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Jammed in Traffic Elizabeth Luis Garcia

Morgan Reynolds

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/08/24/long-

There was a sixty-two mile long “I’d have Pizza Hut delivered to traffic jam on a highway leading my car,” Michael Gunsallus, 10th to Beijing, China that began on August 14th. China’s increased “I would go crazy and try to run population is a cause of the traffic over the cars that were in front of jam since the country has just over me,” Ana Escobar, 10th 1.3 billion people. Many Chinese drivers are used “I would probably go crazy. I to the traffic that they were stuck in. can’t stand traffic,” Miss Eidson, They even fell asleep to pass the teacher time. Authorities “I would knocked on the probably sleep car windows most of the time to wake up the and listen to drivers and tell music,” Price them to keep Langirik, 12th going forward. “I would call Vendors took somebody to advantage of this come and meet traffic by selling me somewhere/ food to drivers across the street and increasing China’s latest traffic jam so they won’t get the prices. “A bottle lasted for days. stuck in traffic,” of water was selling for $1.50, ten times the normal Alexis Scales,9th price,” Chinese media reporters “If I was stuck in traffic for ten said. Several students and staff days I would listen to music, talk on members from North were asked the phone and text,” Florina Billy, what they would do if they were 12th stuck in traffic for ten days. “I would cry, yell, sleep, listen “Get out of the car and go eat to music, talk on the phone, and somewhere and probably scream cancel whatever plans I had and I’m pregnant!” Dinalia Granados, finally stare off in space until it’s 11th over. I would never take that road “Go insane!!!” Ms. Brown, again,” Latasha Spruill, 11th teacher

Some say you need to get a rock and put it on top of your car; others say that you need to play a certain song. Some say that a car will come and chase you until you leave the road. Hearing so much about this place made it very intriguing, so I grabbed a few friends and headed there one night. After driving down the winding road, it was clear why people thought this place was so frightening. With sharp turns and nothing but eerie woods, the place did have quite a weird vibe to it. After finding the old bridge where all of the occurrences were said to have happened, we stopped the car. Then we got out and waited for something spooky to happen. It never did, leaving us with wasted time and disappointment. Maybe it was because there wasn’t an old car being used and no music was played.

From what was observed Payne Road doesn’t seem to be haunted by ghosts, spirits, or strange cars chasing you down the road. Another well known myth is the one of “Bloody Mary”. Supposedly, if you look into a mirror and repeat “Bloody Mary” three times a girl will be summoned and will “rip your eyes out”. The room is supposed to be lit only by a candle; no light bulbs should be used. The actual “Bloody Mary” is said to have been a real woman that was in a horrific car accident. After standing in front of a mirror for several minutes repeating “Bloody Mary” and feeling slightly ridiculous, nothing happened and my eyes are still in my head, perfectly fine. If you want to risk your eyes and your life by trying it yourself, go right ahead. I’m sure you’ll be fine.

http://www.ncghost.com

Heather Hall

Myths and legends have been a part of human culture since the dawn of time. Some of these myths are quite frightening. After investigating several popular myths and legends, I concluded that most of them are silly superstitions. By far the most well known myth around the Rural Hall area is Payne Road. This infamous road has even been investigated by professional paranormal investigators. The legend says that a local man went crazy, killing his whole family on the road. Since then, the road name has changed to Edwards Road, and the house burned to the ground. It is said that if you drive to the bridge (preferably in a car made before 1990) and stop, your car will not start back up. There are several stories about what to do when you get to the bridge.

Halloween is quickly approaching, and this means bonfires, candy, and a good scare. One aspect of Halloween that people seem more aware of during this time of year is superstitions. A superstition is a blindly accepted fear of something unknown or mysterious. Below are several of the most common superstitions and their origins. Ancient Jews and Babylonians believed cats to be related to serpents, a common symbol of evil in the Bible and other works of literature. Cats were also thought to be associated with witches during the Middle Ages. If a black cat crosses your path, there’s nothing more to fear than the ignorance of our ancestors. Walking under a ladder is also considered bad luck. In the days before the gallows, criminals were hung from the top rung of a ladder and their spirits were believed to linger underneath. Common folklore states that it’s bad luck to walk under an open ladder and pass through the triangle of evil ghosts and spirits. Today, when people break a mirror, their first thought is they ‘ve just brought about some bad luck. It was once believed that a person’s reflection in a mirror represented his or her soul. When a person broke a mirror, it was thought to have a harmful effect on the soul.

The old house that used to be on Payne Road.

3 Few people know why they still do it, but when people mention that something good is going to happen in the future, many “knock on wood” twice to keep from jinxing the expected good fortune. It was once thought that trees were the homes of gods. When in need of a favor or some good luck, one politely mentioned a wish to a tree and touched the bark representing the first “knock.” The second “knock” was to say “thank you.” Ever wondered why people say “God Bless You” whenever someone sneezes? During the sixth century, it was believed that a sneeze expelled evil spirits from the body. Later, when a great plague spread in Europe, people began sneezing violently. The Pope passed a new law pertaining to sneezes. At that time, since sneezing meant that the person was going to die of the plague, people were required to bless the sneezer. It was then later believed that your soul could escape your body though a sneeze and that by saying “God Bless You,” the soul could be immediately stuff it back inside where it belonged. In short, the majority of superstitions are simply the musings of confused ancient peoples. They did not possess the scientific knowledge that can easily disprove nearly all of these theories.

Yet another myth is “light as a feather”. It’s said that if you have one person lay down and a few others gather around in a circle and chant “light as a feather, stiff as a board” over and over you will eventually be able to lift the person up only using two fingers each. There are several accounts of this working, so the expectations were high for this myth. After trying several times to do this, it never worked and the person stayed flat on the ground. Maybe it was done wrong, but this myth was also proven to be false. There are thousands of myths out there that have yet to be disproven. If you are brave enough to try some of them, then more power to you. As of these three myths, however, they do not seem to be true.


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