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Friday, 27,26, 2010 Friday,August February 2010

Volume 4, No. 47

Fiscal court tackles road authority questions in special meeting By Brian Graves The News Standard

A special session of the Meade County Fiscal Court Tuesday morning became a schooling of sorts about the county’s policies and ordinances on roads and the chain of authority. The issue of Emmer Drive was the item on the agenda which brought about the discussion. At the court’s regular session last week, the road became a point of contention when Planning Director

Tony Colletta presented an approved inspection signed by Assistant Road Supervisor Jeff Padgett. Magistrate Herbert Chism contended the inspection was not valid since the county ordinance stated such inspections had to be signed by the road supervisor himself. The court later passed a motion requesting Road Supervisor Mark Popham reinspect the road himself as soon as possible. It was on County Attorney Margaret Matney’s

“If there is some confusion, we need to clear it up.” - Meade County Attorney Margaret Matney recommendation the court took up the matter Tuesday because of an ordinance that would place the road in question under county authority should the court take no action before Aug. 28. Popham said the request for final inspection was denied after an inspection on Aug. 3 which found the

need for repair and redistribution of straw for erosion control and a straw mat that needed to be repaired and staked down. “They called back in three hours for another inspection, and that’s not the way it works,” Popham told the court. Popham said the request for a final inspection has to

come in the form of a certified letter which he says did not happen after the Aug. 3 inspection. However, Padgett did another inspection on Aug. 4, which showed the road met county qualifications and that is the one fiscal court was presented at its last meeting. “Jeff really probably shouldn’t have done that second inspection,” Popham said. Popham then asked if the court still wanted him to wait for another request or

act upon the inspection as presented. The discussion then turned to Padgett’s qualifications to produce and approve such an inspection. Meade County Judge/ Executive Harry Craycroft pointed out the job description of the assistant road supervisor calls for him to carry out the duties of the director in his absence. “I think that’s 100 percent right,” Popham said. “That (the first) inspection should See QUESTIONS, Page A2

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Dr. Tom Davenport entertained Meade County chamber members last Thursday.

CoC hears about managing time By Brian Graves The News Standard

Members of the Meade County Chamber of Commerce learned about managing time better during its monthly luncheon last Thursday. Dr. Tom Davenport, dean of workforce development and continuing education for the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, gave THE NEWS STANDARD/BRIAN GRAVES

A truck carrying a replica of the Vietnam War Memorial crosses the Ohio River Bridge into Meade County Wednesday morning. It was escorted by members of the “Rolling Thunder” veterans motorcycle group. Staff Report The News Standard Throughout the weekend, area residents are having the chance to give a salute to Vietnam veterans. Activities started early Wednesday as a caravan of more than one hundred veterans on motorcycles, “Rolling Thunder,” escorted a truck bearing an 80 percent-size replica of the Vietnam War Memo-

rial across the Ohio River into Meade County. That replica is now on display during the weekend at Keyes Park directly behind the Patton Museum at Fort Knox. The public will be able to view the exhibit during the museum’s normal business hours. The celebrations started yesterday at Fort Knox where current active duty soldiers met and greeted Vietnam veterans, their families and survivors.

Ceremonies included the 113th Army Band and a keynote speaker. Free food was made available and tours of current and Vietnam era military equipment were placed on display. Vine Grove began their celebration Thursday evening with a BBQ cookout hosted by VFW Post 10281 and a special program at Optimist Park with music and speeches commemorating the occasion.

Today, Civil War reenactors dressed in period uniforms will be on hand to welcome veterans to Fort Duffield in West Point. The hours will be 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Radcliff will have a full afternoon and evening of activities beginning at 4 p.m. at Radcliff Square. Three live bands will perform and entertainment will include food, games, a car exhibit, and door prizes.

Citizens on Patrol celebrates fifth year anniversary By Jennifer Corbett The News Standard The Citizens on Patrol (COP) unit is a blessing in disguise to the Brandenburg Police Department. “They’re a vital tool for the police department and the citizens,” said Police Chief Jeff Cox. The department recently celebrated the unit’s fifth anniversary. In its short life, the COP has over 7,500 hours of volunteer time; 44,000 patrol miles logged, created crime prevention programs, patrolled the business community and has continued to help with traffic control at schools. Former Police Chief Jason Amburgey created the COP department in 2005. The ultimate goal of the program was to See CITIZENS, Page A2

See TIME, Page A7

Warning tagged on all Ohio River fish By Casey Tolliver The News Standard

On top of years of notoriety for high levels of pollutants, recent influxes of certain toxins prompted the Kentucky Department for Public Health and the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources to issue a fish consumption advisory for the Ohio River last week. Recent high levels of mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) warranted the state to discourage See FISH, Page A7

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•Ginseng hunters prepare to find coveted prey, A12 •Local girl finds her click with photography business, A11

INDEX Agriculture............. A12 Business................. A11 Court News............ A6 Classifieds.............. B8 Faith....................... A5 Games.................... B7 Obituaries.............. A4 Opinion................. A3 Outdoors................ B10 Viewing.................. B5

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The Citizens on Patrol unit of the Brandenburg Police Department is celebrating its fifth anniversary. The unit was created to be an extra set of eyes and ears for the police department.


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Questions From page A1 have stood. I asked him to go do it and it failed.” Popham said the request to reinspect could not be qualified as an official request for final inspection since it did not properly follow the process spelled out in the county ordinances. The ordinance reads as follows: “Upon substantial completion of all required improvements, the developer may notify the (planning and zoning) commission, in writing, by certified mail or by personal delivery of notice of the completion or substantial completion of improvements. The administrative official for the commission shall send a copy of the request to the appropriate county official for inspection. The appropriate county official shall inspect all improvements of which notice has been given and shall file a detailed report…The administrative official of the Commission, on receipt of the detailed report of inspection from the appropriate official shall present the report of inspection to Fiscal Court.” The ordinance continues saying the court has 45 days from receipt of the request for inspection to take action, otherwise the road will be considered approved and accepted into the county road system. Magistrate Randall Hardesty said there needed to be some clarification as to who the “administra-

tive official” is referred to in the ordinance. “The way I read that I think Mark should be,” he added “For street acceptance to the county road system, it says the county road supervisor/engineer has to sign off on it,” Chism read from the policies. “Now, I know Jeff is his assistant, and Jeff does a good job, but I haven’t seen any certification that says Jeff is trained (to do road inspections). I know Mark is, and until I see it, I cannot support this.” Matney explained that when the ordinances referred to the administrative official of the commission, it meant the planning and zoning commission and that person would be the planning director. She then gave a condensed version of the procedure to have road inspections completed. “Basically, that notice for final inspection…we have a 45 day window. The request from the administrative official of the commission — the director of the planning and zoning office — notifies Mark and the road department, and then the inspection is done. The report is given back to the administrative official of the commission, and then he gives it back to (Fiscal Court),” Matney said. Chism replied saying that information should be given to the court members in a “timely fashion.” “Not five minutes before (a meeting),” he added. Popham said he reads the ordinance “totally dif-

NEWS

ferent” and noted a passage that said the inspection request should be sent to “the administrative official or appropriate county official.” Matney noted that phrase had been taken out when the ordinance was last amended. “How did this come about to be amended?” Hardesty asked. “You voted on it a few months ago,” Matney responded. “I think (in this case) we had a jumping of the gun by Jeff by going back out and inspecting it immediately thereafter because they called and said, ‘Hey, we repaired this. Come back out and take a look at it,’” Matney said. In summary, Matney said once the inspection had been done, signed and reported to the planning director, that is the finding on which the court should have made a decision. “If (the developer) says it’s ready, go out do the inspection,” she added. “When they’re done with it, make the report.” Matney told court members she didn’t feel the second evaluation was valid because “he had no obligation to do that based on the way the ordinance is written.” Matney also agreed that under county policy, the assistant road supervisor should be able to fill all duties of an absent road supervisor; however, she added she could not confirm Padgett’s certification or abilities to perform all the responsibilities involved.

Friday, August 27, 2010

“(The inspection) could have waited a few more days for Mark to be back, but I know he’s had some concerns inspecting some of the roads because he wants to make sure he’s not a ‘moving target,’ Matney explained. Popham was accused by a developer at the last regular meeting of continuously changing the requirements needed making it more difficult to get a road approved — an accusation the road supervisor has forcefully denied. “There doesn’t need to be a second inspection until the court has made a determination on the first,” Matney said. “There is nowhere in this procedure that allows for the developer to make corrections during that 45 day period unless the court acts prior to the end of the 45 days.” Attempting to clarify the matter, Matney questioned Popham about Padgett’s qualifications. Popham answered in the affirmative about Padgett’s training and documentation of training. He noted that Padgett had completed the appropriate training, the training was documented, and he was able to perform any duty required of a supervisor although he had not taken the road supervisor ’s exam. At the close of the meeting, Popham said he believed “we have been way too lenient” with developers. “They do one little bitty repair and call you again. They do one more thing and call you again,” Po-

pham said. “As far as having to wait 45 days for repairing what may be a minor issue, I think it should be six months or a year. If they don’t get that to county specifications when they call for a final inspection, they ought to be a long waiting period to re-call for another inspection. Otherwise, they call every month for another re-inspect and another reinspect.” Popham said if developers knew it had to be right before the final inspection or wait six months, “They’re going to get it right before they do it.” Popham also again defended himself against charges he has hindered developers from being able to secure approvals. “I have been accused of moving the target, holding a vendetta against somebody and that is absolutely not true,” Popham said. “If any of those (making the accusations) had read the road ordinance, looked at their design plan or the subdivision regulations, everything I’ve required them to do and more is in those regulations. “I will say I have not followed the road ordinance exactly. I gave them too many breaks. I let them slide on those little things and that was wrong,” Popham said. “Gene McGee (the developer of the subdivision including Emmer Drive) said he wanted the target to quit moving,” he added. “If that’s so, that means it’s got to be exactly what the road ordinance says. Which means they’ve got a lot of

work to do on Emmer.” The court unanimously affirmed Padgett’s position of authority and then proceeded to deny the admission of Emmer Road based upon the report of the first inspection of Aug. 3. Only Magistrate Steve Wardrip voted against the denial. Matney said after discussions with Popham, he wanted the court to consider some type of fee to be paid for repeat inspections. “In seeing these issues as they have come up, you may want to look at what a developer has to do to get those repeat inspections,” Matney said. “Those things are crucial to developers because they want to get their subdivisions done. We want to encourage development in the county, I know, but we want them to know clearly what will be asked of them. If there is some confusion, we need to clear it up.” Magistrates also agreed there needed to be a review of the policies and procedures in an effort to eliminate any unclear points or potential inconsistencies.

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Jimmy Fittz uses the radio in his Citizens on Patrol vehicle to send information over to an officer with the Brandenburg Police Department.

Citizens From page A1 free up the police department by creating an extra set of eyes and ears around the county and reporting any suspicious activity. COP members are CPR trained and log at least eight hours per month in patrol time, Cox said. Some of the other things COP has been involved with include working with the safety booth at the Meade County Fair, ID-A-Bike program, radar

trailer placement, vehicle and foot patrol and crime prevention and neighborhood patrols. The group also does vacation house checks, where if someone is going out of town, they can notify the COP and they can monitor their house while they’re gone. Jimmy Fittz has been a member since the program began five years ago and joined because he “always liked police work.” According to Fittz, some of the benefits of being a COP includes meeting people, lending a helping hand and

just being another set of eyes for the police department. The program is completely funded by sponsors. The money from sponsors helps with fuel expenses, vehicle parts and repair, uniforms, cell phone cost, radios, literature, workman’s comp cost and equipment. Currently, COP just monitors Brandenburg, but Fittz hopes that the unit can expand into the county but the only way they can do that is by getting more members. “It’s a good program,” he said. “It’s something to do.���

Kentucky misses out on federal ‘Race to the Top’ education funds Staff Report The News Standard Kentucky has lost out on the chance to receive $175 million in federal education funding. State officials were notified Tuesday that Kentucky was cut from a short list of recipients of the federal “Race to the Top” funds. The funding, which is part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment

Act, aims to reward states for academic initiatives in struggling schools and increase graduation rates. “While we are disappointed that Kentucky did not win an award in the second round of Race to the Top funding, we are confident that the steps we are taking in education will significantly improve the education experience for Kentucky’s students. The fact that Kentucky was named a finalist twice for these

funds speaks to the success of the combined efforts of my office, the Department of Education (KDE) and the General Assembly,” Gov. Steve Beshear said in a press release. “We will continue to move forward with our vision for education reform through the ongoing efforts of the Governor’s Transforming Education in Kentucky task force, as well as the implementation of Senate Bill 1 of 2009.”

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OPINION

August 27, 2010

Editorial

The News Standard - A3

“An Overdue Salute”

This fear is not an ‘eggsageration’ Casey Tolliver Making a Case I love eggs. But these days, I am too chicken to eat them, all because of recent recall of hundreds of millions of salmonella tainted eggs. Although Kentucky is currently not on the list of nearly 20 states affected by the recall, the careless and reckless actions of a few egg producers have separated me from a food that I dearly enjoy. Produce and food products produced on such a wide scale are often times subjected to mishandling and general oversight based on a “quantity before quality” mantra. The more product offloaded, the more cash raked in. Who cares if more than a thousand consumers are subjected to throes of salmonella poisoning. Since the safety of consumers has taken a backseat to a wider profit margin, it has become obvious that the food conglomerates op-

credible amount of tainted product to be shipped out unknowingly. An ongoing investigation predicts that the number of recalled eggs will rise. The same investigation revealed that the owner of one of the egg companies has been cited for violations in the past. For a company to be cited in the past for irresponsibility while producing and handling consumable goods, only to wind up being part of the conglomerate responsible for one of the largest and widespread food recalls signals inefficiency in the FDA’s procedures and policing of food producers. Other than exposing flawed government agency protocol, the recall has brought up another excellent point. The current egg crisis gripping millions of American egg eaters begs a critical reappraisal of our food shopping tendencies. Free range and organic eggs may possibly be a safer option. Egg vendors at farmer’s markets can help kill two birds with one stone

— supporting the local economy while providing your family with potentially safer eggs and produce. The produce at a farmer’s market was grown on a much more personal and micro-level. It’s easier for smaller scale farmers to ensure the health standards. When the food is grown, the farmers take into consideration and know exactly where the food is going — their community. However, the convenience and selection at grocery stores is too much to keep consumers from being swayed to do their shopping at a farmer’s market. It may never cross your mind that whatever you buy from the grocery store may harm or even kill you. You fill up your cart with food and stuff and assume it is safe to eat. Maybe after the recent massive egg recall, the FDA and food producers will become stricter about enforcing and abiding by food quality codes and policies. But don’t count your chickens before they hatch.

Schools must decide between palace and necessity Jim Waters Bluegrass Beacon Madisonville’s Hanson Elementary School ranks as one of Kentucky’s top performers among all elementary, middle and high schools. It never fails to meet all “No Child Left Behind Act” targets. Never. In reading proficiency, Hanson ranks No. 19 out of more than 1,100 schools. Nearly 90 percent of its students reach math proficiency — much higher than the state average. And all this success occurs in Hopkins County — a school district mired since 2005 in “Tier 3” status, the worst ranking possible. So why doesn’t Hanson get the “TLC” that a bright light amidst the fog of failure deserves — especially when it comes to facilities? The circa 1928 school building last saw adequate remodeling in 1982, said Gwen Kik, a parent of four, including a Hanson student. “The other elementary

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new tech center in one of Madisonville’s highly visible locations is much “sexier” than ensuring kindergartners have a clean, safe room. It also offers much-greater potential for contributing to the legacy sought by a retiring superintendent. When TV reporter Julie Krizen asked Superintendent James Stevens why he pushed for a tech center while his top-performing elementary school crumbled, he followed the path of most “educrats” on those rare occasions in which they directly address an education system’s failure: He skirted. He avoided. He punted. Finally, he claimed, “It was a community decision.” Kik challenges that: “We were not consulted. This is his legacy. He has pushed this tech center and put the pressure on the board.” There’s no disputing that Stevens’ response to the reporter is simply intolerable. “I’m going to try to take care of it,” Stevens said. “We’re not going to be able to take care of it all, but we’re going to really address the issues.” He’s going to try, but

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schools have received renovations, and we have been told we were next in line for years,” Kik said. She referenced a four-year facilities plan established by a local planning committee in 2007 that placed Hanson as its top priority. Instead, the school board voted to spend $9 million on a career and technical center. Parents showed up at an Aug. 16 hearing to protest. They’re not against a tech center, but they believe their children’s health and safety remains a higher priority. Understandably, they wonder why the district plans to erect a new tech center when one of Kentucky’s best schools houses mold infestations, and “mice, bats and lizards — some dead and some alive,” Kik said. A news report on Evansville’s WEHT-TV ABC Channel 25 showed the school’s moldy carpets and missing floor and ceiling tiles. In the past, flooding in kindergarten classes in the basement forced students to roam the school to use rooms vacated by students whose classes went to lunch or recess. But let’s face it, a shiny,

somehow he already knows, “We won’t be able to take care of it all.” Gee, I wonder: Which problems get ignored? Maybe the district can skip fixing the huge holes in the walls, or cracks in the ceilings or foundation? Some officials claim the district’s $12 million bonding capacity came up short for building a new elementary school, so they went with the tech center. Are you kidding me? What if parents could pull their children out of a moldy, rodent-infested school and put them in a charter school that may not be a Taj Mahal but is clean, safe and successful? This district — along with Kentucky’s entire education system — would become much more concerned about meeting student needs and parent concerns rather than ensuring an educrat’s legacy. Jim Waters is vice president of policy and communications for the Bluegrass Institute, Kentucky’s free-market think tank. Reach him at jwaters@ freedomkentucky.org. Read previously published columns at www.bipps.org.

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erate with irresponsible and haphazard standards. The thing is the incident not only leaves egg on the face of food/produce industries, but federal agencies (namely the FDA) who are responsible for rules and regulations that are in place to circumvent such occurrences. The FDA implements rules and regulations and has inspectors to ensure the quality of products Sure, it’s not hard for such massive companies to be subject to an outbreak of disease, and accidents do happen. But lax enforcement of regulations by government agencies surely played a role in the egg fiasco. For such a widespread epidemic to plague such a vast amount of Americans is a beacon that something is amiss — either the regulations aren’t being taken seriously or aren’t being enforced. More than half a billion eggs have been recalled so far, which is only one percent of the 80 billion produced in the U.S. annually. But still, that is an in-

PERIODICAL

The 1960s were not the happiest years in our nation’s history. It seemed like there was always some type of turmoil or chaos in the air. The assassination of a president, a potential president, and a prominent civil rights leader fanned the flames of buried frustratations that burned throughout the decade. The backdrop to all of this was the conflict in Vietnam. The reasons for America being there have been debated for almost half a century. Agree or disagree, the cause was a noble one. A country being attacked by a ruthless neighbor is the type of situation for which America has been always ready to give assistance. It is within our nature to help those who seek the same liberties and freedoms we have and so often take for granted. In seeking to help a people striving for freedom, we sent America’s best. The young men and women of the era traveled thousands of miles across the ocean to a strange land and unfamiliar culture. A total of more than 3 million served in the Southeast Asia theater and 2.5 million served within South Vietnam itself. The battles were tough and bloody. The jungles of that remote land took its toll and the ruthlessness of the enemy took many lives. It took 12 years before the last American troops finally left. It was 4:03 a.m. April 30, 1975 when two U.S. Marines became the last two Americans to die in the Vietnam War. They became part of the roll call of 58,195 who never came home and whose names are now enshrined on the long, black wall in Washington, D.C. meant to honor their sacrifice. However, it is only now many are beginning to have some understanding that whatever one thought of the necessity of the conflict, those who served in it never really got their due. It is almost un-American not to recognize the heroism and sacrifices of those who wear our proud colors into any combat suffer. Slowly but surely, that time has come for those who served in Vietnam. And, this weekend throughout our area, there are celebrations planned for the veterans, their families, and their survivors. “Thank You From The Heartland: A Salute to Vietnam Veterans” is the theme for several events to be held in Elizabethtown, Radcliff, Vine Grove, West Point and Fort Knox. As part of this recognition, the American Veterans Traveling Tribute, featuring the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall, will be on display at Keyes Park next to the Patton Museum. The tribute is a mobile group of memorials and exhibits, with its centerpiece being an 80 percent reproduction of the Vietnam Wall memorial including all the names on the original. The ceremonies at Fort Knox should be particularly moving as the new guard of America’s Armed Forces joins to pay tribute and respect to those in whose footsteps of service they follow. We urge everyone to take advantage of this special weekend and do what should have been done years ago. Give a salute and thanks to those who served in the Vietnam War and say a prayer of remembrance for those who gave all. The decision to go wasn’t theirs. But, the nobility and courage with which they accepted their mission was and it’s time they receive the proper respect and recognition they so rightfully deserve.

The ultimate goal of the Viewpoints page is to encourage frank and lively discussion on topics of interest in Meade County. Editorials are the opinion of newspaper management. Columns represent the view of the writer and do not necessarily represent the view of newspaper management. The News Standard welcomes and encourages letters to the editor. Letters will appear as space permits and may be edited for grammar and clarity. They must be no more than 500 words, must include a signature, town of residence, and phone number for confirmation. Letters may be handwritten, typed or e-mailed. Multiple submissions from the same author may not be printed. Libelous letters will not be published.


OBITUARIES

A4 - The News Standard

Friday, August 27, 2010

Wilma Rhoades

Michael Terry Humphrey

Sister Mary Rosaria Ray

Wilma Jean Fortner Rhoades, 72, of Brandenburg, Ky., died Thursday, Aug. 19, 2010 at her residence. She was the former owner/operator of the Cedar House Styling Salon and a member of New Brandenburg Baptist Church. Mrs. Rhoades was preceded in death by her parents, Atlas Andrew and Pauline Higginbotham Fortner and a sister, Judy Day. She is survived by her husband, James C. Rhoades; three children, James Byron (Lucy) Rhoades of Owensboro, Ky., Cheryl Jean Brown of Louisville, Ky., and Jay Tyler Rhoades of Brandenburg, Ky.; her beloved brother-in-law, Tommy Day of Owensboro, Ky.; six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m. Sunday, August 22, at New Brandenburg Baptist Church. Burial followed in in Cap Anderson Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy may be contributions to New Brandenburg Baptist Church or Hosparus of Central Kentucky. Online condolences may be left at www.hagerfuneralhome.com.

Michael Terry Humphrey, 57, of Brandenburg, Ky., died Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010, at Harrison County Hospital, Corydon, Ind. He was formerly employed at American Standard, was a member of Harrison Lodge No. 122 F. and A.M., a member of Wolf Creek Baptist Church, a Meade Co. Volunteer Firefighter for several years and owned and operated “Terry Tunes” for several years. Mr. Humphrey was preceded in death by his parents, Clay and Edith Kathryn Greer Humphrey and three brothers, Joe, Bob and Don Humphrey. He is survived by two daughters, Terri (Charlie) Smith of Glasgow, Ky., and Amy Humphrey of Hodgenville, Ky.; a grandson, William Matheis; a brother, Tim Humphrey of Brandenburg, Ky.; two sisters, Sandy (Eddie) Osborne and Tammy Humphrey of Brandenburg, Ky.; a special friend, Monica Caswell of Brandenburg, Ky., and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Wednesday, August 25, at the chapel of the Hager Funeral Home. Burial followed in Cap Anderson Cemetery. Masonic Services will be held at the funeral home on Tuesday evening. Online condolences may be left at www.hagerfuneralhome.com.

Sister Mary Rosaria Ray, 88, an Ursuline Sister of Mount Saint Joseph, died Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010, at Mount Saint Joseph, in her 68th year of religious life. A native of Payneville, Ky., she was born Agnes Kathryn Ray, the daughter of William Jennings and Bessie Agnes Pike Ray. She was received into the novitiate in 1942 and made temporary profession in 1944 and perpetual profession in 1947. An educator for more than 45 years, she taught at St. Brigid School in Vine Grove, Ky., in 1957 and from 19601963. She taught and served as principal in many schools in the Diocese of Owensboro and in New Mexico. She also served in parish ministry in Sunfish and worked in crafts and mail distribution at Mount Saint Joseph. She took a deep interest in all of her religious community s activities. Survivors include two sisters, Anna O’Bryan of Ekron, Ky., and Mary Patricia Ray of Brandenburg, Ky.; one brother, Joseph Patrick Ray of Guston, Ky.; nieces and nephews, and the members of her religious community. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, August 24, at Mount Saint Joseph, a wake service followed at 6:30 p.m. Glenn Funeral Home and Crematory in Owensboro, Ky., is in charge of arrangements. Gifts in memory of Sister Mary Rosaria Ray may take the form of donations to the Ursuline Sisters of Mount Saint Joseph, 8001 Cummings Road, Maple Mount, KY 42356.

Thomas B. Ashley Thomas B. Ashley, 88, of Johnson City, Tenn., formerly of Elizabethtown, Ky., passed away Monday, Aug. 23, 2010 at the Appalachian Christian Village. Mr. Ashley was the son of the late Rev. Earl and Cordila Wesley Ashley. In addition to his parents, Mr. Ashley was also preceded in death by his wife of 64 years, Gladys Ashley; a daughter, Wanda Goldsmith; two sisters, Grace Manley, Lula Hatcher; a brother, John Ashley and a grandson, David Kirk. He was a member of Longview United Methodist Church in Longview, Ky., and was a US World War II Navy Veteran. Survivors include two daughters and sons-in-law, Betty and Preston Chapman of Johnson City, Tenn., and Judy and Lee Reed of Elizabethtown, Ky.; a son and daughter-in-law, Larry and Bertha Ashley of Atlanta, Ga.; two sisters, Orpha Allen of Elizabethtown, Ky., and Pauline Lee of Vine Grove, Ky.; two brothers, Charles Ashley of Vine Grove, Ky., Robert Ashley of Radcliff, Ky.; 25 grandchildren, 34 great-grandchildren and 19 great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 27, 2010, at Nelson-Edelen-Bennett Funeral Home in Radcliff, Ky., with Rev. Curtis Hurt officiating. Burial will be at North Hardin Memorial Gardens. Condolences may be expressed online at www.nebfh.com.

VFW Post 11404 - Aug.

Joyce Carolyn Lee Joyce Carolyn Lee, 69, of Radcliff, Ky., died Monday, Aug. 16, 2010, at her home. She retired with over 20 years of working at Parkway Elementary School in Radcliff, Ky. She was a member of Fort Knox Order of Eastern Star Chapter No. 439. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ray Lee; her son, Loyd Keltner; parents, Loyd L. and Agnes Nunn; her sister, Patricia Carol Brown; and a brother, Tommy Brandon. She is survived by her daughter, Lainie Keltner of Sierra Vista, Ariz.; a daughter-in-law, Susan Keltner of Sierra Vista, Ariz.; four brothers, Johnny Brandon of Flint, Mich., Roger Nunn of Kansas City, Mo., Frankie Nunn of Elizabethtown, Ky., and Larry Brown of Cecilia, Ky.; and her faithful companions, Smokey and Snowball. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010, at Nelson-Edelen-Bennett Funeral Home in Radcliff, Ky. Burial followed in the North Hardin Memorial Gardens in Radcliff, Ky. Condolences may be expressed online at www.nebfh.com.

Kathleen Lynn Norton Kathleen Lynn Norton, 53, of Hodgenville, Ky., died Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2010, at Hardin Memorial Hospital in Elizabethtown, Ky. She is survived by her partner, Paula Hillebrand of Hodgenville, Ky.; her mother, Donna M. Breslin of Bloomfield, New Mexico; two sisters, Karen R. Breslin of Elizabeth, Co., and Lenette DiPietra of Westminster, Co. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Condolences may be expressed online at www.nebfh.com. Nelson-EdelenBennett Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

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All Activities Open To The Public! Chu rch Listi ngs Bethel/Muldraugh Methodist Church 120 Bethel Church Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-4501 Big Springs Baptist Church 755 Big Springs Rd, Ekron • 270-828-3844 Blue River Island Baptist Church 595 Big Bend Road, Battletown • 270-497-4877 Brandenburg Church of Christ Brandenburg, Ky • 270-422-3878 Brandenburg Church of God 1 Howard Drive, Brandenburg • 270-422-5488 Brandenburg United Methodist Church 215 Broadway, Brandenburg • 270-422-2810 Buck Grove Baptist Church 255 Buck Grove Rd, Ekron • 270-828-2717 Canaanland Ministries Inc. 674 D.E. Brown Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-1087 Church of the Nazarene 713 Old State Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-4691 Cedar Grove Bible Methodist Church Old Mill Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-8095 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Old Ekron Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-3656 Cold Spring Baptist Church 4997 Battletown Rd, Battletown • 270-497-4500 Community Baptist Church 3770 Old Mill Rd, Brandenburg • 270-828-6500 Ekron Baptist Church 2775 Hayesville Rd, Ekron • 270-422-2958 First Baptist Church 338 High Street, Brandenburg • 270-422-3355 Full Gospel Church of God 303 Smith Rd, Ekron • 270-828-8107 Glad Tidings Christian Center 485 Bypass Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-2020 Gospel Fellowship 1794 Rhodelia Rd, Payneville • 270-496-4311 Grace Baptist Church 7691 Hwy 60, Ekron • 270-828-2333 Grace Freewill Baptist Church 13490 Rineyville Rd. Flaherty • 270-828-3120 Guston Baptist Church Guston, Ky • 270-547-5505 Guston Missionary Baptist Church 14110 Hwy 60, Guston • 270-547-7703 Helping Hands Ministry 2615 Brandenburg Rd • 270-422-1819 Higher Encounters Ministries 5280 Old Mill Rd, Brandenburg • 270-828-5443

Charles W. Cundiff, 79, of Irvington, Ky., died Friday, Aug. 20, 2010 at Medco Center in Hardinsburg, Ky. He was born June 18, 1931, to the late Charlie and Goldie (Vandergraff) Cundiff. He was preceded in death his wife, Inez Cundiff; daughter, Linda Davidson; brother, Sam Cundiff; sisters,Ruby Daugherty and Hazel Daugherty. Survivors include daughter, Mary (Rick) Hoskinson of Irvington, Ky.; sisters, Mary Drury of Irvington, Ky., Eva Daugherty; brothers Oscar Cundiff and Elby Cundiff both of Irvington, Ky.; nine grandchildren, Joey Cundiff of Irvington, Ky., Tina (Jeff) Pawley of Irvington, Ky., Daniel (Emily) Davidson of Irvington, Ky., Anthony (Marcia) McCorkle of Irvington, Ky., Tommy (Mary Ann) Davidson of Irvington, Ky., Laura (Trampus) Ford of Hudson, Ky., Jamie Hoskinson, Chris Hoskinson and Keith Hoskinson; 19 great-grandchildren, one greatgreat-grandchild and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, August 24, at Alexander Funeral Home in Irvington, Ky.

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Hill Grove Baptist Church 55 Ammons Lane, Guston • 270-422-1837 Hill Grove Church of Christ Rt. 1, Guston • 270-828-2110 Hill Grove Church of God of Prophecy 4005 Shumate Rd, Ekron • 270-828-8770 Calvary Baptist Church 135 Olin Rd., Brandenburg 812-732-8209 Holy Trinity Episcopal Church 319 Oaklawn Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-3721 Macedonia Christian Church Battletown, Ky • 270-282-7288 Meade County Baptist Temple 636 Broadway, Brandenburg 270-422-4066 Meade County General Baptist Church 2240 New Highland Church Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-2739 Muldraugh Baptist Church P.O. Box 397, Muldraugh • 502-942-3886 Muldraugh Church of Jesus Christ of United Baptist 910 Rock Haven Rd, Brandenburg • 270-828-3140 New Beginnings Church 1638 Old Mill Rd., Brandenburg • 270-351-7313 & 270735-2986 New Brandenburg Southern Baptist Church 115 Baptist Church Lane, Brandenburg • 270-422-3389 New Highland Baptist Church 1665 Payneville Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-3033 Patterson Memorial Presbyterian Church 100 Newton Rd, Guston • 270-547-7283 Pentacostal Church of God 829 Old State Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-2478 Rock Haven Baptist 4444 Old Mill Rd, Brandenburg • 270-828-2555 Salem Baptist Church 5286 Old State Rd, Brandenburg • 270-422-1399 St. John the Apostle Catholic Church 491 E. Broadway, Brandenburg • 270-422-2196 Tabernacle of Worship 1990 Highway 79, Brandenburg • 270-422-7188 Weldon Christian Church 1595 Christian Church, Brandenburg • 502-635-7515 Zion Grove Baptist Church 209 West First Street, Ekron • 270-828-3939

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FAITH & VALUES

Friday, August 27, 2010

The News Standard - A5

Kids need to be independent before leaving for college James Dobson Focus on the Family QUESTION: My sister’s daughter went off to college at 18 and immediately went a little crazy. She had always been a good kid, but when she was on her own, she drank like a lush, was sexually promiscuous, and flunked three of her classes. My daughter is only 12, but I don’t want her to make the same mistakes when she is beyond our grasp. How can I get her ready to handle freedom and independence? DR. DOBSON: Well, you may already be 12 years late in beginning to prepare your daughter for that mo-

ment of release. The key is to transfer freedom and responsibility to her little by little from early childhood so she won’t need your supervision when she is beyond it. To move suddenly from tight control to utter liberty is an invitation to disaster. I learned this principle from my own mother, who made a calculated effort to teach me independence and responsibility. After laying a foundation during the younger years, she gave me a “final examination” when I was 17 years old. Mom and Dad went on a two-week trip and left me at home with the family car and permission to have my buddies stay at the house. Wow. Fourteen slumber parties in a row. I couldn’t believe it.

We could have torn the place apart — but we didn’t. We behaved rather responsibly. I always wondered why my mother took such a risk, and after I was grown, I asked her about it. She just smiled and said, “I knew in one year you would be leaving for college, where you would have complete freedom with no one watching over you. I wanted to expose you to that independence while you were still under my influence.” I suggest that you let your daughter test the waters of freedom occasionally as she’s growing up, rather than tossing her into the big wide ocean all at once. It takes wisdom and tact to pull that off, but it can be done. If you do the job

Be careful about what’s said in anger, the wound hurts Randy Johnson Pastor’s Spotlight There was a little boy with a bad temper. His father gave him a bag of nails and told him that every time he lost his temper, to hammer a nail in the back fence. The first day the boy had driven 37 nails into the fence. Then it gradually dwindled down. He discovered it was easier to hold his temper than to drive those nails into the fence. Finally the day came when the boy didn’t lose his temper

at all. He told his father about it and the father suggested that the boy now pull out one nail for each day that he was able to hold his temper. The days passed and the young boy was finally able to tell his father that all the nails were gone. The father took his son by the hand and led him to the fence. He said, “You have done well, my son, but look at the holes in the fence. The fence will never be the same. When you say things in anger, they leave a scar just like this one.” When someone gets angry sometimes they speak words that hurt. When I was younger and

someone said something that hurt someone else, they got their arm twisted behind them until they “took back“ what they said. As I got older I realized that once words were spoken they could never be taken back. James 1:19 told us to be “slow to speak, slow to anger, for the wrath of man does not work the righteousness of God.” Be careful what you say, especially in anger. You can put a knife in a man and draw it out. It won’t matter how many times you say I’m sorry, the wound is still there. Randy Johnson is the pastor at Brandenburg Church of God.

People need to decide if it’s vital to set aside enough time for church Submitted by Pastor Al Earley In the parable of the Wedding Banquet, Luke 14:15-24, Jesus explains that the Kingdom of Heaven is like a great banquet hall. God wants the hall filled with people. However, when the servants go to invite the guests, there are many excuses to miss the banquet. The parable begins to reveal just how hard it will be to get the guests to come, for there are many barriers. People find this to be true in their lives, as they try to invite family and friends to church to hear the Good News of God’s Kingdom. One barrier is that some think the church is a place for saints, and they shouldn’t come until they are worthy. There is a woman who has told me numerous times, “I’ll come to church. I’ll come one day; but I need to get my life in order first. It wouldn’t be right until I change some things in my life.” These people need our patience, understanding, and help to understand that the church isn’t a haven for saints, but a hospital for sinners. We are all living on the wrong side of heaven, and we all need what the church is supposed to teach to help us better prepare for the coming kingdom. Let us remember that in God’s infinite wisdom, He has chosen the church to be His main tool to guide people toward the Kingdom. Another man told this story. “Grow-

ing up, I knew a man who was mean and dishonest, and he never missed church. I haven’t been able to go to church, because he was such a hypocrite.” I was sensitive to this man’s concerns as we talked about how much meaner he may have been without the church. In fact, I have found that any organization that allows human beings to be members is full of hypocrites. Perhaps the greatest challenge to getting folks to come to the weekly banquet is the day-today cares of their lives that consume time and energy. These barriers are always present. A person needs to decide that going to church is important enough to set aside time. Most folks don’t mean to make the cares of life more important than their faith and worship of God. They often don’t know they are doing it. They say to themselves, “I am tired. I’ll relax on Sundays.” “It is a great day to shop and do chores.” “The ball games on TV look great this Sunday.” “I don’t need to go to church to worship God.” All of these excuses are very good for the busy people of our day, who are struggling to make worshipping God central to their lives, but are really of little consequence when they consider the lack of spiritual nourishment in their lives. I read a story in Guidepost, Oct. 1990, about Don and Lois Herring. They went on a Sunday fishing trip in the Gulf of Mexico. Lois never missed church, and

Don never went. A sudden storm caught them, and they capsized just before he could radio their position. They were 18 miles off shore, in 120-foot-deep water. Don said, “What are we going to do?” Lois responded, “Pray.” For 16 hours they floated in the storm-tossed sea, hanging onto the bow until someone might find them. When a fishing boat did find them, Don wondered if prayer had saved them. Then the captain explained that it was a miracle they had come this way, for at the last minute they had changed their mind where they would fish. Then their automatic pilot had malfunctioned, putting them 10 degrees off course, but right on course for the rescue. Don wrote, “I know the only thing that kept us going those 16 long cold hours were Lois’ prayers and her faith. Now I know how important it is to keep one’s personal relationship with God alive. We still like to fish, but never on Sunday mornings.” Have you stopped inviting people to church because it is just too hard? Do you consider it important to invite people to church at all? What role should prayer play in reaching out to people to invite to your church? Let us be God’s servants and go into the world announcing the Good News of the Kingdom, for we never know when God is going to use us to bring the Good News into others’ lives.

properly, the time of release in six or seven years will be a gentle transition rather than a cataclysmic event. QUESTION: My two kids are as different as night and day. You’d never even know they were born to the same parents. One of them is having trouble in school, and the other is something of a superstar. I’m very worried about the one boy. Do some kids start out doing poorly and then catch fire? DR. DOBSON: Thank goodness they often do. Let me give you an encouraging illustration. Several years ago I attended a wedding ceremony in a beautiful garden setting, and I came away with some thoughts about parents who are raising a child like yours.

After the minister had instructed the groom to kiss the bride on that day, approximately 150 colorful, helium-filled balloons were released into the blue California sky. Within a few seconds the balloons were just scattered all across the heavens, some of them rising hundreds of feet overhead and others cruising toward the horizon. A few balloons struggled to clear the upper branches of the trees while the show-offs became mere pinpoints of color on their journey to the sky. How interesting, I thought, and how symbolic of children. Let’s face it. Some boys and girls seem to be born with more helium than others. They catch all the right breezes, and they soar effortlessly to the heights, while

others wobble dangerously close to the trees. Their frantic folks run along underneath, huffing and puffing to keep them airborne. It is an exhausting experience. In short, I have a word of encouragement to you and all the parents of low-flying kids. Sometimes the child who has the greatest trouble getting off the ground eventually soars to the highest heights. That’s why I urge you as parents not to look too quickly for the person your child will become. Dr. Dobson is founder and chairman of the board of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995 (www.family.org). Questions and answers are excerpted from “Solid Answers” and “Bringing Up Boys,” both published by Tyndale House.

Bible

Trivia

By Wilson Casey 1. Is the book of Labour in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. From Ecclesiastes 4:9, how many are better than one because they have a good reward for their labor? Two, Three, Five, Seven 3. In 1 Kings 5:13-14, how many thousand men comprised the labor force that King Solomon raised? 1, 5, 10, 30 4. From Exodus 20:9, how many days shalt thou labor and do all thy work? Two, Four, Six, Seven 5. What son of Abda was in charge of the forced labor in David’s kingdom? Baal, Adoniram, Cyrenius, Phaneul 6. From Proverbs 14:23, “In all labour there is ...”? Love, Hope, Light, Profit ANSWERS: 1) Neither 2) Two 3) 30 4) Six 5) Adoniram 6) Profit

2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

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Official Public Notice ATTENTION: CORRECTED CUSTOMER CHARGE On announcements ran previously the Schedule 1, Proposed Rate listed below was incorrectly listed at $4.16 per month. It should have read $14.16 per month or $0.47 per day. The present and proposed rate structures of Meade County Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation are listed below: Rate Class Present Rate Proposed Rate Schedule 1 Customer Charge $9.85 Per Month $14.16 / Month or $0.47 / Day Energy Charge $0.06001 $0.06001

Glad Tidings Christian Center Guest Speaker, Greg Carter August 28th at 9am At Glad Tidings on the By-Pass Food and Event are GTCC Upcoming event: Golf Scramble Doe Valley • October 2, 9:00am $45 before Sept. 19 • Call to Register 422-2020 www.glad-tidings.org/men.html Get educated with a subscription to

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A6 - The News Standard

Deeds

Lincoln Trust Company, trustee for FBO John S. Carver Account, a Colorado Corporation, to Doe Valley Association Inc., a Kentucky Corporation, lot 651 of Doe Valley Subdivision in the Glen Oaks Section, deed tax $10.50. Ronald M. Paradis and Janet Paradis, to the Doe Valley Association, Inc., a Kentucky Corporation, lot 241 of Doe Valley Subdivision in Audubon Woods, deed tax $3. Pensco Trust Company Custodian FBO Janet Paradis, to Doe Valley Association, Inc., a Kentucky Corporation, lot 171 of Doe Valley Subdivision in Audubon Woods, deed tax $3. Larry Butler and Sheila Butler, Martha E. Haynes, to Frederick James Cundiff and Phyllis Cundiff, property located in Meade County. Jill E. Gibson, fka Jill E. Holler, to Danny K. Gibson and Jill E. Gibson, 390 Ditto Lane in Vine Grove. Ronald M. Paradis and Janet Paradis, to the Ritter Family Trust, lot 205 of Audubon Woods Section in Doe Valley Subdivision, deed tax $4. Pensco Trust Company, Custodian, FBO Janet Paradis, to the Ritter Family Trust, lot 204 of Audubon Woods Section in Doe Valley Subdivision, deed tax $3.50. Mike L. McCoy and Denise E. McCoy, to James L. Shircliff, property located in Meade County, deed tax $32. Edward K. Anthony and Kathy Thomason Anthony, to Ronnie W. McCormack and Kenda J. McCormack, a 1.606 acre tract located northeast of KY HWY 1600, deed tax $244. Robert G. Howard and Deborah Howard, to the Meade County Area Chamber of Commerce, by and through Kelly Roberts, and Meade County - Brandenburg Industrial Development Authority, property located in Meade County, deed tax $40. Robert Adams and Debra D. Adams, to Robert Adams, lot 46 of Doe Haven Estates, section 2. Kentucky Land Holdings of Radcliff, LLC, to Kentucky Land Holdings of Radcliff, LLC, lot 46A of Farmington Estates, deed tax $60. Shawn Redmon, to Shawn Redmon Rentals, LLC, a Kentucky Limited Liability Company, a 4.693 acre tract located in Flaherty. HSBC Bank, as Trustee in Trust for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc, to Jennifer Rhodes, a 1.006 acre tract located north of HWY 1238, deed tax $44. Jim Morse, to Gene M. McGehee and Connie S. McGehee, lot 10 of Buckler Knobs, deed tax $12. Shirley Whelan, to Steve Redmon Construction, Inc., a Kentucky Corporation, a 3.797 acre tract located on the north side of Shumate Road, deed tax $33. Chris McGehee, by and through Rhonda Heath, attorney-in-fact, to John D. Albright, lot 700 of Doe Valley Section in Wildflower Ridge Section, deed tax $3. Bonnie L. Arche and Merwyn A. Arche, to Robert L. Schiller, property located in Meade County, deed tax $235. Verle J. Wright and Teresa M. Wright, to Katrina Kay Farley and John Charles Farley, lot 3 of Point Salem Development, deed tax $150. Doan Brothers Construction, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, to Jeffrey Jenkins, a 5 acre tract located at the intersection of the northwesterly side of KY HWY 461 and the southwesterly side of Fackler Road, deed tax $18.50. John C. Crotzer, by his attorney in fact Rachelle M. Crotzer, Rachelle M. Crotzer, to Dean Rhink, lot 371 of Doe Valley Subdivision in Audubon Woods, deed tax $242. Rebecca M. Richardson, to Ronald L. Baker and Delores L. Baker, lot 28 of Johnnie Pack Farm, deed tax $17. Timmy Miller, to PALS Enterprise, LLC, property located in Meade County, deed tax $.50. Wayne E. Medley and Peggy Medley, to Helen Louise Estes, tract 6 of Brown Estates, deed tax $5. Jeff Nott and Joyce Nott, to Deanna J. Vinton, property located in Meade County, deed tax $123. Rubye Rachel Heavrin, to Kenneth P. Heavrin Jr. and Deborah L. Heavrin, and Ray Fackler and Angela Fackler, lot 18 of Buckner Heights Subdivision, deed tax $12. Trea Melissa Humphrey Weick and John A. Weick, to Lloyd Troutman and Mary D. Troutman, property located in Meade County, deed tax $50. Anthony M. Phillips and Brenda Phillips, to Bryan G. Eldredge and Lisa C. Eldredge, a 0.7770 acre tract located on the south side of Board Road, deed tax $106. Mobile Park Homes of Muldraugh, LLC, to Wayne Meyer and Sally Meyer, lot 74 of East Muldraugh Subdivision, deed tax $15. Janice Hope Wix, to Paul W. Corley and Denise H. Corley, lot 167 of Doe Valley Subdivision in Doe Valley Greens Section, deed tax $340.

Quitclaim Deeds

Frederick James Cundiff and Phyllis Cundiff, Martha E. Haynes, to Larry Butler and Sheila Butler, an unnamed

right of way in Meade County. Leslie Scott Singleton, to Leslie Scott Singleton and Susan G. Singleton, lot 44 in Meadow View Park Addition of Brandenburg. Palmer J. Cundiff, to Palmer J. Cundiff and Marietta S. Cundiff, lot 9 of Burch Property. Jason Thomas, to Ashley Thomas, lot 61 of River Cliff Subdivision.

Building Permits

8/12/10 Alfred Wood, garage, $82.50. 8/12/10 Sherry and Otis Morris, finishing extension on deck, $35. 8/16/10 Phillip and Angela Shelton, DW’02, $100. 8/17/10 Steven and Sharon Roberts, pole barn, $82.50. 8/17/10 Donald Rearson, SW’98, $100. 8/17/10 Linda Mae Eldridge, carport, $35.

Septic Permits

8/6/10 Bob Cummings/Garland Brown, Doe Run, Ekron Road. 8/16/10 Jeff Nott/Pat Wathon, Evan Road in Vine Grove. 8/16/10 Jeff Nott/Pat Wathon, Lie’s Road in Vine Grove.

Retail Food

8/16/10 Basham’s Food Mart, 3435 Hwy 60 in Vine Grove. 100 percent food. 100 percent retail. 8/18/10 Webb’s Town and Country. 1910 Rhodelia Road in Payneville. 96 percent food. 98 percent retail. 8/18/10 Stull’s Country Store, 4385 Rhodelia Road in Payneville. 98 percent food. 98 percent retail. 8/18/10 The Corner, 2110 Rhodelia Road in Payneville. 98 percent food.

Brandenburg Police

8/11/10 5:49 p.m. Tiffany S. Filburn, of Brandenburg, was driving a 2008 Dodge Ram. Deonne M. Richards, of Irvington, was driving a 1999 Ford Explorer. Filburn was backing from her parking spot when Richards was attempting to park in one of the parking spaces behind Filburn. Richards was in the middle of the lane in between the parking space, when Filburn struck Richards in the left driver’s side door. No injuries were reported. Report BPD10078 was filed by Officer Richardson. 8/12/10 3:35 p.m. Margarett F. Nevitt, of Union Star, was driving a 2008 Mercury GML. Crystal M. Fackler, of Brandenburg, was driving a 2006 Pontiac Grand Prix. Nevitt was pulling out of Dairy Queen parking lot when a large truck pulled in the parking lot entrance obstructing the view of the road. Nevitt stated that she looked and did not see any cars so she pulled out. Nevitt then struck Fackler. Fackler states that she swerved into the left lane but it was too late, she could not avoid the impact. The impact took place almost on the middle of both northbound lanes. Both vehicles were moved from the roadway before an officer arrived because of no injuries and the high volume of traffic. No injuries were reported. Report BPD10079 was filed by Officer Richardson.

Meade County Sheriff

8/6/10 3:12 a.m. Charles A. Thompson, of Muldraugh, was driving a 1991 Chevrolet C2E. Donald W. Roberts Jr, of Brandenburg, was driving a 2002 Chevrolet S10. Thompson and Roberts were leaving the main parking lot at Meade County High School when Thompson struck Roberts in the rear. Thompson received minor damage to the front bumper. Roberts received moderate damage to the rear bumper. Both operators were in agreement that Thompson would take care of the damage to Roberts. Thompson was not in possession of an insurance card, but insisted the vehicle was insured, and was to provide proof of insurance to investigating officer at school on 8/9/10. When Thompson did not provide an insurance card on 8/9/10, subsequent investigation determined that Thompson was not insured and that the registration plate belonged to another vehicle. Thompson will be charged with improper registration plate and failure of owner to maintain required insurance. No injuries were reported. Report 10-0197 was filed by Officer Cummings. 8/13/10 6:55 p.m. Christopher S. Jones, of Brandenburg, was driving a 2003 Chevrolet CZ2. Jones was operating northbound on Old Ekron Road. Jones stated that a female passenger was putting her hands in front of his face. Jones stated that when she removed her hands he observed he was in the opposite lane of traffic and about to collide with an oncoming vehicle. He then swerved to get back in his lane and lost control of the vehicle. The vehicle ran off the roadway and lodged in a ditch. No injuries were reported. Report 10-0199 was filed by Officer Rogers. 8/14/10 12:38 a.m. Charles R. Spink, of Battletown, was driving a 1988 Chevrolet SC2. Spink was being operated in the westbound lane on HWY 1816, Rabbit Run Road. Spink lost control of his vehicle and left the pavement running off the right shoulder and coming to a rest in a ditch. A passenger notified the officer that he

Court

forgot to tell the driver that there were no rear brakes in the vehicle. Meade County EMS was called to the scene and the injured were transported to Hardin Memorial Hospital. Report 100200 was filed by Officer Shipley. 8/15/10 7:12 a.m. Wilmer O. Camara, of Brandenburg, was driving a 1997 Dodge Dakota. Camara stated that he was north on KY 448 when he fell asleep and ran off the right shoulder and came back up onto the roadway, over corrected and the vehicle started sliding sideways. The vehicle slid off the roadway hitting a mailbox, a fence and then came to a rest. The fence and mailbox is owned by Jane Dooley of Brandenburg. No injuries were reported. Report 10-0201 was filed by Officer Hendley. 8/14/10 10:30 p.m. Ronald D. Ammons, of Guston, was driving a 1986 Chevrolet SC4. Ammons was westbound on Hill Grove Road. Ammons stated he saw five black calves in the roadway, but not before he struck one, resulting in damage done to Ammons’ vehicle. Ammons also stated that Ruby Denham came to the scene and let four of the calves back into the field before the officer arrived. The calf that was struck ran off into a wooded area and was unable to be located at the time of the accident. Mrs. Denham advised the office that they were unsure if the calf was their as it was not there when they arrived. There is a high probability that if the calf is hers, however, there are two other subjects that own cattle in the area. No injuries were reported. Report 10-0202 was filed by Officer Graham. 8/16/10 7:40 p.m. Lisa M. Hurt, of Brandenburg, was driving a 2001 Kia Sephia. Marcus M. Jones, of Guston, was driving a 1994 Chrysler Lebaron. Jones was westbound on KY 1638. Hurt was westbound on KY 1638 behind Jones. Hurt struck Jones in the rear as Jones was making a left turn from KY 1638 onto Crystal Lane. No injuries were reported. Report 100203 was filed by Officer Wright.

District Court 8/11/10 Casey S. Tolliver, 31, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense- plead guilty, 30 days probated after 2 days jail, 2 years probation, $200 fine, KAPS. Amy L. Bullock, 31, 2 counts of theft by deception, including cold checks under $500-plead guilty, 10 days probated after 1 hour jail, 2 years probation. Robert D. Boehler, 27, probation violation, for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing 8/18/10; manufacturing methamphetamine, 1st offense- plead not guilty, preliminary hearing 8/18/10. Patrick K. Joyner, 26, non payment of fines- pay $238; theft by deception, including cold checks under $300- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Margaret S. England, 47, theft by unlawful taking/disp- shopliftingplead not guilty, pretrial conference 9/1/10. Rachid K. Clayton, 32, operating on suspended/revoked operators license- plead guilty, 90 days probated, $100 fine; failure to notify address change to Department of Transportation- plead guilty, $50 fine. Tracy D. Alstott, 40, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense; operating on suspended/revoked operators licensefailure to appear. Heather M. Culver, 21, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Brandy M. Miller, 32, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Steven W. Karstens, 32, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 2nd offense- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Cody D. Goosey, 43, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 9/1/10. Renee K. Reid, 33, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, 3rd offense- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Douglas W. Jones, 43, speeding 22 mph over limit- merge/dismiss; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense- plead guilty, KAPS, 30 days probated after 2 days jail, 4 days county traffic school, 2 years probation. Beth A. Embrey, 31, flagrant non support- plead not guilty, preliminary hearing 9/1/10. Ronald E. Hammond, 45, flagrant non support- plead not guilty, preliminary hearing 8/18/10. James W. Humphrey, 46, escape, 2nd degree- plead not guilty, preliminary hearing 8/18/10. Karen S. Popham, 49, theft by deception, including cold checks under $500- plead guilty, 10 days probated after 1 hour jail, 2 years probation. Conal B. Boyatt, 54, 3 counts of theft by deceptions, include cold checks under $500- plead not guilty,

pretrial conference 9/22/10. Marsha R. French, 49, theft by unlawful taking/disp-all othersplead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Diana J. Wise, 43, theft by unlawful taking/disp-all others- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Linda R. Johnson, 43, theft by deception, includes cold checks under $500- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 9/29/10. Nicholas J. Templin, 7 counts of theft by unlawful taking, gasoline under $500- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 9/1/10. Gregory D. Timberlake, 33, non support- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 9/1/10. Shane E. Staples, 24, theft by deception, includes cold checks under $500- plead guilty, 10 days probated after 1 hour jail, 2 years probation. Tiffany Jefferson, 22, theft by deception, includes cold checks under $500- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 9/8/10. Shelly L. Wright, 40, theft by unlawful taking/disp-shoplifting- plead guilty, 30 days probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation, stay out of Pamida. Joshua R. Howard, 27, operating on suspended/revoked license operators license- plead guilty, amend to no license in possession, $50 fine. Leon Bell Jr., 21, speeding 26 mph over/greater- plead guilty, amend to 20 mph over, $40 fine. Shaun E. Geekins, 28, speeding 16 mph over limit; operating on suspended/revoked operators licensefailure to appear. Kevin A. Lafever, 19, speeding 10 mph over limit- plead guilty, $20 fine; improper registration plate; failure of non owner operator to maintain required insurance 1st offense- dismissed. Jerri L. McCabe, 46, no/expired registration plates; no/expired Kentucky registration receipt; failure of non owner operator to maintain required insurance, 1st offense- plead not guilty, pretrial conference 8/18/10. Thomas W. Ford III, 57, failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security, 1st offense; no/expired Kentucky registration receipt- dismissed with proof; speed 17 mph over limit- state traffic school. Kayla Gonzalez, 25, 2 counts of theft by deception, including cold checks under $500-pretrial conference 9/8/10. John D. Hardesty, 20, driving on DUI suspended license, 1st offense – plead guilty, 90 days probated, after 10 days jails, 2 years probation; possession of marijuana- plead guilty, 6 months probation after 10 days jail, 2 years probation; traffic in marijuana , less than 8 oz, 1st offense- plead guilty, 12 months probations after 60 days jail, 2 year waiver state traffic school; use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense- plead guilty, 6 months probation after 10 days jail, 2 years probation. Nathan W. Sipes, 37, possession of marijuana- pretrial conference 10/20/10; use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense. Timothy E. McGaren, 31, theft by unlawful taking/disp- all othersplead guilty, 12 months probated for 2 years, no contact of communication with Snappy Tomato Pizza. Andrew W. Robertson, 28, changing course abruptly causing danger to other vessel- defer 1 year. Dorothy M. Taylor, 60, theft by unlawful taking/disp- shopliftingplead guilty, 30 days probated for 2 years, stay out of Kroger. Jason E. Brown, 30, careless driving- dismissed/merged; operate motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, aggravator, 3rd offense- plead guilty, 12 months probated after 6 months jail, 2 years probation, $1,000 fine, KAPS, license revoked for 2 years; possess open alcohol beverage container in a motor vehicle- plead guilty, $25 fine. Shane P. Burnfin, 24, no/expired registration plates; failure to register transfer of motor vehicle- dismissed; failure of nonowner operator maintain required insurance 2nd or greater offense- plead guilty, 12 months probation after 120 days jail, $2,500 fine, 2 years probation. Kenny R. McCandless, 31, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense- plead guilty, 30 days probated after 2 days jail, 2 years probation, KAPS. Larry G. Tyler, 44, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, 1st offense- pretrial conference 10/13/10, jury trial 10/22/10. Roger D. Ettel, 57, operate motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, 1st offense- plead guilty, 30 days probated after 4 days jail, 2 years probation, $300 fine, KAPS. Harry P. Carroll, 40, operate motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, 2nd offense- pretrial conference 9/1/10. Roger L. Kearton, 46, operate motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 1st offense- pretrial conference 9/8/10. Kyle R. McGonigle, 34, speeding 18 mph over limit; no insurance, 1st offense; no/expired registration re-

Friday, August 27, 2010 ceipt; operate motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 4th offense; no/expired registration plates- pretrial conference 9/1/10. Joshua S. Rains, 30, operate motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, 1st offense-plead guilty, 30 days probated after 2 days jail, 2 year probation, $200 fine, KAPS; operating atv on roadway- plead guilty, $25 fine; fleeing or evading police, 1st degreeplead guilty 12 months probated after 30 days in jail, 2 years probation; resisting arrest- dismissed/merged. Lonnie Brown Jr., 30, criminal mischief, 1st degree- amend to 2nd degree, county attorney dismissal. Christopher B. Humphrey, 30, alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offense- failure to appear. Rachel R. Smith, 27, theft by deception, include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 8/18/10. Kimberly Clark, 50, wanton endangerment, 2nd degree; assault, 4th degree domestic violence, minor injury- evidentiary hearing 9/1/10. Angela J. Fowler, 42, assault 4th degree domestic violence, minor injury- defer 12 months. John P. Rogers, 19, traffic in marijuana, less than 8 oz, 1st offenseplead guilty, 6 months probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation. Kenneth S. Frasure, 39, cruelty to animals, 2nd degree- failure to appear. James O. Goodwin, 48, terroristic threatening, 3rd degree; assault 4th degree, no visible injury- defer 12 months. Tyler R. Kunkel, 21, speeding 15 mph over limit- $30 fine; possession of marijuana- 6 months probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/ security- dismissed with proof. Phillip L. Roby Jr., 55, 2 counts theft by deception, include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 9/8/10. David L. Bolin, 56, dogs to be vaccinated against rabies; cruelty to animals, 2nd degree; dogs to be licensed- pretrial conference 10/13/10. Steven B. Durbin, 20, non support- plead guilty, 12 months probated for 2 years, pay child support. Andrea S. Dixon, 23, assault, 4th degree domestic violence, minor injury; alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offense- pretrial conference 9/1/10. Michael T. Carman, 33, assault, 4th degree domestic violence, minor injury; alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offense- pretrial conference 9/1/10. Brenda M. Winfield, 62, 2 counts theft by deception, include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 10/13/10. Travis C. Holt, 27, 25 mph over- plead guilty, attend state traffic school. Joe M. Gatrost, 30, operating on suspended/revoked operators licensepretrial conference 10/20/10, jury trial 10/29/10. Douglas R. Allen, 36, operating on suspended/revoked operators license- pretrial conference 9/8/10. Brian K. Horsley, 38, no/expired registration plates; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security; leaving scene of accident/failure to render aid or assistance- pretrial conference 8/18/10. Traver D. Tabor, 37, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, 2nd offense- tep 8/18/10. Bruce D. McMillian, 40, operating on suspended license/revoked operators license; speeding 18 mph over limit; no/expired Kentucky registration receipt; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security- pretrial conference 8/18/10. Jennifer R. French, 28, failure to wear seat belts; operating on suspended/revoked operators license- pretrial conference 10/6/10. Jay T. Rhoades, 46, operating on suspended/revoked operators license; failure to produce insurance card- pretrial conference 8/18/10. Tanya Haley, 38, failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security- pretrial conference 8/18/10. Stephanie D. Gaddis, 33, failure to wear seat belts- pretrial conference 10/13/10, BT 10/22/10. Deidre M. Greenwell, 34, failure of non-owner operator to maintain required insurance- pretrial conference 9/8/10. Aubrey D. Fraley, 33, failure of owner to maintain required insurance/ security- plead guilty, 90 days probated, 2 years probations, $1,000 fine, no driving for 2 years; no/expired registration plates- plead guilty, $25 fine. Angela R. Davis, 42, 5 counts of theft by deception, including cold checks under $300- failure to appear. Cletus M. Lasley, 49, 13 counts of theft by deception, including cold checks under $500- failure to appear. Christopher L. Poynter, 31, 3 counts of theft by unlawful taking gasoline under $500- pretrial conference 9/1/10; no operators/moped license, failure to notify address change to department of transportation- pretrial conference 9/1/10. Anna E. Cundiff, 55, 3 counts

of theft by deception, including cold checks under $300- pretrial conference 9/8/10; probation violation for misdemeanor offense- pretrial conference 9/8/10; theft by unlawful taking, gasoline under $500- pretrial conference 9/8/10; 2 counts of theft by unlawful deception, include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 9/8/10. Linzy J. Ellington, 31, 6 counts of theft by deception, include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 8/18/10. Melissa M. Herron, 40, 5 counts of theft by deception, include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 9/8/10. Deandre S. Benham, 31, 5 counts of theft by deception- pretrial conference 9/15/10. Timothy A. Carman, 25, 7 counts of theft by deception, include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 9/8/10. Courtney A. Scott, 20, 5 counts of theft by deception, includes cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 9/8/10. Jason E. Payne, 31, assault, 4th degree domestic violence, minor injury- county attorney dismissal. Aaron S. Golladay, 24, use/ possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense- county attorney dismissal. Shirley M. Pipes, 60, theft by deception, include cold checks under $500- county attorney dismissal. William H. Haynes, 60, probation violation, for misdemeanor offense- probation hearing 9/8/10. Mary L. Frederick, 43, 2 counts of probation violation, with misdemeanor offense- failure to appear. Casey Cave, 22, probation violation, for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing 8/18/10. Amanda G. Downey, 40, probation violation, for misdemeanor offense- pretrial conference 9/1/10. Steven W. Slone, 24, probation violation, for misdemeanor offensepreliminary hearing 8/18/10; theft by unlawful taking, disp- all others- probation revocation hearing 8/18/10. Ronald M. Raley, 20, 2 counts of probation violation, for misdemeanor offense- admit violation, revoked to 60 days in jail. Nicole M. McMunn, 36, probation violation, for misdemeanor offense; use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense- probation revocation hearing 9/8/10. Dan A. Reson vs. Katheryn L. Baker, domestic violence- found in contempt, 30 days after serving 4 more days, sentenced to 4 days, report immediately. Teresa S. White vs. Ethel D. Lee, domestic violence- DVO dismissed. Donald W. Newton vs. Jo Ellen Newton, domestic violencebond set $1,00, hearing 8/18/10. Kyle L. Risinger vs. Valarie S. Mitoraj, domestic violence- DVO dismissed. Marion D. Chism, 47, 1st degree possession of controlled substance/drug, unspecified, 1st offense- preliminary hearing 8/18/10. Jason C. Moore, 28, theft by unlawful taking/dip- all othersplead guilty, 12 months probated after 2 years. Seth King, 24, theft by unlawful taking/disp- all others- plead guilty, 12 months probated for 2 years. Kimberly A. Stewart, 37, assault, 1st degree- waive to grand jury 9/13/10. Marty L. Miller, 27, alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offense- plead guilty, $25 fine; unlawful transaction with a minor under 18 years, 1st degree- defer 12 months. Dustin R. Harper, 22, alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offense- plead guilty $25 fine; unlawful transaction with a minor under 18 years, 1st degreedefer 12 months with conditions. Gregory W. Searcy, 51, non payment of fines- review 12/8/10; speeding 15 mph over limit; operate a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol/drugs, 3rd offense; driving on a DUI suspended license, 2nd offense in 5 years; no motorcyle operators license- grand jury 9/13/10. Eric M. Padgett, 20, burglary, 1st degree- waive to grand jury 9/13/10; missing one headlightplead guilty, $25 fine; failure to produce insurance card- plead guilty, $100 fine; no/expired Kentucky registration receipt- plead guilty, $25 fine. Michael D. Hack, 48, 2 counts of theft by unlawful taking/disp- all others- review 9/15/10. Kristi A. Reeves, 20, serving alcoholic beverages to minors, 1st offense; alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offensepretrial conference 8/18/10. Chad M. Hall, 25, cultivation of marijuana, more than 5 plants, 1st offense; use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense, possession of marijuana- suppress 10/20/10.


News

Friday, August 27, 2010

The News Standard ­- A7

Daughters of the American Revolution holds regional meeting By Brian Graves The News Standard

Members of the of the Daughters of the American Revolution held their regional meeting at First Baptist Church of Brandenburg last Friday. The members enjoyed a luncheon and treated to speakers all designed to help the members and new officers whose terms are just beginning. Special guest at the session was State Regent Jessieanne Wells who has just begun her three year term in the position. Wells said members attending came from all the chapters around the district. “These summer workshops are designed to help new officers become acclimated to their roles within the organization,” Wells said. She noted the DAR is often stereotyped and misunderstood about its purpose. “We are at the core a service organization,” Wells said. With over 4,000 members and 81 chapters state-

Time From page A1

an entertaining talk about ways to stop procrastinating and get more done in less time. “This is about time management,” Davenport joked. “So, I’ll do this in 15 minutes.” Davenport said before setting out on a task, there must be time set aside a moment and get the project started. He suggested turning off phones and computers as a way of clearing the decks to prepare. Davenport also said if someone is trying to separate all the aspects of life from the professional life, it can’t be done. “We all have the same 24 hours, and you just have to prioritize,” he said. “Somebody else can take the kids to practice, somebody else will make the brownies for the bake sale — my point is sometimes it’s OK to just say no.” He also added the importance of taking 10 percent of the week to plan ahead. “If someone calls in sick, the manager is expected to take their role,” he explained. “Those aren’t managers — they’re something else,” Davenport said. “If you have an organization and you truly

Fish From page A1

certain people from eating types of fish including white crappie, channel catfish and hybrid striped bass. The advisories encompass special populations, including pregnant women, nursing mothers and their infants, and children, according to a press release from the DPH and DFWR. “Pregnant women, women of childbearing age, and children who consume fish as part of their diet are more susceptible to the ill effects of contaminants sometimes found in fish,” William Hacker, M.D., public health commissioner said in the press release. “By following the guidelines in this advisory, individuals can reduce their exposure to contaminants in fish, help reduce their health risks, and still get the benefits of eating fish.” This isn’t the first time the quality of fish caught in the Ohio River has come into question. Fish caught in the Ohio River fell under the umbrella of a statewide mercury advisory issued in 2000. The consumption advisory doesn’t necessarily signal a surge in the amount of chemicals dumped into the Ohio River. “The advisories have actually been out for several years,’ Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Division of Water environmental scientist John Brumley said. “The levels of certain toxins

wide, the DAR focuses its mission on education, preserving history and promoting patriotism. “We do offer scholarships and students at their schools can check with guidance counselors as to the qualifications required for award,” Wells said. The DAR is also heavily committed to being a support for veterans who have served and are now serving in the Armed Forces. Wells said the organization has created “Project Patriot,” designed to help those just leaving military duty. “We want to do something especially for female veterans,” Wells said. “People do not realize that our female service personnel have different and unique needs. Many leave the service as young women which brings about special needs and we want to be able to help in that area.” Wells added the group has been in contact with Fort Campbell about getting a list of helpful items for troops now serving in Afghanistan. want someone to manage it, you’ve got to be sure to let them have that 10 percent a week. It’s three hours a week and it makes a big difference.” Proceeding down the list, Davenport noted how people love to do the “nice things,” but continually put off those tasks that may not be as palatable. He said if there is a task that may be unpleasant, there is no reason to put it off until later. “You don’t want to sit around and think about the task until four o’clock. Why procrastinate the things you dread? Do those first.” There were 21 points to Davenport’s presentation that included: do your homework, maximize personal powers, slice and dice the task, and focus on key result areas. “At the end of the day, don’t beat yourself up if you didn’t get it all done because you’ll never get it all done,” Davenport concluded. “But, if not getting things done can get you fired, you need to reprioritize.” The luncheon, held at the Farm Bureau building, was part of the Meade County Chamber of Commerce’s monthly sessions allowing local business and businesspersons to gather and hear from guest speakers to help business success. are going down significantly. With PCBs, the numbers seem to be going down a little bit. They banned using them a decade or two ago. I suspect as years go by, PCB numbers should decrease, just like DDT in the environment.” Properly cleaning, skinning, trimming and cooking fish can effectively reduce contaminant levels of certain toxins. Only skinless and boneless pieces of fish with as much fat removed as possible should be eaten. Though the outlook on decreasing levels of certain toxins is promising, other pollutants will have a much more lasting effect. “Mercury is a different issue,” Brumley said. “It comes from burning coal. Once it is in the environment, it can be sequestered in plant life. Unlike PCBs, which are deposited in fatty tissue, mercury is accumulated in muscle tissue. You can’t fillet it or cut off the skin and reduce your risk.” Studies show PCBs, which were widely used as dielectric fluids in transformers, capacitors and coolants, may cause liver damage as well as cancer when ingested. “I think the state EPA has really impacted water quality since the Water Quality Act,” Brumley said. “Is there still a long way to go? Sure. But I think we’ve taken a big step and continue to try and improve things. I don’t know if we’ll ever get it to the point it was pre-settlement, but we just try to improve it and make it get better and better.”

The News Standard/Brian Graves

Members of the Daughters of the American Revolution enjoyed a luncheon at First Baptist Church of Brandenburg as part of their regional summer meeting last week.

Ky. women celebrate 90 years of voting Submitted by Kentucky News Connection FRANKFORT — “I am woman hear me roar” was among the chants and cheers in the state Capitol yesterday as hundreds gathered to celebrate the 90th anniversary of women’s right to vote at The Kentucky Commission on Women’s Votes anniversary rally. It was on August 26, 1920 that the decadeslong battle by suffragettes was realized. 

Eleanor Jordan, executive director of the Kentucky Commission on Women, says the anniversary celebration was meant to boast about the Bluegrass state’s contribution to the non-violent suffrage movement and educate rally-goers on the hard-fought effort to liberate women’s political participation.

 “Some of these women were jailed. They were beaten; they were tortured. They were denied their civil rights in le-

gal counsel. They really did put their lives on the line.”
 Ellen Pickering, a filmmaker with Appalshop Community Media Initiative, says contributions by women are often neglected or treated as footnotes in history books.
 “Kentucky has been the home of women involved in the suffrage movement such as Laura Clay. But, going from that point on, there have been many strong women who’ve broken barriers and contributed so much to our political, social and cultural life.”

 Engaging more women in the political process calls attention to issues that aren’t just genderspecific, she adds. 
 “Women tend to earn less. Women often are taking care of children, concerned about school. All of these are areas where the political arena is really important to our quality of life.” There were also events held in Louisville.





Stock Photo

Yesterday was the 90th anniversary of the 19th Amendment allowing women the right to vote.

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NEWS

Friday, August 27, 2010

The News Standard - A7

Daughters of the American Revolution holds regional meeting By Brian Graves The News Standard Members of the of the Daughters of the American Revolution held their regional meeting at First Baptist Church of Brandenburg last Friday. The members enjoyed a luncheon and treated to speakers all designed to help the members and new officers whose terms are just beginning. Special guest at the session was State Regent Jessieanne Wells who has just begun her three year term in the position. Wells said members attending came from all the chapters around the district. “These summer workshops are designed to help new officers become acclimated to their roles within the organization,” Wells said. She noted the DAR is often stereotyped and misunderstood about its purpose. “We are at the core a service organization,” Wells said. With over 4,000 mem-

Time From page A1 an entertaining talk about ways to stop procrastinating and get more done in less time. “This is about time management,” Davenport joked. “So, I’ll do this in 15 minutes.” Davenport said before setting out on a task, there must be time set aside a moment and get the project started. He suggested turning off phones and computers as a way of clearing the decks to prepare. Davenport also said if someone is trying to separate all the aspects of life from the professional life, it can’t be done. “We all have the same 24 hours, and you just have to prioritize,” he said. “Somebody else can take the kids to practice, somebody else will make the brownies for the bake sale — my point is sometimes it’s OK to just say no.” He also added the importance of taking 10 percent of the week to plan ahead. “If someone calls in sick, the manager is expected to take their role,” he explained. “Those aren’t managers — they’re something else,” Davenport said. “If you have an organization and you truly

Fish From page A1 certain people from eating types of fish including white crappie, channel catfish and hybrid striped bass. The advisories encompass special populations, including pregnant women, nursing mothers and their infants, and children, according to a press release from the DPH and DFWR. “Pregnant women, women of childbearing age, and children who consume fish as part of their diet are more susceptible to the ill effects of contaminants sometimes found in fish,” William Hacker, M.D., public health commissioner said in the press release. “By following the guidelines in this advisory, individuals can reduce their exposure to contaminants in fish, help reduce their health risks, and still get the benefits of eating fish.” This isn’t the first time the quality of fish caught in the Ohio River has come into question. Fish caught in the Ohio River fell under the umbrella of a statewide mercury advisory issued in 2000. The consumption advisory doesn’t necessarily signal a surge in the amount of chemicals dumped into the Ohio River. “The advisories have actually been out for several years,’ Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Division of Water environmental scientist John Brumley said. “The levels of certain toxins

bers and 81 chapters statewide, the DAR focuses its mission on education, preserving history and promoting patriotism. “We do offer scholarships and students at their schools can check with guidance counselors as to the qualifications required for award,” Wells said. The DAR is also heavily committed to being a support for veterans who have served and are now serving in the Armed Forces. Wells said the organization has created “Project Patriot,” designed to help those just leaving military duty. “We want to do something especially for female veterans,” Wells said. “People do not realize that our female service personnel have different and unique needs. Many leave the service as young women which brings about special needs and we want to be able to help in that area.” Wells added the group has been in contact with Fort Campbell about getting a list of helpful items for troops now serving in want someone to manage it, you’ve got to be sure to let them have that 10 percent a week. It’s three hours a week and it makes a big difference.” Proceeding down the list, Davenport noted how people love to do the “nice things,” but continually put off those tasks that may not be as palatable. He said if there is a task that may be unpleasant, there is no reason to put it off until later. “You don’t want to sit around and think about the task until four o’clock. Why procrastinate the things you dread? Do those first.” There were 21 points to Davenport’s presentation that included: do your homework, maximize personal powers, slice and dice the task, and focus on key result areas. “At the end of the day, don’t beat yourself up if you didn’t get it all done because you’ll never get it all done,” Davenport concluded. “But, if not getting things done can get you fired, you need to reprioritize.” The luncheon, held at the Farm Bureau building, was part of the Meade County Chamber of Commerce’s monthly sessions allowing local business and businesspersons to gather and hear from guest speakers to help business success. are going down significantly. With PCBs, the numbers seem to be going down a little bit. They banned using them a decade or two ago. I suspect as years go by, PCB numbers should decrease, just like DDT in the environment.” Properly cleaning, skinning, trimming and cooking fish can effectively reduce contaminant levels of certain toxins. Only skinless and boneless pieces of fish with as much fat removed as possible should be eaten. Though the outlook on decreasing levels of certain toxins is promising, other pollutants will have a much more lasting effect. “Mercury is a different issue,” Brumley said. “It comes from burning coal. Once it is in the environment, it can be sequestered in plant life. Unlike PCBs, which are deposited in fatty tissue, mercury is accumulated in muscle tissue. You can’t fillet it or cut off the skin and reduce your risk.” Studies show PCBs, which were widely used as dielectric fluids in transformers, capacitors and coolants, may cause liver damage as well as cancer when ingested. “I think the state EPA has really impacted water quality since the Water Quality Act,” Brumley said. “Is there still a long way to go? Sure. But I think we’ve taken a big step and continue to try and improve things. I don’t know if we’ll ever get it to the point it was pre-settlement, but we just try to improve it and make it get better and better.”

THE NEWS STANDARD/BRIAN GRAVES

Members of the Daughters of the American Revolution enjoyed a luncheon at First Baptist Church of Brandenburg as part of their regional summer meeting last week.

Ky. women celebrate 90 years of voting Submitted by Kentucky News Connection FRANKFORT — “I am woman hear me roar” was among the chants and cheers in the state Capitol yesterday as hundreds gathered to celebrate the 90th anniversary of women’s right to vote at The Kentucky Commission on Women’s Votes anniversary rally. It was on August 26, 1920 that the decadeslong battle by suffragettes was realized. Eleanor Jordan, executive director of the Kentucky Commission on Women, says the anniversary celebration was meant to boast about the Bluegrass state’s contribution to the non-violent suffrage movement and educate rally-goers on the hard-fought effort to liberate women’s political participation. “Some of these women were jailed. They were beaten; they were tortured. They were denied their civil rights in le-

gal counsel. They really did put their lives on the line.” Ellen Pickering, a filmmaker with Appalshop Community Media Initiative, says contributions by women are often neglected or treated as footnotes in history books. “Kentucky has been the home of women involved in the suffrage movement such as Laura Clay. But, going from that point on, there have been many strong women who’ve broken barriers and contributed so much to our political, social and cultural life.” Engaging more women in the political process calls attention to issues that aren’t just genderspecific, she adds. “Women tend to earn less. Women often are taking care of children, concerned about school. All of these are areas where the political arena is really important to our quality of life.” There were also events held in Louisville.

STOCK PHOTO

Yesterday was the 90th anniversary of the 19th Amendment allowing women the right to vote.

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News Resourceful tips on how to stay safe in the kitchen Friday, August 27, 2010

A8 - The News Standard

Carole Goodwin 4-H & Youth Development

Think of all the delicious treats you can make in the kitchen, maybe chocolate chip cookies, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches or even pizza. While cooking can be fun for both you and your parents, it is important to use caution when working in the kitchen to avoid getting hurt or sick.  Burns, cuts and falls are not fun, especially when you are cooking. While accidents may happen, accidents in the kitchen are more likely to occur when you are in a hurry, do not clean up spills, not paying attention or cooking without permission. To avoid being injured in the kitchen, remember the following tips:

•Always dry hands well after washing to avoid slippery fingers and electrical shock •Wipe up spills on the floor and countertop right away. •Close cabinet doors and drawers after opening them. •Place knives where they belong and do not leave them on the kitchen counter. •When using a knife, cut away from your hand. •Always use potholders when handling pots and pans. •Open pan lids away from your face to avoid being burned by steam. One of the easiest ways to keep yourself and the food you are preparing safe is to wash your hands. Good and bad bacteria, also known as germs, are everywhere and can be transferred to food from dirty hands, aprons, utensils and countertops.

Bacteria in the food may cause those that eat it to become very sick. Therefore, it is important to wash your hands using warm soapy water for at least 20 seconds. Be sure to wash your hands in the following situations: •Before handling food •After handling raw foods •After eating or drinking •After handling garbage or dirty plates, utensils or equipment •After using the restroom •After touching your nose, mouth, hair or skin   Whether you are preparing a dish for your 4-H food and nutrition project or just cooking for fun, safety in the kitchen is necessary. With a few simple precautions, you can prevent getting hurt or sick in the kitchen. For more information on staying in the kitchen,

Local Happenings...

The Community Calendar is a free service to community groups and organizations for event announcements. To submit event information, please call The News Standard office at 270-422-4542, visit us at 1065 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg, or e-mail us at sales@ thenewsstandard.com.

Friday, Aug. 27

•SHELTER ADOPTIONS – 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Orscheln Home & Farm Store, Radcliff, Ky. •P.L. KASEY CENTER – 9 a.m. coffee, donuts and games. 10 a.m. exercise. 10:30 a.m. nutrition bingo. P.L. Kasey Center, 303 Hillview Drive, Irvington, KY. Free. Every Friday. All times are eastern. 270-5477648 •SALUTE TO VIETNAM VETERANS – 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Radcliff Square. The event is for all ages and will have food, games, door prizes and music. •CIVIL WAR RE-ENACTORS – 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fort Duffield in West Point. •RASCALS OF RAGTIME – 7 p.m. at Vine Grove’s amphitheatre. The event is free to the public. •RACHEL’S CHALLENGE ASSEMBLY – 9 a.m. at Stuart Pepper Middle School. 1 p.m. at Meade County High School.

Saturday, Aug. 28

•PILATES – 9 a.m. at the MC Public Library Annex. Beginning mat pilates. Limited class size. Call to register. 270-422-2094. •VFW DANCE – 7:30 p.m. at VFW Post 11404, 770 ByPass Road, Brandenburg. All activities are open to the public. 270422-5184. •COOK OUT/BAKE SALE BENEFITING LARRY SINGLETON – 8 a.m. to ? at Cox’s Variety Store. For more information call Sandy McGuire at 270998-0125. •SHELTER ADOPTIONS – 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Orscheln Home and Farm Store in Radcliff. •MCHS CLASS OF 2000 REUNION – 6 p.m. at Doe Valley Swim and Tennis Club. •BROWN BAG DAY – 10 a.m. to noon at the Meade County Clothes Closet. Bring a brown bag and fill it up for $1. •FARMER’S MARKET – 8 a.m. to noon at the MC Extension Office Pavilion. •YUGIOH TOURNAMENT – 9 a.m. to noon for ages 10-18 at the Meade County Public Library Annex. •BAKUGAN TOURNAMENT – 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. for ages 10-18 at the Meade County Public Library Annex. Snacks provided.

Sunday, Aug. 29

•BINGO – 7 p.m. at the Farm Bureau Building in Brandenburg. Sponsored by the Payneville Volunteer Fire Department. License No. 1195. 270-4964349 •4 FAMILY POTLUCK AND REUNION – 1 p.m. for Ashcraft, Richardson, Schacklette and Stith families at Buck Grove Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. •THE LORD’S SUPPER – 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services at Severns Valley Baptist Church, Elizabethtown. Deacon ordination at 6 p.m. in the worship center. Christmas choir rehearsal at 7 p.m. in the choir room. •GLAD TIDINGS INSTALLING NEW PASTOR, LARRY POWELL – Service begins at 10:45 a.m. and a celebration will immediately follow. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information call 270422-2020.

Monday, Aug. 30

•STORY HOUR – 10:30 a.m. at the MC Public Library on Mondays and Tuesdays. For ages 2-6. 270-422-2094 •CARDIO X – 3:45-4:30 p.m. at the MC Public Library Annex. 270-4222094 •MEET THE CHORUS DIRECTORS – 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Meade County High School Cafeteria. Refreshments and cookies will be served. •MEADE COUNTY ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS – 8:30 a.m. in the grand jury room at the Meade County Courthouse. •OUTDOOR FITNESS – 3:45 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Meade County Public Library Annex. •HOMEWORK HELP – 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library. No sign-up required, just stop by with your questions.

Tuesday, Aug. 31

•STORY HOUR – 10:30 a.m. at the MC Public Library on Mondays and Tuesdays. For ages 2-6. 270-422-2094. •DULCIMER JAM – 6:30 p.m. at Vine Grove City Hall. Everyone is welcome to come and listen or play. 270-877-2422. •FARMER’S MARKET – 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the MC Extension Office Pavilion. •HOMEWORK HELP – 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library. No sign-up required, just stop by with your questions.

Wednesday, Sept. 1

•QUILTING CLUB - Meets the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month at 8 a.m. in the MC Library Annex. Free. All experience

levels. 270-422-2094. •YOGA – Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. at the MC Public Library. 270-422-2094. •BEGINNING YOGA –Wednesday at 5 p.m. at the MC Public Library. 270-4222094 •VFW BINGO – 7:30 p.m. at VFW Post 11404, 770 ByPass Road, Brandenburg. All activities are open to the public. 270-422-5184. •LINE DANCING – 7-8:30 p.m. at the Colvin Community Center, 230 Freedom Way, Radcliff, Ky. Every Wednesday. 270-6687228. •HOMEWORK HELP – 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library. No signup required, just stop by with your questions.

contact your Meade County Cooperative Extension Service at 270-422-4958. Join 4-H in the new school year     A new school year is upon us, and it’s a great time to join 4-H, the nation’s largest youth organization. 4-H offers experiential learning to youth ages 9 to 18 with something for all interests, from insects to space to sewing. There are topics for all youths. By participating in 4-H, youths develop many essential life skills including responsibility, leadership and self-esteem.   You can get involved in 4-H in several ways by participating in clubs or completing projects. Clubs provide youths a chance to practice leadership skills while making new friends. Topics vary across the state depending on local youths’ interests, and

Upcoming Events

EKRON HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1946 REUNION – September 3 at 6 p.m. at Doe Run Inn. For more information contact Jane Thompson at 270-8283058. WILD GAME COOK OFF – September 4 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Brandenburg Riverfront Park. Cornhole tournament at noon. BBQ DINNER – September 11 from 4 – 7 p.m. at Raymond Baptist Church. Dine in or carry out. Silent auction. HALLOWEEN COSTUME AND KIDS’ STUFF SWAP- September 18 from 1 - 3 p.m. at the Meade County Public Library Annex. Find a new home for your child’s gently used clothes, toys, or Halloween costumes. Bring your clean, gently used items to the library during regular hours Sept. 13 - 17. Then come back with your trickor-treators on September 18 to shop for new items to take home. Any remaining items from the swap will be donated to charity.

mation on topics such as character development, fitness and healthy eating.   After-school programs offer fun, hands-on activities for youths in a safe environment. Programs differ among communities depending on area 4-Hers needs and interests, but some possible subjects include healthy living, communications, family and consumer sciences, environmental and earth science, plants and animals, science and technology and leadership. By participating in any of these programs, youth learn how to set goals, make sound decisions and resolve conflicts.   4-H offers a world of opportunities for youths to explore. For more information on how youths can get involved, contact your Meade County Cooperative Extension Service at 270-422-4958.

news • [nooz, nyooz] —noun (usually used with a singular verb)

1. a report of a recent event; intelligence; information 2. get it each week in The News Standard; subscribe today by a. calling 270-422-4542, b. visiting us at 1065 Old Ekron Road in Brandenburg

CANDIDATES FOR NOVEMBER 2nd ELECTION IN MEADE COUNTY State and District Offices Office Democrat State Rep. Jeff Greer (D) Dis. Judge 1

Republican Dalton Jantzen (R)

Com. Atty.

Other Steve Crebessa Kenneth Harold Goff II Darren Sipes Shan F. Embry

Dis. Judge 2

Thursday, Sept. 2

•LAPSIT STORYTIME – 10:30-11 a.m. at the MC Public Library every Thursday. For ages 2 and under. 270-422-2094. •COMMUNITY DINNER – 5:30 to 7 p.m. at P.L. Kasey Center, 303 Hillview Drive, Irvington, Ky. Carryout available at 5 p.m. $6 for adults. $4 for children 10 and under. Every Thursday. All times are eastern. 270547-7648. •CHARLIE LOGSDON FREE WALKING TOUR – 7 p.m. on the square in Elizabethtown. The event is free and open to the public. •HOMEWORK HELP –3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library. No sign-up required, just stop by with your questions.

range from animals to communications to financial management. From science to crafts, youths of all ages and abilities will find something that interests them in 4-H projects. By completing projects, youths not only develop new interests and hobbies but also important skills such as self-confidence, time management and critical thinking. While the deadline has passed for state fair entries this year, youths can get a jump start on next year ’s project by joining 4-H in September.   In addition to clubs and projects, 4-H offers numerous in school and after-school programs for youth. 4-H youth development agents make many visits to county schools throughout the year to offer hands-on learning. Many times they reinforce subjects youth are learning in school, but they also provide infor-

Susan Streible (D)

David M. Williams (R)

Meade County Offices Office PVA Judge/Ex. Attorney Clerk Sheriff Jailer Coroner Surveyor

Democrat Rebecca Richardson (D) Becky Flaherty (D) Jessica Brown Roberts (D) Katrina Fitzgerald (D) Clifford L. Wise (D) Troy Seelye (D) William R. “Billy” Adams (D) Timothy W. Smith (D)

Republican

Other

Gerry Lynn (R) Margaret L. Matney (R) William “Butch” Kerrick (R) Carlton ”Daryl” Haynes (R)

Meade County Magistrates District Democrat Republican 1 – Muldraugh, Woodland, Grahampton Chris Cottrell (D) 2 – Rock Haven, Doe Valley, Weldon Herbert “Herbie” Chism II (D) Mitch Shortt (R) 3 – Flaherty, Guston, Otter Creek Mark D. Hubbard (D) Gale Delano (R) 4 – B-burg East, B-burg West, Ashton Tony Staples (D) Gary P. Chapman (R) 5 – Ekron, Buck Grove, Garrett Harold E. Davidson (D) Steve Wardrip (R) 6 – Payneville, Battletown, Wolf Creek Randall Hardesty (D) Debra Masterson (R)

Other Thomas Goddard (I)

Meade County Constables District Democrat Republican Other 1 – Muldraugh, Woodland, Grahampton Henry Bailey (D) Christopher Williams (R) 2 – Rock Haven, Doe Valley, Weldon James R. Tanner (D) Bob Colasanti (R) 3 – Flaherty, Guston, Otter Creek Russell F. Zahnd (R) 4– B-burg East, B-burg West, Ashton Jason L. Fore (D) 5 – Ekron, Buck Grove, Garrett James Perguson (D) James P. Harris (R) 6 – Payneville, Battletown, Wolf Creek James “J.C.” Chism (D) Phillip Wimpee (R) The GENERAL ELECTION to be held in November 2, 2010, will include races for Brandenburg, Ekron, Muldraugh MAYORS and CITY COUNCILS. This list above is for the November election with the current candidate information available.


News District schools aim to keep physical education, recess 2010 School Series The News Standard ­- A9

Friday, August 27, 2010

By Jennifer Corbett The News Standard

Editor’s Note: This is the fifth story in a seven-part series concerning different aspects of a student’s life in Meade County and the opportunities available to them. Items such as the Wii and Xbox have kept children’s focus on the TV, and away from the physical activity such as sports and exercising. Statistically more kids are couch potatoes rather than the next Michael Phelps. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, results from the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey indicate that an estimated 17 percent of children and adolescents ages 2-19 years are obese. The ultimate cause could be anything whether it is a child’s lifestyle at home or failure to learn how to exercise in school. Some educators say obesity is due to unhealthy eating habits, while some say a number of school districts are completely cutting out physical education and recess. Not so fast says Meade County Superintendent Mitch Crump. “I always think it’s good thing when (the kids are) active,” he said. “But not necessarily during school. Schools have to balance (classes) and activities. A lot of it will depend on the school day.” Crump added that if a student doesn’t exercise during the school day, there are many other avenues for children to be active in such as volleyball, basketball and various other sports, clubs and after school activities. Meade County High School Nurse Kellie Conley contributes the childhood obesity factor to living in a fast society that depends on fast food and technology. “Kids have gotten away from being outside,” she said. “To counter that, you have to be active. I encourage kids to be outside at least 30 minutes a day.” As far as eating habits, Conley said it all starts at home. Since kids eat like their parents, she hopes to focus on creating more parent education to improve healthy meals and activities at home. The issue of keeping children active has been on the forefront of many organizations such as the “Right to Recess Campaign” and the “Campaign for Healthy Kids.” It is the goal of those groups to express the vital need to set aside time for kids to exercise. Representative Addia Wuchner tried to increase child wellness by pushing Kentucky House Bill 52, also known as “The Healthy Kids Act,” which would require “school council wellness policies to provide for at least 30 minutes of structured moderate to vigorous physical activity, 150 min-

utes per week, or the equivalent per month.” According to Crump, there are no physical activity requirements set by the state. However, the curriculum and guidelines for PE are determined by each school’s Site Based Decision Making Council. House Bill 52 would also oblige the recording of Body Mass Index and would forbid canceling recess as a form of punishment. “We’ve pushed to not use recess as a punishment because already kids are a bit inactive,” said Jason Sutton, director of pupil personnel. “They want to sit down, watch TV, or play Xbox. So I think we’ve really kind of tried to push PE and recess. We really don’t want to set them out of it.” In the end, House Bill 52 died in a committee hearing. However, the need to keep kids active and moving is still making its mark in Meade County. As a physical education major in college, Crump believes it’s vital for students to have time to exercise, but it’s the school’s job to balance study time with activity time. Thankfully recess doesn’t cost anything, so Crump doesn’t foresee Meade County eliminating recess anytime soon. Despite budget cuts, most Meade County principals make recess for students a priority. While they don’t necessarily have 30 minutes each day, most schools have approximately 24 minutes for recess. Currently MCHS doesn’t offer recess to its students, however they do get P.E. for one semester and health for another. According to James R. Allen Freshman Academy P.E. teacher CJ Kirk, by law high school students aren’t required to have more than one semester of a P.E. class. Since they’ve had P.E. twothree days a week through their school career, Kirk thinks that students tend to hear the same thing over and over again. Once they attend high school, Kirk makes sure to instill the students with proper techniques to stay healthy and active by timing them when they run a mile. “It hopefully ingrains them with a healthy lifestyle,” he said. “What I’ve been happy with is they’re still enjoying P.E..” Each school in Meade County has acquired their own scheduling structure, which implements what they feel is the perfect amount of time for student’s exercise, whether it’s recess or simply walking around the building after lunch. At Muldraugh Elementary, students get 50 minutes of PE twice a week where they just began recording students’ body mass index. “Last year, (P.E. teacher Gary) Whelan was encouraged with the students setting goals of increasing exer-

cise and being more careful with diets,” said Muldraugh Principal William T. Parker. After lunch, the younger classes have a typical recess, while the upper classmen have a “Wellness Walk.” According to Parker, the “Wellness Walk” is a structured 12-20 minute walk around the school building and was created by a sixth grade class three years ago. The walk equals up to three quarters of a mile. Parker feels the “Wellness Walk” meets the expectations of staying healthy for the older students. The school even schedules it as a priority for those students. Even though other schools allow the upper classmen to have recess, Parker thinks the “Wellness Walk” is working tremendously for them. He doesn’t anticipate Muldraugh Elementary changing the structure of its recess and “Wellness Walks” anytime soon. “It’s worked for us,” he said. “They enjoy the Wellness Walk.” Flaherty Elementary jumped on the bandwagon and also implemented a “Wellness Walk,” although it’s only for the sixth graders. For 15-20 minutes after lunch, students follow the same routine as Muldraugh Elementary and walk a few laps around their building. On Fridays, they have their “Wellness Walk” for 45 minutes in the gym. Flaherty Principal, Marc Adams, said each student is only guaranteed 10 minutes of physical activity per day. The school day at Flaherty is very busy with academics, but they try to keep everyone up and moving as much as possible. “We have a really good foundation for year-round physical activity,” Adams said. “We try to keep our kids healthy and learning.” Battletown Elementary hasn’t implemented a “Wellness Walk,” but they do offer PE twice a week plus 20-25 minutes of recess each day. “Kids have to have (recess) each day,” said Battletown Principal Jeff Turner. “It’s a good incentive for kids to do what they’re supposed to do.” What Turner means is if a student gets in trouble, say for not doing their homework on time, they would have to sit out the first 10 minutes of recess. According to Turner, breaks are a vital part of

the school day and if taken away, kids get wore out and tend to loose their focus. “If they get out there and get their blood moving it helps them tremendously (in the classroom),” he said. Turner added that other important aspects of recess include social interactions, building relationships, creating good sportsmanship and overall exercising. When it comes to the classroom, Battletown P.E. teacher Jerry Nelson said that as long as students make an effort to do the exercises in his class, he is content. While teaching to a class of fourth and fifth graders, Nelson spoke about the importance of exercising at a young age, the effects of smoking, why people become obese and the different types of muscles in the body. He even touched upon the upcoming increase in health care. According to Nelson, health care may not seem important to the kids now, but it will affect them when they become adults. “If you look at it, it’s their future,” Nelson said, adding that he realizes it may seem shocking that he is speaking to a young crowd about an adult subject. But Nelson feels it is important to prepare students for adulthood. When it comes to the structure of his P.E. classes, Nelson breaks up his time at Battletown and Payneville Elementary. Though he doesn’t necessarily switch up the routines. “Usually I keep them as busy bodies,” he said. “Not to where they’re huffing and puffing, but to get their heart rate increased.” Nelson added that the school board doesn’t have a set structure for his classes; he just tries to keep everyone moving and involved. “I try to do games where people don’t sit out,” he said. “It’s a lot of heavily moving activities.” Nelson admits the P.E. program isn’t perfect and feels there is always room for improvement. He said he would update the program by creating professional development days that cater solely to P.E. All district P.E. teachers could get together and talk about what works and what doesn’t work for them. Battletown Principal Turner tries to update its facilities as much possible. Since Turner is an avid basketball player, he felt it

The News Standard/Jennifer Corbett

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Emma Maifeld exercises by doing a gymnastics routine in the Battletown Elementary gym. A student exercises during P.E. class at Battletown Elementary. Battletown Elementary students get into their wiffle ball game that was held during a 30 minute break in between classes. necessary to install break-aaway rims for the students’ safety. Turner admits that aspects such as video games, TVs and computers do make it difficult for students to be excited about exercising, but once they get motivated he is surprised by how talented the kids can be. “Some kids discover they’re good athletes,” he said. “It’s little things like that you don’t know impacts a kid.” Nelson compared recess and P.E. by saying that P.E. is “recess using thinking.” According to Nelson, if a school doesn’t offer recess, the time a student should exercise is made up through their work in P.E. Turner feels so strongly about recess that he plans to continue to implement it into Battletown Elementary whether it’s time outside or breaks during the school day. “We have one of the longest school days,” he said. “Kids definitely need that relief.” Some school districts have had to cut recess due to budget shortfalls, but Turner is thankful that Meade County has been safe thus far. If a budget crisis were to arise, Turner said he would fight to keep recess. “If it keeps happening, it does bother me,” Turner said. “I don’t want it to

happen here.” Brandenburg Primary School Principal Gloria Bertrand agreed with Turner, adding that recess is an important aspect of the school day. “I’ve been an administrator for 15 years and I’ve never had a teacher cut out recess,” she said. “The question is whether or not to revamp recess. Sometimes recess gets cut for older grades because of specific projects, but not often.” Throughout her tenure, Bertrand said she has not seen a dramatic shift in the amount of time set aside for recess. “It hasn’t changed a great deal,” she said. Bertrand said she identifies with the dilemma other school administrators face when push comes to shove and the decision is made to cut out recess. “It saddens me but I have an understanding,” she said, adding that if she were presented with budget cuts, she would try to cut somewhere else to keep recess. Whatever issues that may arise whether it be inclement weather or a demanding curriculum, Bertrand will try to keep recess at BPS. “It will stay unless I’m told otherwise,” Bertrand said. “As long as it’s left to my discretion, I would keep it for the children.”

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Features Kentucky couple combines work, travel by singing in churches Friday, August 27, 2010

A10 - The News Standard

They used to be part of a family singing group called The Citadels. But today, they are simply “Blessed.” “Dianne chose that name because of the many blessings we’ve received throughout our lives,” Ward Davis said. The Spencer County residents are back on the road again as a duet, after raising two daughters and ending their careers by retirement. A native of Camp Taylor in Jefferson County, she worked in state government as a nurse in Louisville, while her husband, who was born just outside Mammoth Cave National Park, put in “32 years and four months,” at the Ford plant in Louisville. As a family group that included their daughters,

they combined work and travel, singing in churches throughout the region, and even recording an album. “It wasn’t always easy,” Ward said, noting once they got home from an engagement “just in time to go to work.” They moved to Spencer 12 years ago, building their dream home on a mostly wooded five-acre tract. One of their daughters lives nearby on Day Road. After being out of the singing business for 30 years, the couple decided to renew that part of their lives three years ago, when he was 72 and Dianne, 69. Despite our ages, we decided to try it again because we were retired and good to go, Ward said, further noting “Gos-

pel music is so much better now, and we sing so much better.” The son of a Baptist minister who has sung in church all his life, Ward said he is especially impressed with his wife’s improvement on vocals. “Di sings a lot higher now, and for 72 years old, her voice is so strong.” Since resuming their singing, the grandparents of four and great-grandparents of five have recorded several CD’s and traveled extensively in Kentucky and into about 10 other states. It’s not all work and no play when out on the road, Dianne explains. A major fan of thrift store shopping, she enjoys finding treasures along the way in out-ofthe-way places, while Ward shops for Case knives. The couple, who have been married for 55 years

and attend Plum Creek Baptist when they’re not on the road, say what they are doing is more a hobby than a profession. “We don’t charge, but usually an offering is taken up, and we always come away with enough to cover our expenses,” Ward said. They sell their CD’s for $15 each or three for $30. “Mainly we’re doing what we feel like it’s meant for us to do. “People come up to us after we sing and say ‘You all were a real blessing to me,’ and that means everything. It makes all the practice and travel worthwhile. “Mostly, it makes us feel blessed,” Ward said. For further informaPhoto by Don White tion, contact Ward and Ward and Diane Davis are the husband and wife duo beDianne Davis at 502477-1642 or email ward- hind the band “Blessed.” The couple have recorded several CDs and traveled throughout Kentucky. davis@yahoo.com.

Save on electric bills by paying attention to phantom loads Jennifer Bridge Family & Consumer Science A dripping faucet can make a water bill soar, so rather than watch money go down the drain, you’d probably grab a wrench or call a plumber. But there are equally expensive leaks elsewhere in your house, and you probably aren’t aware of them. They’re called phantom loads, and they’re constantly draining electric current.

The term phantom load refers to the amount of energy electronic devices and appliances use when you think they’re turned off. Instead, these devices go into standby or sleep modes. And though it’s just a trickle, it can end up costing you a great deal over the course of the year. You may think you’ve turned off your television, DVD player or computer, but the fact is, as long as the device is plugged into the wall, it is pulling current to run timers, remote sensors or programming. It is estimated that 25 percent of the electrici-

ty used by home electronics is consumed when the device is “off.” Some of those energysucking devices may surprise you. A cordless phone base pulls nearly 29 kilowatt hours of electricity over the course of a year. That’s the equivalent of 483 60-watt light bulbs burning for one hour. A DVR uses 111 kilowatt hours. Constantly keeping your desktop computer plugged in eats 311 kilowatt hours of electricity a year. And a plasma TV? It’s the all-time winner, drawing 1,452 kilowatt hours per year or the equivalent of using 24,200 60-

watt light bulbs for one hour. Not only is that a drain on the bank account, but it’s hard on the environment. Depending upon your total energy usage, up to 10 percent could be going toward maintaining home electronics and appliances when you’re not using them. Multiply that amount by every home in the state and then every home in the country. That’s a lot of fossil fuel being burned to generate electricity, not to mention the resulting carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere. What’s the answer? Unplug electronic devices when

not in use. A convenient way to do that is to plug multiple devices into a power strip, which you can easily turn off when you’re finished using the equipment. Group devices that have common usage. For instance, plug a computer hard drive, monitor, modem and printer into the same power strip. With one touch, the entire system is taken off the grid. And don’t forget about a laptop computer’s transformer. If you disconnect the cord from the computer, but leave it plugged into the wall, it will still draw power. Unplug it to cut the current. In the kitchen,

unplug the coffee maker and microwave when not in use. In the garage, don’t keep the battery chargers plugged into the wall after the batteries are recharged. They will continue to pull a trickle of current. Though you may not be able to unplug every device in your home, every little bit counts. In the long run, those little bits will make a big difference for both your budget and Mother Earth. For more information on energy conservation, contact the Meade County Cooperative Extension Service at 270422-4958.

Add a little pizazz to your breakfast in honor of the new school year By Angela Shelf Medearis The Kitchen Diva Along with the clothes and supplies your child needs for the new school year, add eating healthy meals to the list. One of the best ways to ensure your child will have a productive and successful school year is to start each day with a healthy breakfast, pack a nutritious lunch, provide healthy snacks and end the day with a well-balanced family dinner. The foods your children eat now will affect their health as an adult. Start teaching your children how to eat well today for your good health tomorrow! Remember the Food Guide Pyramid when selecting the items you buy and prepare for your child’s meals. Nutritious food and physical activity can help your children: • Feel good. •Enjoy friends and family. •Improve their ability to comprehend and retain information. •Have pep and energy for

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Oven baked berry toast is a fun treat to use for the beginning of a new school year. sports and activities. •Develop strength and endurance. •Show interest and enthusiasm. •Assure lifelong health. Snacks also can be part of a nutritious meal plan. Some snacks will give your child a lot more nutrition for the money than others. Peanuts and popcorn cost about the same as a candy bar. Apples, oranges and bananas are full

of vitamins and minerals. Sandwiches and pizza made with low-fat meats and cheese have lots of protein. Yogurt and milk drinks furnish plenty of calcium. Teach your child how to plan, shop, cook and respectfully interact with others during meal-time discussions. Allow your child to assist you with planning weekly menus. Bring them along when you shop for groceries, and let

them help select the items on the list. Teach them how to prepare their lunch, and let them help with the preparation of family meals. A child who helps with the planning, shopping and cooking is more likely to try a variety of foods. Teach your children how to set the table and to assist you with cleaning up after dinner. Dinner with the family goes far beyond providing your child with a healthy meal. It helps bond the family together and keeps them in tune with what everyone is doing and thinking. Family discussions around the dinner table provide numerous teachable moments and will provide your child with invaluable skills for a long and healthy life. This easy recipe for Oven-Baked Berry Toast is the perfect way to involve your children in the kitchen and start their day off in a healthy way. This kid-pleasing breakfast dish can be prepared the night before and bake while everyone is getting ready for

school. The berries form delicious syrup for this all-in-one dish. Any leftovers can be reheated in the microwave for breakfast the next morning. Oven-baked Berry Toast 1 (16-ounce) loaf whole wheat French bread or whole wheat or multi-grain rolls (cut into 1-inch-thick pieces; dayold bread works fine) 5 cups mixed berries (strawberries, raspberries, blackberries or blueberries — fresh or frozen — with juice) 1/4 cup sugar or agave syrup 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 egg 4 egg whites 1 cup lowfat milk or soymilk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon honey or agave syrup 1. Preheat oven to 350 F. 2. Using a 2-quart oblong baking pan, mix together the

berries, sugar or agave syrup, lemon juice and cinnamon. Spread the berries across the bottom of the pan in an even layer. 3. In a medium bowl, combine egg, egg whites, milk or soymilk and the vanilla. Add the bread and soak for 2 to 3 minutes, pushing the bread down into the liquid, and then turning and soaking the bread for 2 minutes more. 4. Arrange the bread in a single layer over the berries. Drizzle the bread with honey or agave syrup. Bake for 2530 minutes or until the bread is golden and the custard is bubbling around the edges. Makes 10 servings. Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children’s author, culinary historian and the author of six cookbooks. Her latest cookbook is “The New African-American Kitchen.” She is known as The Kitchen Diva and is the executive producer and host of “The Kitchen Diva!” cooking show on Hulu. com. Visit her Web site at www. divapro.com.

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BUSINESS

Friday, August 27, 2010

The News Standard - A11

Photographer makes hobby into passion and art By Brian Graves The News Standard “I have a passion for photography,” said Jessica Thomas, “for as long as I remember.” The Meade County High graduate never went to a formal photography school, but is planning to go soon to even more enhance her skills. But, already she is showing herself to be quite the artist. “I really consider myself more of an artist than a photographer,” Thomas says. “I capture how I see the world.” Not too long ago, she began showing some of that art to friends, and then came the encouragement. “I decided to start Click Photography,” Thomas said.

Although she does not currently have a studio, she is in the planning stages of equipping one for her use. “I want to get a little more established first,” she said. But until then, Thomas said she is happy to make herself available for location shoots such as weddings, anniversaries, and other special events. Originally from West Virginia, Thomas entered MCHS at the end of her sophomore year and she takes credit for forming the school’s first photography club. Thomas said she began by taking nature pictures. “I then slowly progressed and I did some weddings in the fall and recently did my first fiftieth anniversary and that was really nice,” Thomas

said. She recently was able to visit Thailand with her grandparents and while there she enthusiastically practiced her art. “That’s when I realized, when I got back, this is what I really, really wanted to do,” Thomas said. She added she took so many pictures, there are still a lot of rolls of films she still has not developed yet. While there is one specific camera she enjoys using now, she says she has around 20 different cameras dating back to the old Polaroid camera. “My first camera was probably a Polaroid, but then I went to using the 35mm and advanced from there,” Thomas said. “I really like the new digital photography be-

cause I like to see the picture as soon as I take it,” she added. “I think it’s a little bit easier and editing is more advanced. I like that a lot better.” She also credits her husband Andy and daughter Lilly for inspiring her. I’ve always wanted to do this and have done it for free here and there,” Thomas said. “My husband and mother-in-law said I should start trying to get my name out there. That’s when I decided I’d like to start a business.” The name for the business came from her daughter. “We were lying in bed one day talking right after I decided to start my business and I asked her what she thought I should name the business,” Thomas said. Her daughter replied,

“I think you should just call it ‘Click.’” For more information on Click Photography, Thomas can be contacted

at 945-1368 or by visiting her Web site at www. click-photography.webs. com.

ART PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY JESSICA THOMAS PHOTO OF JESSICA THOMAS - THE NEWS STANDARD/BRIAN GRAVES

ABOVE: Jessica Thomas is happiest when surrounded by her work. The photographer is now making her talents available to the general public.

State unemployment below 10 percent for first time since ‘09 Submitted by KY Education and Workforce Development Cabinet

FRANKFORT — For the first time since February 2009, Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate fell below 10 percent to 9.9 percent in July 2010, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. The revised rate in June 2010 was 10 percent. The July 2010 jobless rate is .9 percentage points lower than the 10.8 percent rate recorded in July 2009 for the state. The 9.9 percent rate recorded in July 2010 is the lowest unemployment rate recorded since February 2009 when the rate was 9.6 percent. “The decline in Kentucky’s unemployment rate in July 2010 continues to be a result of the decrease in the state’s civilian labor force because people have become discouraged in their job search. People who have not looked for a job in the last four weeks are no longer counted in the labor force,” said Ron Crouch, director of research and statistics in OET. The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate remained at 9.5 percent from June 2010 to July 2010, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Unemployment statistics are based on estimates and are compiled to measure trends rather than actually to count people working. Nine of the 11 major nonfarm North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) job sectors reported an employment decrease in July 2010, while two increased, according to OET. A decrease of 8,000 jobs in July 2010 brought Kentucky’s nonfarm employment to a seasonally adjusted total of 1,772,400. In contrast, Kentucky’s nonfarm employment has grown by 8,600 workers since July 2009. According to the seasonally adjusted employment data, the government sector, which includes public education, public administration agencies and stateowned hospitals, plunged by 4,800 jobs in July 2010. The sector has 800 fewer jobs compared to July 2009. “The largest drop was in the federal government area

where short-term data collection work has wrapped up. State government also saw a large decrease in positions as the state budget constricts,” said Crouch. Kentucky’s manufacturing sector jobs shrunk by 4,200 in July 2010. Since July 2009, employment in the manufacturing sector has fallen by 800 positions. “In July 2010, the majority of the decline in the manufacturing sector was in the nondurable goods subsector which fell by 2,300 jobs. Most of those job losses were in food manufacturing and tobacco manufacturing. The durable goods subsector jobs also decreased as several automobile manufacturers had temporary layoffs in July to retool,” he said. Kentucky’s leisure and hospitality sector dropped by 1,300 jobs in July 2010. Since July 2009, employment in the sector has decreased by 1,200 positions. The leisure and hospitality sector includes arts, entertainment and recreation, accommodations and food services and drinking places industries. “The employment losses occurred predominately in accommodations and foodservices enterprises, which suggests that people cut back on travel and vacationing in July of this year. Normally, we have an increase in travel during the summer as people vacation, but this year we are seeing fewer people take to the road because of the economic downturn across the country,” Crouch said. Employment in the other services sector, which includes such establishments as repair and maintenance businesses; personal and laundry services; religious organizations and civic and professional organizations, decreased by 700 positions in July 2010. This sector had 2,200 fewer positions in July 2010 than in July 2009. The educational and health services sector reported 600 fewer workers in July 2010 than in June 2010. The sector has added 3,300 workers since July 2009. This sector includes private and nonprofit establishments that provide either education and training or health care and social assistance to their clients. Construction sector jobs

fell by 500 in July 2010. Since July 2009, employment in the construction sector has plunged by 5,700 jobs. The financial activities sector lost 200 jobs in July 2010. This segment, which includes businesses involved in finance, insurance, real estate and property leasing or rental, has fallen by 3,400 positions over the past 12 months. The information sector reported 200 fewer positions in July 2010. This segment, which includes firms involved in publishing, Internet activities, data processing, broadcasting and news syndication, has decreased by 700 positions since July 2009. Employment in the mining and logging sector dropped by 100 workers in July 2010. The sector has gained 600 workers since July 2009. Kentucky’s trade, transportation and utilities sector gained 3,600 jobs in July 2010. This area includes retail and wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing businesses and utilities. It is the largest sector in Kentucky with 368,100 employees. Since July 2009, the number of jobs in this sector has increased by 6,300. “The increase in retail trade and wholesales trade jobs was about equal in July 2010. Some of the upturn in employment came from people buying supplies and clothes for school,” said Crouch. The professional and business services sector increased by 1,000 positions in July 2010. This area includes professional, scientific and technical services; management of companies and administrative support; and waste management, including temporary help agencies. Since last July, jobs in the sector have surged by 13,200. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly estimate of the number of employed Kentuckians for July 2010 was 1,860,523 on a seasonally adjusted basis. This figure is down 2,899 from the 1,863,422 employed in June 2010, but up 667 from the 1,859,856 employed in July 2009. The monthly estimate of the number of unemployed Kentuckians for July 2010 was 203,299, down 4,342

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Quotes effective as of close of market Tuesday, August 24, 2010 Deere & Co. ................................DE ............... 62.34 Caterpillar Inc............................CAT ............... 65.04 Ford Motor Co. .............................. F ............... 11.24 Harley-Davidson .....................HOG ............... 24.08 CSX Corp...................................CSX ............... 47.45 General Electric Co. ....................GE ............... 14.57 Peabody Energy ........................ BTU ............... 43.21 Marathon Oil...........................MRO ............... 31.23 Chevron ................................... CVX ............... 73.78 Arch Chemicals ..........................ARJ ............... 29.90 Brown Forman B....................... BF B ............... 61.87 Lowes Companies ...................LOW ............... 20.22 Home Depot Inc.........................HD ............... 27.78 McDonalds Corp .....................MCD ............... 72.72 Papa Johns .............................. PZZA ............... 23.65 Yum! Brands Inc ...................... YUM ............... 41.59 Coca-Cola Co ............................. KO ............... 55.66 Pepsico Inc ................................ PEP ............... 64.78 RadioShack .............................. RSH ............... 18.30

Best Buy Co Inc .........................BBY ............... 31.68 Dell Inc ................................... DELL ............... 11.59 Microsoft CP........................... MSFT ............... 24.04 Wells Fargo & Co .................... WFC ............... 23.64 Vulcan Materials ..................... VMC ............... 37.00 Proctor & Gamble ...................... PG ............... 59.66 Johnson & Johnson ..................... JNJ ............... 58.01 Wal-Mart Stores ...................... WMT ............... 51.30 United Parcel B..........................UPS ............... 63.85 Fedex Corp ............................... FDX ............... 79.09 Dow Jones Industrial Average ................... 10,040.45

from the 207,641 Kentuckians unemployed in June 2010, and down 22,948 from the 226,247 unemployed in July 2009. The monthly estimate of the number of Kentuckians in the civilian labor force for July 2010 was 2,063,822. This figure is down 7,241 from the 2,071,063 recorded in June 2010, and down 22,281 from the 2,086,103 recorded in July 2009. Civilian labor force statistics include nonmilitary workers and unemployed Kentuckians who are actively seeking work. They do not include unemployed Kentuckians who have not looked for employment within the past four weeks.

Kentucky’s statewide unemployment rate and employment levels are seasonally adjusted. Employment statistics undergo sharp fluctuations due to seasonal events, such as weather changes, harvests, holidays and school openings and

closings. Seasonal adjustments eliminate these influences and make it easier to observe statistical trends. However, because of the small sample size, county unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted.

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Veterans Assistance Officer to Assist Area Veterans Frank Niederriter, field representative for the Kentucky Deptartment of Veterans Affairs, will be available to assist Meade County veterans at the Brandenburg Methodist Church on the third Tuesday of every month from 8:30 until 11:30 a.m. Veterans and their families will be provided counseling and assistance in filing claims for state and federal benefits. This is a free service provided by the state of Kentucky. Special emphasis is being directed toward Vietnam veterans who have diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancers and skin cancers. Widows of Vietnam veterans who had these conditions may also be able to apply for compensation. Veterans should bring a copy of their DD214 (record of military service) with them, if they have it, and any other documents they feel could help with their claim. For further information, or if you have any questions, you may call Frank Niederriter, Regional Field Representative for the KDVA at 502-799-0418 or 866-817-1360.

Earl F. Wright Financial Advisor 425 Broadway Brandenburg, KY 40108 270-422-1922

“Proudly serving Kentucky’s 348,000 Veterans”


A12 - The News Standard

AGRICULTURE

Friday,August 27, 2010

Ginseng hunting is rooted in Kentucky tradition By Casey Tolliver The News Standard

There is no shortage of animal hunters in Meade County, but hunters of a different stripe will be scouring local hills and hollers in pursuit of their stabilized prey. Last week marked the advent of the 2010 ginseng digging season, which means local root diggers will be out in full force. But some hunters want to ensure the future availability of ginseng and discourage over hunting of the already disappearing plant. “Me being a biologist, I just want to conserve,” Kentucky Fish and Wildlife technician Trevor Mills said. “Ginseng is a rare plant, it’s a beautiful plant.” Mills, who is a first year ginseng hunter, has grown to respect the plant in the short time he has hunted

Local ginseng hunters are gearing up for the 2010 digging season. it.

“I have a lot of respect for the ginseng I find, because I count the scars on the stems to see how old they are, and a lot of the bigger ones are as old as me and I think ‘wow, I am killing something that is

as old as I am.’” Ginseng, which is a slow growing perennial plant with fleshy roots, is prized for its potential health benefits and high market value. In 2007, the price of dried wild ginseng sky-

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rocketed to nearly $1,000 per pound. Over the last couple of years, prices have fluctuated between $250 and $500 per pound of dried root. Many studies have been conducted on the health

benefits of ginseng, with contradictory results. The inconsistent conclusions may be the result of the wide variety and quality of ginseng plants used in the study. However, despite the inconclusiveness of the studies ginseng has been a staple in Kentucky folk medicine for generations, with users upholding findings of some of the studies and swearing by the effects and benefits of taking ginseng. “I don’t use it myself, but I have read some research papers and what they have found is there is an active chemical (in ginseng) that effects the human body,” Mills said. Ginseng digging season began Aug. 15 and lasts until Dec. 1. Hunters are free to dig roots within this time period, as long as they are sure to ask permission before digging on private

property. Ginseng digging is prohibited on state or federal land. There is also a ginseng buying season, which runs from Sept. 1 to March 31. The seasons were enacted to counterbalance the plant’s dwindling population in a conservation and sustainability effort. An influx in the number of ginseng diggers coupled with the plant’s already rare status make it necessary to follow the seasons, as well as state law on digging and selling ginseng. “Just follow all the applicable state laws. Hunt it when it’s in season,” Mills said. “Go light handed. Don’t trespass, it is private property. It’s a protected species. You can and will be prosecuted.” For more information on Kentucky ginseng laws, visit www.kyagr.com.

Cattle bloat proves problematic for farmers this year Andy Mills Ag & Natural Resources It seems like every year something in agriculture out of the ordinary happens. I guess it is getting harder to refer to a normal year because “what is normal?” This year environmental conditions were just right to suppress grass growth and stimulate clover growth. All across Kentucky cattle loss due to bloating was a common occurrence. Even now pastures show an abundance of clover. Beef producers need to be aware of bloat and take the necessary precautions of preventing it. The following information by Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler, University of KY Beef Specialist, helps explains what happens during bloat and how to deal with clover in the pasture. Frothy bloat associated with grazing is often the result of consuming forages that are high in soluble protein combined with rapid fermentation. This produces a stable foam in the rumen blocking the normal escape of the gas from fermentation through eructation or belching. This build up of gas results in rumen distension similar to blowing up a balloon which can impact the animal’s ability to breath normally due to pressure against the diaphragm. Wet, lush forages however, reduce chewing activity and saliva production. Risk is greater during periods when the forage is wet such as when dew is present in the morning and evenings. Stimulating rumination by providing palatable, good quality grass hay is believed to help prevent frothy bloat. Some researchers, however, have not shown this to be effective means of preventing or reducing the severity of bloat. Monensin (Rumensin) is commonly utilized in wheat grazing areas to prevent wheat pasture bloat. It has been shown to reduce the incidence of frothy bloat from legumes in cattle when consumed at levels near 150-200 milligrams per head daily. It is important to note that free choice mineral mixtures are approved for grazing stockers and replacement heifers. Poloxalene is another feed

additive shown to be very effective in preventing frothy bloat. It is more effective than monensin and other ionophores, however, it can be costly to feed. Poloxalene must also be consumed on a daily basis as there is no carry over protection.There are additional practical management strategies to reduce the incidence of frothy bloat. Ideally, the legume content should be kept below 50 percent to reduce the risk of bloat throughout the grazing season. Allowing the legumes to mature to late bud, early bloom stage will also reduce

the risk bloat. Risk to bloat from legumes is reported to be higher for vegetative, prebud stages. Moving cattle to pastures with less legume content and returning to pastures when the legumes have advanced in maturity might be an effective strategy if such diversity exists on your farm. Avoid moving cattle to new fields with high legume content when they are hungry. Attempt to fulfill their hunger with high quality hay if necessary before moving into legume pastures. Monitor cattle frequently throughout the

day. When faced with an emergency case of frothy bloat, prompt treatment is extremely important as death can occur in as little as one hour after grazing

begins but is more commonly seen three to four hours after bloat starts. If not in immediate danger, passing a stomach tube into the rumen and administering an antifoaming

agent such as mineral oil may aid with the problem. For more information you are encouraged to contact your county Agricultural Extension agent and your veterinarian.

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Kentuckian Livestock Market - Owensboro, KY • KY Dept of Ag-USDA Market News • Monday, August 23, 2010 Receipts 447 Last week 417 Last year 267 ***AD-Average Dressing, HD-High Dressing, LD-Low Dressing Compared to last Monday: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to 1.00 lower. Feeder steers under 500 lbs steady to 2.00 lower over 500 lbs steady to firm. Feeder heifers steady. Feeder Steers Medium and Large: 200-300 lbs 133.00-134.00; 300-400 lbs 122.00-132.00; 400-500 114.50-119.00; 500600 lbs 111.00-125.00; 600-700 lbs 106.00-118.00; 700-800 lbs 106.00-109.00. Medium and Large 2 300-400 lbs 110.00117.00; 400-500 lbs 106.00-111.00; 500-600 lbs 105.00107.00. Feeder Holstein Steers Large: 3: No Test

Feeder Heifers Medium and Large: 1-2: 200-300 lbs 113.00120.00; 300-400 lbs 107.00-118.00; 400-500 lbs 104.00115.00; 500-600 lbs 100.00-112.50; 600-700 lbs 92.00-99.00; 700-800 lbs 90.00-95.50. Medium and Large 2 200-300 lbs 104.00-109.00; 400-500 lbs 102.00-102.50 600-700 lbs 92.50. Feeder Bulls Medium and Large: 1-2: 200-300 lbs 134.00136.00; 300-400 lbs 115.00-124.00; 400-500 lbs 108.50120.00; 500-600 lbs 102.00- 107.00; 600-700 lbs 92.50103.00. Slaughter Cows: %Lean Weight AD HD LD Breaker 75-80 875-1680 57.00-63.00 65.00-66.50 53.50-56.00 Boner 80-85 810-1295 51.50-57.50 59.50-62.00 Lean 85-90 860-1170 45.50-50.50 52.00 40.00-44.50

Slaughter Bulls: Yld Grd Weight Carcass Boning 1 1395-1870 79-81 2 1258-1600 75-78

% AD HD 70.00-75.00 79.00 62.00-65.50

Stock Cows Medium and Large: 1-2 3-8 years old 3-8 months bred 985 lbs 1460 lbs 55.50-74.00 per cwt. Stock Cows and Calves Medium and Large: 1-2 3-8 years old 1200-1350 lbs with 100 to 300 lbs calves at side 825.00985.00 per pair. Stock Bulls: No Test Calves: Baby beef: 165.00 per head


Sports

SPORTS

Football and cheer team photos are in this issue, B2 Friday, August 27, 2010

Ben Achtabowski, Sports Editor 270-422-4542 sports@thenewsstandard.com

Aug. 27 Greenwave Football Anderson County Aug. 28

8 p.m.

Greenwave Soccer Greenwave Classic

TBA

Lady Waves Volleyball Wester Hills Tournament @ Western Hills TBA Aug. 30 Lady Waves JV/V Soccer North Bullitt 5:30/7 p.m. THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Aug. 31 Greenwave JV/V Soccer @ North Hardin 5:30/7 p.m. Lady Waves F/JV/V Volleyball @ Hancock County 6/7/8 p.m. Sept. 1 Lady Waves JV/V Soccer @ North Hardin 6/7:30 p.m. Sept. 2 Greenwave JV/V Soccer Elizabethtown 5:30/7 p.m. Greenwave Golf North Bullitt

TBA

Sept. 3

Tiffany Filburn had 24 kills against former district rival Grayson County.

What looked to be another easy victory for the Meade County Lady Waves volleyball team turned out to be a struggle when they hosted the Grayson County Lady Cougars on Aug. 19. Luckily, senior middle hitter Tiffany Filburn saved the day with 24 kills to give the Lady Waves the win in three games, 25-16, 2527, 28-26. “(Filburn) always is a huge part of our wins,” Meade County head coach Jennifer Smith

GOLF SCORES

By Ben Achtabowski The News Standard

Chad Lancaster 41 Chase Garris 42 Matt Hewlett 44 Dustin McMahan 47 Brian Carter 42 Blake Hardesty 48 Riley Clark 48 Taylor Bartlett 51 Ethan Wright 54 Tyler Adams 56 Aug. 23 tri-match at Lincoln Trail Country Club ELIZABETHTOWN 158, NORTH HARDIN 162, MEADE COUNTY 178 Chase Garris 44 Chad Lancaster 44 Dustin McMahan 45 Blake Hardesty 45 Matt Hewlett 48 GOLF OUTINGS Meade County 4-H Annual Golf Scramble

A new football season brings in not only a new set of senior leaders, young talent and returning stars, the Meade County Greenwave football team will also bring in a new offense. Diverging from its Wing-T grind-it-out offense, the Greenwave is now switching to a more spread offense, which suits the athletic ability of the team. “You have to adapt to the kids you have,” said Meade County head coach Larry Mofield. “We’ve totally revamped our offense. We have had a change in philosophy. We want to spread the field out. Down the road we’d like to stretch it vertically.” The changes are a good thing that fits the team’s athleticism at the quarterback and running back positions. Junior quarterback Thomas Wilson will take the reigns of the offense this year and adds a new dimension. “(In) most offenses, the quarterback just manages the game,” Mofield said. “Thomas not only has the ability to manage the game, but if something breaks down he can get us a few yards.” Thomas Wilson has played wide receiver for the Greenwave the past two seasons and now See NEW, page B3

Bellarmine University 7th Annual Golf Scramble

Bellarmine University softball team will host its 7th Annual Golf Scramble Sept. 11 at Doe Valley Golf Course. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m., with a shotgun start at noon. There is only enough room for 36 teams.

The cost is $200 per team which includes golf, cart and lunch. Lunch will be served at 11 a.m. For more information contact the Bellarmine University softball team.

“Bethany came in and did an awesome job,” Smith said. During the final game, Roberts served three straight points for Meade County to give them a 9-6 lead. Meanwhile, Filburn took over the game and had two straight kills to make the score 12-8 then ended the game by scoring four of the Lady Waves final five points on kills to win 28-26. Filburn ended the night with 24 kills, 17 digs, 12 blocks, and two aces. Junior Rebecca See KILLS, page B4

THE NEWS STANDARD/ BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Lydia Moore practices the cheer team’s routine during practice on Tuesday.

MC Cheer aims high By Ben Achtabowski The News Standard

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

TOP: Thomas Wilson is the new quarterback. ABOVE: The Greenwave defensive front is strong this year.

With the start of football season tonight, the Meade County Lady Waves cheer team is ready to root the team on while preparing for their all-important late-fall cheer competitions. “Football is my favorite,” said senior captain Brittani Troutman. “I love football. I’m excited about the season and now that it’s my senior year it’s going to be even more exciting.” While the team prepares to cheer every Friday night, the real meat of the season for the Lady Waves is competition time. Their first big competition will be qualifying for a national tournament at Mrytle Beach. The qualifying round is set for Nov. 13 at Southern High School. “Oh yeah, we’ll qualify,” See AIMS, page B3

By Ben Achtabowski The News Standard

There will be cash prizes and lunch.

Call the Meade County Extension Office for more information at 270-4224958.

settle down.” Luney left the game when the score was knotted at 17. The two teams went tit-for-tat and traded the lead four times. In the end, Grayson County extended the match to a third game when they got an important kill to tie the game at 25 and then scored two straight points to win the second game, 27-25. Luney was nearly irreplaceable for the Lady Waves as the bench had no back up middle hitter. Sophomore defensive specialist Bethany Roberts filled Luney’s spot.

MC Greenwave start season 3-0

The Meade County 4-H will hold its annual golf scramble Sept. 25 at 8 p.m. The event will take place at the Lindsey Golf Course in Fort Knox.

There are four person teams with $50 per person, $200 per team. Early bird registration is Aug. 27.

said about her 6-foot2 middle hitter. “She’s such a good player and we can lean on her when we’re in tough spots like that.” After Meade County decisively took the first game 25-16, Filburn had to pick up the slack where her counterpart, sophomore middle hitter LeAnna Luney, rolled her ankle after contorting her body mid-air to save a tipped ball. “After LeAnna got hurt, we were a little nervous,” Filburn said. “You could tell there was a little bit of panic. It took us a while to

(Green)

Meade County football starts up new season tonight at home

NORTH BULLITT 172, MEADE COUNTY 174

The News Standard

New Wave Offense

Greenwave Football John Hardin 7:30 p.m.

Aug. 18’s match at Doe Valley

Bowfishermen haul in big fish at tourney, B10

Filburn leads Waves past Grayson with 24 kills By Ben Achtabowski The News Standard

ON DECK

OUTDOORS

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Lindsey Burchett takes a shot against Ballard.

Lady Waves soccer win home opener By Ben Achtabowski The News Standard Senior striker Kristin Benton has been a very important part of the Meade County Lady Waves soccer team’s early season offense. During the first three games, Benton has claimed all four of the Lady Waves’ goals, including a hat-trick in the team’s first win of the season when they beat Ballard, 3-1. “Kris is very aggressive,” said Meade County head See HOME, page B4

The Meade County Greenwave soccer team has been an offensive juggernaut during their first three games to outscore their opponents 17-2. “That’s where we want to be,” Meade County head coach Matt Pollock said about being 3-0. “It’s a good morale boost. It’s a good way to start the season and you would like to keep that going as long as possible.” On Tuesday, the Greenwave defeated Indiana rival Corydon Central, 6-1, during the home opener. The scoring onslaught started when senior Cody Clements stole the ball inside the penalty box and had his shot deflected. Junior forward Alex McAdams cleaned up the rebound to score four minutes into the match, 1-0. A little more than a minute later, sophomore Brent Raley outran the defense to score from 10 yards out. Meade County took a 3-1 lead heading into the half when senior D.J. Spurlock scored on

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Brent Raley fights for the ball against a Corydon Central defender on Tuesday.

a cross from senior midfielder Cody Shain. “I really like the way we were moving the ball at the end of the first half and then we See START, page B4


B2 - The News Standard

Sports

Friday, August 27, 2010

Football and cheer start the season

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ABOVE: The 2010 Meade County Lady Wave cheerleaders are freshmen Jessi Blehar, Makayla Harper, Whitney Fackler, Kaitlyn Ives, Alicia Lee, Katie Russell, sophomores Alisha Cross, Hanna Darnall, Taylor Hammond, Emily Kendall, Allie Stull, Taylor James, juniors, Ashley Dalton, Becca Harmon, Lydia Moore, Kylie Tucker and seniors Kelli Warford and Brittani Troutman. RIGHT: The 2010 Meade County Greenwave football team take to the field tonight.

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Meade County High School athletics...

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GREEN with envy.


SPORTS

Friday, August 27, 2010 2010 football roster and schedule 2 Zeb Wilson QB, DB, Fr. 3 Shacklette Jonah RB, DB, Fr. 4 Logan Burchette QB, DB, Fr. 5 Garrett Kenealy RB, LB, Jr. 6 Bo Wilson WR, DB, Jr. 7 Thomas Wilson QB/WR, DB, Jr. 8 Seth Pile RB, LB, Fr. 9 Mervin Carney WR, DB, Jr. 10 Tilden Cross RB, DB, So. 11 Trey Hammock RB, DB, So. 12 Jake Wilson QB, LB, So. 13 Bryce Garris WR, DB, So. 15 Tylor Pinkard RB, DB, Jr. 17Luke Wilson TE, LB, Fr. 19 Taylor Reese RB, DB, So. 20 McGraw Dylan WR, DB, Sr. 22 John Clark RB, LB, So. 21 Rex Liverman RB,DB, Sr. 23 Brady Smith RB, LB, Jr. 24 Zach Kulman TE, LB, So. 25 Billy Carter RB, LB, Jr. 26 Sean Graham RB, LB, So. 30 Zach Bogard P/K, So. 32 Max Cundiff RB, LB, Jr. 34 Michael Clinkscales K, Sr. 38 Kippy Caro RB, LB, So. 42 Ryan Hogan TE, LB, Sr. 43 Devonte Duncan RB, LB, Fr. 45 Brandon Hubbard OL,LB, Sr. 50 Zack Adams OL,DL, Sr. 51 Evan Kenealy OL,DL, So. 52 Alex Hogan OL, DL, So. 53 Stephen Compton OL, LB, Jr. 54 Ryan Webb OL, DL, So. 55 Brandon Simota OL, DE, Sr. 56Matt Millay OL, DL, Fr. 57 Scotty Rister OL, DL, Jr. 58 Michael Whitely OL, DL, Sr. 59 Keyan Gittings OL,DL, Fr. 60 Trey Fout OL, DL, So. 61 Walter Miller WR, DB, Fr. 62 Will Wilson OL, DL, Sr. 63 Nick Obrien WR, DB, Fr. 64 Allen Carroll OL, DL, Jr. 65 Aaron Settles OL, DL, Sr. 66 Ryan Babb OL, DL, So. 67 John Ashmore OL, DL, Jr. 68 Brad Sonner OL, DL, So. 69 Devin Hendley RB, LB, Fr. 70 Jeremy Greenwood OL, DL, Sr. 72 Dustin Wells OL, DL, Sr. 73 James Kennedy OL, DL, Sr. 75 Xanth Dorsey OL, DL, Sr. 76 Matt Moore OL, DL, Jr. 77 Brandon Roeder OL, DL, So. 78 Matt Wise OL, DL, Sr. 79 Joey Claycomb OL, DL, So. 80 Ronald Williams WR, DB, Sr. 83 Conner Williams TE, DB, So. 84 Blake Robbins WR, DB, Sr. 85 Shante Williams WR, DB, Fr. 86 Kurt Nevitt WR, DB, Jr. 88 Brandon Kennedy WR,LB, So. 89 Danny Mattingly WR, DB, So. 98 Joby Embry WR, DB, Fr Aug. 27 Anderson County 8 p.m. Sept. 3 John Hardin 7:30 p.m. Sept. 10 @ Fern Creek 7:30 p.m. Sept. 17 @ Ballard 7:30 p.m. Sept. 24 Greenwood 8 p.m. Oct. 1 North Hardin 7:30 p.m. Oct. 8 @ Lincoln County 7:30 p.m. Oct. 15 Nelson County 7:30 p.m. Oct. 22 @ Central Hardin 7:30 p.m. Oct. 29 Butler 7:30 p.m.

New From page B1 will move to the important quarterback position. “The advantage of moving him to quarterback is he can touch the ball every single play,” Mofield said. “I think that he can make something happen when things aren’t even there. He gives us some athleticism and he’s a smart kid. He works hard and he’s a great leader too.” The spread offense will feature running the option and sweeps, while maintaining a physical presence at the line of scrimmage. Junior Max Cundiff and senior Rex Liverman are the team’s top returning backs. The two bring a rare combination of speed, strength and awareness, which will make them a potent one-two punch. “We don’t have to have them out there at the same time,” Mofield said about the advantage of the new offense. “They won’t have to worry about pounding the ball every time. “I don’t think you can find a harder runner than Max Cundiff. When the ball is in his hands I believe he gives you 100 percent. He’s going to be a big role for us. He could touch the ball 15, 20 times a game. And Rex is an athlete.” Keeping in true Meade County fashion, the team will rely on the running game to set up their passing game. During the preseason, Mofield is most worried about the passing aspect of the team. “If you can’t run the ball at all, then you can’t rely on throwing the ball,” he said. “We’re not the type of team that can throw it 50 times a game. Naturally, if we find a team that we can throw it on then we’re going to throw it. But usually we’re going to set up our passing game with a good running game. “We have to find someone who will go out and run the routes and run them hard,” Mofield added about the receiver squad. “Right now, our wide receiver spots are as open as any other position on the field.” Junior Bo Wilson returns as the team’s top receiver. Filling the other wide out spots could be sophomore Bryce Garris, senior Blake Robbins, senior Ronald Williams, junior Tylor Pinkard and junior Brady Smith. At the tight end position are the large targets, senior Ryan Hogan and sophomore

Jake Wilson. “He’s got a motor on him,” Mofield said of Hogan. “He also can catch the ball at tight end and his blocking has improved. He could be a very good blocker.” The success of the offense will hang mostly on the health and ability of the offensive line. This season the line is uncharacteristically big for a Meade County team. “We may have one of the biggest lines we’ve had,” Mofield said. “We still have to block and stay with our blocks. I like what we have — just we have to stay healthy.” The line is anchored by three-year starter senior center Will Wilson, who will team up with his cousin Thomas Wilson for the first time since his eighth grade year. “We’ve been playing football in the backyard since we were little kids,” Will Wilson said. “We’ve always had a good relationship. I was center our eighth grade year and he was quarterback in seventh grade. It’s good to be back together again.” Six-foot-5, 248-pound senior Jeremy Greenwood has been fighting a nagging hip injury throughout the preseason, but should be ready for the season. Senior Aaron Settles has been the team’s most consistent blocker alongside Will Wilson. Senior Matt Wise is the team’s starting left guard, but also has a hurt knee. Sophomore Ryan Webb, sophomore Evan Kenealy and senior Zach Adams could fill the right tackle spot. The new offense hasn’t phased the offensive line and actually makes the blocking schemes easier. “I thought we would have a little bigger learning curve than we actually have had,” Mofield said. “The one thing I think it’s done is it’s simplified what we do. I think some of our schemes you can run the same against any front. I think they like it and I think they’ll like it even more when we start distributing the ball a little better.” Greenwood has enjoyed the change in offense. “It’s been an easy transition,” he said. “We’ve made it to where the line knows what we’re doing. I like the offense a whole lot better. It’s more simple. We have zones instead of picking out who we have to block.” The defensive line is just as big and as good as the offensive line. In fact, Mofield believes it’s the best unit on the team.

The News Standard - B3

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Jake Wilson makes a tackle during last week’s scrimmage against Daviess County. “Our defensive front should be our strong area,” he said. The line is lead by Will Wilson, senior Dustin Wells, Adams, Hogan, senior Brandon Simota and junior Stephen Compton. Wells returns to the team after not playing for two years. Listed as a 6-foot-1, 352 pound defensive tackle, he should attract plenty of double teams. “He can help us. He’s big and has pretty good feet,” Mofield said of Wells. “His only drawback is he’s a little out of shape. But if he stays with us he can be dominant. I don’t think there will be too many centers who will be able to hold him.” “I like our defense front,” Mofield said. “I think it’s going to have to carry us. We’re only going to go as far as they take us for a little while.” While the defensive line is strong, the linebacker crew is very inexperienced. They have one senior linebacker — Ryan Hubbard — and Cundiff will be starting linebacker who saw some playing time last year. “We have some potential at that position,” Mofield said. “We’re young, we’re inexperienced. We could see up to three sophomores at linebacker this season.” Jake Wilson, Smith, junior Garrett Kenealy, sophomore John Clark, junior Billy Carter, sophomore Zach

Kullman, sophomore Sean Graham and sophomore Kippy Caro all could see time at linebacker. Three-year starter Thomas Wilson will anchor the secondary, while Bo Wilson will take one of the corner spots. The third secondary player is still between Liverman, sophomore Trey Hammock, sophomore Taylor Reese, senior Dylan McGraw and Pinkard. “We’re a little inexperienced,” Mofield said. “But we have to play with what we have. We’re going to kind of learn while on the run. We had two pretty good showings in our scrimmages.” The special teams will be strong also with top return man Rex Liverman. He returned three kickoffs last season and one that was called back due to a penalty outside the play. Sophomore Zach Bogard will be the team’s punter, while senior Michael Clinkscales will herald the place kicking duties. “He’s kicking the ball well right now,” Mofield said of his second year place kicker. “We still haven’t gotten him kicking in the end zone, but I think maybe before the end of the season he could kick it in the end zone.” With the new additions to the offense, the one thing still remains: The Greenwave will play one of the toughest

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schedules in the state. The first four games — Anderson County, John Hardin, Fern Creek and Ballard — is a tough task. Both Fern Creek and Ballard are ranked in the top ten 6A schools, while John Hardin is a state championship contender in 5A. “Our first four games are as tough as anyone in the state,” Mofield said. “We can pad our schedule or we can go out and play the big boys. We may not see those 9-1 seasons, but by playing Ballard, John Hardin and Fern Creek we won’t be shaky at the knees when we see our district teams. “ The district is as competitive as ever. North Hardin will bring its usual athletic program and Greenwood has had a strangle hold on the district championship the last two years. Nelson County returns one of the district’s best running backs, while Central Hardin will field another solid team. “No one is going to run away with the championship this year,” Mofield said. “If we can get through the first few weeks and we can keep the ship afloat. It will prepare us for our district teams. All we can do now is roll our sleeves up and tighten our boots and go to work.” The Greenwave open the season tonight when they face Anderson County at Hamilton Field. Kickoff is slated for 8 p.m.

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Brittani Troutman shows Meade County pride during practice on Tuesday.

Aims From page B1 Troutman said confidently. “We’ve qualified every year we’ve competed.” The lone seniors on the team, Troutman and Kelli Warford, both have been on the team four years and every year have competed for the national tournament in Myrtle Beach, S.C. “It’s really good,” Warford said of the team. “I really think this team can excel in nationals and I believe we can win nationals.” With the hopes of winning nationals, the cheerleaders have already set their possible national championship routine.

“We just got our routine down,” Troutman said. “We’ve been working on that pretty hard the last few weeks.” The squad has also grown since last year and now has 18 girls. “That’s a big change but it’s really good,” Troutman said. “Last year we were a medium size team, now we’re large. We’re working on harder stunts and a harder routine. It’s almost easier to have a bigger team because you have other girls that can step in if someone gets hurt.” Along with a bigger squad, the team has also pulled out better stunts and a bigger pyramid. “We have a big pyramid this year,” Warford said. “Our pyramid is a lot big-

ger this year,” Troutman added. “Usually we’ll have three stunt groups in the pyramid, but this year we have five. It’s a lot bigger pyramid.” Despite having only two seniors on the team and having 12 freshmen and sophomores, the chemistry is very good. “There’s some people that take charge, some that listen well and some that can teach everyone,” Warford said. “It’s a good mix of girls.” The Meade County team, striving for a coveted national championship, still needs to work hard and keep together, according to Warford. “We’re going to have to pull more as a team,” she said. “We’re already really close, but we need to pull together even more. Then we need to focus.”

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Sports

B4 - The News Standard

Home From page B1 coach Dan Shook. “Her mentality is ‘I’m going to score.’ She’s like that in practice, she’s like that in the games. She’s a good threat up top for us.” Three was the lucky number for Benton during the home opener. She had two solid scoring chances within thirty seconds of each other to start the second half. Then two minutes later, she scored the eventual winning goal on her third scoring chance in three minutes. It was assisted by junior Ashley Collins. The goal gave the Lady Waves the lead nine minutes into the half, 2-1. “We just couldn’t get the ball in,” Benton said, who had two hat trick games last season for the Lady Waves. “We had a bunch of good plays to give us chances. They kept coming and we finally scored.” The first goal, scored by Benton, came with three

Start

minutes left in the first half when she chipped the ball over the Ballard goalkeeper ’s head from 15 yards out. A little more than a minute later, Ballard scored the equalizer with two minutes left in the half. “There was no excuse for that. It was just carelessness,” Shook said, whose team was plagued by last minute breakdowns last season. “That happens, but you like to think when you score you can get right back into the game and finish out the half. That was what we did continuously last year. We’d give up goals just at the end of the either half.” Meade County tacked on an insurance goal by Benton with 30 seconds left in the game. “We’ve had trouble putting two good halves together,” Shook said. “That’s one of the main things I stressed before the game. I wanted them to be strong mentally and physically. They were tonight. I thought we dominated

most of the game.” Senior keeper Kiana Rupe had a solid performance in net and collected 16 saves. Meade County had several missed scoring opportunities from their predominant strikers. Benton sailed three shots over the net and was tripped up during a break-away. Senior Lindsey Burchett also had a few one-on-one opportunities where the ball skimmed just wide of the net. Meade County had 15 shots on goal. “There were plenty opportunities where we could have put them away earlier than we did,” Shook said. Meade County’s first two games were against Bullitt East where they lost 2-1 and 3-0 against Bardstown. Benton had the lone goal against Bullitt East and was assisted by her sister, senior defender Erin Benton. The Lady Waves host North Bullitt Monday, starting with the JV game at 5:30 p.m.

Friday, August 27, 2010

The News Standard/Ben Achtabowski

Darla West battles for the ball against a Ballard player on Monday.

for a consolation match.

From page B1 played well the whole second half,” Pollock said. “We got a lot of guys in and everybody was doing a good job of keeping the ball on our feet.” During the second half Clements, sophomore Chase Long and junior Chuckie Lafollette each had a goal to make the final score 6-1. Senior Logan Griffth played the seccond half and didn’t allow a goal. Corydon Central’s only goal came from a penalty kick — a result of an inadvertent handball inside the penalty box during the first half. Meade County hosts the annual Greenwave Classic where Ohio County, PRP, and Warren East will participate. Meade County plays Ohio County in the first game of the tournament. The winners of the first game will play each other for the championship in the evening, while the losers will play each other

Meade scores a bunch Meade County lit up the Grayson County scoreboard during their season opener on Aug. 17 when they beat the Grayson County Cougars 9-0. Senior forward Todd Johnston and senior defender Michael Clinkscales each had two goals in the game. Midfielders senior Jeremy Hardesty, senior Cody Shain, sophomore Austin Lancaster each scored a goal, while senior defender Ethan Madison and sophomore defender Alex Fackler had a goal each. Meade squeaks by Apollo Senior forward Todd Johnston scored the winning goal against Apollo with 30 minutes left in the game to win, 2-1. Johnston scored off a crossing pass from senior forward D.J. Spurlock. Johnson scored the first goal in the first minute of the game off a corner kick from Cody Shain. Sophomore keeper Alex Fackler made six saves in the match.

MEADE COUNTY SCHOOL MENUS

Kills From page B1 Clark had 34 assists, 27 digs, five kills and three aces, while junior outside hitter Rachel Powers had 12 kills and two and a half blocks. It was Meade County’s fourth straight win, which leaves them with a 7-3 record in nine days. “It’s been a long week,” Smith said. “Luckily, we have a little break here. I think we’ll need it.” “I think this is a great start,” Filburn added about the first two weeks of the season. “We really are playing amazing volleyball. I didn’t know how we would start after losing so many seniors from last year. But, I’m not worried any more. Everyone has stepped up their game.” Filburn even thought Luney’s injury was a result of the busy schedule. “We’re really tired,” she said. “I think that’s why LeAnna got hurt. She was probably a little tight from playing so many games.” Grayson County was in Meade County’s district the last six seasons. This is

The News Standard/Ben Achtabowski

Senior midfielder Cody Clements weaves through two Corydon Central defenders during Tuesday’s game.

Aug. 30 - Sept. 3 Primary & Elementary

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Lunch All lunch comes with choice of 1/2 pint drink

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Breakfast The News Standard/ Ben Achtabowski

Leah Cannady uses a jump serve to throw off Grayson County.

the first time the two have met without any playoff implications. “I wish they were still in our district,” Filburn said. “They’re a good team.”

All breakfast comes with Milk Choice

Lunch All lunch comes with choice of 1/2 pint drink

Meade County High

Breakfast All breakfast comes with Milk Choice

Lunch All lunch comes with choice of 1/2 pint drink

Week 2

MONDAY Choose One: Pancake on a Stick Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

TUESDAY TChoose One: Breakfast Pizza Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

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THURSDAY Choose One: Cinnamon Roll & Yogurt Cup Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

FRIDAY Choose One: Pancakes w/Syrup Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza or Burrito Choose Two: Corn - Tossed Salad Fresh Pears Mandarin Oranges In Addition: Vanilla Pudding

Choose One: Popcorn Chicken Spaghetti Choose Two: Glazed Carrots Steamed Broccoli w/ Cheese - Grapes Pineapple In Addition: Hot Buttered Texas Toast

Choose One: Hamburger or Cheeseburger or PB & J Uncrustable w/Mozzarella String Cheese Choose Two: Oven Baked Fries Lettuce, Tomato & Pickle Fresh Apple - Peaches

Choose One: Taco Salad or Oven Fried Chicken Choose Two: Baked Beans Lettuce, Tomato & Cheese Cup Fresh Orange Mixed Fruit In Addition: Sugar Cookie

Choose One: Breaded Chicken Pattie Sandwich or Yogurt Munchable Choose Two: Baked Potato Green Beans Banana - Applesauce

Choose One: Biscuit & Gravy Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: French Toast Sticks Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

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Choose One: Blueberry Muffin & Yogurt Cup Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/ Ham & Cheese; or Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal or PB&J Uncrustable Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Choose Two: Garden Salad - Glazed Carrots - Pineapple Fresh Apple In Addition: Cookie

Choose One Box Meal Grilled Garden Chicken Salad or Yogurt Box w/ choice of fruit & veggie; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Corn Dog or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal Choose Two: Oven Baked Fries - Fresh Mixed Veggies w/Dip - Applesauce - Fresh Orange In Addition: Mac & Cheese

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad w/Chicken Nuggets; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Taco Salad w/Tortilla Chips or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal or PB&J Uncrustable Choose Two: Corn - Lettuce & Tomato- Mixed Fruit Fresh Grapes

Choose One Box Meal Grilled Chicken Garden Salad; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Popcorn Chicken w/Hot Roll or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal Choose Two: Peas - Mashed Potatoes - Pears Strawberries In Addition: Cookie

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/Cheese; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Stuffed Breadsticks w/ Marinara or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal or PB&J Uncrustable Choose Two: Green Beans - Vegetable Medley- Banana - Mandarin Oranges

Choose One: Pancakes Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Breakfast Pizza Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Biscuit & Gravy Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/Ham & Cheese; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Chicken Pattie Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Pepperoni Pizza Choose Two: Garden Salad Fresh Veggies w/Dip Fresh Orange Applesauce

Choose One Box Meal Yogurt Box w/vegetable & choice of fruit; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Hamburger Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: BBQ Sandwich Choose Two: Peas -Mashed Potatoes - Fresh Apple Pineapple In Addition: Cookie

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad w/ Chicken Nuggets; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Chicken Pattie Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Soft Taco Choose Two: Corn Lettuce & Tomato Mixed Fruit Fresh Orange

Choose One: Sausage, Egg & Chz on English Muffin Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit Choose One Box Meal Yogurt Box w/vegetable & choice of fruit; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Hamburger Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Grilled Chicken Sandwich Choose Two: Green Beans Cooked Carrots Pears - Fresh Apple In Addition: Cookie

Choose One: Scrambled Eggs & Toast Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/Turkey & Chz Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Chicken Pattie Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Fish on Bun Choose Two: Potato Wedges Vegetable Medley Peaches Banana


Friday, August 27, 2010

Viewing

The News Standard - B5

Flashback

By Mick Harper

1. Name the group that had a No. 1 hit with “Saturday Night.” (Think: tartan plaid.) Bonus for knowing the year. 2. Who penned the songs “A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You” and “Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow)”? 3. Which short-lived 1960s group had a hit with “I’m Telling You Now?” 4. Name the band that released “Where Were You When I Needed You,” “Let’s Live for Today” and “Midnight Confessions.” 5. Who released “I’ve Been Loving You” and “Lady Samantha”? 6. Name the singer who died before his hit “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” was released.

Answers: 1. Bay City Rollers, in 1976. A 1993 remake of the song was used in the film “So I Married An Axe Murderer.” 2. Neil Diamond. The Monkees recorded the songs before he could cut his own versions. 3. Freddie and the Dreamers, in 1963. The British group recorded from 1963 to 1965. 4. The Grass Roots, a band that was originally put together to perform songs that had already been written. 5. Reginald Kenneth Dwight, aka Elton John. 6. Otis Redding. He was only 26 when the plane in which he was riding went down in Wisconsin in December 1967. It’s said that Redding whistled one verse of the song because the final lyrics hadn’t been penned yet. (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

Trivia Test

By Fifi Rodriguez

1. MEASUREMENTS: What period of years is described by the term “duodecennial”? 2. TELEVISION: What is the name of Homer Simpson’s dog? 3. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is the scientific name of a turtle’s shell? 4. MYTHOLOGY: What was the name of the Greek goddess of vengeance? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: In what country is the airline company Aer Lingus based? 6. GEOGRAPHY: What is the largest island in the Caribbean? 7. COMICS: What was the name of Superman’s pet monkey? 8. LEGAL: What is a codicil? 9. MOVIES: What was the name of the main character (played by Mel Gibson) in “Braveheart”? 10. LANGUAGE: What does the abbreviation P.S. stand for? Answers: 1. 12 years 2. Santa’s Little Helper 3. Carapace 4. Nemesis 5. Ireland

6. Cuba 7. Beppo 8. Addition to a will 9. William Wallace 10. Postscript

(c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

Paws Corner By Fifi Rodriguez Treating Pet’s Mouth Ulcers

DEAR PAW’S CORNER: If you can get this information to Linda J., whose dog, Caitlin, had mouth ulcers, I think she would appreciate it. There is a relatively new product on the market called Vetericyn. I used it on my elderly horse who also had a terrible erosion of his gum. It looked better in about four days and healed in two weeks! — Carol S., via email DEAR CAROL: Thanks! Vetericyn’s Web site (http://www.vetericyn.com) claims the treatment reduces healing time for wounds by up to 60 percent, and that it’s nontoxic and doesn’t damage healthy tissue. Now, I tend to look askance at any product that claims to be a cure-all, so I did a bit of research on this relatively new product, which has been touted to the equine world for about a year and is beginning to take off as a treatment for household pets. Vetericyn is a mixture of ionized water and very low amounts of bleach and sodium (salt) — all of which are pretty effective at killing bacteria, viruses and fungi. But some horse owners have mentioned on equine forums that it was not effective in helping wounds heal. Others think it’s a great product. Does this mean you shouldn’t use Vetericyn? Feel free to give it a try. If your pet is suffering from a sore that won’t heal, however, I strongly recommend you work with your vet during treatment so he or she can monitor your pet’s progress and provide treatment alternatives should they be needed.

Have a question about your pet? Contact Sam at ask@pawscorner.com, or write to Paw’s Corner, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. And visit www.pawscorner.com for more pet advice and resources.

Want to adopt a pet? Contact the Meade County Animal Shelter at 422-2064 for more information and don’t forget to spay and neuter your pets. The animal shelter also accepts donations of pine cleaner, paper towels and bleach. (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.


Viewing

B6 - The News Standard

Friday, August 27, 2010

Celebrity Extra By Cindy Elavsky

Q: I can’t tell you how excited I am that the fall shows are about to start up. Can you give me a little scoop as to what I can expect on my favorite show, “Castle”? — Drew D., via e-mail A: The ABC Monday night comedy/suspense/detective drama returns with a bang on Sept. 20. I spoke recently with Jon Huertas, who plays Detective Javier Esposito, and he gave me a sneak peek at Season Three. “For my character in parAna de la Reguera ticular, I’m going to have a little bit of an onscreen romance with another member of the cast,” he said. “Also, for the first episode, there’s a big surprise. In the murder we are investigating, our first suspect surprises everybody. You also are going to see a lot more fleshing out of the satellite characters — my character and Dr. Lanie Parish -- there’s going to be a lot more of that.” (If you’re curious as to whom Jon was referring when he mentioned the suspect on the season opener who will surprise everyone, read our full interview at www.celebrityextraonline.com.) Q: I know there is talk that Danny McBride could be coming to “The Office” to fill the void when Steve Carell leaves, and I think that’s a great idea, but I hope it won’t interfere with his hilarious HBO series, “Eastbound and Down.” When does Season Two start, and can you tell me anything about it? — Sam M., Miami A: Ana de la Reguera, who co-starred with Jack Black in “Nacho Libre,” comes to the show as a series regular (when it returns on Sept. 26) as a lounge singer whom Kenny Powers meets in Mexico. Ana gave me the scoop: “After Kenny leaves April at the gas station, he basically disappears and wants to start over. He wants to go to a new world, so he goes to Mexico. He’s in a completely new culture. His weaknesses are much bigger. I’m a singer, and he thinks we have a connection because I sing Bob Seger songs, covers, but in Spanish the whole time.” Q: Why didn’t Sylvester Stallone cast Jean-Claude Van Damme in his summer blockbuster, “The Expendables”? He seems like a perfect fit! — Denny J., via e-mail A: I agree, and so did Sly. However, Jean-Claude did not. According to Sylvester (in an recent interview in Britain’s Sunday Times), he asked Jean-Claude to be in the movie: “I wanted to set JeanClaude against Jet Li, but he didn’t want to lose to Jet. He didn’t think that was cool. But that’s why it would be cool — to have JeanClaude beaten by the other man.” Q: How is Michael Douglas doing? I read he has cancer! — Trudy G., Altoona, Pa. A: Doctors discovered a tumor in the throat of the 65-year-old actor, for which he’ll have to undergo eight weeks of radiation and chemotherapy. His doctors expect him to make a full recovery. Write to Cindy at King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475; or e-mail her at letters@cindyelavsky.com. For more news and extended interviews, visit www.celebrityextraonline.com and twitter.com/Celebrity_Extra. (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

Soap Updates By Dana Block

Nicole Blevins Licensed Massage Therapist Bring in this ad for 10 OFF your 1st massage

$

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ALL MY CHILDREN: Caleb asked Tad to team up with him to defeat David. Kendall confessed that she didn’t like living so far away from Pine Valley. Greenlee’s hatred toward David was getting the best of her. Kendall saw Liza giving David a mysterious key. Damon felt like he wasn’t good enough for Colby after he couldn’t afford lunch. Kendall encouraged Greenlee to go after Ryan before it’s too late. Wait to See: David collapses. AS THE WORLD TURNS: Jerry ver Dorn stars as “Clint” on Lucinda received a mysteri- “One Life to Live” ous phone call from Ralph. Craig lied and hinted to Lucinda that he and Lily were intimate. Jack shot the gun out of Blackthorn’s hand, saving Dusty’s life. Holden told Faith that he would wait patiently for Lily to come back to him. Chris told Katie the truth about his health. Henry and Barbara wed. Wait to See: John Dixon returns to Oakdale. THE BOLD AND THE BEAUTIFUL: Thomas was jealous of Steffy’s restored status at the company. Hope forgave Oliver for his indiscretion but wasn’t ready to forgive Brooke. Bill fired Liam over the video debacle. Thomas warned Taylor that she would probably regret giving Steffy her shares. Ridge told Liam to stay away from his family after he expressed interest in Hope. Thorne made a shocking revelation about someone from his past. Wait to See: Alone together in the Big Bear cabin, Owen finds himself delivering Bridget’s baby. DAYS OF OUR LIVES: Stephanie found out that someone already changed the DNA results on Chloe’s baby. Rafe stopped Sami and EJ’s wedding before they could say “I do.” Vivian made plans to keep Maggie out of Victor’s orbit permanently. An enraged Sami told EJ that he would never see his children again. Wait to See: Vivian’s stone coffin (for Maggie) is delivered. GENERAL HOSPITAL: Sonny was arrested for shooting Johnny despite his claims of self-defense. Brenda accepted Murphy’s marriage proposal. Robin kicked Patrick out of the house after he admitted that he slept with Lisa. Michael found out that Carly was paying Brook Lynn to do her dirty work. Lisa threw herself in front of Robin’s car. Wait to See: Suzanne encourages Brenda to return to Port Charles. ONE LIFE TO LIVE: Marty found out that Eli was responsible for her fall. Cole tried to fight his attraction toward Hannah. Clint told David that his imprisonment was payback for breaking up his marriage to Kim. John told Marty that Natalie was pregnant with his child. Todd was devastated to learn that Tea died before he could see her again. Wait to See: Kelly and Rex share a connection. THE YOUNG AND THE RESTLESS: Passion ignited between Ashley and Tucker after she tried to break up with him. Phyllis went to bed with Deacon after finding out that Nick and Sharon were moving in together. Heather and Chance shared a kiss after she told him that she had feelings for him. J.T. exploded after seeing Victoria’s “Billy Forever” tattoo. Wait to See: Nikki returns to her old habits.

270.422.3694 / 270.945.0667

365 East Broadway Ste. 2 • Brandenburg, KY 40108

(c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.


Fun & Games

Friday, August 27, 2010

ACROSS 1 Bake sale org. 4 List-ending abbr. 7 Animal 12 Sleep phenom 13 Bill’s partner 14 White-collared thrush (Var.) 15 Sphere 16 Quasimodo, notably 18 Tramcar contents 19 Sequence 20 MacDonald’s place 22 Ages and ages 23 Hardy cabbage 27 Help 29 Penn pal 31 Be a goldbrick

The News Standard - B7

Strange but True By Samantha Weaver

34 Material for blue shoes 35 Addicted 37 Likely 38 Longings 39 Sinbad’s bird 41 Fly fast 45 Spanish appetizers 47 Weep 48 Car style 52 Bill 53 Open-mouthed 54 Golfer’s concern 55 Greek vowel 56 Sir’s counterpart 57 Horror film with four sequels 58 Sen. Kennedy

DOWN 1 Evidence 2 Earth 3 Cautionary color 4 Reverberate 5 Went sightseeing 6 Individually owned apartment 7 Physicist Niels 8 Abrade 9 - Today 10 Sleuth 11 Antlered animal 17 Minimal change 21 Report card data 23 Hardly dexterous one 24 Brewery product 25 Started 26 Before

28 30 31 32 33 36 37 40 42 43 44 45 46 48 49 50 51

Mamie’s man Kreskin’s claim Bashful Weeding tool Charged bit Colorless Source of gum arabic October birthstones Square dance group Preach, maybe “Oops” Not us Distort Overactive one? Khan title Slight amount Bkpr.

Last Week’s Solutions

• It was 19th-century author Samuel Butler who made the following sage observation: “Morality is the custom of one’s country and the current feeling of one’s peers. Cannibalism is moral in a cannibal country.” • When the city of New York was concerned about leaks in its main water-supply system, it found a novel approach to the problem. Six experienced deep-sea divers were hired to live in a pressurized tank within the water-supply tunnel for a month while they investigated the leaks. • Perhaps unsurprisingly, the Popsicle was invented by an 11-year-old boy. • If you would like to get into modeling and live the glamorous life, you might want to reconsider: Researchers at Dow Jones MarketWatch have found that the average model makes a mere $11 to $12 per hour. • Statistics show that for every person born in the United States, there are 15 puppies and 45 kittens born. • In 1950, the average executive earned about 30 times as much as the average worker. Today’s executives earn 300 to 500 times as much. • Thought for the Day: “A conference is a gathering of important people who singly can do nothing, but together can decide that nothing can be done.” -- Fred Allen (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

Horoscopes ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Cupid is strong in the Aries aspect this week, with the cherub opening romantic possibilities for single Lambs, and strengthening ties ‘twixt loving pairs already in a caring relationship. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your dramatic flair might make things more interesting as you recount an event to your colleagues. But be careful not to exaggerate reality to the point that facts and fancy combine to form fiction. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You love to talk, and this week you should get lots of chances to share your thoughts with people who will not only pay attention to what you have to say, but will want to hear more. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The pattern of recent changes could begin to shift from mostly workplace-related events to more personal matters. Continue to keep an open mind as you prepare to deal with them. LEO (July 23 to August 22) An opportunity for work-related travel could be just what the Terrific Tabby needs to get a new perspective on a balky situation. The trip could also prove to be personally rewarding. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might want to suggest resolving an old disagreement before it can affect a matter expected to come up for discussion. It’s always best to start with a clean slate. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) The week favors combining dollops of creativity and practicality to work out both professional and personal problems. A longtime friend could have something of note to suggest. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Some surprising facts could come to light if you decide to probe deeper into an “opportunity” than you might usually do. What you’ll learn could determine what you’ll earn. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Someone close to you might seek your counsel. Hear him/her out, but hold the line at giving actual advice until you get credible answers to all your questions. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) What seems to be an overwhelming workplace project can be dealt with quite well if you handle one category at a time. Things will soon begin to fall into place. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A personal matter might need more of your time than you had expected. Try to prioritize between your many outside commitments and your domestic responsibilities. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A developing situation still needs more time to grow, and more time to study before you can plunge in and make some attention-getting waves. Patience is best for wise Pisceans. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a gift for organization that would make you a fine archivist. (Are you listening out there, Library of Congress?) (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.


MARKETPLACE

B8 - The News Standard

Friday, August 27, 2010

Marketplace

Get great deals when you shop the... Call us...

The News Standard, and place your AD TODAY!

Announcements

Construction

Navy and Marine Corps shipmates who served on the USS Columbus CA-74/CG-12 from 1944 through 1976 and the USS Columbus (SSN-762) past and present, if you would like to share memories and camaraderie with old friends and make new ones, please contact Allen R. Hope, President, 3828 Hobson Road, Fort Wayne, IN 46815-4505. 260-4862221. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Eastern Time. Fax 260-492-9771. Email hope4391@verizon. net

Quality Starts At The Top Serving Meade and all surrounding counties

USS Columbus Ca-74/ CG-12/SSN-762 Reunion September 29-October 2, 2010 at Best Western Albany Airport Inn. Please contact Allen R. Hope, President. 3828 Hobson Road, Fort Wayne, IN 46815-4505. 260-4862221. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Eastern Time. Fax 260-492-9771. Email hope4391@verizon. net Meade County General Baptist Church has free food, clothing, etc. for anyone in need. Mission House (behind church). Hours – Sat. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. – For more information, please call 270-422-7060 or 422-3760. ADVERTISERS: You can place a 25-word classified ad in 70 Kentucky newspapers for as little as $250 with one order, one payment. For information, contact the classified department of this newspaper or call KPS 1-502-223-8821 DIVORCE with or without Children $125.00. With FREE name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs/7days: 1-888789-0198; www/ CourtDivorceService.com

Autos

’77 Chevy truck. 44 inch tires. 350 V8 motor. Needs some work. $2,500. If interested call 270-9800896

Buildings STEEL BUILDING INVENTORY SALE...$4 TO $11sq.ft. Immediate orders only-FREE shipping. Up to 90 days to pay. Deposit required. Pioneer Manufacturers since 1980. 1-800-668-5422.

Business Services FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH Network! Lowest price in America! $24.99/ mo for over 120 channels! $500 Bonus. 1-866-2403844

Cleaning House Cleaning by Penelope – Monday thru Friday. Call between 9am and 6pm. 270-668-4515

Education Childbirth Education Classes are offered at Harrison County Hospital in Corydon, Ind. Free if delivering at HCH, $20 if delivering at another facility. Call 812-738-7830 ext. 2012 for information and registration. Call The News Standard to subscribe - 422-4542

Notice

Wright’s ConstruCtion The experience you want, the service you expect, the value you deserve! Residential • Commercial 22 years experience! Free Estimates & Roof Inspections

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We also install METAL ROOFING!

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Education

Help Wanted

The EMS Training Center at 245 Atwood Street, Corydon, Ind. offers Healthcare Provider CPR and CPR Renewal classes monthly. Please call 812-738-7871 for more information.

Wright’s construction is now hiring experienced roofers and laborers. For more information call 270828-5206.

Free English Classes – Call 270-422-5884. U.S. Citizenship and social security number not required. Meade County Adult Education Center. Ask for Dianne or Melissa for information on class dates and times.

Equipment for Sale Blacktop sealer equipment, 1,000 gallon tank and sprayer on International truck. 4,000 gallon tank storage, blower and stripper. 606-528-4043. NEW Norwood SAWMILLS LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quickcycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N

Financial CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau

Free Meade County General Baptist Church has free food, clothing, etc. for anyone in need. Mission House (behind church). Hours – Sat. 10 a.m.2 p.m. and Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. – For more information, please call 270-422-7060 or 422-3760.

Do you have a few hours a week you can search the internet? Are you willing to make a few phone calls? We are looking for motivated people in your area. Call 270-85-HOMES for more information. CDL-A Drivers: You Deserve The Best! High Miles, Great Pay, 2011 Freightliner Cascadias! New Performance Bonus Program. $500 Sign-on for Flatbed Drivers.CDL-A, 6 mo. OTR. Western Express. 888-801-5295 Driver - CDL/A Top Hometime! Solos & Teams Highest Team Pay CDL/A with 1 yr. recent OTR req’d. 800-942-2104 ext 238 or 243 www.totalms.com Drivers - Flatbed CDL/A $2,000 Sign On bonus. NEW TRUCKS ARRIVING! 6 months Experience Required. Lease Purchase Available No Felonies. Hornady Transportation 800-441-4271 x KY – 100 Drivers - FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED OTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/Tanker REQ’D. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter TODAY! 877-484-3061 www. oakleytransport.com

hydehomeimprovement@gmail.com

• ADDITIONS • DECKS • WINDOWS • DOORS • SHEDS • PAINT • SIDING • CERAMIC TILE • CONCRETE SIDEWALKS • DRIVEWAYS • RENTAL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

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Member of the Meade County Chamber of Commerce • Insured • References

Instructional ACT NOW! You may qualify for FREE HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR TRAINING Funded by State WIA Program AMERICAN HEAVY EQUIPMENT TRAINING 866-280-5836 AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888)2072053 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-460-9765 www.CenturaOnline.com Drivers: ACT NOW! You may qualify for FREE CLASS-S CDL Training Funded by State WIA Program. Must meet hiring requirements of major trucking companies. TRUCK AMERICA TRAINING 866-244-3644 SALE! CDL Training Starting at $1995! WIA Approved. Job Placement Assistance. Tuition reimbursement available. Accredited BBB. Delta Career Academy. Mt. Sterling, KY. 859498-9988, 800-883-0171.

Insurance Save on your auto or auto/ home insurance rates. Nationwide has announced rate decreases of 9.3% on auto insurance; up to 30% decreases on package policies. Let me show you how to save! Renee Thompson, Nationwide Associate Agent/ Hamilton Insurance Group. 859-317-2217

Help Wanted...

Accepting applications for immediate openings construction, concrete, laborers/concrete finishers, carpenters, form setters, operators. Drug screening required. Equal Opportunity Employer 270-945-0082 or 502-933-5900 between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm

Pet Adoptions will take place at Orscheln Farm and Home in Radcliff, Ky. on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. If you are thinking of volunteering, stop by and see how you can help or PINS at 270422-3838.

HERNIA REPAIR? DID YOU RECEIVE A COMPOSIX KUGEL MESH PATCH BETWEEN 1999-2008? If the Kugel patch was removed due to complications of bowel perforation, abdominal wall tears, puncture of abdominal organs or intestinal fistulae, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800535-5727

Report suspected illegal activity in your neighborhood by calling the Meade County Sheriff’s Department anonymous tip line at 270-422-4673 or email drugtips@bbtel. com.

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TODAY Notice

ADDITIONS / REMODEL / REPAIR Now Accepting Visa or Mastercard

Notice

Call Marci Today!

The News Standard 422-4542

The News Standard

422-4542 Medical Help Wanted Health Occupations Training: New Online Nurse Aide Training! Ky State and Medicaid approved. Certified Clinical Medical Assistant, Phlebotomy and EKG. Ky Health Training: 859963-2901; 888-274-2018 www.kyhealthtraining.com

“Your customer just read this ad.” Call Marci to place your ad, call 270-422-4542

Is your closet full of clutter? No room for new stuff? Advertise your Yard Sale with

The News Standard 270-422-4542

From the office of: Evelyn ‘Debbi’ Medley Meade County Circuit Court Clerk This office has received a letter from the KENTUCKY STATE POLICE Driver Testing Department that they are presenting a regulation to the State Personnel Board, outlining a plan to furlough state driver testing employees a total of six days for Fiscal Year 2011. The six days include three common days during which state driver testing will be closed that are adjacent to existing state holiday weekends for Meade County: • Friday, September 2, 2010 (Labor Day Weekend) • Friday, November 12, 2010 (Veteran’s Day Weekend) • Friday, May 27, 2011 (Memorial Day Weekend) In addition, the driver testing employees will be furloughed for one day each in the months of October 2010, March 2011, and June 2011. What this means for the Meade County Office is that our driver testing on Friday’s will be affected. There will be certain Friday’s that we will not have a driver examiner available. We realize this will be an inconvenience, and apologize to the citizens of Meade County. If you have any questions concerning this matter, please feel free to contact my office at 422-4961. Thank you in advance for your understanding and patience to this situation.

PUBLIC NOTICE Due to Frankfort computers being down on Friday, September 3rd, 2010, PVA and County Clerk offices will be closed. There will be NO drivers testing or licenses issued/renewed. Circuit Court Clerk will be opened for other business. All offices of the Courthouse will be closed September 4th - 6th for the Labor Day holiday. The Courthouse will re-open Tuesday, September 7th, 2010 at 8:00am. Pet / Pet Supplies Get your adopted pets spayed or neutered! Pets adopted from the Meade County Animal Shelter can be spayed or neutered for free from PINS (Pets in Need Society). www. petsinneedsociety.org or call 270-422-3838. All New Happy Jack® Xylecide® anti-fungal shampoo treats ringworm and hot spots on dogs & horses without steroids. Orscheln Farm & Home Stores. (www.happyjackinc.com)

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MARKETPLACE

Friday, August 27, 2010 Pets / Pet Supplies

The News Standard - B9 Truckers Help Wanted

Real Estate

MEET YOUR NEW PET! ADOPT TODAY!

No/Low Credit? - Low Down Payment - Help Financing - 3 bedroom 2 bath….HURRY - Call Lynn at 270-85-HOMES

real estate development We buy and sell land

270-547-4222 • 1-866-865-5263

LAND FOR SALE

3BR, 2 bath doublewide on 1 acre in Webster. $74,900. $4,900 down, $775 per month 1-866-865-5263 www.ky-landco.com

mwlandforsale.com Hunting Property Available 112 Acres. Good deer & turkey hunting. Breckinridge Co. Only $1,500 per acre May Divide 1 Acre near Fort Knox. Water, septic, electric. Only $25,800 16 Acre Mini Farm near Irvington. Only $35,500 84 Acres near Caneyville. Good deer & turkey hunting. Open woods, 2 ponds, cabin, barn, running creek. Nice home site. Only $2,000 per acre. Must see to appreciate! 1-4 Acre tracts now available in Meade County near Fort Knox. County water, electric

3 BR, 2 bath brick house with carport , ready to sell. New carpet, new paint. $120,000. Financing available 1-866-865-5263 www.ky-landco.com 3 BR, 2 bath doublewide with 2 car garage and 3 acres in Big Springs. $79,900. $4,900 down, $830 per month 1-866-865-5263 www.ky-landco.com Lake front lots available with electric and city water. Starting at $17,900. $900

1.2 acres on Wells Cemetery Lane in Harned. $14,900. $900 down, $155 per month 1-866-865-5263 www.ky-landco.com 2-4 acre tracts, open and wooded with electric and city water available. Starting at $12,900. $900 down, $133 per month 1-866-865-5263 www.ky-landco.com 122 acres open, woods, pond and 2 barns located on Highway 86 on the HardinBreckinridge County Line. $1,900 per acre 1-866-865-5263 www.ky-landco.com

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7 Acres, creek front property, Breckinridge County. $46,500

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I buy houses: No Equity? No Problem!

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McQuary Rd Guston, KY 2 Bedroom, 1 Full Bath, 1,196 SF, 7acres, Large Detached Shop, Charming home with an amazing view 877-201-3835 270-422-4499

965 Sunset Vine Grove, KY 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, laminate and tile flooring, Eat in Kitchen, and Fireplace 877-201-3835 270-422-4499

Support Groups Notice: Transportation to NA and AA meetings will be provided from MACC Ministries for Brandenburg and Irvington. For more information, call Glenn at 270-497-4378.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS: Meetings are held at the Acceptance Place, 1370 Hwy.79 in Irvington. Meetings are every Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sundays at 8 p.m. For more information, call 270-547-0347 or 270-547-0445.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS – Alcohalt House, 2255 Fairgrounds Road, meets nightly at 8 p.m. On Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, meetings are at 10 a.m. Call 270-422-1050 for more information.

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS: Meetings are held at the Acceptance Place 1370 Hwy. 79 in Irvington. Meetings are Monday, Tuesday, and Thursdays at 8 p.m. For more information, call 270-547-0347 or 270-547-0445.

BRANDENBURG AL-ANON: Alcohalt House, 2255 Fairgrounds Road. Meets Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday at 8 p.m. Open to all. Call 270-422-1050 for more information.

SLEEP DISORDERS: AWAKE meeting – Meetings are the 3rd Tuesday each month at the Parvin Baumgart Education Center at Harrison County Hospital in Corydon, Ind. A health awareness group for people affected by sleep apnea and/or sleep disorders. Call 812-738-7892 for more information.

OPEN DOOR ALATEEN GROUP: Alcohalt House, 2255 Fairgrounds Road. Meets Thursdays at 8 p.m. These meetings are for Al-Anon and Alateen members only. You qualify for membership if your life has been or is being deeply affected by close contact with a problem drinker. Please come to any Al-Anon or Alateen Opened or Closed meetings! Call 270-4221050 for more information.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT: T.O.P.S group meets at Buck Grove Baptist Church every Tuesday at 6 p.m. For more information, call Lena at 270-422-2692.

English Estates

• Lots for Sale • Protective Covenants • Black top roads • Close to Schools, Hospitals & Stores • 1.5 miles West of Brandenburg By-Pass

• Lots for Sale • Protective Covenants • Black top roads • Close to Schools, Hospitals & Stores • County Water • Wooded lots • 2.5 miles South of Brandenburg By-Pass, subdivision on left

ACRES 1.638 1.696 1.224 1.572 1.296 1.27 1.232

LOT # PRICE 8 $19,900 28 $19,600 42 $13,900 48 $15,290 49 $14,500 50 $14,400 51 $13,900

ACRES 3.46 2.5297 2.5399 2.250

LOT # PRICE ! 10SOLD$25,500 14 $17,000 15 $17,000 16 $16,500

Drivers: Owner Operators Needed! Long and short hauls. Reefers welcome. Base plates and trailers available. No forced dispatch, home weekends. Call anytime at 502-797-1344 or 502-6375053.

Indian Oaks

Drivers-Owner/Operators $3000 - $4000/Week, Your Tractor - Our Trailer, must run 2800-3000 miles per week - home every 14 days. Midwest to Southwesst runs 1-800-817-3962

Summitt Trucking is currently hiring CDL-A Solo Drivers & Teams! Miles+ Benefits+ Hometime! Min age 23 with 24 mons exp. www.summitt. com or 1-866-333-5333

Truck Drivers WANTED! MORE Hometime! TOP pay! EXCELLENT Benefits! NEWER Equipment! Up to $.48/mile company drivers! HEARTLAND EXPRESS 1-800-441-4953 www. heartlandexpress.com

Lots for Sale • Protective Covenants • Black top roads • Close to Schools, Hospitals & Stores • 1 mile South of Brandenburg By-Pass, turn left on Meade Springs Road, property on right

4635 Fackler Road Webster, KY 2 Bedrooms, 1 bath, Garage, 2 acres, completely remodeled in 2010.

ACRES LOT # PRICE 4.092 29 $35,000 4.988 30 $42,000

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Yard Sale – August 27 & 28 – 8am - ?. 233 Community Park Rd, Flaherty. A little bit of everything!

Lots for Sale • Black top roads If Country Living is were you want to be, then this is the place for you!

Yard Sale - Muldraugh United Methodist Church - Corner of Main and 1638, Muldraugh - Saturday, August 28th, 8am-3pm - Rain or Shine Furniture, baby items, office furniture, display cabinet, appliances, what nots, clothes

ACRES LOT # PRICE 6 9 $30,000

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Truckers Help Wanted CALL NOW! BIH Trucking Company/ International Truck Driving School Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! STATE WIA PROGRAM if qualified, or Financing available. 888-780-5539 Class A CDL Drivers Needed ASAP. $1000.00 Sign on Bonus. OTR Van, Flatbed, and Teams. First $500.00 after 30 Days. Final Payment of $500.00 in 6 months. Full Benefit Package. Home Weekly. Safety Bonus. Solo 2500-3000 Miles Per Week. Teams 4000-5000 Miles Per Week. Local Drivers. 2nd and 3rd Shift. 40 Plus Hours Per Week. Set-Schedule. Call Linda 1-800-860-0889 1-502-863-0108 ext 403

Multi FamilyYard Sale - 3 days – Thursday, September 2 / Friday, September 3 / Saturday, September 4, 2010 – 8:00am – 2:00pm. Corner of HWY 1638 and 144. Parking lot of Outer Limits, 2940 Brandenburg Road, Brandenburg, KY 40108

Moved in sale! Friday ONLY, August 27, 8am - ? Lots of school uniforms, household items and décor. Rain or shine at 3455 Fairgrounds Road

Service Directory Attorney

STONE LAW OFFICE, PLLC

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Automotive Repair

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Back Hoe Work Bush Hogging Garden Tilling Tree Removal Finish Mowing Remodeling Masonry Pole Barns Garages


OUTDOORS

B10 - The News Standard

Friday, August 27, 2010

Lunar Calendar Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

12:31-2:31 a.m. 1:02-3:01 p.m.

1:12-3:12 a.m. 1:42-3:42 p.m.

1:55-3:55 a.m. 2:25-4:25 p.m.

2:41-4:41 a.m. 3:11-5:11 p.m.

3:31-5:31 a.m. 4:01-6:01 p.m.

4:24-6:24 a.m. 4:54-6:54 p.m.

5:20-7:20 a.m. 5:50-7:50 p.m.

Darker shades of gray indicate the best fishing or hunting potential based on the phase of the moon. = New Moon

= Full Moon

Bowfishing tournament reels in big winners Event featured 11 boats, with the winners catching a 42 pound fish By Ben Achtabowski The News Standard The 10th annual J.W.R. Bowfishing Tournament held last weekend was successful with 11 participating boats. However, the fishing wasn’t at its best on the Ohio River during the event. “The tournament went well,” said first-year tournament organizer Lee Wardrip. “The fish (numbers) weren’t up like they normally are. They didn’t see a whole lot out there. Normally, there would be a lot bigger fish then there was today.” Wardrip said the low fish count could have been due to storms that came through the area early Saturday morning. “Last weekend everyone was shooting fish everywhere,” he said. “Then this weekend, a week later, and the same place … there’s no fish. I guess that’s how fishing goes.” The winners of the tournament, J.B. Fox and Dave Hash of Franklin, Ind., were two of only a few participants who hauled in some hefty fish during the 12-hour fishing tournament. Their total winning weight was 144 pounds, while they also won the big fish competition with a fish weighing in at 42 pounds, 2 ounces.

They also took the biggest gar award of 13 pounds, 14 ounces. When all was said and done, the duo from Franklin cashed in more than $700. The second place team, led by Meade County’s Michael McCoy, took second place with an overall weight of 126 pounds. “Winner takes all,” Wardrip said. “(Fox and Hash) just came out with a lot of money. But they were kind enough to give some of (their) winnings back (to the Sportsman Club).” Some of the tournament funds went toward the Meade County Sportsman Club, where Wardrip would like to help send Meade County children to conservation camps in Kentucky. During the past 10 years of the tournament, former tournament organizer Dan Richeson said the record winning overall weight was 445 pounds — when the rules allowed 10 Asian species fish in the count. This year, the rules regulated how many big Asian species fish participants could count toward their overall weight. The record single fish weight was 56 pounds according to Richeson. The long-standing tournament and growth of participants have been a reflection of the rise of popularity in bowfishing. “Bowfishing is getting big,” Wardrip said. “When I started 15 years ago there were very few and far between bowfishermen. Now, there’s someone out on the river every night of the week.”

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

TOP: J.B. Fox (left) and Dave Hash, of Franklin, Ind., hold up their biggest fish weighing in at 42 pounds. ABOVE: Meade County’s Michael McCoy took second place with his three-person team called “Dirty Deeds”

If You DRINK....

Don’t DRIVE!

R E S O N S I B L E

Had a big bite? Show off your catch!

Submit pictures of your recent fishing trips to be published on the Outdoors Page. E-mail sports@thenewsstandard.com or stop by the office at 1065 Old Ekron Road in Brandenburg. The News Standard • 270-422-4542

B E

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MAC TRIATHLON First Annual MAC Triathlon a swimming success The News Standard - B11

Friday, August 27, 2010

By Ben Achtabowski The News Standard Torrential downpours and clapping thunder didn’t put a damper on the Meade County Activities Center’s (MAC) first annual mini triathlon last Saturday at Doe Valley. With the start of the triathlon slated to begin at 7:30 a.m., event coordinator Meg King was concerned about dense fog without noticing a menacing weather front barreling down on Meade County. “The funny thing about it, I was actually worried about fog in the morning,” King said. “When I was driving to (Doe Valley) I noticed there was no fog or anything and I was happy. I didn’t even realize it was lightning out.” The weather delayed the event and swimmers finally started the swimming leg of the race around 9 a.m. The event went on without a hitch the remainder of the morning despite slippery roads on the bike portion of

the triathlon. “It was a crazy morning,” King said. “But really everyone was great. No one complained and everyone stayed around and made the best of the situation. They had a good time just talking and being with the community.” In fact, the rain may have been a blessing in disguise as past weekends have seen early morning temperatures skyrocket in the muggy air. “Really the rain might have been a blessing,” King said. “It kept everyone cool rather than the weekend before where it was 105 degrees out.” More than 100 total participants competed in the event — more than doubling what the organizers were expecting. People of all ages enjoyed the event including 13-year-old Hannah King who finished in second place for the women with a time of 1:01.46. “I saw Hannah King out training with her dad,” Meg King said. “It was really neat to see families work together and accomplish

something. “There were a lot of young participants that did the whole thing. Then there were a lot of kids who formed a team and did a portion or the race. It’s good to see the young kids do something like this.” Renee English won the women’s division with a time of 59:38, while Jon Mark Tribodeau led the men’s division with at time of 45:42. Greg’s Team brought in the best time of the morning in the team division with a blazing 43:02. “There were some incredible athletes,” Meg King said. “They did awesome. But everyone did great. I don’t think anyone outshined the others. Everybody was out there and did great and you could tell they worked hard to compete.” The event was in conjunction with the MAC in an effort to get a recreation activities center which would include basketball courts, a pool and workout facilities. The group is currently working on future events

such as its second gala event. For more information on future events check their Web site at www.meadeactivitycenter.org. With the success of the triathlon, Meg King says MAC will host it again next year. “This is definitely an event that can grow from this year,” she said. “I’ve had several people tell me they wanted to do it again and several people told me they want to try it for the first time after seeing this year’s event. This is certainly something we want to do again.” Top finishers: Men’s Division: 1 Jon Mark Tribodeau 45:42 2 Scott King 49:53 3 Bryan King 50:32 Women’s Division: 1 Renee English 59:38 2 Hannah King 1:01:46 3 Kim DeVries 1:04:50 Team Division: 1 Greg’s Team 43:02 2 Hobbs Clan 50:06 3 Team Powers 52:00

And the winners are...

Men’s Division

Women’s Division

NEWS* Program

Waste Transport Service

Team Division Meade County Area

RiverRidge Marathon

Chamber of Commerce

*Newspapers Educating and Working for Students

Medco Center of Brandenburg

Local businesses and individuals work together with Meade County Schools and The News Standard to help enhance education through their local newspaper. To become a sponsor call us today at 270-422-4542.

Garland Brown Backhoe & Plumbing

FIRST CHOICE

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Miles Farm Center, No. 4

The News Standard

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Concrete Products

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Knotts Supply

Fashion Floors Tony Brown Chevrolet

J & N Services, Inc. Complete Auto Care

Kentucky Farm Bureau

Meade County

FISCAL COURT

Cardinal Concrete Co. Since 1985

Allen’s S&T Hardware


B12 - The News Standard

Wedding Engagement

HERITAGE

Tyra — Troutman Engagement Allen and Teresa Fackler and the late Gary M. Troutman of Battletown, Ky., announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their son, Gary Lamar Troutman to Lyndsay Rayna Tyra of Waco, Ky. Lyndsay is the daughter of Lloyd and Patricia Tyra of Waco, Ky. and is a 2002 graduate of Madison Southern High School. She also has a cosmetology degree from the Eastern School of Hair Design. Gary is a 2001 graduate of Meade County High School. The wedding will be held Saturday, September 4th at 4:30 p.m. in McKee, Ky. All family and friends are cordially invited to attend.

Wedding Hurt — Smith Wedding

Kannon Smith would like to announce the marriage of his mommy and daddy, Joshua Smith and Ashley Hurt. They are to be married on August 28th, 2010, at their home in Payneville, Ky. Kannon would like to invite all family and friends to attend.

Achievements Kelli White donates hair to Locks for Love

Kelli White is the 7-year-old daughter of Greg and Anne White. She donated her hair because she wanted to help kids who have lost their hair because of cancer. Lisa Jenkins of Classic Cuts had the honor of cutting her hair.

Exxon donates $500 to school volunteer

Ekron Elementary School recently received $500 from Exxon Mobil as a result of volunteer hours that Joyce Durbin put in at the school last year. Pictured receiving a check are some of Mrs. Durbin’s grandkids who attend Ekron.

Birthdays August 27: David Fackler, Chaselyn Allgeier, Blake Tyree, William Stogsdill, Scotty Singleton, Troy Brown , Ashley Blake August 28: Trudy Claus, Christine Ramsey, Amy Hardesty, Caleb Nevitt August 29: A.B. Hurn, Eric Benham, Lloyd Claycomb, Diana Compton August 30: Lonnie Lockard, Todd Wemes, Kevin Mattingly, Frank Blackburn, Latesa Mudd, Lewis Bennett, Joe Yates August 31: Duncan Smithson; Danny Morgan, Sondra Hinton, Charles Light, Clyde Mims September 1: Darren Goins

Marriage Licenses Dororthy Lucinda Hart, 23, of Ekron, daughter of Sharon Rosalie Hart and Donald Lee Embry Jr., to Sean Dwight Bullock, 24, of Ekron, son of Robin Elaine Tubb and Richard Allen Bullock. Katie Jean Berry, 17, of Brandenburg, daughter of Colleen Marie Barry and Gary Thomas Kessinger, to Robert Dwight Mitchell, 18, of Brandenburg, son of Elizabeth Marie Mitchell and Robin Dwight Mitchell. Katherine Lee Hodson, 20, of Brandenburg, daughter of Evanthia Tula George and Lee Taylor Hodson, to Alton Reed Worley Jr., 27, of Brandenburg, son of Sandra Kaye Hampton and Alton Reed Worley Sr.

Friday, August 27, 2010

Local Activities

Friday Night Live A large crowd gathered for Friday Nite Live on August 20th at The Vine Grove Optimist Park and a great time was had by all. Klassic Tymes Band played old-time rock and roll. After the sun went down the shoes came off and everyone danced the night away. Vine Grove will host its final Friday Nite Live of the season, on August 27th at 7:00 p.m. with Rascals of Ragtime and their New Orleans Dixieland Jazz

Did you know? You can submit special events and accomplishments, including birthdays, wedding and engagement announcements, and special occassions, to The News Standard for FREE Call 422-4542

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2010.08.27 The News Standard