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Table of Contents Editor’s Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Women in the Arts Amber Clour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Lauren Sonder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Jennifer Baker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Jill Simpson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Helen Duchon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Food For Thought . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Community Meals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Women Giving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Pumpkin for the Holidays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Entertainment Briefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Covered In Silk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Cover Design & Photos by Shevaun Williams Aaron Wright Gray, Editor editor@silkthemagazine.com • 366-3533 Cathy Hanselman, Advertising Executive advertising@silkthemagazine.com • 366-3563 Nanette Light, Writer Michael Kinney, Writer Jocelyn Pederson, Writer Kyle Phillips, Photographer Jerry Laizure, Photographer Marise Boehs, Designer Jason Clarke, Webmaster Saundra Morris, Advertising Director Silk is a publication of The Norman Transcript with offices at 215 E. Comanche, Norman, OK 73069

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Hello beautiful SILK readers, Fresh. That seems to be the word on the street these days. It’s not quality food unless it’s fresh like ours, restaurants seem to say. The problem with these types of trends, it seems to me, is that they often can make the public skeptical of the novelty of fresh entrees. But over the past few months, after adding the signature dishes feature here at Silk, I’ve seen (and tasted) the importance of freshness. This adventure began at Misal of India Bistro. Let me just say, I didn’t know how much I liked Indian food and all its spices until I tried his buffet. Next was the fare at Benvenuti’s where chef Anthony Compagni’s dedication to fresh, local and organic ingredients should be a testament to the words.

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And just recently, I went to the home of Yolanda Rainey and sampled several of her signature Italian dishes. This woman is dedicated to freshness, so dedicated that she makes her own marinara sauce from fresh tomatoes! This holiday will be my first as a wife and a slightly more experienced cook. (Just slightly… I’m no Martha Stewart. We’re a sandwich family). As I decide what dishes to bring to the family meals, whether it be sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, dessert or stuffing, I will keep in mind the lessons I have learned about quality and fresh ingredients. Happy Thanksgiving, Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all the Silk readers. I hope that your holidays are filled with special memories. For a look at some area events this holiday season, see our briefs section on page 31. I mean, what's Christmas without seeing the city light up its tree or a visit from Santa Claus, even for us mature adults? Happy Holidays, Aaron Wright Gray

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Women in the Arts: Amber Clour By Aaron Wright Gray • Photo by Shevaun Williams Amber Clour believes in the potential of the Films in the Alley events, local and independent Norman art scene and the dreams that make it. films are shown on a big screen in the alley It’s the reason she has, for four years, designed a behind Dreamers Concepts building, 324 E. place where local artists in a variety of fields can Main St. Often, the filmmakers come in and launch careers and get their first breaks. speak about their work. The Spoken Word series “I feel like our goal here is to plant a seed and highlights the words of songwriters, prose writers let people know they can succeed in whatever and poets, both traditional and slam. Dreamer they may choose to do,” she said. also hosts an annual fashion show and hosted for In the midst of growing a successful T-shirt the first time its first second one in a year in design business, Clour had obtained a retail space October. where she could sell her products. But she wantClour said she was lucky to know so many peoed to do more than just sell T-shirts. She wanted to make an impact ple with ideas and talents they wanted to pursue. These artists on the arts. With a background in jewelry design, Clour knew first- helped shape the direction of the organization. hand the difficulties beginning artists face. She wanted to give these “We can’t do everything and we don’t want to do everything,” dreamers more opportunities. Thus, Dreamer Concepts, an alter- she said. At this point, Clour said, she feels confident about the native art space was born for emerging artists. As she surveyed the condition of the foundation. That statement is a relief for somecurrent art scene, Clour looked for the voids she could fill, arts to body who had a dream, but no experience. Clour built Dreamer highlight that were often put on the backburner. What she landed Concepts with passion, sweat and advice. She dipped into her peron were four programs which have become the core programs of sonal finances in order to keep it afloat in the beginning years. the non-profit studio and foundation. Now, though, she said, her only fear is keeping up with all the posThe Downtown Arts Market is a conglomeration of arts that sibilities for the non-profit. take place on Saturdays during the fall and winter months. At “We’re going so quickly- can we all keep up?” she asked.

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Women in the Arts: Lauren Sonder

By Aaron Wright Gray • Photo by Shevaun Williams Lauren Sonder had been a student of music her advice. Soon after, Sonder Music, Dance and Art, entire life. After graduating the New England 225 E. Gray St., was born. All the lessons at the Conservatory of Music in Boston, Sonder found school, everything from voice to brass to folk herself at odds with what to do next. Through her instruments, are presented with the same ideology years of studies, Sonder had become disillusioned she taught piano with. with the conventional method of art education. “We’ve really filled the void for people looking for “At that point, I was kind of frustrated with the alternative, progressive or holistic education,” she classical music world and its limitations,” she said. said. She ventured away from music for a few years Sonder soon realized that the community need before realizing she couldn’t leave that part of her life extended beyond music. Her school now offers a behind. In the meantime, she had moved to range of classes, including visual arts and dance, as Norman. She decided to take a class at the well as a variety of community events. University of Oklahoma just for fun, but it didn’t stop at that one Sonder listed some of her most unique events and classes as a class. As she became more involved in the music program she mural design class, a Dance Around the World class, monthly jam shared with her professors her vision for the future of music edu- sessions, monthly Celtic dance lessons and composer salon concation. certs. Some of her more popular listings include Zumba, belly They encouraged her to make it happen. She started teaching dancing and yoga. piano, but with her own twist. Music remains at the heart of the operation though. “I didn’t want to teach piano the way I was taught,” she said, not“Music lessons are kind of the backbone,” she said. ing that she incorporated improvisation and composition into the Needless to stay, Lauren stays busy building the art scene in lessons. Norman. What keeps her going? Seeing the success of this method, she decided to open a music “I most enjoy knowing people have a place to go for things they school, using her current musical connections to find teachers and want to learn,” she said.

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Women in the Arts: Jennifer Baker By Aaron Wright Gray • Photo by Shevaun Williams As Jennifer Baker shares her story of the stage and life’s greatest adventure — family — it seems as if there should be a credit screen next to her, thanking all the people she mentions as a key part of her life’s journey. Marie Keeling: Introduced me to dance Jonna Johnson: Gave me my first big break in choreography Dr. Russell Mathis: Refined my singing skills And the list goes on... But without dance and without song, Baker just would not be the person she is today. Growing up, she learned that she couldn’t choose to be just a dancer or a singer. When she stumbled across the concept of musical theater, which combined the two, she knew it was the perfect fit. Although she had always been a performer, her professional career really launched while a student at the University of Oklahoma. There, she acted in school dramas and belted tunes in musical productions across the state at venues such as the Lyric Theatre and Discoveryland. “While I was in school and learning my craft, I also picked up other skills,” Baker said. It was during these years that she learned of her love for choreography. She soon took a job with a production company where choreography was her sole chore. “I found out through all that I could make a living on the other side of theater as well,” she said. While doing this Baker also spent time in New York auditioning for shows both locally and with on-theroad productions. Despite her life in the lights, she www.silkthemagazine.com

found herself dreaming of a different life. “While I was in New York, I was always wanting to come back to Norman,” she said. She had dreams of family and marriage. So in 1999, she made her other dream a reality and returned home when she soon was betrothed. By the next year, she was pregnant. But she couldn’t stay away from the stage. In 2002, she joined the board of the Sooner Theatre. But that stint didn’t last too long. As the Sooner Theatre’s role in the community began to shift, Baker saw herself helping the theater in another capacity. “I need to be on your staff, not your board,” she told her fellow board members when she announced her resignation. She was going to apply for the position of director. She received the job in 2003. Since then, she’s helped the Sooner Theatre produce several yearly shows and also has played a massive role in the development of The Studio, a place for area children to learn music and put on productions. “It was something I dreamed about,” Baker said of the children’s theater programs. Baker said that she feels the Sooner Theatre is not just important to the arts community in Norman, but also to all citizens as it makes an economic impact on the town. When Baker reflects on all her previous gigs, she finds the Sooner Theatre best fulfills her passions. “I just know the Lord has blessed me. This job feeds the soul a little bit,” she said. 13


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Women in the Arts: Jill Simpson By Aaron Wright Gray • Photo by Shevaun Williams “I’m one of those people who knew by filmmaking. After nearly 20 years away the time I was 8 what I wanted to do,” from Oklahoma, Simpson found herself Jill Simpson said. getting homesick. Simpson, who currently serves as exec“I was waking up in the middle of the utive director of the Oklahoma Film and night thinking of my parents,” Simpson Music Office, knew at a young age she said. She evaluated the quality of her was destined for Hollywood and the life in the film world and compared it to world of films. the quality of life in Oklahoma. She She remembers the impact classics decided it was time to come home. She such as “True Grit,” “Funny Girl” and left her job and moved back to the “The Sound of Music.” Sooner state with no plan in mind. After studying film at the University of “I didn’t know what I was going to do Oklahoma, Simpson, through persistent when I got back here,” she said. and bold conversations at the filming, Upon her return, she realized that her landed a gig obtaining extras for the Hollywood resume wasn’t opening filming of “The Outsiders,” directed by many doors in Oklahoma. What she Francis Ford Coppola. had to offer wasn’t relevant to the jobs “I just took what I could get and made she was applying for. the most of it,” she said. And make the It took her eight months to land one most of it she did. Simpson reported as the compliance manager of marketthat the connections she made on “The ing for the Oklahoma Tourism Outsiders” set led to 10 years of jobs in Department. the industry. But that job proved to be short-lived After the filming of “The Outsiders” once she heard of an opening with the wrapped in the Tulsa area, Simpson got Film and Music Office which she got in her parents blessing, packed her car and less than a year with the tourism departdrove to Los Angeles. ment. Since taking over as director, What she learned there is that, even with passion, it takes a Simpson has worked to build the Oklahoma Film while to get things moving. Enhancement Rebate Program which has worked to draw an “Honestly, it took me eight months to get a film job,” she increased number of productions to Oklahoma. Simpson has said. also made it a goal to provide resources to local filmmakers The film job she finally got was working with casting direc- and also to make it easier for local workers related to the film tors to cast films such as “Clue,” “Stand By Me” and “Real industry to get jobs when larger companies come into the Genius.” state. Simpson said the experience was education and fun, but not All part of making Oklahoma film friendly, she explained. fulfilling. Simpson said there’s great talent here in the state and she “I realized that I didn’t want to be a casting director,” she wants to help filmmakers develop their talents. said, noting that during that time, she had realized her inter“Oklahoma by its very nature promotes creativity,” she said, ests fell more to the production side of film. noting that the variety of landscapes and places to pull away She eventually did work her way into that side of the film from crowds create an ideal environment for developing creindustry, working as a producer’s assistant on the NBC show ativity. “Sisters” and providing oversight on the show “Just Shoot Me.” Simpson, a Norman resident, feels that Norman plays an Wanting an adventure outside of television, Simpson’s next especially large role in developing artists. She credits her gig included a job with a small, independent German film opportunities she encountered in her home town as an company called Atlantic Streamline with offices in Santa important part of her successful career. Monica. During this job, she worked on “Igby Goes Down.” “I grew up here. I cut my teeth on the local theaters and This last job would be her last one directly involved with studied film here,” she said. www.silkthemagazine.com

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Women in the Arts: Helen Duchon By Patricia Moore Harvey • Photo by Shevaun Williams Helen Duchon is a woman of many talto work for Boeing Aircraft, where her talent ents — talents encouraged in their infanearned her a spot in an eight-week training cy by her parents, teachers, and other peoprogram for drafting. She came out “best in ple who matter. Now a seasoned artist, the class,” she said. Unfortunately, her sucpatron of the arts and behind-the-scenes cess brought only disappointment. Not only organizer, Duchon continues to learn and had she discovered an aptitude for drafting create. Ubiquitous in her home, her work at Boeing, but an attitude of gender bias. reflects years of travel, friendships and While the guys at work were getting their events — a veritable time-line in pastels, tuition paid for engineering school, Duchon watercolor and photography. received no such offers; and when she asked Her roots go back to the Great to work in the illustration group, the group Depression, a time when necessity was the head told her he wouldn’t hire a girl. Her mother of invention. Her father was a solution was to enroll at the University of lineman on the Bonneville Dam on the Washington, where she studied commercial Columbia River, and their home was a 27-foot trailer in a art and economics. camp for workers and their families. It was while working at a drafting job in the university’s The family settled in Seattle where they bought a home. Atmospheric Science Department that she met her future Duchon made posters for her parents’ square dance club husband, Claude Duchon, then a graduate student. The and her dad taught her to dance. Down in the basement, couple moved to Norman in 1969 for his work at the her brother set up a ceramics studio, where she cast and University of Oklahoma School Of Meteorology, where he painted figurines — “lacy Victorian ladies,” she said. “I later became a professor. loved it.” With three children under the age of 8 — Andy, Peter and Her mother was an organizer, often on the board of any Lisa — Duchon dove right into life in Norman. She joined group she belonged to. As it turned out, the apple didn’t fall the local chapter of the League of Women Voters, becoming far from the tree. the group’s president, and later produced a pamphlet for the At school Duchon was recognized for her artistic ability and Norman Coalition for ERA (Equal Rights Amendment) urggiven special projects to supervise; and when her vocal abili- ing the bill’s passage. Having married before she finished colty earned her only a second alternate spot in glee club, she lege, Duchon graduated from OU with a degree in journalism begged the teacher to let her in anyway. and public relations in 1980, the same year her daughter Lisa But it was clothing that really fired up her creative juices. graduated from high school. “Fashion was my thing,” she said. After seeing the clothes Norman artist and writer John Brandenburg had this to say she’d made for a paper doll comic strip character called Brenda about Duchon’s outlook on life: “She’s so open, anxious to Starr, Star Reporter, her friends began asking her to make learn and travel; and her interest in culture is amazing. I was paper dolls for them. They even paid her a quarter. always amazed by her sweet nature, high ideals and positive Being a typical adolescent female, Duchon was determined attitude.” to have the latest styles for starting junior high. When her The artist says she’s retired now but shows few signs of folks told her they couldn’t afford to buy them, she designed slowing down. When she isn’t traveling with her husband a mix-and-match wardrobe that her mother sewed on the she’s busy with her home-based business, Duchon Designs. machine. “I think those pieces served me from the seventh She also designs newsletters on a volunteer basis for groups grade to the twelfth,” she said. like the Norman Galaxy of Writers, which she represents on Through the efforts of her high school art teacher, some the Norman Arts Council Roundtable. exceptional opportunities came Duchon’s way, including a Her community involvement includes serving as a docent chance to speak on television about Van Gogh and at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum and supporting the OU Impressionism; lessons at the Seattle Art Museum and the School of Dance through its Dance Partners program. In job of yearbook editor for the West Seattle High School class addition, she’s a member of the Firehouse Arts Center, the of 1956. Oklahoma City Museum Association and the Chicago Art High school graduation brought rapid changes. She went Institute. www.silkthemagazine.com

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Food For Thought What’s for dinner? By Sara Ann Kaplan Halloween is past, but don’t put away the pumpkins yet! And yes, the hard winter squashes make a beautiful centerpiece, but are even more beautiful in a casserole or soup. Fall is my favorite time of year because of the cooler weather and the food! We celebrate the harvest and it is no coincidence that our fall holidays are so food-centric. Thanksgiving is crème de la crème holiday for seasonal eating enthusiasts. It’s the one meal in our country that truly highlights the appropriate food at the appropriate time. This Thanksgiving, I challenge you to remake your favorite dishes using more local and fresh ingredients, resist the canned and frozen veggies. In my family, we always have 2 types of cranberries on the table, the “cranberry nastiness” (this is actually what we call it, yet we still have it every year) and homemade organic cranberry sauce sweetened with orange juice. Here are two great recipes that I promise you will freshen up your fall dinner tables The first is a casserole that is decadent enough to be a main course, you should be able to find local butternut squash and apples easily at this time of year and both will keep for months if stored properly. The second is a healthier version of the traditional green bean casserole. If we’re lucky, we may still have fresh local green beans in November. Pair that with some organic mushrooms from Om Gardens in Norman and you’ll never go back to the cream of mushroom slop version again! Butternut Squash, Apple, Onion Au Gratin Cooking spray or olive oil 1/4 cup flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 pinch cinnamon 1 butternut squash - peeled, seeded and sliced 4 apples - peeled, cored and sliced 1/2 sweet onion, thinly sliced 1 cup chicken stock 1 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese 3 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled 1.Preheat oven to 350. Spray 9- x 11-inch glass baking pan with cooking spray. 2.Place flour, salt, and cinnamon into a large plastic bag. Add squash, apples, and onions; shake until lightly dusted. 18

3.In glass dish, layer 1/2 of squash, apples, and sweet onion. Pour 1/2 cup chicken stock over the top, then sprinkle 1/2 of cheese. Layer with remaining squash, apple, and onions. Pour remaining chicken stock over the top, and cover with foil. 4.Bake in preheated oven for 40 minutes. 5.Take out and sprinkle with bacon crumbles and remaining cheese. Return, uncovered, to oven; bake for another 5 minutes. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving. Source: http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/butternut-squashapple-onion-au-gratin/Detail.aspx Miso-Glazed Green Beans and Mushrooms 2 tablespoons mellow white miso ? cup warm water 1 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 shallot, sliced 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger 8 ounces shiitake or oyster mushrooms, stems trimmed, cut into ?-inch slices 1 pounds green beans, ends trimmed 1teaspoon finely grated lemon zest 1. Slowly whisk miso into warm water until smooth. Set aside. 2.Heat a deep, 12-inch sauté pan or very wide pot over medium heat, then add oil. Add shallot and ginger; cook, stirring occasionally, until shallot begins to brown. Add mushrooms and 1 teaspoon water, reduce heat to mediumlow, and cover pan to allow mushrooms to sweat, about 5 minutes. Once mushrooms have begun to soften, remove lid, increase heat to medium, and cook until mushrooms brown, about 10 minutes. Scrape mixture into a bowl and set aside. 3.Drop green beans into the same pan, then pour in miso mixture. Increase heat a bit and cover to allow beans to steam. Stir periodically, replacing lid each time. Cook until beans are tender, about 10 minutes. 4.Add mushroom mixture to beans. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are heated through and miso mixture reduces to a glaze. Stir in lemon zest and serve. Recipe Source: http://southernfood.about.com/od/eggplantrecipes/r/bl00810c.htm

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Fresh, homemade Italian is dinner guest’s delight Story and Photos by Aaron Wright Gray

Silk reader Yolanda Rainey comes from the type of Italian family that spends nearly the entire day Sundays eating and socializing, then eating and socializing again. She joked that before her husband moved to New Jersey with her at the beginning of the their marriage, he was a skinny boy. Rainey grew up cooking; she got her start in her father’s pizzeria, where Southern Italian staples were a hit. It was during these years that she learned the importance of freshness. “If you have fresh ingredients, anyway, you don’t need to cover it up with lots of spices,” Rainey said. Rainey even insists on making her own pasta sauces. She buys tomatoes, chops them, cooks them down and uses a hand food mill to create the sauce. This attention to detail and love of Italian food led to a delicious meal for this Silk editor. Rainey prepared some of her signature dishes including chicken francaise: This is her husband Rick’s favorite dish. Another chicken dish, chicken marsala, with thick portobello mushrooms, also graced the table. Not wanting to forget the staple--pasta-- Rainey offered two types of pastas, one was a rigatoni with vodka sauce and the other was rigatoni with tomato sauce and homemade meatballs. But it wouldn’t be an Italian meal without the antipasta platter, with consisted of Kalamata Olives, chunks of real, moist mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced and salty prosciutti, thick slices of hard Parmesan Reggiano and a bruschetta mix. It’s not just taste that drives Rainey toward Italian, it’s also practicality. “If you feed a family, it goes a long way,” said this mother of three children. www.silkthemagazine.com

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Community meals By Aaron Wright Gray

As the holidays roll around, many of us begin dreaming of turkey, pumpkin pie and egg nog. But with the traditional meal comes the stress of preparing it – time for grocery shopping, cooking, picky eaters. So many things could go wrong. Imagine trying to prepare a holiday meal for 100 or more people. We at Silk would like to say a special thanks to members in our community who take on that responsibility, not just at the holidays, but throughout the year. These community members and organizations dedicate themselves to providing food for those who have a hard time coming by it or those who just need somebody to share their lasagna with. Norman Salvation Army The Norman Salvation Army shelter facility, 318 E. Hayes St., serves breakfast and dinner 365 days a year for anybody who wants to share a meal. Lt. Joe Price and his wife Betty Price, corps officers, oversee the operations at the shelter. Joe Price estimated about 60 people each day come by for meals. “It goes up and down,” he said. Dinner, Price said, usually consists of donations from KFC and Olive Garden, two of their biggest supporters. The meal is usually subsidized by vegetables provided from canned good donations. “The community is really helpful in supporting residents here,” Betty Price said. Price said the amount of meals served through September of this year is higher than the total number of meals served last year. So far this year, 14,161 meals have been served. “As far as we know, we’re the only ones who serve dinner,” Betty Price said. In addition to the two meals a day, the Salvation Army also offers a food panty and Christmas dinner assistance. Betty Price said that the organization receives many of the items for their food pantry from the Post Office food drive. She said donations have stayed steady during the recession, noting that she’s thankful for that. The money and food is still spread thin, though, she said since the need is greater during these times. The Salvation Army serves breakfast from 7-8 a.m. and dinner from 5-6 p.m. 22

Friendship Lunch The First Baptist Church of Norman prepares a weekly Friendship Lunch open to anybody in the community who wants to join in for a meal. The meal is served each Sunday from noon to 1 p.m., following the morning service. Joey Armstrong, community minister, said that the luncheon began to fill a need the church saw in the community. “There was no meal option for people for Sunday for lunch,” Armstrong said, noting that to his knowledge the Friendship Lunch is still the only Sunday lunch option. The church pays for the food that is served and Sunday School classes take turns preparing the meal. Armstrong said the church is in the process of revamping the meal program to provide more nutritious meals. Nutrition is already something the church is mindful of, though, keeping whole wheat breads and other healthy alternatives on hand. As of mid-October, Armstrong said the church had served 4,400 people at the lunch and averaged about 130 people each week. Armstrong said the attendance is lower at the beginning of the month, after people get paid, and higher at the end of the month when funds are running low. “We actually see that we’re providing a service that’s helping people out,” Armstrong said, adding that people come when they need the lunch and don’t come when they don’t need the assistance with food. The church also offers a food and clothing pantry each 1st and 3rd Sunday. Food and Shelter Inc. Lisa Sorrells, executive director for Food and Shelter Inc., said that their congregate meal program has always been a signature program for the agency. The organization feeds about 90 -100 people a day for breakfast and lunch, Monday through Saturday. Breakfast begins each day at 8 a.m. and lunch is served from 10:30 a.m. to noon. The meals are open to anyone in the community. She said the meal program serves as a great introduction for people to the organization. “Ultimately, the goal of our program is to engage them and re-engage them into the community,” she said. Volunteers and donations are what keep the organization running, she noted. Although a necessity for the organizawww.silkthemagazine.com

tion, Sorrells said that having volunteers from various socioeconomic backgrounds adds an interesting dynamic to each meal time. “There’s something really special about the breaking down of those barriers over something as simple as feeding a hungry person,” she said. The organization began in 1986 and now includes various services in addition to the meals. Food for Thought Learning Institute Matt Joplin, creator of the brand new Food for Thought Learning Institute, wants to serve as a follow-up for the many organizations in the Norman area that host food pantries. For about four years, he’s been working on the development of a program that would help teach people how to prepare meals from what they have, or what they have had donated. “It really is basic survival for a lot of people,” Joplin said. His approach will be to not only to teach people how to cook, but just to teach them about food in general, such as how it’s composed. “I mean, what’s in spaghetti sauce?” Joplin said, showing an example of the types of mysteries he will unravel in his classes.

Joplin has had the institute incorporated since June of this year and is now ready to begin working with various programs in Norman. There is no facility yet so Joplin is looking to work with organizations that have kitchen facilities. “We are still in the very beginning stages of lifting this off the ground,” he said. Joplin had the idea while working at the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma. He noticed that a lot of the food that was given away would return to the agency, mainly because people didn’t know how to incorporate pinto beans and other canned dishes into their meals. This dilemma is what formed the idea of the institute in his head. As he continued working at the agency and observing the community around him, something occurred to him. “What I saw was that nobody was doing this thing I was envisioning,” he said. He then went back to school to get the skills necessary for him to make his vision become reality. He graduated in December 2009 and is now ready to get things rolling. Editor's note: We realize that there are many more organizations serving our community with the gift of food. We regret that we were not able to use everyone in the article. We wish you the best of luck in your efforts and ministries.

On this special day, join your neighbors for a free, hearty holiday feast. A special community meal has been going on in Norman since 1987. The Norman Christmas Day Community Dinner is a feast of turkey, dressing, potatoes, gravy, string beans, rolls, pumpkin pie, La Baguette desserts and sometimes, even more desserts. The meal is open to anyone seeking some Christmas company. “No one should eat alone on Christmas Day,” Bob Magarian, director said. The dinner began in the late 1980s under the direction of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church and at the church’s facility. By 1989, the crowd had outgrown the church’s facilities. The dinner was from then on held at the Norman High School, where it remains today. Magarian said that over the years, the attendance of the dinner has grown from 20 people to about 1,200 in addition to about 200 home deliveries. Each dinner also includes a visit from the big man himself and some gifts for those in attendance. Even Santa Claus needs a lunch break on Christmas Day. Although started at St. Michael’s, Magarian said after the fourth year, it truly was a community event. These days, volunteers from all across the city come to serve and assist at the meal on Christmas. This year’s lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Norman High School, 911 W. Main St.

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Additional resources http://www.foodforthoughtlearning.org/ http://www.foodandshelterinc.org/ www.fbcnorman.org

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Community meals By Aaron Wright Gray

As the holidays roll around, many of us begin dreaming of turkey, pumpkin pie and egg nog. But with the traditional meal comes the stress of preparing it – time for grocery shopping, cooking, picky eaters. So many things could go wrong. Imagine trying to prepare a holiday meal for 100 or more people. We at Silk would like to say a special thanks to members in our community who take on that responsibility, not just at the holidays, but throughout the year. These community members and organizations dedicate themselves to providing food for those who have a hard time coming by it or those who just need somebody to share their lasagna with. Norman Salvation Army The Norman Salvation Army shelter facility, 318 E. Hayes St., serves breakfast and dinner 365 days a year for anybody who wants to share a meal. Lt. Joe Price and his wife Betty Price, corps officers, oversee the operations at the shelter. Joe Price estimated about 60 people each day come by for meals. “It goes up and down,” he said. Dinner, Price said, usually consists of donations from KFC and Olive Garden, two of their biggest supporters. The meal is usually subsidized by vegetables provided from canned good donations. “The community is really helpful in supporting residents here,” Betty Price said. Price said the amount of meals served through September of this year is higher than the total number of meals served last year. So far this year, 14,161 meals have been served. “As far as we know, we’re the only ones who serve dinner,” Betty Price said. In addition to the two meals a day, the Salvation Army also offers a food panty and Christmas dinner assistance. Betty Price said that the organization receives many of the items for their food pantry from the Post Office food drive. She said donations have stayed steady during the recession, noting that she’s thankful for that. The money and food is still spread thin, though, she said since the need is greater during these times. The Salvation Army serves breakfast from 7-8 a.m. and dinner from 5-6 p.m. 22

Friendship Lunch The First Baptist Church of Norman prepares a weekly Friendship Lunch open to anybody in the community who wants to join in for a meal. The meal is served each Sunday from noon to 1 p.m., following the morning service. Joey Armstrong, community minister, said that the luncheon began to fill a need the church saw in the community. “There was no meal option for people for Sunday for lunch,” Armstrong said, noting that to his knowledge the Friendship Lunch is still the only Sunday lunch option. The church pays for the food that is served and Sunday School classes take turns preparing the meal. Armstrong said the church is in the process of revamping the meal program to provide more nutritious meals. Nutrition is already something the church is mindful of, though, keeping whole wheat breads and other healthy alternatives on hand. As of mid-October, Armstrong said the church had served 4,400 people at the lunch and averaged about 130 people each week. Armstrong said the attendance is lower at the beginning of the month, after people get paid, and higher at the end of the month when funds are running low. “We actually see that we’re providing a service that’s helping people out,” Armstrong said, adding that people come when they need the lunch and don’t come when they don’t need the assistance with food. The church also offers a food and clothing pantry each 1st and 3rd Sunday. Food and Shelter Inc. Lisa Sorrells, executive director for Food and Shelter Inc., said that their congregate meal program has always been a signature program for the agency. The organization feeds about 90 -100 people a day for breakfast and lunch, Monday through Saturday. Breakfast begins each day at 8 a.m. and lunch is served from 10:30 a.m. to noon. The meals are open to anyone in the community. She said the meal program serves as a great introduction for people to the organization. “Ultimately, the goal of our program is to engage them and re-engage them into the community,” she said. Volunteers and donations are what keep the organization running, she noted. Although a necessity for the organizawww.silkthemagazine.com

tion, Sorrells said that having volunteers from various socioeconomic backgrounds adds an interesting dynamic to each meal time. “There’s something really special about the breaking down of those barriers over something as simple as feeding a hungry person,” she said. The organization began in 1986 and now includes various services in addition to the meals. Food for Thought Learning Institute Matt Joplin, creator of the brand new Food for Thought Learning Institute, wants to serve as a follow-up for the many organizations in the Norman area that host food pantries. For about four years, he’s been working on the development of a program that would help teach people how to prepare meals from what they have, or what they have had donated. “It really is basic survival for a lot of people,” Joplin said. His approach will be to not only to teach people how to cook, but just to teach them about food in general, such as how it’s composed. “I mean, what’s in spaghetti sauce?” Joplin said, showing an example of the types of mysteries he will unravel in his classes.

Joplin has had the institute incorporated since June of this year and is now ready to begin working with various programs in Norman. There is no facility yet so Joplin is looking to work with organizations that have kitchen facilities. “We are still in the very beginning stages of lifting this off the ground,” he said. Joplin had the idea while working at the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma. He noticed that a lot of the food that was given away would return to the agency, mainly because people didn’t know how to incorporate pinto beans and other canned dishes into their meals. This dilemma is what formed the idea of the institute in his head. As he continued working at the agency and observing the community around him, something occurred to him. “What I saw was that nobody was doing this thing I was envisioning,” he said. He then went back to school to get the skills necessary for him to make his vision become reality. He graduated in December 2009 and is now ready to get things rolling. Editor's note: We realize that there are many more organizations serving our community with the gift of food. We regret that we were not able to use everyone in the article. We wish you the best of luck in your efforts and ministries.

On this special day, join your neighbors for a free, hearty holiday feast. A special community meal has been going on in Norman since 1987. The Norman Christmas Day Community Dinner is a feast of turkey, dressing, potatoes, gravy, string beans, rolls, pumpkin pie, La Baguette desserts and sometimes, even more desserts. The meal is open to anyone seeking some Christmas company. “No one should eat alone on Christmas Day,” Bob Magarian, director said. The dinner began in the late 1980s under the direction of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church and at the church’s facility. By 1989, the crowd had outgrown the church’s facilities. The dinner was from then on held at the Norman High School, where it remains today. Magarian said that over the years, the attendance of the dinner has grown from 20 people to about 1,200 in addition to about 200 home deliveries. Each dinner also includes a visit from the big man himself and some gifts for those in attendance. Even Santa Claus needs a lunch break on Christmas Day. Although started at St. Michael’s, Magarian said after the fourth year, it truly was a community event. These days, volunteers from all across the city come to serve and assist at the meal on Christmas. This year’s lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Norman High School, 911 W. Main St.

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Additional resources http://www.foodforthoughtlearning.org/ http://www.foodandshelterinc.org/ www.fbcnorman.org

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Time, Talent & Treasure Story by Jocelyn Pedersen

There are people in the world and then there are people in the world who make a difference. These are stories about three women from Noble, Norman and Moore who give freely of themselves in time, talent and treasure. We salute these women and all who work alongside them. Robin Parker How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world. –Anne Frank Robin Parker gives abundantly of her time, talent and treasure to the community in Noble. And that’s saying it mildly. Originally from Troy, Missouri, Parker has lived in Noble for fifteen years. Married to husband Tony for 23 years and with four children, Nick, Kate, Josie and Carlie, it’s a wonder how she finds the time to volunteer as much as she does. “If there’s a need and I can fill it, I want to fill the need,” Parker said. “I’m blessed to be at a place right now where I can give back to the community.” She gives back to Noble in many ways. Serving on the Chamber board, Parker recognized the need to find funding for city park development. In order to apply for grants, a new organization with 501C3 (non-profit) status was formed. From this, Noble Now, an umbrella community betterment organization was born. Parker serves as president. “The greatest need was to develop a plan. It wasn’t anything that required a degree in rocket science—just time. I thought, ‘I can do that.’ My goal was to make a plan,” Parker said. As President of the Parks Committee, her efforts have cumulated in the formation of other active groups. A Disc Golf group is currently raising money for a course at King Park, the Community Gardens located near two Senior Centers in Noble, and the Austin Haley Memorial Splash Pad which provides intergenerational community involvement because, while the senior ladies enjoy their gardens, they take pleasure in watching children play on the nearby splash pad in Dane Park. Parker is active with the Noble Public Schools. At Curtis Inge Middle School, she runs the student store offering kids treats and snacks over the lunch hour. “It’s a good program,” Parker said. “We allow students to work at the store alongside us and serve their peers. It teaches them responsibility as they handle money, and the kids really look forward to and enjoy it.” Project Graduation is another one of her endeavors. Having served as president two years ago, she is co-president again this year. In addition to Noble Now and school volunteering, Parker serves as the Noble Representative to the Pioneer Library System Board. Committed to her children, Parker is a soccer mom and volunteers at church, too. But she hardly thinks that teaching a 24

girls’ Sunday school class counts. “That’s just what everybody does,” she said. City Manager, Bob Wade said in Noble he’s “not known anyone as willing to put in that kind of time and effort.” He describes Parker as a person who “has a reputation as someone trustworthy and above reproach.” Jaci Williams Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does. –William James Not so very long ago, Jaci Williams found one of her former 6th grade penmanship lessons dated March 3, 1948. On it, when she was just entering double-digits, she wrote, “When I grow up, I want to be a detective. I want to be able to use my brain clearly.” Williams must have known something about herself back in those years because she is a go-getter who has certainly used her brain clearly over the years to detect and solve the needs of those around her. She was born an Okie—Jaqulyn Morrison McAfee Williams—and aside from a short detour to California where she lived with her family during WW II, she’s resided in the Norman area where she’s poured herself into the community. Community involvement began for Williams in 1968 when her daughter, Terri and son, Mark, joined Cub Scouts and Camp Fire Girls, where she was a leader for many years and on the Board of Directors. She also served as Youth Group director at church for “innumerable years,” as she puts it. Williams was on the board of directors for the Center for Children and Families, Inc. (CCFI) for two years back when it was known as JSI (Juvenile Services, Inc.). During her long association with JSI, she and her family served as short-term hosts to children of various ages who were unable to stay in their own homes due to various reasons as determined by DHS. Her association with JSI served as a springboard into cofounding Oklahoma’s CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) with Judge Alan Couch. CASA volunteers help children by serving as their advocate in the court system. She became a CASA volunteer and spent part of her eleven-year association with the group serving as president. Her passion for helping children didn’t end there. She became the first president of the Citizen’s Advisory Board of the Cleveland County Child Welfare Unit, Inc., (CAB) which was founded in 1989. She was president for five years, and treasurer for 16 years. Along with Sue Durrett in the Department of Human Services, and Bob and Ellen Usry, CAB developed the Secret Santa and Special Needs programs. Williams’ involvement doesn’t stop there. She has served on www.silkthemagazine.com


the Board of Directors for the Sooner Theatre and the Norman Convention and Visitor’s Bureau. She’s been president of the Norman Arts and Humanities Council for five years and can’t even remember when she started serving on the board there— it’s been so long. Williams worked with Cimarron Circuit Opera Company to create, incorporate and develop the Jazz in June festival. She was on the board for a number of years and then served as president for over four years. In 1989-1990, she restored the Casa Blanca building located on the corner of Boyd and Jenkins, which was then put on the Oklahoma Historical Register. She’s been a Pioneer Library System board member for seven years and was President for six. She’s a member of the Friends of the Norman Library, Inc., where she’s been a board member and president for six years. The Friends of the Norman Library puts on the annual book sale to raise funds for the library. She’s won various awards over the years including, Civic Volunteer (1992) presented by United Way and the Junior League of Norman. In 1957 and 1995, DHS presented her with the Volunteer of the Year award. The Norman Arts Council has twice named her Business Person of the Year. Her involvement in the Norman Rotary club has provided the opportunity for her to host fourteen exchange students over the years. She’s served as both Club and District Youth Exchange Officer from 1993 to the present. Williams was on the Rotary International Youth Exchange Committee from 2006-2009. She is currently President Elect, for the South Central Rotary Youth Exchange, which is a multi-district youth exchange program comprising 34 districts in the USA and Canada. “Getting to know these young people and watch them mature and open themselves to a far different future than they ever imagined is the real benefit to working with them,” Williams said. “It not only promotes peace and understanding in the world, it is just down right good fun.” Williams said she hopes that when she dies, her tombstone will read: “She made a difference.” Janie Milum We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. –Winston Churchill. A resident of Moore, Janie Milum works hard for her community. She’s involved with children, seniors and various civic groups. Aging Services, Inc., is a Cleveland County organization whose mission is to enhance the lives and dignity of Cleveland County senior adults by providing programs, services and referrals that assist and promote healthy and independent living. Milum has served on the Board of Directors for Aging Services since 2004. She says she enjoys working with this group because she knows providing services to seniors in the form of food, transportation, wheelchairs, walkers and housekeeping are an essential part of helping seniors live independently. “Seniors want to be independent,” Milum said. “It’s important to keep services available to them so they can stay at home.” Milum’s passion for helping people extends to her work with the American Red Cross, Heart of Oklahoma Chapter, which www.silkthemagazine.com

serves over 322,000 people by preparing and responding to emergencies, ensuring a safe blood supply, and providing life saving training. Milum has worked diligently with the Red Cross since 2002 to help raise money for these efforts. She knows first hand how important the Red Cross can be in a person’s life. In 1999, during the May 3rd tornado, Milum’s mother lost her home. The Red Cross stepped in to help. Later, the 2003 tornado affected her own home and neighborhood and the Red Cross stepped in to help again. “It sparked a real passion for me to give back,” Milum said. That desire to give back has led Milum in other directions, too. Food 4 Kids is a program sponsored by the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma. Milum explained that on a weekly basis, over one-third, or about 15,000, of the Regional Food Bank’s emergency food recipients are children. Since there is a critical connection between childhood nutrition and cognitive and physical development, even nutritional deficiencies of a relatively short-term nature can negatively impact a child’s health, behavior, and the ability to concentrate and perform complex tasks. Additionally, going without food can cause behavioral and psychological effects such as depression, aggression, anxiety, and poor social skills in children. “Food is the most essential school supply. Hungry children cannot learn,” she said. Milum is chair of the Moore Chamber’s Education Service Committee and a member of the Moore Home Builder’s Association both of which help raise funds to provide backpacks filled with kid-friendly food to give to chronically hungry elementary children. Children in the program are given enough food to sustain them over weekends and holidays. If a school-aged child has younger siblings, food is provided for them also. Lisa Perry, Regional Development Manager for the Food 4 Kids Program describes Milum as “An incredibly gentle, generous, fantastic person. If you ask her to do something, she gets it done. Her work with the Food 4 Kids program in Moore has [raised] more than enough funds to make it run. She’s a fire starter. She’s well respected in the community.” Milum maintains, “It is really hard to imagine a child going without food.” Last year, the Food 4 Kids program served 303 children in the Moore Public Schools. On the civic side, Milum is a charter member of the Moore Rotary club where served as Secretary/Treasurer for seven years from 2002-2009. Additionally, she’s a member of Moore’s Old Town Association, which was established as a charitable and working force to assist the economic growth and well being of Moore. Milum says she’s always been involved with the community since her two sons, Dwayne and Chris, were in Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts and swimming along with many other school activities. Her sons are now grown and she and her husband Clinton of 42 years have two grandchildren. 25


Pumpkum-m-m Story and Photos by Nanette Light There's two months every year when my menu takes a turn for the orange. For this foodie, the cooler months aren’t just a time for thanks. They’re a time for orange … and a mass infiltration of beta-carotene. Below is a short-stacked selection from a long-running list of sweet potato and pumpkin-themed favorites that guarantee requests for seconds. Here’s to a season of orange.

Pumpkin Pancakes Adapted from Joy the Baker

Makes 14-18 small pancakes 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 2 Tablespoons brown sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg pinch of ground ginger pinch of ground cloves 1 cup milk 1/2 cup canned pumpkin 1 egg 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil or melted butter

proof plate and place in the oven set at 200 degrees F to keep warm while the rest of the pancakes are cooked. Serve with whipped cream and cinnamon sugar or maple syrup. Pumpkin Turkey Chili Serves 6 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper 1/2 cup chopped yellow pepper 1 clove garlic, minced 1 pound ground turkey 2 (14.5 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 2 cups pumpkin puree 2 tablespoons chili powder 1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 dash salt 2 cans (14.5 ounce) water 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese for serving 1/2 cup sour cream for serving Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat and sauté the onion, green bell pepper, yellow pepper and garlic until tender. Stir in the turkey and cook until evenly brown. Drain and mix in tomatoes and pumpkin. Season with chili powder, pepper, salt and cinnamon. Take empty tomato cans and fill with water and pour over chili. Repeat. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Serve topped with cheddar cheese and sour cream.

Sweet Potato and Buttermilk Pie Adapted from Smitten Kitchen

The whipped egg whites give this pie a frothy texture, and buttermilk gives it a tangy flavor. Together, you end up with a sweet potato pie that is more cheesecake-like than the traditional. If you want to opt for less tang, than omit the lemon juice. 1 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes (about 2 medium potatoes), peeled and chopped into a 1/2-inch dice 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (optional) 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Whisk together flours, salt, spices, sugar and baking powder in a medium sized bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together milk, egg, pumpkin and vegetable oil or melted butter. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and whisk until just combined. Don’t worry if you have a few lumps. You don’t want to over beat the batter, it’ll produce tough pancakes. Let the batter sit for 10 minutes while you heat the skillet. Over low-medium heat melt a tablespoon of butter or vegetable oil. Once skillet is hot, spoon a heaping 2 tablespoons of batter per pancake into the skillet. When pancake starts to bubble slightly, carefully flip over. Once browned and cooked through place pancakes on a oven

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1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 3 large eggs, separated 1/2 cup sugar 2 tablespoons all-purpoe flour 3/4 cup full- or lowfat buttermilk 1 Pie Crust, prebaked (instructions below) Whipped cream, for serving Preheat the oven to 375°F. Pour 1 1/2 inches of water into a 3-quart stock part with a strainer basket suspended over it and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the sweet potatoes, cover and steam until fork-tender, about 20 minutes. Place the steamed sweet potatoes in a large bowl and let cool to room temperature. Mash them into a smooth puree with a fork, potato masher or food processor. You should have 1 1/4 cups puree; discard any excess or save for a tasty snack. Add the butter, lemon juice if using, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt and mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula after each addition. In a small bowl, beat the egg yolks lightly with a whisk, about 30 seconds. Add the sugar and beat until they’re a creamy lemon-yellow color, about 1 1/2 minutes. Add the egg mixture to the sweet potato mixture and stir until the eggs are thoroughly incorporated and the filling is a consistent bright orange color. Add the flour a little at a time, stirring after each addition until thoroughly incorporated. Add the buttermilk and again stir until smooth and even. With a cleaned whisk (or electric hand mixer), whisk the egg whites to soft peaks in a clean, dry bowl. With a wooden spoon or rubber spatula, gently fold the egg whites into the sweet potato-buttermilk mixture until thoroughly combined. Pour the mixture into the prebaked crust and bake on the middle rack of the oven until the center is firm and set, 35 to 40 minutes. Remove the pie from the oven and cool completely on a rack. Serve at room temperature (or cold from the fridge; you can cover it with plastic wrap before chilling) with a dollop of whipped cream. To pre-bake your pie crust, lay a sheet of aluminum foil over the dough and carefully scatter pie weights, dried beans or pennies over it. Bake on the middle rack of your oven at 350°F for 5 minutes. Remove the pie weights and the foil, prick the bottom of the crust with a fork, and bake for 5 minutes more. Pumpkin Pie Pop Tarts with Maple Glaze Adapted from Joy the Baker. Crust recipe from King Arthur’s flour.

Makes 9 tarts For the Crust: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) unsalted butter, cold, cut into cubes 1 large egg 2 tablespoons milk

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1 large egg (for brushing the dough) For the Filling: 3/4 cup pureed pumpkin 1 large egg 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/3 cup granulated sugar Maple Glaze: 1 cup powdered sugar 2 teaspoons maple syrup 2 tablespoons milk To prepare the Crust: In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, sugar and salt. Add the cold butter and break it up in the flour mixture using your fingers, a pastry cutter or a food processor. Work it in until only pea sized lumps remain in your mixture. The mixture should also hold together when squeezed into a ball. In a small bowl, beat the egg with the milk. Add the mixture all at once to the dry ingredients and stir to make sure that moisture is introduced to all of the flour mixture. Lightly dust a clean counter with flour and knead the dough on the floured counter for a few turns until it really starts to come together. Divide the dough in two, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 30 minutes. While the dough is chilling, prepare the filling: In a small sauce pan, heat pumpkin puree and spices over medium heat. Just heat through until the spices become fragrant. This helps to bring loads of flavor into the filling. Remove from heat and place spiced pumpkin in a medium sized bowl. Whisk in egg, salt and sugar and place in the fridge to rest while you roll out the dough. On a well floured work surface, press dough into a 3-by-5-inch rectangle, roll the dough out to about 1/8-inch thickness. The dough should be slightly larger than 9-by-12-inches. Trim dough with a pizza cutter, creating a rectangle that is 9-inches tall and 12-inches long. Using the pizza cutter, cut each side into thirds, creating 9 squares. Place dough squares in the fridge while you roll out the second piece of dough in the same way. Brush one set of 9 squares with beaten egg. This will act as the glue for the top layer of dough. Spoon about one tablespoon of pie filling into the center of each brushed dough square. Top with a piece of dough and use a floured fork to crimp the sides closed. Use the tines of the fork to create vent holes in each tart. Position a rack in the upper third of the oven and preheat to

350 degrees F. Let tarts rest in the fridge for 30 minutes while the oven preheats. Remove tarts from the fridge and place in the oven to bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until golden brown on top. While the tarts bake, whisk together ingredients for the glaze and set aside. Let baked tarts rest on a cooling rack to cool completely before glazing. Best served within 2 days. 27


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“It’s the most wonderful time. . .” Holiday Celebrations

Scrooge ve th at W ho do es n’t lo it h th e cr ab by m is er w of gold? soon-to-be hear t re welThe Sooner Theat s with comes the holiday hr is tm as th e be love d C .” T he cl as si c “S cr oo ge the stage show will stay on ec . 12 . fr om Nov. 26 -D . Tickets are $23-28 Christmas lights • The 18th annual Norman Tree Lighting ceremony will take place at 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 3 in Andrews Park. Hot chocolate, treats, choirs and a visit from Santa Claus will complete the festivities. • 17th annual Christmas Lighting Contest in Moore will take place Dec. 9 at 5 p.m. There will be a first, second and third place for each city ward. To enter, call 793-4332. • Moore’ Old Town Christmas celebration will take place Dec. 3 from 608 p.m. There will be free carriage rides, a visit from Santa Claus and the lighting of the Old Town Christmas Tree. One Peace at a Time Gallery 123’s holiday event, One Peace At a Time, will be on designated days in November and December. On those days, the gallery will donate 10 percent of all sales to Food and Shelter for Friends. The One Peace At a Time event will take place from 1-3 p.m. and 610 p.m. Nov. 12 and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 13. It will continue in Dec. 10 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 6-10 p.m. and Dec. 11 from 1-6 p.m. Gallery 123 is located on the second floor at 123 E. Main St. in Norman. Holiday Gala The Holiday Gala at the Moore Public Library, 225 S. Howard, will take place from 6:30-8 p.m. Dec. 3. There will be live music, free photos with Santa Claus and crafts for children.

Gingerbrea d house This contest is really a tr eat! The se c o n d a n n ual G in g e rb re a d Ho u se Competition will be held from 5-8 p.m. D ec. 3 at the Brand Senior Cente r, 501 E. M ain in Moore. The pastry art st u dents of Platt Co llege will giv e live demonstrati ons.

Christmas parade With rocking horses, dolls and wooden bats, the annual Norman Christmas parade will take place Dec. 11 in downtown Norman. This year’s theme is “Toys in Toyland.” Other winter events: Downtown Arts Market From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., artists will have booths set up in the Old Town Plaza building. Live music will be available too. Veterans Day celebration The July 4 fireworks and ceremony have been rescheduled to Nov. 6 in honor of Veterans Day. The event will take place at Reaves Park and will include food, live music and military displays. Fireworks will begin at dusk. The National Weather Festival Always been little fascinated with lighting or maybe you’re just a lover a rainy days. Weather lovers, everywhere, you’re in luck. The National Weather Festival will take place at the National Weather Center from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 6 at the National Weather Center, 120 David L. Boren Blvd., near Highway 9 and Jenkins Avenue. Second Friday Circuit of Art Businesses, galleries and art organizations in downtown Norman and near the University of Oklahoma campus will join forces to support the arts from 6-10 Nov. 12 and Dec. 10. These events are part of the monthly 2nd Friday Circuit of Arts. The CART busses shuttle patrons to and from each location.

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Covered in Silk First State Bank Ice Cream Social Photos by Cathy Hanselman

Jayden Henson, Caitlin Ponder

Edgar Cruz

Lola Ariel, Evan Kent, Vicki Clary

Tabitha Steward, Nelissa Mallory, Frank Campbell

Madison Moses, Cheryl Brown

Kim King, Kenneth Cubbage, Don Steveson


East Main Street Benvenutis Photos by Kyle Phillips and Cathy Hansellman

Ginny Corson , Jackie Farley

Tom Cooper, Janice Fox, Kathrine Staggs

Bev Chess, Adele Hoving, Ken Hoving

Hoss, Steve Owens, Pete Wilson, Bud Miles Chesca & Dan Baily 34

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Mary Jane Hulin, Ron Hulin, Judy Sullivan

Shelley Wilson, Barry Switzer

Kimberly Brantley, Alisha McGee

Ann Carlson, Mitsuno Reddy, Karen Tobey

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Full Circle “Purs-o-nality” Photos by Kyle Phillips

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Kris Akey, Audrey Gough, Susie Conklin, Tollie Burnett

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Jeanne Fowler, Katheen Wilson

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Betty Standifer, Kathy Heiple, Kelly Standifer,Joanne Miller, Traci Heiple

Seated: Judy Morrell, Denise Williams, Sarah Feuerborn Standing: Tammy Vaughan, Carrie Miller, Alyssa Colby, Jennifer Voss

Tracy Bates, Anita Bednar, Kelley Miller, Nancy Dill, Jeri Sliba,

Paula Palermo, Michelle Rosatic, Jennifer Burk, Lisa Stieg, Dede McCully

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United Way Celebrity Sing at Riverwind Photos by Andy Rieger

Aubrey and Brandon Adams

Cindy Parson, Cindy Scarberry, Sharon Pyeatt

Gene McKown

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Silk - A magazine for women  

The November/December 2010 issue of Silk - A magazine for women