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Table of Contents Editor’s Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 A Weigh of Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 It’s Easy Eating Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 A Woman of Substance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Garden Essentials for Spring . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Spring Is Picnic Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Reflexology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Hormone Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Swimwear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Let Your Green Thumb Bloom . . . . . . . . . .19 Images Woven in Silk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Ask A Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Covered In Silk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-30

Shana Adkisson, Editor editor@silkthemagazine.com 366-3532 Cathy Hanselman, Advertising Executive advertising@silkthemagazine.com 366-3563 Shana Adkisson, Editor Aaron Wright, Writer Nanette Light, Writer Michael Kinney, Writer Kevin Ellis, Photographer Jerry Laizure, Photographer Marise Boehs, Designer Jason Clarke, Webmaster Saundra Morris, Advertising Director David Stringer, Publisher Silk is a publication of The Norman Transcript with offices at 215 E. Comanche, Norman, OK 73069

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Letter from the Editor There are certain things in this world I wish I could do. I’ve always wanted to be able to sing. Wait. I’ve always wanted to be able to sing and have people enjoy hearing me sing. I can sing. But, and you’ll have to just trust me on this one, you really don’t want to hear my voice climb up and down the vocal ladder. I also wish I could eat a bucket of carbohydrates and not gain the weight. But one of my biggest dreams is having a green thumb. My thumb is more of a pale yellow. Every spring I get these odd notions. I want to plant. Something. Anything. One year it was watermelons and cantaloupe. Go ahead and laugh, everyone else did. At the first signs of spring I usually spend one weekend cleaning the house from top to bottom. We donate clothes to charity. A couple of dead appliances find themselves on the curb ready for trash collection or nosy neighbors. There are strict guidelines for cleaning the garage. And there seems to always be a paintbrush involved in the scenario. When the curtains are cleaned, the floorboards are dusted and the paint has dried, I look outside at my yard. It’s there I don’t see the dead grass or the trees that have yet to bloom. I have beautiful visions of rhododendrons, chrysanthemums and lilies. In my mind the blooming beauties would be capped off with a koi pond. And a fountain. And cute little statues of garden gnomes. Then reality sits in. Deep inside I know those rhododendrons would rot, the chrysanthemums could cry and the koi would be eaten by the two dogs that would traipse through the previously mentioned pond. I also shouldn’t forget the rabbit that keeps inviting himself into the yard. He really enjoyed those watermelon plants a few years ago. The former owner of our home was blessed with the ability to plant something and have it thrive. When we took ownership of the house there were flowers and plants busting out of our yard. It was a sight to behold that’s for sure. I think we’d lived in the house a month when all outside vegetation realized the new owner hadn’t a clue as to how to care for them. I was like the wicked stepmother you’ve seen in fairy tales — hated and feared. The only survivors are two rose bushes and a crepe myrtle. I can’t take credit for any of these surviving specimens. They have to do it all on their own. I’m afraid to go near the plants for fear they will wither under my control. Seems as if they have this thriving and surviving thing figured out without my help. I’ve tried, too. For the first two years of home ownership, I gave it my all. I weeded. I fertilized. I planted. I watered. I also ached. I moaned — a lot. And that’s where the story ends. Usually by the time my body would stop aching is about the time the plants and flowers would die. If killing a plant were a crime I’d be doing life without parole by now. I’ve given up the idea of ever having a lush landscaped yard. Now I just drive through neighborhoods and dream. It’s like looking at Christmas lights, only this time I admire your peonies, hydrangeas and your daffodils. Keep on blooming. Sincerely,

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On the north lawn at West Point, poised on a tip of land overlooking the Hudson, is a cauldron full of stones encircled by an enormous steel chain. Visitors often pause there to take pictures. It reeks of significance. People video the stones and muse about their origin as if, perhaps, they might have been carried there from Plymouth Rock itself. It’s funny though, the cauldron and the rocks aren’t important in the least. It’s the chain that has a story. The 114 lb. links were actually strung together back in the 1700s to prevent British ships from passing through the channel. The natural S curve of the Hudson in this area would force the ships to slow enough that an ingeniously designed underwater barricade would thwart their passage onto the Hudson. The chain in its entirety was 600 feet in length. It’s total weight was 65 tons. It was like an inanimate Red Rover wall taunting the British to try to break through if they dared.

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While the creativity behind the chain was definitely what we now like to call “outside the box” thinking, the actual implementation of the concept was off the charts. I can see the pioneers in a big roundtable meeting: “Great idea guys! Love it! Now who’s going to carry this one end over there to the other side?” Ultimately, an elaborate system of ropes and pulleys that not only enabled assemblage but also allowed for adjustments to tides and currents was employed. Each link in the chain was placed on a wooden raft and floated across the channel to be anchored to its neighbor thus constructing a web of steel protecting American turf. And it did exactly what it was designed to do. Without doing anything at all. See, no ship ever tried it. Tests performed much later revealed that the chain was actually incapable of stopping a British vessel, regardless of its speed. Had any ever dared pass, they could have, despite the ingenious American plan.

around the court before the opening tip. She just had this confident air about her that made opponents think and re-think. And while they were thinking about what she might do, we usually jumped out to a sizeable lead. Weird but real. We used to giggle as we watched it take place.

The Power of Perception

The chain worked without working. And it’s proudly displayed at our United States Military Academy as a result. I find that ironic and enlightening and downright funny all at the same time. We think of our Nation’s Army as brawn and guts personified. And the chain is certainly that. But its effectiveness came not from what it did but from what the opponent feared it could do. And it made me think of Stacey Dales and the way she used to warm up before basketball games. Many an opposing coach lost color to her face just watching Dales maneuver

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A fair of amount of success is stunting. Are great poker players great because they always get the best cards or are they great because they make the other guy believe they’re holding the best cards? Hard to say. Maybe a little bit of both. There are lots of ways to win. You can out think, you can out muscle, you can out maneuver. Or you can bet the house on the other guy not having enough moxie to beat you. One thing is for certain: perception can be reality. In battle, in sport, in competition of any kind, “what is” really matters. But maybe “what might be” matters just as much.

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It is easy eating green By Aaron Wright Toni Viles, RD, LD, community dietitian at Norman is essential to keeping your salad healthy. It’s common Regional Health System, gives healthy salad tips to follow for restaurant salads to be tossed with 1/3 cup of dressing; as the temperatures rise and our thoughts turn to eating this could add an extra 350 calories. Keep the dressing on green. the side and try just • Get plenty of green dipping your fork in it leafy vegetables like before getting a bite to romaine, spinach or help limit the amount mixed salad greens. of dressing you eat. Remember that the dark• Don’t go overboard er lettuces offer more on the starchy garnishvitamins than pale icees like fresh-baked berg. bread, breadsticks, • For more fiber, vitamuffins and biscuits. mins and bulk without a Soft breadsticks have lot of calories add fruits about 150 calories each and vegetables. Try and the bread (without chopped apple, oranges, the dipping oil) has blueberries, blackberries, about 100 calories for a sliced strawberries or a medium piece. Having few raisins (remember two or three pieces can that dried fruit is healthy make the calories add fruit but it’s a condensed up quickly and defeats version so keep the por- Fancy That’s Strawberry Blue Cheese Salad (containing mixed greens, sliced strawber- the purpose of having a ries, blue cheese crumbles and a raspberry vinaigrette dressing) — estimated 245 calories tions small). Toss in salad in the first place. from calorieking.com. some veggies like red bell pepper, tomatoes, carrots, snap peas, radishes, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini, Local salads nutritional information: asparagus and cucumbers. Panera Bread Classic Cafe Salad — 170 calories, • Add heart-healthy nuts and seeds, but remember that according to its Web site every two tablespoons adds 100 calories so don’t get too Panera Bread Salmon Caesar Salad — 480 calories, wild. Beware the candied nuts on some restaurant salads according to its Web site — they can have double the calories. Quiznos Steak and Blue Cheese Salad — 230 for the • If the salad is a main dish, be sure to add some lean small salad and 510 for regular, according to its Web protein to help keep you full longer. Skip the fried or site breaded chicken and opt for the grilled or roasted chickQuiznos Classic Cobb Salad — 420 for the small en or turkey, fish, lean beef, a hard-boiled egg or beans. salad and 830 for regular, according to its Web site You also can add some cheese but choose reduced fat Coach’s Peppered Turkey Spinach Salad (containing versions and keep the portions to about 1/4 cup to limit peppered turkey, tomatoes, hard-boiled eggs, mushthe calories and the artery-clogging saturated fat. rooms, parmesan cheese and a balsamic vinaigrette) — Picking the more flavorful varieties of cheese like parmeestimated 345 calories from calorieking.com. san, feta or pepper jack can make it easier to go easy on Pink Elephant Cafe’s Pink Elephant Salad (containing the cheese. strawberries, kiwi, pineapple, feta cheese, toasted • Skip the thick, creamy dressings and go for a lighter almonds, berry-cinammon vinaigrette over organic option like balsamic vinaigrette, plain vinegar or lime greens) — estimated 245 calories from calorieking.com juice. It’s important to remember that most salad dressings are high in fat and sodium so limiting the portions 8

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A Wo m a n o f S u b s t a n c e

Judy Hatfield is sweeping the market By Nanette Light

When crisis erupts, Judy Hatfield is on the receiving end, trying to lessen the quake’s aftermath. An organizer of chaos — as she likes to call herself — Hatfield, president and CEO of the commercial real estate firm Equity Realty, launched her career as a receiver beneath the rubble of the oil bust in the 1980s. “When I was growing up, women were either teachers, nurses or secretaries. That didn’t really fit my M.O. I always knew I wanted to own my own business, but I wanted to learn how-to on other people’s dimes” said Hatfield, a self-made business woman, who has worked as a plant controller for a local electric company, vice president of First National Bank of Norman and president of a public relations firm, before breaking out into real estate. “I’ve got lots of jeans and cowboy boots but party dresses, too. You name it; I’ve probably done it,” said Hatfield, a University of Oklahoma finance major who positioned herself on the job market at age 2 when she sold her father’s busi- Photo by Jerry Laizure ness cards. Hatfield, known for her 20-year plans (her current one is to control Norman’s commercial real estate market), comes from a lineage of entrepreneurs: Her dad and grandfather were in the furniture business and her oldest son sells commercial real estate in the Dallas area. www.silkthemagazine.com

After graduating college, Hatfield was certain of one thing: She was going to own her own business — and it wasn’t going to be furniture. As Hatfield pulled out her one-page resume, admitting the humbling task of limiting her accomplishments to one sheet, she began answering the hanging question: How did she chart her path? “Back in the olden days, I had this gruff grandpa that was really Judy Hatfield cool. He always said everybody zips their pants the same way, you’ve just got to learn how,” Hatfield said. Hatfield, who grew up in Pauls Valley, didn’t have a mentor or counselor outlining her route. She schemed her career climb solo. “I love to do strategic visioning,” said Hatfield, adding that her innate ability to read people and forward thinking steered her course. “It’s like a puzzle for me. I love math, and I’m very math oriented. When I was little, I didn’t draw pictures, I drew funky numbers.” And though Hatfield, who initially marked the course toward being a developer, didn’t plan for her numbers to add up to real estate, realized that numbers don’t lie. Her carefully derived career formula proved “X” equaled the commercial market. “And to think, all this started from the bust,” she said. 9


Garden essentials for spring By Nanette Light

When the calendar flips to spring, the green thumb in many begins to bud. Here, Silk has streamlined a list of gardening tools to make gardening — for the novice to the expert — open to full bloom with ease. 7-in-1 Planter Buddy: This multi-purpose gardening tool functions as a trowel blade for planting; its serrated edge can open bags of mulch and soil; the sharpened, straight edge is used to cut sod and twine; its cutter tip rips up weeds; and poly tamper tamps down stakes, markers and fertilizer spikes.

Gloves: Available in leather, canvas and jersey varieties, gloves protect hands from thorns and other unforeseen objects when digging through dirt.

Garden kneelers or knee pads: Whether you prefer to strap on or go strapless with the kneelers, these pads make hours of kneeling while planting and weeding more breezy and protects pants from large mud stains. Available in packs of three at Ace hardware. The pads and kneelers are made of soft foam with a moisture wicking fabric liner. 10

Garden Netting: If you have problems with birds and animals tearing through your vegetables and flowers, try garden netting. This mesh netting protects gardens from those that fly and walk on fours and is available in a variety of sizes.

Leverage Assisted Trimmers: These shears increase the efficiency of cutting while reducing the effort, due to these tools’ ratchet-driven ability that makes cutting through branches easier, if you lack strength. The secret to these trimmers is the handle, which thanks to its betweenthe-handles cam and off-center pivot, rolls when you squeeze.

Select-a-spray nozzle: Here’s a nozzle with multi-personalities. The seven spray pattern positions, let you adjust from a full spray — in either a cone, sharp steam, or full flow — flood, mist, jet and shower.

Photos provided by acehardware.com and amazon.com

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Spring is picnic time By Aaron Wright Not too cold, not too hot. Flowers are blooming. Cabin fever has set in. Spring is the perfect time for picnics. Below are some tips to make your outing more enjoyable. • Keep leftover condiments from fast food restaurants on hand. They are easy to bring along. • Pick the spot according to your guest list. For instance, for a family picnic, you may want to go to Andrews Park in Norman, where there is playground equipment, tennis courts, basketball courts and a skate park. Or Northeast Lions Park, where there is a fishing pond and a Frisbee golf course. For a more romantic picnic, consider renting the gazebo at Lions Park. There’s electricity in the gazebo where you can plug in music and a lamp for a twilight romantic dinner for two. • Make a list of all the food and other things you will need on the picnic. You don’t want to get stuck in the park without bread for sandwiches or something to drink.

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• Bring or brainstorm activities to entertain children during the picnic. Food can only hold their attention so long. • Check the weather before heading out. Mother Nature is fickle. • Plan for emergencies. Bring umbrellas in case it decides to rain, bring bug repellent, Band-Aids, extra plates and antibacterial spray. • Double-check to make sure your picnic area of choice is safe for both you and the natural environment and wildlife around the spot. Is it really safe for you to bring food where you are? • Consider investing in a picnic pack or basket if you are frequent picnic-goers. Many times, these packs include all the utensils you need for an easy-outing.

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Feeling balanced. . . By Nanette Light

Jan Allison is at that age, she said. For her, it’s a time catapulted by an onslaught of headaches, mood swings and hot flashes. “I know I’ve got a hormone imbalance,” said Allison, 52, who attended a seminar on bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, held by Dr. Amy Gregory of First Glance Medical Spa, 3000 S. Berry Road, in January. Dr. Amy Gregory Gregory is a board certified family physician who specializes in bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. “I just wanted to check it out and see what she had to say,” said Allison, who’s a nurse. And so did 80 other women. In fact, Gregory had to tack on another session for these women, exhausted in their search to alleviate the aches of aging. “I do seem like the last ditch effort sometimes,” said Gregory, who touted Photo by Jerry Laizure the benefits of bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, as opposed to traditional hormone replacement therapy. “They go to everybody else before they come to me.” Bioidentical hormone replacement therapy summed up Also known as natural hormone replacement, bHRT replaces a woman’s hormones with identical, natural hormones that are tailored toward each woman’s specific needs and amounts. This means there is a balance of natural estrogens, progesterone, DHEA, testosterone, melatonin and other hormones. Natural hormone replacement therapy is derived from the Diascorea composite of a wild yam, which is converted into molecules identical to estrogens, progesterone, testosterone and other natural hormones. Gregory said the treatment is deemed natural because the chemical formula of these hormones matches the hormones produced by the body. 14

“No chemist on the planet can tell the difference between what God gave you and bioidentical hormones,” Gregory said. Bioidentical hormones versus synthetic hormones Traditional hormone replacement has been around since the early 1970s. According to information provided by Gregory’s office, the most widely used hormone, premarin, is made from pregnant mares’ urine. Gregory said premarin could cause complications such as headaches, vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, nausea and irritability, since it does not act the same in a woman’s body as natural estrogen. How to know if bHRT is the right treatment Gregory said bioidentical hormones, while not a cure for a hormone imbalance, can help reduce hot flashes; improve sleep, mood, concentration and memory; improve the sex drive; and better maintain muscle mass and strength. “I get headaches a lot. I take Advil PM, but I’d like not to have to take it,” Allison said after the seminar. Stagnant weight also can begin to drop, for women — frustrated by lack of diet success — who are trying to lose weight. Kathy Oden-Hall, who started bioidentical hormone replacement therapy in September 2009 and manages public relations for Gregory, said she has dropped 20 pounds since she began treatment. “I was trying every diet in the book and exercising, and nothing would happen,” she said, adding that within three weeks, the therapy also had wiped her hot flashes, raised her energy levels and ensured sound-sleeping nights. “I still have more to go, but it helps me stay motivated. It’s not a magic bullet.” www.silkthemagazine.com


Prospective patients of Gregory’s must fill out an in-depth “I think it’s worth trying, but it’s kinda expensive,” Allison health survey. Patients then meet with Gregory to determine said. “This is an investment in yourself,” Gregory said. appropriate tests, administered usually through saliva tests but sometimes urine, blood or stool. “I need you to listen to yourself. I’m just the guide,” she Gregory said hormone imbalances can strike said. at all ages and includes: Gregory will then recommend hormones, supplements or • Long and heavy menstrual cycles both. In the beginning of treatment, Gregory meets with patients • Irritability once a month for three months. • Bloating “I’m not going to just hand you a bag of goodies and say, • Hot flashes ‘have a nice life.’ If you have purple eyes, come back and see • Insomnia me,” Gregory said. • Unexplained weight gain • Headaches Cost of the treatment Gregory said the first visit is $500, and the first set of hor• Lack of sexual interest mones, which she prefers to administer through drops, is about $100. From there, she said the replacements run much less, she said.

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Reflexology connects body By Aaron Wright

Ilonka Vos

Photo by Kevin Ellis

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When IIonka Vos’s clients have sinus problems, they hand over their feet. When their shoulders are sore from stress, she relaxes their feet. When their digestive tract acts up, she helps them find relief through their feet. Vos has been practicing reflexology for more than five years. She currently rents office space from Healthy Solutions in Moore. “It’s so interesting how that corresponds to your body and what you’re feeling and what’s going on,” she said about reflexology. “I’m just amazed by the science of this.” Reflexology, a growing trend among those seeking relief for health issues, is a science focusing on the principle of linking all of the glands, organs and parts of the body with areas on the hands and feet. For instance, Vos said the toes represent the top of the body, the head and brain area. “I love checking the brain reflex and telling people, ‘You’ve got a brain, and it feels good,’” said Vos. The practice of Reflexology can be traced back to ancient Egyptian days. Modern day reflexology is thought to have stemmed from the Zone Theory in the early 20th century. Different than a massage, Vos said she uses accupressure to guide people in a type of preventative maintenance. During each session, Vos starts by rubbing powder on www.silkthemagazine.com

people’s feet. This dries them so she can rub them without slipping. Then she begins rubbing the feet, focusing on specific areas that relate to parts of the body. In this way, she said, the feet talk to her, telling her if there are issues in the client’s overall body. Vos stressed that she never diagnoses people; she will merely tell people if she observes knots or unusual tension in specific areas of the foot. Mostly, Vos recommends people follow up with their doctor on what the issue could be. Sometimes, though, she said people will report to her that they immediately see effects on their body after having a reflexology session. Vos said when clients with sinus issues come, oftentimes, within 20 minutes after a session, they will experience congestion clearing and other side effects related to the issue. One of Vos’s clients, Tim Orndorff, goes to Vos for problems with his feet. Ordorff said the reflexology sessions keep his feet relaxed.

Reflexology can be used to: • reduce stress • increase energy • improve blood circulation • aid digestion and sinus issues, among others • further maternity wellness • facilitate healing

“It’s working out really well for me,” he said. Although the footwork is helping his feet, he said the whole science of reflexology is interesting to him. “She can hone in what’s hurting you — it’s kind of odd,” he said. James Henson, a therapist at Integrative Health Center in Norman said that he thinks reflexology is a way to treat people before they have to turn to treatments that require extra medication. Although Henson said he only performs a couple of reflexology sessions a month, he sees this science growing as more people find out about it and as it becomes more easily available. He especially sees this a viable option for those interested in holistic healing. Vos admits that reflexology is not a solution for everyone. Some people experience no difference after a session or even several sessions. Others actually have negative side effects. Vos said she had one client that would experience nightmares after sessions. She attributed it to toxic chemicals released in his body after being stimulated from reflexology. Vos doesn’t get discouraged when her craft is not effective for a client. She said she originally got into reflexology because of how it helped her several years ago. She wants to share the relief with others and said she gets enough positive stories to keep her motivated. “I still have that kind of child-like, that’s-fabulous-thatyou-got-what-I-wanted-you-to-get feeling,” said Vos. For those who are interested, but have fears of surrendering their ticklish feet over, Vos wants to put their worries to bed. “I’ve only met one client who laughed the entire time I worked on her feet,” she said.

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Reflexology connects body By Aaron Wright

Ilonka Vos

Photo by Kevin Ellis

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When IIonka Vos’s clients have sinus problems, they hand over their feet. When their shoulders are sore from stress, she relaxes their feet. When their digestive tract acts up, she helps them find relief through their feet. Vos has been practicing reflexology for more than five years. She currently rents office space from Healthy Solutions in Moore. “It’s so interesting how that corresponds to your body and what you’re feeling and what’s going on,” she said about reflexology. “I’m just amazed by the science of this.” Reflexology, a growing trend among those seeking relief for health issues, is a science focusing on the principle of linking all of the glands, organs and parts of the body with areas on the hands and feet. For instance, Vos said the toes represent the top of the body, the head and brain area. “I love checking the brain reflex and telling people, ‘You’ve got a brain, and it feels good,’” said Vos. The practice of Reflexology can be traced back to ancient Egyptian days. Modern day reflexology is thought to have stemmed from the Zone Theory in the early 20th century. Different than a massage, Vos said she uses accupressure to guide people in a type of preventative maintenance. During each session, Vos starts by rubbing powder on www.silkthemagazine.com

people’s feet. This dries them so she can rub them without slipping. Then she begins rubbing the feet, focusing on specific areas that relate to parts of the body. In this way, she said, the feet talk to her, telling her if there are issues in the client’s overall body. Vos stressed that she never diagnoses people; she will merely tell people if she observes knots or unusual tension in specific areas of the foot. Mostly, Vos recommends people follow up with their doctor on what the issue could be. Sometimes, though, she said people will report to her that they immediately see effects on their body after having a reflexology session. Vos said when clients with sinus issues come, oftentimes, within 20 minutes after a session, they will experience congestion clearing and other side effects related to the issue. One of Vos’s clients, Tim Orndorff, goes to Vos for problems with his feet. Ordorff said the reflexology sessions keep his feet relaxed.

Reflexology can be used to: • reduce stress • increase energy • improve blood circulation • aid digestion and sinus issues, among others • further maternity wellness • facilitate healing

“It’s working out really well for me,” he said. Although the footwork is helping his feet, he said the whole science of reflexology is interesting to him. “She can hone in what’s hurting you — it’s kind of odd,” he said. James Henson, a therapist at Integrative Health Center in Norman said that he thinks reflexology is a way to treat people before they have to turn to treatments that require extra medication. Although Henson said he only performs a couple of reflexology sessions a month, he sees this science growing as more people find out about it and as it becomes more easily available. He especially sees this a viable option for those interested in holistic healing. Vos admits that reflexology is not a solution for everyone. Some people experience no difference after a session or even several sessions. Others actually have negative side effects. Vos said she had one client that would experience nightmares after sessions. She attributed it to toxic chemicals released in his body after being stimulated from reflexology. Vos doesn’t get discouraged when her craft is not effective for a client. She said she originally got into reflexology because of how it helped her several years ago. She wants to share the relief with others and said she gets enough positive stories to keep her motivated. “I still have that kind of child-like, that’s-fabulous-thatyou-got-what-I-wanted-you-to-get feeling,” said Vos. For those who are interested, but have fears of surrendering their ticklish feet over, Vos wants to put their worries to bed. “I’ve only met one client who laughed the entire time I worked on her feet,” she said.

with feet, hands www.silkthemagazine.com

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Be a bathing beauty By Shana Adkisson

Whether we like it or not ladies, it’s almost bathing suit season. We’ve hid under those lumpy sweaters long enough. And after the rough winter we’ve had we deserve to bare a little skin and hit the pool to soak up some warm sunshine. Swimsuit shopping can be a daunting task. But with a little know-how and lots of patience the perfect swimsuit is out there. Honest. For a short torso, when your body is short in proportion to your legs, try a bikini with a halter-top. This will emphasize your bust and shoulders. Paired with a bikini bottom that sits low on the hips and you’ll be swimming in compliments. Ladies with a long torso should try a one-piece swimsuit or bikini with high-cut legs. A high-cut style suit will shorten the torso and lengthen the legs. If being pear shaped is your body’s main flaw, you are not alone. The pear shape has often been the plague of women. In order to draw attention toward your more appealing characteristics try pairing an eye-catching bikini or tankini top with subdued bottoms in a dark color. When swimsuit shopping, large busted women should look for a straight across cut at the top of your swimsuit with wide set straps to minimize your bust. Another helpful tip might be to look for a bikini top with a hidden underwire for extra support.

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Small busted women can add curves and subtle cleavage by wearing a bikini top with triangle-shaped cups and a tiefront. Both features can add shape to any small bust. In general, plus-sized women should purchase swimsuits in darker colors. Darker colors, such as reds and blues, can offer an overall minimizing effect. Look for a fitted swimsuit with a defined waist and high percentage of Lycra/spandex. A high-cut leg also will slim your legs and hips. When camouflaging a flabby stomach tankinis work better than a bikini or one piece. Bikinis totally expose a jiggly belly, and trying to squeeze into a one-piece will not slim your stomach, only emphasize it. Other tips Check the swimsuits out. After you have chosen a few swimsuits to try on, try to view them in as natural light as possible. Dressing room lights are often harsh and very unflattering. Buy what fits well. Overall, you should choose the swimsuit that you feel most comfortable to display around your family and friends. One of the best-kept secrets of sexiness is feeling comfortable within your own skin. Source: www.wikihow.com

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Wish you had a green thumb? Join the club. Take baby steps and start by caring for these hard-to-kill indoor and outdoor plants. Indoor variety: • Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) — “Basically, it’s castiron,” said Tracey Payton, horticulture agent from the Oklahoma State University extension office in Cleveland County. • Mother-in-law tongue or snake plant — “I’ve had the one I have since my freshman year of college,” said Payton. These plants are evergreen perennials with tall, stiff leaves. • Philodendron — Payton suggests a type of ivy with heart-shaped leaves. Outdoor variety: • Cone flowers — perennial flowers that come in a variety of colors and are native to Oklahoma. • Crepe myrtles — “Crepe myrtles do great in Oklahoma; they’re pretty resilient,” said Payton. Crepe myrtles are shrubs that bear colorful and long-lasting flowers, generally pink or purple in Oklahoma. • Gaillardia — the state wildflower. These blanket flowers are droughttolerant annuals and perennials that are part of the sunflower family. • An arrangement of ornamental grasses — From pink muhly to zebra grass, these grasses are easy to take care of and come in a variety of styles, colors, textures and sizes.

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IMAGES

Woven In Silk

Lauma Redin submitted these photos of a sunrise and sunset at Judy Hatfield’s ranch in Blanchard. Lauma writes “I loved the fluffy clouds with the prairie — very Oklahoma.”

Do you have a picture of a glorious Oklahoma sunset? How about a flower that is in beautiful bloom in your yard? Why not share your picture with Silk? Send your 8X10 (2400 X 3000 pixel) photo to editor@silkthemagazine.com for future publication. Please include your name, location of photo and a brief story about the location. If you would like to mail the photo send it to P.O. Drawer 1058, Norman, OK 73070, Attention Silk editor. If you would like your photo mailed back please include a self address stamped envelope. www.silkthemagazine.com

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Ask A Man By Michael Kinney Dear Ask a Man: Sports Illustrated and other sports magazines seem to be more into showing women’s bodies than talking about sports. Are sports magazines sexist? And if so, should I be upset that my husband looks at them? If you look hard enough, anyone can find controversy. The latest example is the Feb. 8 issue of Sports Illustrated. On the cover, American downhill skier Lindsey Vonn is shown in what some are calling a extremely provocative pose in a skintight skiing outfit. Detractors of the cover feel that Sports Illustrated is just using Vonn’s attractiveness to sell copies of their magazine. According to womantalksports.com, “When females are featured on the cover of SI, they are more likely than not to be in sexualized poses and not in action and the most recent Vonn cover is no exception.” I agree with them. It’s sexist and exploitative. But I don’t think there is anything wrong with it. Putting a beautiful woman on the front of almost any magazine will sell more. It’s advertising 101. The fact is, Vonn is not the first athlete to use sexuality to sell magazines. Gabrielle Reece, the 2002 Brazilian women’s soccer team and figure skater Katarina Witt posed for Playboy. Not to mention that Sports Illustrated started a trend that turned into a monster with its annual swimsuit edition. In 2009 ESPN the Magazine featured Serena Williams, Adrian Peterson and Dwight Howard nude in its “Body Issue.” Even the great Jim Brown posed fully nude for Playgirl in 1974. Vonn is doing nothing new or even close to

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as provocative as her counterparts in other sports. But it looks like she will be the target for those who want to keep sexuality out of athletics. The same thing happened to Brandi Chastain. After the U.S. soccer star ripped off her jersey during the 1999 women’s world cup and celebrated in her sports bra, the photo landed her on the multiple magazine covers around the world. Discussions about feminism and sexism popped up on the media and on television. “For me, my basic comment to anyone who asked me about it was that I was actually excited to have the conversations,” Chastain recently told NBC. “It gave us a chance to talk about issues, and it always came back to soccer. So it was an open-door invitation to talk about the picture but also other things.” And for a brief moment in time, Americans actually cared about professional women’s soccer. The players who came before Chastain may have hated the spectacle she made, but they could not argue with the attention that was drawn to their sport. While it may ruffle a few feathers, we all have to agree that sex sells. As far as if you should be upset, that’s a big no. Regardless of how any wife or girlfriend feels, men will continue to look at beautiful athletic women. It’s in our DNA. So even if you took the route of outlawing SI, GQ, Maxim, etc., in your house, it may not work. If a man wants to look, he will find something to look at. Better in a magazine than when you two are out on the town. If you have a question for Ask a Man, e-mail editor@silkthemagazine.com.

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Covered in Assistance League • Norman Chamber of Commerce • East Main Place

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Chamber of Commerce Marketplace Embassy Suites Hotel Photos by Jerry Laizure

Cheryl Jackson and Jessica Henning,

Brian Burks, Hey Day Entertainment Center and Pat Givens, Norman Chamber of Commerce ambassador

Sally Shauberger, center, and David Attaway, right, of Great Nations Bank and Matt Mann of Gray, Blodgett and Co.

Tiffany English, Fowler Productions, left, and Charles Johnson, Johnson and Assoc. 24

Michael Bendure, Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, left, and Jeff Lester, Eide Bailey www.silkthemagazine.com


28th Annual Firehouse Art Center’s Chocolate Festival Photos by Kevin Ellis

The Pink Elephant Cafe's Erin Smith works on making some chocolate wontons

Sugar, a bakery in Norman, had cakes at this year’s festival

Michelangelo's Coffee & Win Bar's Paula Palermo hands out a sample to Susan Hinson

Allison, left, and Tate Hammontree build some clay sculptures in the Firehouse Art Center activity room

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Amy Cakes table

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Norman Parks and Recreation Daddy Daughter Dance Embassy Suites Hotel Photos by Kevin Ellis

Scottie Bacon and his daughter Jadelyn

John McHughes and his daughter Shelby

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Sean Murphy and his daughter Hannah

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Central Oklahoma Business Women’s 16th Annual Spaghetti Dinner and Silent Auction StepBrothers Photos by Kevin Ellis

Jungwoo Lee, bottom let, Yejin Choi and Boram Kim. Helen Duchon and her husband Claude are standing.

Guests glance at auction items.

Vicki Jansing, Denise Heavner, Amy Million and Felecia Farha, (seated)

Barbara Wright and Leah Jackson.

Crystie Shebester serves up some spaghetti and salad.

Wendy Tecumseh, HeatherCook, Jennifer Nett, Nikki McBride and Crystie Shebester. www.silkthemagazine.com

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Silk - A Magazine for women