 7:12 pm

Monday, March 18 Sunrise 7:16 am • Sunset 7:18 pm

Friday, March 15 Sunrise 7:22 am • Sunset 7:14 pm

Tuesday, March 19 Sunrise 7:14 am • Sunset 7:20 pm

4:23 am 9:48 am 5:13 pm

12:00 am 5:29 am 10:36 am 6:14 pm

1:33 am 7:01 am 11:41 am 7:20 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

5.6 ft 10.0 ft 06 ft

9.0 ft 6.5 ft 9.6 ft 0.4 ft

9.3 ft 6.9 ft 9.3 ft 0.0 ft

Saturday, March 16 Sunrise 7:20 am • Sunset 7:15 pm

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Juan Corrales, Lakewood’s junior mid, uses his speed to get past the Spartan defense and advance the ball upfield at Lakewood High School on March 7.

2:56 am 8:35 am 12:56 pm 8:26 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

9.8 ft 6.8 ft 9.3 ft -0.4 ft

3:51 am 9:41 am 2:10 am 9:26 pm

4:32 am 10:31 am 3:17 am 10:21 pm

5:07 am 11:15 am 4:18 am 11:11 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

10.4 ft 6.1 ft 9.5 ft -0.7 ft

10.8 ft 5.2 ft 9.9 ft -0.9 ft

11.2 ft 4.2 ft 10.3 ft -0.8 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

Home & Garden

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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n WHISTLING GARDENER

March To-Do List

bloom in the sumAre you feelmer, like butterfly ing a sense of bush, spiraea, popanic, like you tentilla, and hyjust lost the last 30 pericum, can be days of gardening hacked back hard and are now so far now. This also behind that you By Steve Smith goes for red twig will never catch up? Not to worry. Mother dogwoods that are grown for Nature is also behind sched- their winter interest. Hard ule so we have the entire pruning stimulates lots of month of March to get back new growth, which is good on track. The days are get- for these summer bloomers. ting longer, daylight saving Early spring bloomers, like time is here, and everything forsythia and quince, should will be fine. Here are some be pruned after they finish blooming, so hold off for things to work on. Pruning: I could spend now on them. this whole column on just Roses will require some pruning, but I won’t. Focus serious attention this month, on removing tattered foli- if you want spectacular age on evergreen perennials blooms this summer. Prune such as ferns, Epimedium, them down to knee high Hellebores, and Euphorbias. (except climbers of course), Broadleaf evergreen shrubs clean around them, apply a may show signs of winter generous application of ordamage, but I would wait ganic fertilizer (2 cups per until later in the month or bush isn’t too much), and even into April after new cover the soil with a fresh growth starts to emerge to layer of compost. see how far back you may Be careful with Hydranneed to cut. Any broken geas. PG type hydrangeas limbs caused by the snow can be cut back “hard” since can certainly be removed they bloom on new wood. now by making a clean cut “Mop head” and “Lace leaf ” and letting it heal over natuvarieties should be cut just rally. There is no need for below last year’s blooms, pruning sealers. Deciduous shrubs that same for Oakleaf and climbing varieties. It gets complicated, so don’t hesitate to ask a horticultural professional. Fruit trees should be pruned now, even if they are starting to push flower buds. If you act fast, there is still time to apply a dormant spray of copper and oil — but always avoid any insecticides (natural or synthetic)

when trees are in full bloom. Weeding: In addition to pruning, weeding is just as important. Remember the old adage: “A stitch in time saves nine." Pull out every last clump of “shot weed” you can find before it goes to seed, same for chick weed and henbit. These weeds germinated last fall and if you had applied a mulch, you wouldn’t be dealing with them now — remember that this coming September. Once you you’ve got the beds cleaned up, get some mulch on the surface before more seeds germinate. Planting: While pruning and weeding are clearly the primary tasked to be completed this month, I like to throw in planting simply because we should always be planting new treasures into our gardens. We are blessed with a mild climate (well except maybe for the last month) where we can literally plant year around. Don’t worry about a few mild frosts, they won’t hurt shrubs and trees or hardy perennials. Garden centers are loading up with early blooming plants like Arabis, candy tuft, and Aubrietia. They will be gone by April, so for a garden that will delight you 12 months a year, shop early, late, and often you will be richly rewarded for your efforts.

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Home & Garden

A new front door is a great way to update your home Visitors’ impressions of a home are often dictated by the home’s entryway. Just as one may judge a book by its cover, the same can be said about the impression that a front door and entryway can create, regardless of how accurate that impression is. One of the best ways to improve that impression is to replace the front door of the home. “Buying a new front door is cheaper than buying a new house,” said Joe Murphy, manager at Frank Lumber in Marysville. The new door can change the look of a home. Frank Lumber, also known as “The Door Store” specializes in selling doors of all kinds. “There’s a vast amount of options,” said Murphy. To help wade through the options, Murphy said a homeowner should bring ideas of what they are trying to achieve with the new door so staff can find a type and style that complements the home. People should have measurements of the door and an idea of whether they want it painted or stained. Homeowners should know what kind of weather exposure the door would have to endure. “We want something that works for the environment and is suitable for the house

7

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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FILE PHOTO

Improving your home's entryway is a good way to give your home a new look. as well,” Murphy said. If a door would be facing south or west and receive a lot of rain, he may encourage people to buy one comprised of fiberglass which requires less maintenance than a wood door. While they come in a wide array of styles, fiberglass doors can’t be customized the way wood doors can. See DOOR on page 9

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8

Home & Garden

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Improving your home's curb appeal An attractive front entrance area gives a home curb appeal that invites both guests and potential home buyers. Upgrading a home’s exterior can be as simple as painting or as complex as installing new windows or adding a patio. A potential home-buyer's first impression is extremely important and that impression forms before they even walk into a house.

The more a homeowner can do to give the front of a home a makeover, the better a buyer will feel better about what they see inside a house, said Dan Peterson, managing broker of Windermere Real Estate in Marysville. "The first impression is huge for the buyer," Peterson said. He said improvements should be made before a

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home goes on the market and before a real estate agent takes photographs of their home. Painting is a good start. Whether it's trim, railings or decks, any peeling paint on the house should be eliminated. If the entire structure needs to be painted, then a homeowner might want to consider hiring a professional. For more help, visit a local hardware store, such as Ace Hardware in Arlington or The Home Depot on the Tulalip Reservation. Check out do-it-yourself information to learn about painting a home and other projects. HomeDepot.com has a nice library of how-to guides about how to tackle painting and other homeimprovement projects. One of the easiest and

Located inside the North County Outlook newspaper

quickest ways to boost curb appeal is to paint (and repair if needed) a home’s front door, molding and trim. Painting garage doors, porches, shutters, doorsteps, flower boxes, furniture, mailboxes/stands, and window trim are other potential projects, as is changing the front door hardware. Another possible project to improve curb appeal is to trim and edge the yard and replace the bark around flowerbeds. "Nothing gives a better first impression than a well-manicured lawn," Peterson said in an email. In addition, add some color to the front by adding flower pots or colorful flowers to the flower beds, which will put a smile on a buyer's face when they visit, Peterson said. Replacing windows,

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to wash the windows and make them shine," Peterson said. He added that moss has to be removed from the home's roof. Peterson said in an email that nothing looks worse than moss on a roof and it makes it look like a homeowner doesn't take care of their house. To further help a potential buyer's first impressions, preparing a home for sale will also mean decluttering a house and depersonalizing. Clear items from countertops in kitchens and bathrooms. In keeping with the concept of "less is more," remove personal items from walls and shelves and place excess furniture and items into storage. The amount of clutter a potential buyer will influence their impression of a home's condition. Once a homeowner decides to sell their home, there relationship with the house changes. "You almost have to treat it like a business transaction," Peterson said.

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Home & Garden

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

DOOR Continued from page 7

“If you draw me a picture, we can build it,” Murphy said. He also asks a homeowner what kind of maintenance they’re willing to undertake to care for the new door. While upgrading the front door of the home helps increase curb appeal, there are other things a homeowner can do to help improve their main entryway. Whether one chooses to be classic or bold, modern or traditional, there are various ways to quickly transform a home’s entryway. n Bold front door color. Color can dramatically enhance an entryway. Painting an existing door or replacing it with a more vivid option can do the trick. The DIY Network says certain colors stand out as favorites. These include turquoise, yellow, red, indigo, orange, and black. The door color should complement the other shades of the home, such as those on siding and trim. n Custom walkway. Guide guests right to the front door with an attractive (and safe) walkway. Stamped concrete or decorative paver blocks may fit the bill. This walkway can extend to the street or to the driveway. n Contain plants. Landscaping around the entryway should be neat and well-tended. Overgrown plants or shrubbery may give off an air of neglect. Container plants and carefully curated shrubs can

FILE PHOTO

In addition to a new door, details such as lighting can also improve your home's entryway. create a neat and inviting aura. n Highlight the address. Make sure the home can be found easily with bold and decorative house numbers. Consider two different address signs: one illuminated and easily viewed from the curb, and another closer to the front door. n Utilize high-end materials. The relatively small area of real estate by the front door enables homeowners to splurge on more opulent materials that can really add a feeling of luxury. These can include colorful tiles, ornate planters, decorative wooden doors, or elaborate knobs and lighting fixtures. n Add architectural

details. Find out which architectural elements will meld with the style of the home and then incorporate them. Moldings, columns, shutters, and trim are areas to consider. The entryway to a home garners a lot of attention. Homeowners can enhance their spaces with entryways that really make a statement.

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10

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BRUCE C. CALDWELL, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00314-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: JOSEPH EDWARD KELLER, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00282-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EVELYN GRACE HOY, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00315-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Personal Representative: Christina Marie White Attorney for Personal Representative: Breanne W. Martin, WSBA #44519 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No.19-4-00314-31

LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILMA CAROL TILLY, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00313-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Personal Representative: Jolene Inez Martinis Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00313-31

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 27, 2019 Personal Representative: Wendy Lee Christie Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The co-personal representatives named below have been appointed as co-personal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Co-Personal Representative: Thomas Richard Hoy Co-Personal Representative: Priscilla Ann Baker Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00282-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00315-31

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HELEN PAULINE BLOODWORTH, Deceased, NO. 19-400316-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: ROSS G. MCLOUGHLIN, Deceased, NO. 19-4-00374-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 6, 2019 Personal Representative: Judith Ann Claxton Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 13, 2019 Personal Representative: Elizabeth Cook Attorney for Personal Representative: Bradley E. Neunzig, WSBA #22365 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00316-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 19-4-00374-31

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Program helps renters By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com People who need help learning how to obtain an apartment and get past previous mistakes on their rental record can get help from Volunteers of America’s Renter Certification Program. The program from the Volunteers of America of Western Washington has dates across March and April at locations throughout Snohomish County, including April 3 at the Arlington Community Resource Center at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington. A full list of dates is at www.voaww.org/ rentercertification. James Rankin, the fair housing counselor and trainer at the Volunteers of America of Western Washington, said that the program is about improving relationships between tenants and landlords. “As neutral moderators we are all about conflict res-

olution,” he said. “We want to foster better relationships between tenants and their landlords.” The program can provide help to those who are homeless or who have trouble getting past the application stage of finding an apartment. “It’s a big help to be able to say ‘I have some problems in my past, but I’ve been taking these steps to improve,’” said Rankin. If two people are applying for the same space, the person who has shown the effort to improve themselves will look better to the landlord, said Rankin. The Renter Certification classes teach locals how to respond to a notice, how to communicate with landlords, how to request repairs and other topics. There is also an emphasis on not letting problems come up in the first place. “We really believe in the preventative measures,” said Rankin. The program began in

2007 and was developed by talking with landlords, said Rankin. “We actually went out and asked the managers what are the biggest challenges for renters getting into a place,” he said. Snohomish County has supported it since then, with the local Volunteers of America running it. “We pitched it to the county and it has been successful enough that they support us with grant money every year,” said Rankin. Although it is something important for many people, tenant rights and how to manage housing is something that not many know much about. “It’s not really something that is taught in schools, and how to navigate these renting issues is such an integral part of so many people’s lives,” said Rankin. More information about the program is available at https://www.voaww.org/ rentercertification.

Our Best Friends Douglas

Submit Legal Notices to: editor@northcounty-outlook.com

Follow us on Twitter: @NCOutlook Follow us on Facebook: TheNorthCountyOutlook

Douglas is the Best Friend of Dan Campbell.

Send us photos of you and your pet The North County Outlook has a weekly feature titled Our Best Friends. Community members can send us photos of them with their pets and we will elect one to run in that week’s issue. To submit a photo, please send it to editor@northcountyoutlook.com. Please include the names of the people and pets in the photo.


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Communities

Marysville names Hiatt Volunteer of the Month Congratulations to volunteer extraordinaire Jodi Hiatt, Marysville’s newest Volunteer of the Month. Hiatt is the president and chief ambassador of the Marysville Strawberry Festival where she has volunteered since 1999 and has played a great part in the festival's continued success. As Maryfest’s current president, Hiatt is an ambassador for the city of Marysville and attends dozens of summer festival events throughout Washington, Oregon and British Columbia, where she promotes Maryfest events and the Marysville community. This past June more than 100,000 people attended the 87th Annual Strawberry Festival, placing third on the Herald’s list of top 10 most-visited attractions in Snohomish County Hiatt also has volunteered countless hours to other local nonprofit organizations over the past 25 years. Among them are Pennies for Puppies, Marysville Handmade and Homegrown Street Festival, the Marysville Historical Soci-

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

11

Arlington High School’s Neobots Robotics Team competed in its first competition of the season at the Mt. Vernon District Tournament March 1-3. COURTESY PHOTO

Neobots Robotics Team competes at Mt. Vernon tournament

COURTESY PHOTO

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, right, presents Jodi Hiatt with the city's Volunteer of the Month award. ety and Red Curtain Arts Center. Other volunteers appreciate that Jodi steps up to take on challenges and continually works to create a culture of teamwork. “Thank you, Jodi, for continually working to make Marysville a better place,” said Mayor Jon Nehring as he presented the award at the Feb. 25 Marysville City Council meeting.

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The Arlington High School Neobots Robotics Team competed in the FIRST Robotics Mt. Vernon District Tournament March 1-3 Thirty-two teams from Washington state participated in the competition. The Neobots team made it to the quarterfinals of the competition with their robot nicknamed “Berg.” The Neobots team finished the competition with a record of 4-10-0.

“The students have been working hard on Berg and the robot performed well during the competition,” said Mark Ehrhardt, team advisor. “The students will now evaluate what worked well and what needs more work.” Thirty-five students currently participate on the Neobots team. They will be competing again this year at the West Valley District Tournament in Spokane, March 21-23.


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March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Opinion

n GUEST OPINION

Highlighting the parks projects in North Snohomish County

In each annual budget, the Snohomish County Council allocates money to be spent on local parks and community projects throughout the county. These projects are mostly funded by REET (Real Estate Excise Tax) and various grants. In the 2019 budget, $2.7 million was allocated for projects in District 1 across North Snohomish County. In this month’s column, I will highlight some of these projects funded in 2019. One of the most meaningful parks projects in North Snohomish County is the SR 530 slide memorial. The memorial has been designed in line with the vision of the victims’ families and local community members. Snohomish County previously allocated $250,000 as seed money for the project. Efforts are currently underway to raise the estimated $6 million for construction through philanthropic donations and grant money. Another significant project is the renovation of Kayak Point Park. Kayak Point includes 480 acres of park land. The County has conducted an extensive review of the park and received public input regarding future improvements. This year’s budget includes $1,103,079 to start the improvements to the day-use portion of the park. These improvements will include additional recreation space, improving the boat launch, relocating and increasing park-

Nate Nehring

ing, and habitat improvements for local wildlife. As part of the larger Preferred Plan, we will also be making improvements to other areas of the park including the camping areas and additional trails for passive recreation. In total, we are expecting to put over $16 million in improvements to the park. I am excited that Snohomish County is able to help our local cities with critical community projects like the Granite Falls Civic and Community Center. Granite Falls is a fastgrowing city in our area and, as we know, a growing population creates additional demands on public services. The new Civic and Community Center will include a new public plaza, community room, emergency response center, and city hall. Snohomish County has included $250,000 toward the project and the city has funded the remainder of the project. This year’s budget also includes funding for a new Executive/Council Partnership Grant. These projects are in partnership with our cities to enhance local parks and open

space. In 2019, we funded the following projects in North Snohomish County: $50,000 for ballfield improvements at Cedar Field in Marysville, $40,000 for improvements at Terrace Park in Arlington, $35,000 for improvements at Frank Mason Park in Granite Falls, and $25,000 for ballfield improvements at Whitehorse Park in Darrington. The Whitehorse Regional Trail is a staple for North Snohomish County’s park and trail system. This 27-mile stretch of trail between the City of Arlington and Town of Darrington provides amazing scenery of the Cascade Mountain Range, the Stillaguamish River, and everything in between. This three phase project includes trail and bridge rehabilitation, Highway 530 crossings, paving in certain areas, and more trailheads and access. The 2019 budget includes $1,032,291 for these improvements. More about these projects and other parks projects throughout the county can be found by visiting https://snohomishcountywa.gov/2703/ Current-Projects Nate Nehring is a member of the Snohomish County Council and represents District 1 which includes Arlington, Darrington, Granite Falls, Marysville, Stanwood, and unincorporated north county. He can be reached by email at Nate. Nehring@snoco.org or by phone at (425) 388-3494.

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Our Favorite Quotes "Don't tell me what you believe in. I'll observe you behave and I will make my own determination." Author ­— Alex Trebek Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

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RAVE RAVE: I want to thank the members of the Marysville School Board for hosting their Coffee with Constituents last weekend. It's good to see they want to hear from the community to make our schools better. RAVE: Congratulations to Snohomish County FC which had a record turnout for their open tryout last weekend. The players that were selected have about a month to prepare before their first home preseason game on April 13

at Lakewood High School.

RAVE: It's great that Paine Field has started offering commercial flights. It will be so much more convenient than having to drive all the way down to SeaTac.

RAVE: The recent sunny (albeit chilly) weather is a reminder that spring is just about one week away. I'm definitely looking forward to winter finally being over.

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March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Utility discounts available to people with disabilities ___ “ By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

It is now significantly easier for low-income Marysville residents with disabilities to receive a reduction to their utility rates thanks to a recent change in the city’s laws. The Marysville City Council changed the city’s laws regarding the income threshold to make them

more in line with other cities in the region this February. "The city has offered reduced rates for residents with disabilities since 2004,” said Connie Mennie, communications administrator with the city of Marysville. State law gives cities the option to allow a 30 percent reduction in utility rates for

low-income people with disabilities. The city was contacted by a resident who alerted officials to the situation. “She said ‘hey, I’m low income and disabled and your utility billing situation uses a threshold that is far lower than any other community,’” said Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring. “And she had done the

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research and found what all the other cities did,” he said. Nehring said city staff wanted to provide low-income people with disabilities the same benefits that other area cities offer. “We looked and thought that if someone is in that situation we want to give them the same threshold that other cities are giving them,” said Nehring. "We wanted to provide that rate relief for the people in our community who financially are probably finding it very difficult to make ends meet,” said Mennie. City officials wanted to help those people and Mennie said city staff researched what was causing the disparity. "Our city staff looked into why that was and discovered we were using a different set of guidelines about who can qualify,” she said.

We looked and thought that if someone is in that situation we want to give them the same threshold that other cities are giving them.

___

Mayor Jon Nehring

The city was using a more restrictive set of guidelines from the United States Department of Health and Human Services when the guidelines from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development would cover more people. "These new HUD guidelines recognize the different costs of living in the greater Seattle region compared to other areas in the country,” said Mennie. "It can be quite a drastic change,” she said. For a single individual under the old guidelines they had to make about

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$15,000 or less to qualify, but now that threshold is raised to $37,000. For a family of four the old guidelines set the limit to about $31,000, but now it is about $53,000. "So a lot more people would be able to qualify under the new guidelines,” said Mennie. The utility rate reduction will cover water, sewer and stormwater fees and garbage fees if you’re provided service by the city of Marysville (some areas within city limits are provided service by Waste Management). To qualify for the reduction you have to show that you’re disabled, either by providing a disabled parking placard or through other means. Mennie said that city staff can help guide individuals through the forms to show that. The forms to apply for the reduction can be found at marysvillewa.gov, by calling 360-363-8001 or at Marysville City Hall at 1049 State Ave. #101, Marysville.

Celtic Gala at Opera House

Time to get your Irish on at the Third Annual Magical Strings Celtic Gala on March 15. This festive and timeless realm of Celtic music, dance, storytelling and songs will have you jigging all the way home The event will be 7:309:30 p.m., doors open at 6:45 p.m., at the Marysville Opera House, 1225 Third St. Tickets are on sale now and cost $18 per person. To pre-purchase tickets go to https://apm.activecommunities.com/marysvillewa/Activity_Search/4349 Online sales will end on March 15 at 4 p.m. Tickets will be sold at the door if still available. Beer, wine and refreshments will be available for purchase through the Marysville Soroptimists. For more information please visit marysvillewa. gov or call the Parks and Recreation Office at 360363-8400.


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Communities

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

Submit your events via email to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com March 13 - March 19

ton Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Friends of the Arlington Library Book Sale: Great books available at bargain prices. Something for everyone! Mar.'s theme is gardening. Proceeds support the Arlington Library. Held Wednesday, March 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Arling-

Soil Science and Plant Nutrition - With the WSU Master Gardeners: Learn soil and compost tips from the WSU Master Gardeners. Held Wednesday, March 13 beginning at 5 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

Classified: Events/Festivals

Teen STEM Day - Remixing With Littlebits: We’ve got fun gadgets to play with; come snap them together and see what kind of musical remixes you can do with these simple electronic pieces. For grades 6 and up. Held Thursday, March 14, beginning at 3 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Grant Writing Workshops: Grant Writing Workshops

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

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Real People. Real Life. P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 classifieds@northcountyoutlook.com

Benefits Include:

• Starting wage $15.50hr$17.75hr (depending on experience and certification). • Additional $1.00/hr for weekend work • Up to $1.50/hr more for client specific care needs • Time and a half for all holidays • Mileage and travel reimbursement • Paid training and certification • Paid Leave • Excellent Medical, Dental, Visioneven for part-time work...

will be held Thursdays, March 14 & 28, beginning at 2 p.m., at the Marysville Library, 6120 Grove St. This two-part grant writing workshop helps you perfect your ability to craft proposals that effectively and successfully deliver your organization’s message to potential funders. Session One: Crafting Proposals That Pack a Punch (March 14) Session Two: From Budgets to Attachments, Character Counts, and Balancing Stats with Stories (March 28). Please preregister as space is limited. For more information call 360-658-5000 Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories, music, and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 19 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Held Mondays, March 18 and 25, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

COMING EVENTS Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs, and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3 to 5 years. Caregiver required. Held Wednesdays, March 20 and 27, beginning at 10:30 a.m.,

www.northcountyoutlook.com at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Waggin’ Tales: Read a tale or two with Arlington's favorite registered therapy pets! For children and families. Held Saturday, March 23, beginning at 11 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Saturday STEM - Peep Engineering Challenge: Use your engineering skills to build a jellybean structure for your Peeps and design a launcher to help them fly! For ages 6 and up. Held Saturday, March 23, at 2 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Class of 1979 Reunion: Marysville Pilchuck High School Class of 1979 40year reunion will be held July 27, 2019, at the Marysville Opera House, 3-10 p.m. and will include dinner and fun. RSVP required by 4/28/2019. Cost is $65 per person. For ticket and more information email classof79-40@hotmail.com.

ONGOING EVENTS Assistance for veterans: Military Veterans seeking help with the VA may contact American Legion Post 178, 119 Cedar Ave., Marysville. Messages may be left on the Post phone, 360-6530155. A service officer will

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(425) 212-9571

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return your call. Post 178 meets the third Thursday of each month. The Post has a social/coffee hour at 6:00 PM and the meeting starts a 7:00 PM. All veterans are invited to visit and learn how the Legion serves our community.”

Volunteers for Animal Care Wanted: The NOAH Center in Stanwood is looking for volunteers. NOAH offers several volunteer opportunities to help care for their adoptable animals. If you are interested in volunteering you can go to their website at www.thenoahcenter.org or call 360-6297055.

Jam Session for People with Disabilities: Youth and adults of all abilities are invited to Village Music and Arts Friday jam sessions featuring live music by Jon Dalgarn and Voices of the Village. Bring your own instrument or use theirs. Sessions are every Friday, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at 338 North McLeod, Arlington, WA. Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Call Michelle at 360-653-7752 ext. 14 for more information or to sign up.

Pills Anonymous Meeting: Do you now, or have you ever had a problem with prescription pills. If so, the join the new book study Pills Anonymous Meeting. Held on Mondays, 5-6 p.m., at the Peace Lutheran Church, 1717 Larson Rd., in Silvana. For more information contact Barry at 951212-4080 or Virginia at 360631-5142. Pills Anonymous is a fellowship of mine and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other so they may solve their common problem and help others recover from pill addiction. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using pills.

Family Night to Battle Addiction: The Tulalip Tribes Family Services runs their “Family Night” on the last Tuesday of every month. The dinner and discussion night provides information, support and community ideas on how to help loved ones in their battles with addiction. From 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Juanita AnnJones Morales building at 2821 Mission Hill Road, Tulalip. Call 360-716-4400 to RSVP.

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MSD Continued from page 1

solid philosophical underpinnings behind it, I think one of the main drivers was money," said Marysville School District board member Pete Lundberg. The SLC model had been drifting away from the original intent for years, said Lundberg, and the district could have done a better job talking with parents. "The worst thing that happened when we went out from the SLC model was the lack of communication, and when you don't give people enough information everybody fills in the gaps," he said. Lundberg said that the school district is working on a clearer goal for how to treat all its students equitably and there is a committee forming with community members that will help answer that question. Parents said that the Getchell SLCs were valuable for helping

students see if they liked that particular discipline, and providing those options to explore careers is important for the school district, said board member Vanessa Edwards. "Right now, the state is really hammering on that they need to have more guidance out there at the high school and middle school levels," she said. Students wouldn't necessarily be fully trained in a skill but should have the opportunity to "dip their toes in," she said. Parents hoped that those opportunities came earlier for students. "We wait until the junior or senior year and we say 'oh you have this freedom now, what do you want to do?' and they're like 'what? I have to apply for college in six months and know what I want to do?' The model doesn't really fit the system as it works in reality," said local parent Beth Ha. The district is trying to create

pathways for students, said Edwards, which are not necessarily a track of classes a student would be committed to, but a guideline for students to follow if they want. "It's not necessarily the student has to pick and know where they're going, but they should be able to see what they like," said Edwards. The district is also planning to pilot a trimester schedule soon at Mountain View Arts and Technology High School, which would allow up to 30 credits over a high school career instead of 24. A class day would be five periods under a trimester system. This decision is being driven largely because of new state standards which require 24 credits to graduate. "The problem we have with a six-period day is if you have to have 24 credits to graduate, that means you can never fail anything," said Lundberg. This would allow students more

March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

flexibility in their class choices. "We know that often electives are what inspire kids to go to school, so with more classes you would have the opportunity to take more electives as well," he said. Because of the planning period that teachers need, a trimester system would require the district hire more staff which would mean about $800,000 more if implemented across the district, said Lundberg. "We would have to be prioritizing our budget if that's what we decide to do," he said. The school district has been holding Coffee with Constituents meetings since the start of the year to help the school board talk directly to parents. "These meetings help the board understand what the community wishes are and I think that is the huge value in this. It's relaxed and you can say whatever you want," said Lundberg.

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville School Board member Pete Lundberg talks at a recent Coffee with Constituents on March 9.

Community members also liked the casual setting. "I thought it was really good. Kind of a unique opportunity directly from the horse's mouth what they're thinking," said local parent Mark Indrebo. "I appreciated the honesty," said local parent Kelly Indrebo.

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March 13, 2019 - March 19, 2019 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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New M'ville business sells CBD products By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com A variety of CBD products that many people say can help with chronic pain or other medical issues are available at recently opened Marysville business New World Distributors. CBD, or cannabidiol, is a component of marijuana, however it doesn’t cause the high typically associated with cannabis, which is instead caused by THC. The Marysville store at 9109 State Ave., carries a number of products with CBD, but none with THC. Many of the medical purposes that marijuana is used for are provided by CBD. “There’s a wide range of conditions that it helps with,” said owner David Day, which include chronic pain, anxiety, Chrohn’s disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, antibiotic-resistant infections and other problems.

“It’s to each his own, and everybody can find out what benefits it has for the individual,” said Day. Day has information pamphlets at the store with more information about CBD and the potential benefits of the compound. There are a broad range of ways to take the CBD. “We have a full health and wellness line, from sprays to rubs and roll-ons,” said Day. Oils and tinctures are also available to apply the CBD. Their CBD honey has been very popular and is often sold out, said Day. They also have a skin care product line with moisturizing cream, facial cleansers, anti-aging creams and other products. “The skin care products affect the skin receptors that the oil and CBD penetrates and works with,” said Day. A variety pack for those who want to sample the products is also at the store. “We have an assortment pack

that kind of gives people a full spectrum of what products are available,” said Day. “We also carry a great line of dog treats, like the infused pet line with three different flavors,” he said. There are still some more types of products that Day is planning to bring to the store as well, including a hemp capsule. The Marysville store has been open for three weeks now. “It’s been excellent. We’ve had a great response from the community,” he said. “It’s been a challenge, but it’s been rewarding to see what kind of people come in and what kind of people return,” he said. The current plan is to open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. from Monday to Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, although Day admits that he is still trying to figure out exactly how to schedule the hours. “I’m still figuring out what

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

David Day, owner of New World Distributors, at his recently opened Marysville business that sells a variety of CBD products. works best,” he said. Day is a long-time Marysville resident and said he is happy to open a business that he feels can help a lot of people in the community.

“It’s great to be accepted into the community. It took so long and there is a need in the community for this product, not just for the older folks but the younger folks,” he said.

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