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Index

Get to know Doe At Doe Run Inn, patrons can expect a fine dining experience paired with a pastoral view BUSINESS, A13

Court News Classifieds Faith Obituaries TV Grids Viewpoints

FFA Leadership Day

A4 B6 A7 A6 B5 A3

MCHS hosted more than 100 regional FFA’ers for a day of fun and personal growth. AGRICULTURE, A14

Homecoming duo

Check out homecoming photos galore and more

PAGE B13

The News Standard Meade County's Award-Winning Paper for the People

Friday, January 22, 2010

Meade County, Kentucky

0.18’

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Building Meade County 0.21’

0.6’

13’18”

18’6”

.1’

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Fort Knox ESC soldiers head to Haiti Sustainers deploy in support of relief efforts Submitted by 3d Sustainment Command (Exp.) Public Affairs

FORT KNOX — Between Jan. 1517, liaison teams from Fort Knox’s 3d Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) deployed to Haiti, Fort Bragg and U.S. Southern Command in support of relief efforts stemming from the devastation caused by an earthquake on Jan. 12 The command’s experience gained from providing command and control for operational level sustainment and distribution of supplies in support of Multi-national Corps-Iraq will play a By Lindsey Corley lindsey@thenewsstandard.com Businesses, homes and more are expanding in Meade County, with construction sites popping up all over, including more than 15 sites in Brandenburg alone. “A lot (of the construction) is businesses expanding,” said Brandenburg mayor David Pace. He also said for the folks coming to this area, finding a house or an apartment should be fairly easy, due to those growing construction ventures. Pace said he knows of at least eight spec houses, or homes built in anticipation of finding a buyer, specifically due to the expectation of an increase in population from Fort Knox’s Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC). Land is also being cleared next to Scott-Gross Company Inc., on Broadway, for the first phase of new apartments. A total of 40 units are slated to be built there. “We’ve got a lot going on,” Pace said. Meade County Judge/Execu-

See HAITI, A8

tive Harry Craycroft agreed. “There are several projects in the works,” Craycroft said. “We’re on the move and growing very much.” For Meade County, the growth is coming in the form of new and improved roadways. Craycroft said a couple of road projects, Hwy. 933 and 313 are both scheduled to begin later this year and work on Hwy. 79 is also on the radar. During the spring, a new phase of the water project to extend water lines throughout the county will also be underway. In 2009, Ekron Elementary School underwent an expansion to accommodate more students, and a new primary school is currently in the works next to Flaherty Elementary School to help alleviate a full house of students in the current building. The Meade County Fire Protection District began operating out of its new fire station No. 1 on Armory Place at the beginning of the 2009 and Hardin

Community remembers loved one’s dream First steps taken to make Matt Pike’s hopes become a reality By Charlotte Fackler charlie@thenewsstandard.com

As head of a joint effort of family and friends, Jason Allen is excited to begin stage one of a building dedication in the memory of Matthew Pike. After a few years and much hard work by the Matt Pike Truck and Tractor Pull (MPTTP) group, stage one is about to unfold. Matthew Pike was a well-known Meade County native. He passed away suddenly three years ago, at the age of 26. He was an avid farmer whose ties run deep in the Payneville and Rhodelia communities.

See BUILDING, A2

See DREAM, A9

Dis. 2 Judge Embry files for reelection

THE NEWS STANDARD/STAFF PHOTOS

CLOCKWISE (From top): Flaherty Primary School is slated to open next year; the new library will be built on Old Ekron Rd.; new town homes on Main Street were built during the summer; expansion at Kroger began last fall; Doe Run Federal Credit Union opened June 29, 2009; Meade County Pediatrics opened Aug. 3, 2009; an openair pavilion is under construction at the extension office campus; Fort Knox Federal Credit Union is being erected along the ByPass; attorney Doug Vowels’ offices were constructed during the summer; Meade County Fire District’s new station was in service Jan. 2, 2009. Ekron Elementary School completed its expansion before this school year; Brandenburg Diagnostic Center opened Sept. 9, 2009.

Submitted press release

“I think we need someone who can respond quickly,” said councilman Ralph Lee. Tate was also concerned with the city’s legal requirement to take the lowest bid. The lowest bidder, Motor Automotive located in Muldraugh, has been on the city’s clean-up list for two years and has been visited by code enforcement officers.

Judge Shan Embry filed for re-election to the District Court bench, Division II serving Meade, Breckinridge and Grayson counties on Nov. 5, 2009. Judge Embry has held this seat for the last seven years. The position of District Judge is a goal to which she has dedicated herself through- Shan Embry out a career spent in public service which includes having served as an assistant county attorney in Grayson County, and as an assistant commonwealth attorney for the 46th Judicial Circuit. However, anyone who knows Shan

See FIRM, A8

See JUDGE, A5

Muldraugh selects storm water engineering firm By Lindsey Corley lindsey@thenewsstandard.com MULDRAUGH — During a special meeting called by city council, members heard a recommendation of the storm water committee regarding the selection of an engineering firm, after reviewing requests for qualifications. The committee proposed the council accept Hawkins Engi-

neering of Vine Grove, Ky., because of the firm’s close proximity to Muldraugh and because the firm had previously worked for the city, doing the topographical map, so the firm had prior knowledge of the sewer system, as well. Council members also attempted to award the towing contract, which was tabled during the last regular meeting of the council Monday, Jan. 11.

Mayor Danny Tate said he wasn’t “real happy” while researching the five submitted bids, based on the distance some of the towing businesses were from the city, including those located in Guston and Brandenburg. His concern stemmed from not having a quick response time if the weather’s bad or if an accident occurs on Dixie Highway and blocks the roadway during a busy time of day.


NEWS POW medal found in Irvington barn

Friday, January 22, 2010

A2 - The News Standard

Community Briefings Muldraugh seeks new police officer Muldraugh Police Chief John Stinebruner reported to members of the Muldraugh City Council during its regular monthly meeting last week that he is in pursuit of a new officer to join the force in Muldraugh. He said he is hoping to find someone already certified, but would be willing to consider a candidate who still needs certification, as well. There are three officers employed in Muldraugh, including Stinebruner, who make up the department. For more information, contact Muldraugh City Hall at 270-942-2824. Teen fatality last week on KY 1600 At 8:15 p.m. on Jan. 15, victim Colen D. Casey III of Rineyville, Ky., age 19, had been standing on the center yellow line of KY 1600 speaking to a stopped motorist. He stepped back away from that car into the path of a northbound vehicle. That driver was unable to avoid striking him. Casey was pronounced dead at the scene. No charges are pending on the driver. The driver of the vehicle was not injured. The accident was investigated by trooper Terry Whittaker. Bluegrass Cellular participates in Haiti relief efforts Bluegrass Cellular announced last week that it will collect and donate food to support relief efforts in Haiti. The company will collect peanut butter, rice, and beans from anyone wishing to donate. These non-perishable food items may be donated at any Bluegrass Cellular retail location by Saturday, Jan. 23. “We have an opportunity to assist in a very real and needed way with the relief efforts,” said Barry Nothstine, Director of Marketing and Product Development for Bluegrass Cellular, Inc. Monetary donations can be made online via the Red Cross at http:// american.redcross.org/ supporthaiti> or via USAID at www.usaid. gov/helphaiti. Headquartered in Elizabethtown, Ky., Bluegrass Cellular has been operating in Kentucky for over 19 years with 21 company owned retail locations and more than 30 authorized agent locations. For more information, visit bluegrasscellular.com or call 800-928-CELL. State officials take voluntary 10 percent salary reduction for 2nd consecutive year As part of Gov. Steve Beshear’s “Smart Government” policy, Lt. Gov. Daniel Mongiardo announced he will continue in 2010 with a voluntary 10 percent salary reduction that first began in January 2009. Mongiardo also announced his chief of staff will take a 10 percent salary reduction effective Jan. 1, 2010. “As we continue to cut and reduce state government, I believe that it is important that, as elected leaders of our Commonwealth, we lead by example and share in the sacrifice to ensure that the state we love emerges from this crisis stronger than ever,” said Lt. Gov. Mongiardo. In December 2008, the Governor, Lt. Governor, and members of the Governor’s senior staff took a voluntary 10 percent salary reduction for 2009. This year, for the first time, Cabinet secretaries and the Lt. Governor’s Chief of Staff will take a 10 percent salary reduction as well.

By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com An impressive Prisoner of War medal, issued by the United States of America, was recently found pinned to silk inside a small wooden box in a barn in Irvington, Ky. The medal was discovered by Jamie Cundiff, who was cleaning out the barn when he came across the medal inside an old dresser drawer. Cundiff brought the medal to the attention of his stepfather, Dave Clark, radio personality for WMMG (93.5 FM), earlier this week. Together, the pair began searching for the medal’s rightful owner. “Somebody’s missing it somewhere,” Cundiff said. “I know if it were mine, I’d want someone to try to return it to me.” The medal was awarded to Charles Basham, the name inscribed on the back of the pendant. Clark said he searched on the Internet for war veterans named Charles Basham, and found two. Charles E. Basham, an Army S/Sgt., was given prisoner number 1147 at Camp Fukuoka, a Japanese WWII POW site. Clark said the name Charles Basham also appears on a list of Vietnam Conflict prisoners. After making some phone calls to a few Meade County war scholars and Fort Knox officials, Clark finally got a hit when Army personnel said they believe the medal probably belongs to Charles E. Basham, the WWII veteran. Cundiff and Clark were given the contact numbers

270-422-2228

619 High Street, Suite 2, Brandenburg, Ky. Paul F. Mik Jr., CAI, Auctioneer/Broker ....................................................... (270) 234-3168 Jodie Babb, Realtor/Apprentice Auctioneer ................................................. (270) 945-9799 Jim McCoy, Realtor ......................................................................................... (270) 945-6581

NEW! ABSOLUTE AUCTION Saturday, January 23rd @ 10:30 a.m. for two local Basham families, one in Cecilia, Ky., and one in Irvington, Ky. “The woman we spoke to at Cecilia said she didn’t know who he was,” Cundiff said. Clark and Cundiff are waiting to hear back from the family in Irvington, Ky. Clark said they are also researching information about Charles E. Basham from funeral homes in and around the city, since Fort Knox officials also stated that the recipient is most likely deceased. “It would be pretty neat if we could find out who this belongs to ... or at least his next of kin,” Clark said. The U.S. Prisoner of War medal was first signed into law by Pres. Ronald Reagan in 1985 and is authorized by public law to “any person who, while serving in any capacity with the U.S. Armed Forces, was taken prisoner and held captive after 5 April 1917...” On the front of the bronze medallion is an eagle surrounded by a circle of barbed wire and bayonet points.

103 East Garnettsville Road, Muldraugh, KY HOME and PERSONAL PROPERTY

ABSOLUTE

Close to Fort Knox, Radcliff and 20 minutes from downtown Louisville. Nice 4 bedroom home on a large lot. Garage with workshop for the woodworker enthusiast. Grow and eat your own fruit from several trees on the property. This will sell at ABSOLUTE AUCTION. DON’T MISS THIS ONE!!!! An additional to the home, there is a 19th Century Spinning Wheel (primitive), 1800s school bell, 1800s china set, sewing machines, metal bed (2), decorative cigar boxes, antique decorative end table, glassware, tools, 50’s memorabilia, over a 1/2 century of items collected for sale. Antique dealers welcomed! Call for details or directions.

ABSOLUTE AUCTIONS AUCTION 1 Jan. 30 @ 10 a.m.

6300 Eureka Avenue Louisville, KY

AUCTIONS 2 & 3 January 30 @ 11:30 a.m.

1003 Main Street West Point, KY

207 North Fourteenth West Point, KY

UPCOMING AUCTION Saturday, February 13th @ 10:30 a.m. THE NEWS STANDARD/LAURA SAYLOR

This POW medal was recently found inside a barn in Irvington, Ky. It was awarded to Charles Basham, the name inscribed on the back.

Building From page A1 Memorial Hospital extended its services to Meade County when it opened a new diagnostic center in September. The site of the Meade County Public Library’s new building, which will share property with a new city park, has begun to be cleared directly across the road from a new open-air pavilion presently under construction at the Meade County Extension Service office on Old Ekron Road. Kroger at RiverRidge Plaza in Brandenburg began its store expansion in early fall and tentatively aims to

open its larger, roomier additions by mid-February. Additionally, the potential for a county-wide fitness center continues to pick up steam as the Meade Activity Center (MAC) committee continues to garner community support and funding for the project. Craycroft said Meade County is in a unique position to see an impact from the BRAC expansion at Fort Knox. “With Fort Knox changing the way they are, we’ll see a good boost,” he said. And for Meade County, Craycroft thinks it’s a great thing. “It’s real positive,” he said. “Meade County is on the verge of making real growth.”

Today's Weather Local 5-Day Forecast Fri

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6215 Flaherty Road, Vine Grove, KY BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY HOME with 1 1/2+- acres, 5 bedroom, 2 bath, dining room, living room, family room, walk-in pantry, water softener, ceramic tile floor, refrigerator, stove, creek rock fireplace and much more.

TERMS and CONDITIONS

TERMS and CONDITIONS: Auction: held on-site. There will be introductions and explanations of the auction process. All announcements will take precedence over printed, advertised and/or oral information. Registration: Although there is no obligation to bid, all prospective buyers must register at the auction site. Registration will begin one hour prior to the sale time on the date of the auction. Auction Terms: 15% down on the day of the sale with the balance due 30 days or less. A 10% buyer’s premium will be added to the final bid price to determine the purchase price. Taxes: 2010 property taxes will be prorated between buyer and seller to date of deed. Possession: Date of deed. Closing of Real Estate: The balance of the purchase price will be due at closing. Closing can be scheduled for as soon as possible, but in no event shall the closing date be later than 30 days after the auction date. Conditions of the sale: The property to be sold at auction will be sold “as is, where is” without expressed or implied warranty by auction personnel, auction company, auctioneer(s) and/or seller(s). All information was derived from sources believed to be correct, but is not guaranteed. Buyers shall rely on their own information, judgment and prior inspection of the property and records. All announcements will take precedence over printed, advertised and/or oral information. Special Note: Property being built prior to 1978 will be available for private lead based paint inspection beginning 10 days prior to sale date. A waiver will be issued on the day of the sale to the buyer(s). Broker Participation: U.S. Auction Group, LLC. welcomes broker participation. A fee equal to 2% of the top price will be paid from the auctioneer’s commission to any licensed real estate broker whose prospect successfully closes on the property. To qualify, prospect must register 48 (forty-eight) hours prior to the sale and broker/agent must attend the auction until the winning bid is announced. Broker and or agent must attend the closing with the buyer he/ she represents. Personal Property: Any person purchasing personal property items must provide cash or good check on the day of the sale.

“Your Auction Professionals” 47/39

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Showers ending by midday. Highs in the upper 40s and lows in the upper 30s.

Cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s and lows in the upper 40s.

Showers possible. Highs in the low 50s and lows in the upper 30s.

Mix of rain and snow showers. Highs in the low 40s and lows in the low 30s.

A few snow showers. Highs in the upper 30s and lows in the mid 20s.

Sunrise: 7:56 AM Sunset: 5:57 PM

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Sunrise: 7:55 AM Sunset: 5:59 PM

Sunrise: 7:54 AM Sunset: 6:00 PM

Sunrise: 7:54 AM Sunset: 6:01 PM

U. S. Auction Group CALL US TODAY!!!! Paul F. Mik, Jr., Broker & Auctioneer, CAI R

Jodie Babb, App. Auctioneer & REALTOR R

Jim McCoy REALTOR R

270-422-2228


VIEWPOINTS

Friday, January 22, 2010

Letters to the Editor

Q uestion

of the

Week

Did you contribute monetarily to Haiti relief efforts? Submit your answers to news@thenewsstandard.com or leave a comment on our Facebook Page.

Last week’s results: Will you support the new Meade Activity Center?

No 1% Yes 99%

Once a month, local political party members are asked to compose a 500-word response to a local or national topic (see headline above) provided to them by The News Standard. To suggest a topic, e-mail editor@thenewsstaandard.com. Meade County Democratic Party Global warming has always been a “what’s in it for me?” or “what could I possibly do to help?” type of topic. Considering the fact that this planet has been here for billions of years and taking into account the various climate shifts that have taken place in the past, most people do not give this issue the attention it deserves. This is the unfortunate reality. On the individual level, we as citizens of this planet can do our part, remembering that a team is only as strong as its’ weakest player. Limiting our use of gasolinepowered engines, vehicles, lawn mowers, etc., is one way we can help. Recycling, which here in Meade County has really taken hold, is another important way to make a difference. Any time you can reuse a product, that is one less tree, one less gallon of fuel, one less natural resource that has to be produced again and increase the greenhouse gases which in turn decreases the protective ozone layer that surrounds our planet. Individuals can do their part, but only if they can be shown the benefit. Most will not take the initiative unless one or both of the questions stated at the beginning of this article are answered. Businesses, which only exist because there is a group of individuals employed to accomplish the common goal(s) of their employer, can do their part as well. The day-to-day practices as well as waste products produced by all businesses can be effectively managed to reduce their carbon foot-

The News Standard 1065 Old Ekron Road Brandenburg, Kentucky 40108 Phone 270-422-4542 • Fax 270-422-4575

Laura Saylor, editor editor@thenewsstandard.com Lindsey Corley, staff writer lindsey@thenewsstandard.com Ben Achtabowski, sports editor sports@thenewsstandard.com

Editor

The News Standard is an award-winning, weekly newspaper in Meade County, Ky. It is a proud member of the Kentucky Press Association and the Meade County Area Chamber of Commerce.

Kentucky Press Association 2008 General Excellence Award

ADS

Laura Saylor

General Manager

GENERAL

Charlotte C. Fackler

Meade County Republican Party A 1977 book, “The Weather Conspiracy: The Coming of the New Ice Age,” featured a lead quote from a CIA report claiming, “The weather we call normal is in fact highly abnormal … There is growing consensus among leading climatologists that the world is undergoing a cooling trend … excellent historical evidence exists that the earth is changing from an interglacial to glacial time period and could take place in less than 200 years.” The book focused on colder winters as proof that a new ice age was imminent. “The winter of 1977 was something else again,” the first chapter began. “For two-thirds of the United States it was the coldest winter on record.” Obama’s science czar John Holdren was among the scientists who predicted 1 billion people would die in “carbon-dioxide induced” famines in an ice age by 2020. In the 1970s, Holdren’s theme was that government-mandated population control was essential to prevent “ecodisasters.” Today, Holdren urges immediate passage of the Obama administration’s cap-and-trade legislation to control carbon emissions before it’s too late to save the planet from “global warming.” What a change in such a few years. So how did we get from a coming ice age to 15 years later when Al Gore started his Earth in the Balance propaganda that man was destroying the earth and the solution was forced abortions, government mass transportation and a plan to do away with the combustible engine by 2017? Gore’s “inconvenient truth” and billions of tax dollars were spent on global warming propaganda to brainwash our children and citizens that the earth is warming and we are all going to die while such a few years ago it was global cooling.

Their hypocrisy is sickening. These Democrat liberal elitists drive SUVs and have private planes while imposing laws that will tax your family and force us to purchase oil from terrorist nations that have no environmental regulations. We can’t drill for oil here because it causes too much global warming, yet the U. S. has more environmental regulations on oil drilling than any other country. So you have a history of climate change from freezing to a slight warming for a few years to freezing again. In no way, shape or form is it caused by man, but rather God our Creator. Keep in mind it was never the majority of climate scientists that believed in global warming but a very low percentage. They have been very vocal and the liberal-controlled media has carried their hoax. The Democrat solution to the global warming hoax is taxing sheep because they burp too much, taxing dairy cows because they pass too much gas, driving dangerously small minicars to save energy, forcing you to paint your roof white, and outlawing big screen TVs. Ironically, there was a breach in the computer system at the Climate Data Center in Great Britain. Thousands of e-mails among climate scientists that prove global warming is a manufactured hoax were confiscated. These e-mails detailed how data could be manipulated to convince people the earth was melting away while admitting there is no truth to it. This story broke in November 2009, yet Democrats still are determined to use “global warming” to tax your family and impose other laws that allow more control of our lives. Throughout creation we have had weather changes created by a God who put things in motion. Our problem is manufactured fear mongering in an attempt to justify the largest tax increase ever.

Winner of the Kentucky Press Association’s General Excellence Award

Sue Shacklette Cummings Publisher

print on the planet. Again, recycling can play a large role, as businesses of all sizes tend to consume and produce much more recyclable waste that can be used again for the greater good. Local businesses here in Meade County have taken the initiative and installed their own recycle stations where employees can place cardboard, white paper, newspaper, plastics and aluminum where our Meade County Recycle Center can pick them up on a periodic basis. After hours containers are also available at their main location and several key locations throughout the county. Some have also started using hybrid vehicles as well. Businesses throughout the state and the nation should take the initiative to do their part. Government begins at the local level, and so should doing our part to combat global warming. Providing local citizens with the tools to help, as well as setting the example to follow is a step in the right direction. At the state level, again government should pave the way by making it financially beneficial for businesses to locate in Kentucky that are willing to “go green” for the environment. “What’s in it for me?” applies in this case, as the bottom line is that an industry will only go as far as it is financially possible in order to combat global warming. The local, state or federal government has to meet them half way in order to make it work. The almighty dollar still rules in corporate America. The bottom line is that global warming is a concern for us all. It must begin with us as individuals, then the businesses we operate, and finally the government leaders we elect. Only when we all realize that together, we can make a difference, will global warming be taken as serious as it should be by all citizens on this planet.

Remle Wilkerson, sales sales@thenewsstandard.com Jessica Oliver, sales sales@thenewsstandard.com Rod Smith, sales sales@thenewsstandard.com Crystal Benham, proofreader Ryan Collingwood, student co-op Marty Smith, distribution manager Billing, Announcements & Classifieds news@thenewsstandard.com Obituaries obituary@thenewsstandard.com All subscriptions, $26 per year

The News Standard is published every Friday and is available by subscription for $26 per year by MC Media Group, LLC, (USPS - PP 025387), located at 1065 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg, KY 40108. Periodicals postage at mail at USPS, 636 High Street, Brandenburg, KY 40108. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The News Standard, 1065 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg, KY 40108.

VIEWPOINTS AND LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Sheri Lynn Luckett, Brandenburg

Meade County Democratic Party

Should global warming be a pressing concern for individuals, businesses and governments?

PERIODICAL POSTAGE MAILING INFORMATION

Dear Editor, I am forced to disagree with both editorials presented in the Jan. 8 Viewpoints. Brett Guthrie stated that he hopes Congress will work harder for the American people this year. Why? Everything Congress does lately just makes matters worse for the country and stifles freedom that much more. Unless Congress acts to repeal some of the harmful laws it has already implemented (for example, laws requiring banks to make mortgage loans to people who can’t afford them), I wish Congress would stay home and leave us alone. I surely don’t want them working hard to ruin our health care system. I also disagree with Lt.Gov. Mongiardo’s essay on stopping the prescription drug pill pipeline. First, let me state that taking a drug you have no medical need for is downright stupid. Now, let me ask, when was the last time you heard about a pipeline from Florida to Kentucky sneaking alcohol into the state? When was the last time someone was murdered just so the murderer could sell or acquire alcohol? The last time that these events were common place was during the Prohibition era. Prohibition was stopped because it was discovered that it caused more violence and crime than allowing the legal sell of the drug alcohol. I believe the same holds true regarding prohibition of other drugs. It is none of my or the government’s business if you ingest something that is bad for you. But when we try to stop you, that is when you resort to criminal activity or violence to get your drug of choice. Education to prevent drug abuse and available treatment for those who get addicted are much cheaper than criminalizing drug use, result in fewer crime victims, fewer jail inmates, and fewer meth labs exploding in your neighborhood. We need to stop turning to the government to solve every problem for us. Americans used to band together to take care of a problem quickly and effectively. Now we sit back and wait for the inefficient government to save us. Ask Louisiana how well that worked for them.

Political Poles

NEWS

Meade County Quarry LLC

Meade County Republican Party

SPORTS

Happy New Year to all the citizens of Meade County, As we approach our next step in the development of Meade County Quarry we wanted to make sure we keep the citizens of Meade County updated on our next steps: In 2009, Meade County Planning & Zoning and Fiscal Court decided to rezone the Meade County Quarry (MCQ) site located at 2595 Big Bend Road in Battletown. The decision by the fiscal court represents the growing need for this project to bring much-needed jobs and tax revenue to your county. We sincerely appreciated all the citizens who have reached out to us and have continued to support our efforts. Thank you. We have started to identify talent and skill within your community. It is our sincere intention to hire as many folks from Meade County as we can. If you already submitted your name, contact information, or resume to MCQ in 2009 it has been entered into our database. We assure you that you are on the list for employment opportunities once your county resolves an appeal by David Bell of the fiscal court zoning decision on Sept. 8, 2009. MCQ may call upon you again for further assistance regarding the appeal. Our company continues to work diligently with the Army Corps of Engineers in preparing and finishing permitting on the MCQ site. As we have stated, this next step could take at least a year if not longer, but we continue to make good progress. If you have not had a chance to enter your skill or trade into our database please visit our Web site at meadecountyquarry.com MCQ will be creating roughly 25 generational jobs within your community over the next few years as the quarry becomes fully operational; that will enhance the financial security of your families as well as the overall well-being of the community. All MCQ valid surface mining permits have been issued and approved by the state of Kentucky. Again, thank you for your continued support and interest in MCQ. We look forward to building a positive, longterm relationship with your county and appreciate the opportunity to work with the citizens of Meade County. We will continue to keep the citizens of Meade County updated through local radio and newspapers. You can also get additional updates at meadecountyquarry.com We wish everyone a healthy and prosperous 2010.

The News Standard - A3

The ultimate goal of the Viewpoints page is to encourage frank and lively discussion on topics of interest in Meade County. Editorials are the opinion of newspaper management. Columns represent the view of the writer and do not necessarily represent the view of newspaper management. The News Standard welcomes and encourages letters to the editor. Letters will appear as space permits and may be edited for grammar and clarity. They must be no more than 500 words, must include a signature, town of residence, and phone number for confirmation. Letters may be handwritten, typed or e-mailed. Multiple submissions from the same author may not be printed. Libelous letters will not be published.


A4 - The News Standard

Deeds Brandenburg, LLC, A Kentucky Limited Liability Company, by and through Stephen Barr, member, to Doan Brothers Construction, LLC, by and through Chuck Doan, member and Wade Doan, member, Lot 59 of The Station Subdivision, deed tax $16.50. Ronald F. Allen, Sr. and Linda Allen to Libby McKenna, a 2.000 acre tract located in Guston, deed tax $75. PENSCO Trust Company Custodian FBO Robert T. Milne IRA Beneficiary, Benefit of Alma M. Civin, to Doe Valley Association, Inc., Lot 305 of Greenbriar Section of Doe Valley Subdivision, deed tax $7. Bank of America, National Association as Successor by Merger to Lasalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificateholders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC Asset Backed Certificates, Series 2005-HE1, to Jesse Manning, 104 Troy Court, Vine Grove, Ky., deed tax $145. The Estate of Lena Mae Simmons Stiff to Stephanie R. Woosley and Chad T. Woosley, property located in Meade County, deed tax $138. Gordon Board and Bernett Board, by and through Gene McGehee, their attorney-in-fact, to John Martin, Lot 52 of Flaherty Heights Subdivision, deed tax $11. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, D.C., acting by and through the Federal Housing Commissioner, to Trading Post Homes of Meade County, LLC, 88 Otter Ridge Drive, Brandenburg.

Building Permits 1/11/10 Emmet HayesLamuel Graham, singlewide ’97, $100 1/12/10 Camp Piomingo, pool house, $287.36 1/14/10 John and Pam Hamilton, basement remodel, $100 1/14/10 Teresa Livers, doublewide ’04, $100

Septic Permits 1/5/10 Richard Alexander/homeowner, Valley Creek Road, Battletown. 1/6/10 Joe Ross/Jim Warren, Charlie Pile Road, Guston. 1/12/10 Mike Baskette/ DC Marcum, Fort Avenue, Vine Grove, Ky. 1/12/10 Steve Redmon/ John Allen, Burnett Court, Vine Grove, Ky. 1/13/10 Jeff Nott/Pat Wathen, Ritchie Drive, Brandenburg.

Retail Food Establishment Report 1/5/10 Dollar General Store, Brandenburg. 95 percent food service. 100 percent retail. Food service: dented cans found, corrected. 1/5/10 Doe Valley Express, 155 Old Mill Road, Brandenburg. 90 percent food service. 92 percent retail, 97 percent same day follow-up. Food service: lid containers stored on floor of storage room, thermometers not conspicuous in cold units, hot food serving utensil not properly stored, floors of food prep area unclean, 3 comp sink not properly set up during food prep. Retail: Tylenol sinus expired boxes, voluntarily removed. Both: gasket on walk-in door freezer in poor repair, brooms and cleaning articles stored on floor of storage room. 1/5/10 Kings Kids Daycare, 515 By Pass Road, Brandenburg. 99 percent food service. Food service: bottom shelves of freezer and refrigerator observed with build-up. 1/6/10 Curran’s Value Mart, 8035 Brandenburg Road, Ekron. 99 percent food service. 99 percent retail. Both: ceiling stained in back storage area. 1/6/10 By Pass Chevron, 305 By Pass Road, Brandenburg. 94 percent food service. 97 percent retail. Food service: some cold units lack thermometers, flour stored on floor of walk-in cooler.

Both: walk-in cooler glass door in poor repair, floor tiles (numerous) stained and in poor repair. 1/6/10 Short Stop #29, 490 Broadway Street, Brandenburg. 93 percent food service. 90 percent retail, 95 percent same day followup. Food service: no hair restraints worn, no chemical test strips for 3 comp sink, cup lids stored on floor of storage room. Retail: Deans 1% chocolate low fat milk ½ gallon expired, shelving rusty in walk-in cooler. Both: no hand towels at hand sink beside 3 comp sink, mops and brooms stored improperly, swinging doors in poor repair. 1/6/10 Medco Center of Brandenburg, 814 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg. 95 percent food service, 100 percent same day followup. Food service: 1 gallon Sysco Vegetables for Stew, dented can, voluntarily destroyed. 1/11/10 Jay Henderson Entertainment at Senior Citizens Building, 1200 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg. 95 percent, 100 percent same day follow-up. Food service: two bottles of tarter sauce expired, voluntarily destroyed. 1/13/10 Midway Kwik Stop, 4950 Hwy. 79, Brandenburg. 92 food service. 94 percent retail. Food service: no hair restraints worn in food prep area, cutting board at small prep cooler in poor repair. Retail: buildup on counter by drink machine. Both: no hot water at hand sink in back. 1/13/10 Ekron Grocery, 302 Broadway, Ekron. 98 percent food service. 99 percent retail. Food service: non food contact surface improperly repaired. Both: floor tiles in poor repair. 1/14/10 Hager’s Country Store, 6472 Big Spring Road, Vine Grove, Ky. 98 percent food service. 100 percent retail. Food service: some cold units lack conspicuous thermometers, no test strips for sanitizer. 1/14/10 Best Stop, 7920 Hwy. 60, Ekron. 97 percent food service. 97 percent retail. Food service: no hair restraints worn in food prep area. Retail: build-up on fountain drink machine (ice dispenser). Both: floor tiles in poor repair, bare wood used as baseboard, ceiling tiles missing.

Brandenburg Police Department 1/3/10 (time not listed). Rocco Addesa of Ekron was driving a 2001 Ford when it rolled down a hill on Fireside Drive and collided with a house. Addessa then left the scene without contacting anyone. No injuries were reported. Minor damage was done to the vehicle. Report BPD10001 was filed by Officer Young.

Meade County Sheriff Department 1/8/10 at 3:45 p.m. Tyler McMahan of Payneville was driving a 1997 Chevrolet Silverado. Vivian Holbrook of Payneville was driving a 1997 Jeep Cherokee. McMahan was traveling west on North Sirocco Road when he lost control, swerving off of the roadway and running over a mailbox. McMahan continued onto private property, striking Holbrook, who was parked in a private drive facing north. McMahan struck Holbrook’s vehicle in the back left corner, spinning the vehicle and it coming to a rest facing east. No injuries were reported. Moderate to severe damage was done to McMahan’s vehicle. Minor to moderate damage was done to Holbrook’s vehicle. Report 10-0006 was filed by Officer Shipley. 1/8/10 at 6:34 p.m. Joseph Lancaster of Brandenburg was driving a 1995 Ford eastbound on KY 886. According to a witness, Lancaster skidded off the right side of the roadway in a left curve. Lancaster then traveled over an earth embankment, overturned, and struck a tree. The roadway was covered with ice when the officer arrived on the

COURT

scene. Lancaster stated that he had drunk some alcohol before the accident. First aid was given by Meade County EMS and injured parties were taken to Harrison Memorial Hospital. Severe damage was done to the vehicle. Report 10-0007 was filed by Officer Wright. 1/10/10 at 2:34 p.m. Joseph Thompson of Ekron was driving a 1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme. Martin Wade of Brandenburg was driving a 1999 Chevrolet Malibu. Both were traveling westbound on Old Ekron Road. Wade was slowing on the roadway preparing to make a turn. Thompson failed to stop and struck Wade in the rear end. No injuries were reported. Minor to moderate damage was done to Thompson’s vehicle. Moderate damage was done to Wade’s vehicle. Report 100008 was filed by Officer Ponder. 1/10/10 at 1:57 a.m. Dennis Whited of Brandenburg was driving a 2010 Dodge Charger westbound on Fairway Drive when a deer struck the vehicle on the left side, causing minor to moderate damage to the vehicle. No injuries were reported. Report 10-0009 was filed by Officer Matti. 1/11/10 at 5:12 p.m. Jason Bartley of Ekron was driving a 1979 Ford northbound on Buck Grove Road. According to Bartley, he lost control due to ice on the roadway and skidded off the left side of the roadway and struck a tree. No injuries were reported. Moderate damage was done to the vehicle. Report 10-0010 was filed by Officer Wright.

B

Friday, January 22, 2010

District Court 01/13/10

Albert G. Wilson, 29, speeding 18mph over limitpled guilty, $36 fine; operating motor vehicle under/ influence of alcohol/drugs etc. 1st offense- pled guilty, 30 days probated after 2 days jail, 2 years probation; ADE/KAPS, license suspended for 90 days. Anthony Sullivan, DUI, 1st- license surrendered, pled guilty, 30 days probated after 2 days jail, 2 years probation, KAPS/ADE. Brian Wallace Murphy, 34, controlled substance prescription not in original container, 1st offense; possession of controlled substance, 3rd degree, 1st offense, drug unspecifiedpled not guilty, pretrial conference 2/3/10. Kevin Bradley Gable, 35, failure to produce insurance card-pretrial conference 1/20/10. Phillip Wayne Daley, 33, speeding 25mph over limitamend to 15mph, pled guilty $30 fine; fleeing or evading police, 2nd degree (on foot)- pled guilty, 6 months probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation; operating motor vehicle under/ influence of alcohol/drugs, aggravator, 1st offense- pled guilty, 30 days probated after 4 days, 2 years probation, $200 fine, KAPS/ADE, license suspended. Edward E. Young, 58, no/ expired registration platesdismiss; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security, 1st offensepled guilty, 90 days probated for 2 years, KAPS, $100 fine. Derrick W. Nevitt, 21, alcohol intoxication in a

public place, 1st and 2nd offense- pled guilty $25 fine. Michael Hammack, 33, theft by deception include cold checks under $500failure to appear, send court notice 1/27/10. Charles P. Hayes, 67, theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pled guilty, 10 days probated after 1 hour jail, 2 years probation. Jean Renee Shaw, 44, 3 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $500- failure to appear, said had car trouble, send court notice 1/20/10. Herman E. Nibet, 57, 11 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $500- failure to appear, send court notice 1/27/10. Amanda Alean McCoy, 25, 3 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Christopher A. Chretien, 18, use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense; possession of marijuana; reckless driving- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/20/10. Larry Dale Knott, 49,

alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offense; possession of marijuana; use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offensepled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Jason R. Mathis, 22, theft by deception include cold checks under $500- failure to appear, send court notice 1/27/10. Chad Vough, 20, speeding 11mph over limit- defer 6 months; failure to produce insurance card- dismiss with proof. Shane P. Burnfin Jr., 23, failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security, 2nd or greater offensepled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Deja A. Brown, 20, failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security, 2nd or greater offense- send court notice 1/20/10. Christopher W. Daley, 29, failure to wear seat beltspled guilty, $25 fine; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security, 1st offense- pled guilty, 90 days probated for 2 years, PINS, $100 fine.

See COURT, A9

Thank You!

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NEWS Raid on the Sheep Shed Part II: Fiscal court hears from concerned The aftermath and the mystery landowner about neighbor’s land

The News Standard - A5

Friday, January 22, 2010

By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com

Editor’s note: This is the second of a two-part series written by local resident Gerald Fischer. See the Jan. 8, 2010 issue for the first segment. By Gerald W. Fischer Guest columnist The battle of the Sheep Shed had largely ended with the death of Gossett and Wimp, and the capture of Dan Morgan Shacklett. Billy was mortally wounded, and Jarrett had escaped the first part of the battle and then took to hiding while others escaped or feigned death and hid. The following writing describes the aftermath of the battle, and a final mystery. As the battle ended, the troopers took Jarrett to the schoolhouse that was still in session and the teacher, Susan Willet, brought him a gourd dipper of water. One of Herr’s man said, “Drink it. That will be the last drink you ever get.” And it probably was. During the battle, five Confederates were killed and a sixth, a man named Duke, was shot to death the next day on the ride to Louisville. He was killed near the town of Garnettsville, Ky., while he was shackled because he cursed his captors. After the battle, Captain Herr and his men went back to Meadeville and told Thomas Shumate to go up and collect the dead. Several men and women were enlisted for the death hunt and at least one student participated. The school children witnessed part of the raid, and saw Dan Shacklett held bound and silent as a prisoner. The recovery team first found Gossett and next came to John Wimp and both were put in a wagon. Jess Taylor crept out of hiding when he saw the wagon collecting the dead and he was saved. Billy Shacklett was found by one of the Shumate School students, A.J. Thompson, a cousin of Wimp and Shacklett, who followed the trail Billy left as he crawled the 50 yards from the red oak tree through the woods. Tender hands picked him up and he was taken to Mrs. Barnes’ home where his wife Anne was sent for, and Anne and their child, Juliet, were with him when he died at 11 p.m. that night. The wagon carried Wimp and Gossett to the house of Mr. Kendall, later called the John Jones house. John Wimp and Billy Shacklett were buried in the Meadeville Cemetery a day later, and Gossett was taken to Louisville for burial. Captain Herr later

Judge From page A1 Embry will tell you that while she is proud to preside over the district court and she works diligently to be fair and evenhanded in that position, her heart is with the people, and particularly the children, of the jurisdiction she serves. In 2007 Judge Embry brought to the attention of the local school systems a program known as Challenge Day. She formed an organizing committee in each county and found the

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GERALD FISCHER

The grave of Billy Shacklett, located in what used to be Meadeville in Meade County. The original gravestone is on the left; a restored one on the right. stated that he regretted killing Billy Shacklett because he was the bravest man he ever saw. In all, six Confederate soldiers were killed as a result of the raid. There is no known casualty list of union soldiers, although there must have been men wounded. I read a mention of the battle on the Internet and it was described as a small skirmish near the town of Meadeville. How easy it is to minimize a historic event, and in doing so forget the lives of the people that took part, their courage, devotion to a cause and willingness to make the supreme sacrifice that is so important to us today. Dismissing it as merely a skirmish does not come up to the truth, in my eyes. The battle at the Sheep Shed, while small in size, is important because it illustrates how the Civil War affected the people in our communities. It shows how the rules of law, war and habeas corpus when suspended as they were during the Civil War, resulted not only in cruel murder but also polarization of the population. When I discussed this story with Mr. Travis Shacklette and inquired about any information he might know about the fight, Mr. Shacklette, who teaches science at the Meade County Freshman Academy, told me how the Civil War caused a division within the Shacklett family resulting in a dual spelling of the family name. When the Civil War was over, some of the Shacklettes added “e” to their name to separate themselves from those who favored the Confederacy. Since feelings ran so deep in that time of war, it might be the reason for the mystery I uncovered in the Meadeville Cemetery.

When I was researching this story I came across a recent tombstone with two bronze plaques attached to it that made me wonder if Billy Shacklett’s men returned and took their revenge on a Union soldier that recently returned home. The top plaque on the stone gave James Irvin Newton’s name and regiment of Union Calvary. The plaque on the front of the stone reads: “October 1998, In commemoration of James Irvin Newton, Husband of Elender Rhodes Newton, shot and killed in July of 1865 by the Nightriders at his Home across the Road from this Meadeville Cemetery.” Who led the nightriders when they attacked James Irvin Newton and why was he targeted? He may have become a target just because he wore the federal uniform of the north and he could, of course, have been suspected as taking part in the raid on the Sheep Shed. Any number of people could have led the nightriders in the raid on the James Netwon house but we can eliminate several people. Bill Marion was killed in April 1865, three months earlier, ironically in Marion County, Ky. Thomas Dupoyster was killed Sept. 12, 1864 in Taylorsville, Ky., and John Bryant met his end in late August 1864, when he was shot in his raid on the Coomes Cabin. The mystery is who murdered James Newton and why? We may never know the answer to these questions but if James Newton was murdered in retaliation for the death of Billy Shacklett then how oddly fitting they should rest together in the same cemetery for so many years, separated by only a few feet.

funds to underwrite the costs for each of three public high schools. The Challenge Day program, offered each year since then at Meade and Breckinridge county high schools, reminds students to look beyond the appearance of their classmates to see the actual people with whom they are sharing their school experience. The motto of the program is “Be the Change.” The results of the program are better communications among the various social groups in the school. Communications between these groups reduces the feeling of isolation that so many young

people experience and that can contribute to a host of problems ranging from truancy to substance abuse and other self-destructive behaviors Embry witnesses in court on a regular basis. While implementing Challenge Day is not part of the job description, Judge Embry is happy to put her time and effort into this and other similar projects that are designed to benefit our children and our community. Judge Embry seeks your support for re-election as Judge of the District Court, Division II. She may be contacted at sembry@usdol.net.

Report A Crime... 270-422-HOPE (4673) The Meade County Sheriff’s Department is committed to fighting the drug and criminal problem in our community, but we need your help. Please help by reporting any and all suspicious activity in your area. The tip line is totally anonymous, and your identity cannot be revealed.

The new tip line is 270-422-HOPE (4673).

During Jan. 12’s Meade County fiscal court meeting, magistrates heard two separate cases during the public session, both concerning property in the county. Scott Vance and Rick Roberts described the impediment a neighbor’s unkempt property has become, located along Flaherty Road. Roberts has taken initial steps to secure a loan to purchase property from Vance along Flaherty Road, though Roberts said the bank declined to back the loan because of the amount of inoperable vehicles visibly located on the neighboring property. Vance said the piece of land he’s trying to sell was appraised at $152,000 in 2003, though presently the appraised value dipped to $133,000. “I was told the property value should have steadied and even increased some,” Vance said. “But it’s gone down because of ... my

neighbor’s property.” Vance said his neighbor cleans up the “junk cars” every once in awhile, but they return every time after a few weeks. “It just looks really bad,” Roberts said. Planning and zoning administrator Tony Coletta said because the residence on the property is inhabited, nothing can be done through the county’s abandoned property ordinance. Meade County Judge/ Executive Harry Craycroft assured the gentlemen that fiscal court will “look at it every possible way we can look at it” to help get the problem solved. Fiscal court also heard a property dispute from Jim Thomas. He asked why his right to use a 10-foot long stretch of right-of-way on Twin Lakes Road was recently being contested by nearby land owners. Greta Noe, assistant county attorney, said there was present litigation ongoing about the Twin Lakes Drive matter, and urged fiscal court to not

take any action until that legal business concluded. Magistrates agreed and took no action. Coletta read aloud Ordinance No. 2009-07, a text amendment regarding the re-submission of denied map amendment requests, and Ordinance No. 2009-08 which relates to the permitted uses in industrial districts regarding adult entertainment establishments. Also during the January meeting: •Fiscal court revisited a matter tabled from December, and voted to fund $2,000 to the Meade County Civil War Heritage Association for its upcoming summer Civil War reenactment. •Approved the budget salary cap for the county clerk’s office and the sheriff’s department. •Accepted a resignation letter from JoAnn Fitzgibbon from the board of ethics. Craycroft said he would have a recommendation prepared for next month’s meeting.

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Emergency Management Hotline 422-1082 www.meadeema.com


A6 - The News Standard

OBITUARIES

Friday, January 22, 2010

Helen B. Babb

Juanita Bell Schmitt Mattingly

James E. “Tickle” Thompson

Mrs. Helen B. Babb, 77, of Brandenburg, died Thursday, Jan. 14, 2010, at Hardin Memorial Hospital in Elizabethtown, Ky. Mrs. Babb loved to bowl and was an avid UK fan and sports fan in general. She is survived by her husband, Ralph Babb of Brandenburg; four children, Debra Mercer of Anchorage, Ky., Sheila (Neal) Ford of Falls of Rough, Ky., Jodie (Lisa) Babb of Guston and Missy (Reece) Wardrip of Flaherty; eight grandchildren, Chris (Stephanie) Mercer, Cassie Ford, Ryan, Luke, Zachary and Annabelle Babb, Jayne and Ethan Wardrip; and a great-grandson, Alexander. The funeral service was held Sunday, Jan. 17, at the chapel of Hager Funeral Home, with the Rev. John Oliver officiating. Burial was in St. George Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy may take the form of contributions to the American Lung Association. Online condolences at www.hagerfuneralhome.com.

Mrs. Juanita Bell Schmitt Mattingly, 91, of Brandenburg, died Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010, at Harrison County Hospital in Corydon, Ind. She was born Jan. 25, 1918, the daughter of the late Frederick Jefferson and Grace Elizabeth Hardin Schmitt. Mrs. Mattingly was a parishioner at St. Mary Magdalen of Pazzi Catholic Church. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree and Masters Degree in Education from Spalding University. Mrs. Mattingly retired from the Meade County Board of Education with 44 years service. She served seven of those years as a teacher and 37 years as director of pupil personnel. She organized the Meade County Teacher Retirement Association and served as their president. Mrs. Mattingly was also a charter member and officer of the rosary and altar society of St. Mary Magdalen of Pazzi parish, a charter member of the Meade Association of Retarded Citizens (MARC), a charter member of the Meade-Breck Right to Life, and a charter member and treasurer of the S.T. Mission Club. Mrs. Mattingly was preceded in death by her husband, Bernard Howard Mattingly; four brothers, Fred Hardin, William Karl, Herman Augustine and Edward Lamar Schmitt; and a sister, Lucille Stull. She is survived by two sisters, Lois Leonard of South Bend, Ind., and Catherine Crews of Irvington, Ky.; several nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews, and a special friend, Darlene Livers of Webster, Ky. A mass of Christian burial will be held Saturday, Jan. 23, from St. Mary Magdalen of Pazzi Catholic Church, with burial in the church cemetery. Friends may call at Hager Funeral Home, Brandenburg from 4 to 8 p.m. today, Jan. 22. A prayer service followed by a recitation of the rosary will begin at 7:15 p.m., today, Jan. 22, from the chapel of the funeral home. Expressions of sympathy may take the form of contributions to Trinity Misssions, P.O. Box 7130, Silver Spring, MD 209970701 or to the Meade-Breck Right to Life, c/o Darlene Livers, Director, Route 1, Box 78, Webster, KY 40176. Online condolences at www.hagerfuneralhome.com.

Mr. James E. “Tickle” Thompson, 91, of Brandenburg died Friday, Jan, 15, 2010, at Harrison County Hospital in Corydon, Ind. Mr. Thompson was a U.S, Navy veteran of World War II, a charter member of the Meade County Sportsman’s Club, a member of the Ft. Knox Los Cazadores Archery Club, a Kentucky Colonel and a longtime radio and television repairman. He was preceded in death by his wife, Minnie Manning Thompson; his parents, Eva and Jodie Thompson; two sisters, Lorene King and Mary Jo Treat; and two brothers, Pat and Frank Thompson. Mr. Thompson is survived by his daughter, Joy Mangin (Donald) Self of Brandenburg; two brothers Charlie (Rita) Thompson and Ronald (Doris) Thompson; four grandchildren, Jeannine (Tom) Beck, Jennifer (Jeff) Meadows, Janette Mangin and Jonathan Mangin; and six greatgrandchildren, Nathan Meadows, Travis Beck, Caitlyn Meadows, Tara Beck, Taylor Beck and Isaac Mangin. A mass of Christian burial was held Monday, Jan. 18, from St. John the Apostle Catholic Church, with burial in St. George Cemetery directed by Hager Funeral Home. Expressions of sympathy may take the form of contributions to the Meade County Archery Club or to the St. John Convent. Pallbearers were Nathan Meadows, Francis Beck, Jeff Meadows, Tom Beck, Chris Corum, Jonathan Mangin and Josh Thompson. Online condolences at www.hagerfuneralhome.com

Pearl Savanah Stidham Banks

Pearl Savanah Stidham Banks entered eternal life Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2010. She was 56 years old. She was preceded in death by her husband, Edsel Vaughn Banks; parents, Authur and Altie Stidham; brother, Alvin Stidham; sister, Lula Boggs; and daughter, Cassandra Lynn Banks. She is survived by two daughters, Heather Banks and Felicia Kirby; three grandchildren, Emily-Jo Banks, Mason Kirby and Kennedy Kirby; three brothers, Bobby and Darrell Stidham, both of Charlestown, Ind., and Dorris Stidham of Brandenburg; four sisters, Sue Thomas of Whitesburg, Ky., Shirley Kelly of Louisville, Lou Whitaker of Central City, Ky., and Evelyn Banks of Carlisle, Ohio, as well as a host of friends, lots more family and loved ones. She will be missed. The funeral service was held Friday, Jan. 15, at the chapel of Bruington-Jenkins-Sturgeon Funeral Home. Expressions of sympathy may be made to the funeral home for the family or to the American Kidney Association.

Donald Ray Taylor Donald Ray Taylor, 50, of Radcliff, Ky., died Friday, Jan. 15, 2010 at Hardin Memorial Hospital in Elizabethtown, Ky. SSG Taylor served 22 years in the U.S. Army before retiring. He served in Desert Storm and Desert Shield. On Dec. 12, 2009, he was nominated for the Order of the Spurs. He was preceded in death by his father, Leon Taylor; and two sisters, Edna Hurst and Flora Marie Taylor. He is survived by his wife, Julie Taylor of Radcliff, Ky.; a son and daughter-in-law, Chris and Judie Taylor of Georgetown, Ky.; his mother, Patricia Pittman of Lexington; three sisters, Linda Lane and her husband David of Lexington, Lisa Petro of Corbin, Ky., and Susie Warner and her husband Randy of Nicholasville, Ky.; two grandchildren, Jordan Rai Taylor and Donovan Christian Taylor; two nieces, Crystal Cook and Nina Warner; and two nephews, George Petro and Ryan Petro. The funeral service was held Wednesday, Jan. 20, at NelsonEdelen-Bennett Funeral Home in Radcliff, Ky. with Dr. James Shaw officiating. Burial was held with military honors in the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery Central in Radcliff, Ky. Online condolences at www.nebfh.com.

Norma Jean Roberts Norma Jean Roberts, 74, of Radcliff, Ky., died Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010, at her home in Radcliff, Ky. She was preceded in death by her father, Estille Hall; her mother, Sara Fields Hall; and her brother, Kirby Dale Hall. She is survived by her husband, Ernest Roberts of Radcliff, Ky.; two daughters, Connie Toppi of Flint, Mich., and Sandra Bennett of Apache Junction, Ariz.; three sons, Jimmy Roberts of Clark Summit, Pa., and Bobby Roberts and Michael Roberts, both of Louisville; two sisters, Joyce Duff of Garett, Ky., and Sara Faye Cornett of Elizabethtown, Ky.; eight brothers, Burt Hall of Trenton, Ohio, Estill Hall Jr. of Dayton, Ohio, Billy L. Hall of Lothair, Ky., Odis Hall and Glen Hall, both of Lexington, Vaughn Hall of Newport, Ky., Ernest Hall of Hazard, Ky., and Bobby Hall of Middletown, Ohio; 12 grandchildren; and one great-grandson. The funeral service will be held today, Jan. 22, at 1 p.m., at Nelson-Edelen-Bennett Funeral Home in Radcliff, Ky., with Pastor Caleb Korth officiating. Burial will be in the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery Central in Radcliff, Ky. Visitation will be begin at 10 a.m. today, Jan. 22, at the funeral home. Online condolences at www.nebfh.com.

Earl P. Carrico Mr. Earl P. Carrico Sr., 84, of Muldraugh, died Thursday, Jan. 14, 2010, at Hardin Memorial Hospital in Elizabethtown, Ky. Mr. Carrico was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II. He is survived by his wife, Gladys Carrico of Muldraugh; two children, Earl P. “Sam” Carrico of Magnolia, Ky., and Terry L. Carrico of Atlanta, Ga.; three grandchildren, Eric P. Carrico of St. Petersburg, Fla., Shawna M. Lucas of Orlando, Fla., and Holly M. Carrico of Del Ray Beach, Fla.; and three greatgrandchildren, Carson Lee, Lance and Slade Carrico. The funeral service was held Monday, Jan. 18, from Muldraugh Baptist Church, with the Rev. David Sullivan, officiating. Burial was in Garnettsville Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy may take the form of contributions to the American Cancer Society. Online condolences at www.hagerfuneralhome.com.

The Community Calendar is a free service to community groups and organizations for event announcements. To submit event information, please call The News Standard office at 270-422-4542, visit us at 1065 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg, or e-mail us at sales@thenewsstandard.com.

Friday, Jan. 22

AFTER SCHOOL TEENS – 3:15 p.m.-6 p.m. at the Meade County Public Library Annex. Games, snacks and fun for teens. 270-422-2094

Saturday, Jan. 23

PILATES – 9 a.m. at the Meade County Public Library Annex. Beginning mat pilates. Limited class size. Call to register. 270-422-2094

Roy S. Jones

Roy S. Jones, 72, of Elizabethtown, Ky., died Saturday, Jan. 16, 2010, at Woodland Terrace Health Care in Elizabethtown, Ky. SFC (retired) Jones served three tours in Vietnam while in the U.S. Army. He was a member of American Legion Post #113 and VFW Post #10281. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, Tammy and Doug Caudill of Elizabethtown, Ky.; a son and daughter-in-law, Tim and Velvet Jones of Clarkson, Ky.; three grandchildren, Spencer Jones, Sheldon Jones and Brittany Caudill; and a sister, Sylvia Schgallis of Louisville. The funeral service was held with military honors Tuesday, Jan. 19, at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery Central in Radcliff, Ky. There was no prior visitation. Nelson-Edelen-Bennett Funeral Home handled arrangements. Online condolences at www.nebfh.com.

You may submit photos with loved ones’ obituaries at no extra charge. Bring the photo to our office at 1065 Old Ekron Road in Brandenburg or e-mail it to news@thenewsstandard.com

Community Calendar

OBSERVATORY – 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the South Harrison Park Observatory in Indiana. Free. Visit www.harrisoncoparks.com/Observatory.html for more information. TEXAS HOLD’EM – 7 p.m.-1 a.m. St. John the Apostle Church Gym, Brandenburg. No limit with limited re-buys and add-on. Limited to 400 entrants. 10 winners collect 60% of entire pot. To register, call John Beavin at 270-668-2734 or St. John’s 270-422-2196 or email stjohn.poker@insightbb. com KY Gaming License ORG0000416

Monday, Jan. 25 ROOK - 6:30 p.m. at P.L. Kasey Center, 303 Hillview

Drive, Irvington, Ky. No Fee. Concessions sold. Every 4th Monday of the month. 270547-7648 PINS (Pets In Need) MEETING – 7 p.m. at Little Dave’s Restaurant in Brandenburg. 270-422-3838

Tuesday, Jan. 26 HOMESCHOOLING CONNECTION CLUB MEETING – 1 p.m. in the Meade County Public Library Annex. 270-422-2094 LION’S CLUB - 6:30-7:30 p.m. Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday at Home Plate Restaurant. Call 422-3293 for more information.

Wednesday, Jan. 27

VFW BINGO – 7:30 p.m. at

VFW Post 11404, 770 ByPass Road, Brandenburg. All activities are open to the public. 270-422-5184

Thursday, Jan. 28

COMMUNITY DINNER 5:30 to 7 p.m. at P.L. Kasey Center, 303 Hillview Drive, Irvington, Ky. Carryout available at 5 p.m. $6 for adults. $4 for children 10 and under. Every Thursday. All times are eastern. 270-547-7648

Friday, Jan. 29

CHILI SUPPER – 4:30-7:30 p.m. Greenwave Baseball Chili Supper in the MCHS Cafeteria. Come out and eat before the Meade and Breckinridge County basketball game.


FAITH & VALUES

Friday, January 22, 2010

The News Standard - A7

Fathers’ are key to daughters’ self-esteem VFW Post 11404 - Jan. James Dobson Focus on the Family

QUESTION: Talk about a father’s impact on his daughter and what he should hope to accomplish through that relationship. DR. DOBSON: Fathers have an incalculable impact on their daughters. Most psychologists believe, and I am one of them, that all future romantic relationships are influenced positively or negatively by the way a girl interacts with her dad in the childhood years. If that is true, then fathers should give careful thought to this responsibility and seek to be what their daughters need of them. There are, I believe, at least seven components to that assignment. First, a dad’s leadership at home should be a model of strength and authority, but always tempered by love and compassion. Harsh discipline tends to close down a sensitive feminine spirit, but permissiveness and capriciousness can create lifelong disdain for men.

Second, a dad must remember that he is being watched closely by that little girl around his knees. The way he treats her mother will teach her volumes about how men and women should relate to one another. Blatant disrespect toward his wife will not be missed by the child. Third, I think it is good to begin “dating” a daughter when she is six years of age, or even earlier. Dad should let the child help plan their evenings and then see that they occur when and where promised. These times together are not intended simply for fun, although that is important. The father can also use them to show his daughter how a man treats a woman he respects. He can open doors for her, help her with her chair, and listen attentively when she speaks. Later, when she is a teenager, she will know what to expect — or insist on — from the boys she dates. Fourth, a dad should always look for ways to build the self-confidence of his little girl. If she believes he thinks she is pretty and “special,” she will be inclined to see herself that way. He holds the key to her self-acceptance.

Fifth, a father should keep the lines of communication open throughout childhood so that he is seen as someone to whom his daughter can turn when she needs advice. She will need that counsel before she is grown. Sixth, God designed men to be the “providers and protectors” of their families. Their daughters should perceive them that way. Dad is often his little girl’s “hero,” and it is wonderful when that kind of relationship develops. Seventh, a father must be the spiritual leader of his family, making clear his devotion to Jesus Christ and to the principles in Scripture. He should give the highest priority to bringing up his daughters, and his sons, in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. It’s not an easy responsibility raising girls, is it? But those who do the job properly can rest in the knowledge that they have given their daughters the best chance for a successful marriage, if they choose to wed. QUESTION: Can boys and girls be taught to treat each other with respect? That seems like a tough assignment.

DR. DOBSON: They certainly can! Young people are naturally more sensitive and empathetic than adults. Their viciousness is a learned response, resulting from the highly competitive and hostile world in which they live — a world we have allowed to develop. They are destructive to the weak and lowly because we adults haven’t bothered to teach them to feel for one another. One of the values children cherish most is justice. They are uneasy in a world of injustice and abuse. Therefore, when we teach children respect for others by insisting on civility in our classrooms, we’re laying a foundation for human kindness in the world of adulthood to come. It is a fundamental attitude that should be taught in every classroom and every home. Dr. Dobson is founder and Chairman Emeritus of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80995 (www.focusonthefamily.org). Questions and answers are excerpted from “Complete Marriage and Family Home Reference Guide” and “Bringing Up Boys,” both published by Tyndale House.

Cyrus’ edict shows the power prayer can have in life Dan Newton Divine Guidance

Ezra 1:1-3 says, “Now in the first year of Cyrus king of Persia, that the word of the Lord, by the mouth of Jeremiah, might be fulfilled, the Lord stirred up the spirit of Cyrus, king of Persia, so that he made a proclamation throughout all his kingdom, and also put it in writing, saying, ‘This says Cyrus king of Persia: All the kingdoms of the earth the Lord God of heaven has given me. And he has commanded me to build Him house at Jerusalem which is in Judah. Who is among you of all His people? May his God be with him, and let him go up to Jerusalem which is in Judah, and build the house of the Lord god of

Israel (He is God), which is in Jerusalem.’” (NKJV). The Persian Empire was astonished. King Cyrus had decided to let the people of God return to their homes in Jerusalem and Judea. This news spread throughout the Jewish community; only one man was not surprised — Daniel. He had read Isaiah’s prophecies about King Cyrus that Cyrus would become a shepherd to the people of God and would allow them to return to Jerusalem and rebuild the temple (Isa. 44: 28). He read the prophecies of Jeremiah that predicted Israel would only be held captive in Babylon for 70 years. When this time came to an end, Daniel began to pray. Now, as he read the edict of Cyrus, his heart was filled with thanksgiving for the mercy God had shown to his beloved people.

This story demonstrates one a most remarkable answer to prayer in Scripture. If God can transform the pagan leaders of a dark empire in the shepherd of his chosen people, imagine what he can do for the leaders of our world today! But until God raises up a group of men and women who will embrace the principles in which Daniel operated, we will never see the leaders of our society change. Daniel based his prayers on the promises of God’s word. The prophecies of Isaiah and Jeremiah inspired in Daniel the confidence he needed to persevere in prayer until his answer came. God’s Word commands us to intercede for our leaders so that we can live peaceful and quiet lives in godliness and holiness (1 Tim. 2:1-12). When we look at our world today, there are obviously

Don’t impede God’s plans Randy Johnson Pastor’s Spotlight

Once a long time ago there was a young man who was fascinated with boats and ships. He dreamed of building great, beautiful ships that could sail around the world. He spent much of his life learning the trade of shipbuilding until one day he started on his project of building the greatest sailing ship the world had seen. He spent many hours each day for several years using the best wood, the best paint and the best polish until his project was completed. It certainly was a vessel that appeared to be seaworthy and it was also a vessel of beauty. The man was proud of his life’s work. The more the man thought about it, the more he became fearful about what might happen to his masterpiece if it was in the open sea and a

storm came. He wondered what might happen if the ship sailed too close to a reef. These thoughts troubled the man so much that he put the ship in the water, vowing never to take it too far from shore. His dream and the true purpose behind all those years of work were sacrificed because of his worry of what might happen to his sailing ship. A ship in a harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for. Don’t allow worry to stop you from being and doing what God has created you for. You are God’s masterpiece; worry will prevent you from being used greatly by the master builder. Sure life can sometimes be difficult. There are plenty of dangers just around the next curve in life’s road but you weren’t created to sit still. Jesus said, “I have come that you may have life and have it more abundantly.” Now get out there and be all God created you to be. Randy Johnson is the pastor at Brandenburg Church of God.

Bible Trivia By Wilson Casey

1. Is the book of Exodus in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. I Corinthians 13 is known as the chapter of “what”? Faith, Hope, Love, Pardon

3. How old was Joseph when he died? 100 or 110? ANSWERS: 1) Old; 2) Love; 3) 110 (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

many places where people do not have the freedom to live as a follower of Christ. Could it be that if we took Paul’s command more seriously, the leaders of our world would be changed? Once Daniel had established his faith on the promises of God, he persevered until his answer came. Whether it was a simple prayer, deep intercession, fasting or spiritual warfare, Daniel did what it took to see the will of God expressed on the earth. God wants to put that same heart in us and to breathe fresh power of the Holy Spirit into our prayer lives. If you and I will take the examples and the commands of Scripture seriously, God will use our prayers to change our leaders so the world they rule can also be changed. Reverend Dan Newton is the pastor of Grace Baptist Church.

770 Meade County Veterans Memorial By-Pass Sunday

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The News Standard welcomes columns written by local church leaders that spread faith and good will. To submit your column, e-mail lindsey@thenewsstandard.com, or call us at 270-422-4542.

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Inside Kroger 270-422-4411 Mon. - Thur. 10 - 6 Fri. 8 - 8 • Sat. 8 - 3

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NEWS

The News Standard - A8

‘Conan’ School budget numbers not as up in the air until state mighty legislators make decisions as name By Lindsey Corley lindsey@thenewsstandard.com

Shawn Hughes Jr. Old & New Movie Reviews

Conan the Barbarian, 1982 Many famous names in history get passed down over the course of several hundred or even thousands of years, and as time goes by, their exploits become blown wonderfully and delightfully out of proportion until their heroic deeds become legendary. Such is the case, I believe, with “Conan the Barbarian,” an example of a movie whose reputation supersedes the actual quality of the film itself. Let me be quick to say that it’s not a bad film. On the contrary, it’s actually quite entertaining ... during the second half. The first half-hour is dreadfully boring and not at all becoming of a revolutionary action/adventure movie. The first half relies way too much on a narrator to progress the story along, and it can get very disjointed when switching from one scene to the next without any explanation as to what even happened. The latter half of the first half-hour becomes stupidly predictable: minor action, sex scene, repeat. I actually began to wonder if this was what the whole movie would be. As soon as the side characters are introduced, however, things start to get more interesting. This is when I felt the movie really started. From then on the relevancy of events starts to become more clear. The action scenes are dated by today’s standards, of course, but they occasionally offer some fine entertainment. The highlight of the movie is one of the first major scenes: Conan and a giant snake. This is the only scene that doesn’t feel the least bit dated, but more importantly serves as a benchmark for action scenes throughout the rest of the movie. At least, it should. In my opinion, no other fight ever topped this one, which happened during the film’s first act. The thing is, there’s plenty of action to be found — some of which is pretty good, but it’s rarely ever rousing. It seemed like I was simply watching an elaborate sparring session that never really had any impact. Part of this is due to age, and I admit and respect that, but it also has to do with something else, which I think is this movie’s biggest flaw: Conan is not a very good character. All of the emotional heavy-lifting is done by the supporting characters. I suppose he was meant to be the epitome of the strong silent type, an enigmatic powerhouse that would be able to speak volumes without ever saying a word. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work. Instead, I feel like I know nothing about Conan, which therefore makes him unrelatable. He’s just ... there. This is a major problem considering he’s the main character. All in all, the movie didn’t live up to my expectations for the great Cimmerian. While I accept the outdated combat and effects and even the disjointed first act, I can’t get past the unrelatable nature of the film’s title character. Final grade:

Meade County superintendent Mitch Crump presented the 2010-11 draft budget to board members and a few school faculty and staff during the monthly board meeting Tuesday, Jan. 12. “It looks pretty familiar,” Crump said, as the proposed budget is exactly the same as the 2009-10 budget. All school systems are required by the Kentucky Department of Education to submit a general draft budget, but at this point, Crump said he and other school superintendents around the state have “no idea what the legislature is going to do” and projections must be made before schools have an idea of what they think they might get. Crump said this year, the system’s categorical programs, like the Family Resource, textbooks, professional development and the like, will be cut 3 percent, again. “We’re going to have to pick those things up with our general fund,” he said. By the time the budget has to be finalized, in May, Crump said he hopes things will be more concrete and they’ll know more about what funds are going to be available. “You’re guess is as good as mine,” Crump said. “So, at this point, what we think is very prudent here, is just to put the same budget as we had last year into this year and be very conservative.” Crump also said one thing to notice between last year’s budget receipts and the receipts from the year before is a $2 million decrease, due to the AAR stimulus money. “We cannot show that as state or local revenue in our budget,” he said. “That was allocated through the federal government.”

Firm From page A1 Currently, the city’s towing needs are met on a temporary contract with Long’s Towing, located in Muldraugh, and the difference between Long’s bid and Motor’s is $35. Tate said they must be able to legally justify why the city doesn’t want to accept the low bid. “What concerns me is the shape of the business,” he said, of Motor Automotive. “I don’t want to run businesses out of Muldraugh, but I’ve preached and preached and preached.” Tate suggested putting Motor Automotive on a temporary contract, but councilman Curtis Kelley asked the other council members to consider going straight to the city’s attorney with the issue and asking what legal options they have concerning this bid. “If we’re having that much trouble out of him keeping his place clean, and you’re wanting to revoke his license for not complying with what you’ve been asking him to do, I think we need to talk to the attorney and ask him what he thinks, if there’s anything we can do to get out of it,” Kelley said. Kelley made the motion to table action on the towing contract until the city’s attorney can be consulted on whether or not the lowest bid has to be accepted because of previous problems and to clarify mileage and distance of out of town bids. The motion carried. The council also had the

He said this is something to plan for in May, but that if within the next two years, federal stimulus money is withdrawn, all states, not only Kentucky, will be looking at making cuts. “Right now, it’s very difficult for all public services,” he said. “So we’ll see where we go from here … A best guess is all we have right now.” In other school board news, the board: •Approved plans for Flaherty Primary Sewage Treatment Plant. •Approved submission of continuation plans for family resource/youth service centers. •Approved the 2010-11 school calendar; fall break will be the first full week of October and spring break will be the first full week in April, and Feb. 18 and 21 are scheduled days off for students that could be used as make-up. School will also be closed Nov. 2 and May 18 for elections. •Approved the WHAS Crusade for Children grant application for 2010-11. This year’s needs and wants followed themes for assisted technology, autism and sensory issues and the grant request is for a total of $23,763. •Approved advertising for bids for projectors and screens for Flaherty Primary School. •Approved non-resident contracts with Hardin County Schools, Breckinridge County Schools and Elizabethtown Independent Schools for the 2010-11 school year. It is a yearly contract between the districts, but Crump noted that for the 2010-11 year, all districts have agreed to put a hold on any additional new students “coming over or going, reciprocal either way, and we’re going to respect the contract.”

second readings of Ordinances No. 293 and 294. Ordinance No. 293 concerns providing for prohibition, elimination and control of illicit discharges to the storm sewer system. All council, excluding Woody Holston who wasn’t present, voted in favor of the reading and accepted it as read. Ordinance No. 294 concerns mandating erosion prevention and sediment control. Lee did not vote in favor of having the first reading of this ordinance during the regular meeting, but told the council he would vote in favor of passing the ordinance if the council would consider adding an amendment to the ordinance, at a later date, specifically excluding personal gardens as requiring a permit. Part of the ordinance requires a level one permit for ground disturbances less than one acre and Lee said he doesn’t think personal gardens should require permits. Tate said the ordinance is mandated by the federal government and is something the city is required to adopt. “If they’re telling you anything less than 3,400 square feet you have to get a permit if you’re going to do erosion work, then we need to abide by what the government says or suffer the consequences,” Tate said. “I think we can visit each one of the issues as it applies.” The council agreed to send the amendment separately to the city’s attorney and request his advice on the legality of adding the exclusion of gardens in the ordinance. The ordinance had its second reading and passed by all council members present.

Friday, January 22, 2010

Haiti From page A1

key role in support of ongoing logistical operations in Haiti. The 3d ESC deployed three teams; one to U.S. Southern Command led by 3d ESC commander, Col. (P) Robin Akin, one to Haiti led by 3d ESC deputy commander, Col. Jarrold Reeves and one to Fort Bragg, N.C. These liaison teams will provide logistical expertise to U.S. Southern Command, Joint Task Force-Haiti and also the 18th Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg. “Within our 3d ESC team, there are many years of experience amongst the soldiers regarding sustainment and logistics,” said Col. Marvin Whitaker, the 3d ESC’s chief of staff. “We are prepared to deploy at a moment’s notice and our knowledge and experience will be key in assisting Joint Task Force Haiti in providing support to Haiti and its citizens.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SPC. MICHAEL BEHLIN

Soldiers with Fort Knox’s 3d ESC deployed three teams to Haiti to provide logistical expertise with rescue efforts. “Our soldiers are qualified and very capable of handling this mission in the wake of this disaster.” Much of Port-au-Prince was destroyed last week leaving Haiti’s largest city and capital in ruins. Delivery of food and water are currently a high priority amongst those in need. “I have no doubts in my mind that my soldiers will perform exceptional work in support of relief efforts in Haiti,” said Command

Sgt. Maj. Willie C. Tennant, the 3d ESC’s senior enlisted leader. “Sustainment and distribution are what we do as a command, and we’re willing to help in any capacity that we are needed.” The 3d ESC provides logistics and distribution management anywhere, at any time, in any environment. The command returned to Fort Knox in August 2009 after serving a 15-month tour in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

JUDGE SHAN EMBRY ANNOUNCES RE-ELECTION BID FOR DISTRICT JUDGE, DIVISION II Shan F. Embry formally filed for re-election as District Judge, Division II, for the 46th Judicial District (Grayson, Breckinridge and Meade counties) on November 5, 2009. Judge Embry has served as District Judge since January 2003. Embry, a resident of Grayson County, graduated from the Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville in 1985. Appointed as an Assistant Grayson County Attorney in January 1986, Shan worked primarily in the District Court for eleven years protecting the interest of children in juvenile court and serving the citizens of Grayson County who were the victims of crime by prosecuting misdemeanor offenses. In 1997, she chose to leave the office of the County Attorney and opened a private law practice. She also served as the Public Advocate for Grayson County under contract with the Department of Public Advocacy. In January 1999, Embry was appointed Assistant Commonwealth Attorney for the 46th Judicial Circuit again serving all of the citizens of Breckinridge, Grayson and Meade counties where she remained until her election as District Court Judge. Embry is married to Leroy Embry and they have raised four children, Linnea Embry, Andrea Embry Vanzant (Jeff), Cliff Embry (Krystal), and Jamie Embry. She is the proud grandparent of five with whom she spends many delightful hours. Passionate in her belief that the protection and nurture of children is the key to preserving the American dream, Judge Embry has participated in numerous community and school activities, organizations and boards and has also been the guest speaker for school and community organizations across Grayson, Breckinridge and Meade counties. Other of her achievements and recognitions include: * 2010 - Implementing “In Her Shoes” Domestic Violence training in Grayson, Breckinridge, and Meade County High Schools; * 2009 - Presenter for Salt River Trail Region Foster Parent Training; * 2009 - Truancy Court - Collaborated with community partners to implement Truancy Diversion Program in the Grayson County High School; * 2008 - Re-wrote the 46th Judicial District Local Rules of Practice for District Court; * 2008 - Initiated and organized first Challenge Day Programs held in Breckinridge, Grayson and Meade County High Schools; * 2007 - Organized and hosted “Meth Watch” in Grayson County; * 2007 - Wrote Domestic Violence Protocol for the 46th Judicial District; * 2006 - Truancy Court - Collaborated with community partners to implement Truancy Diversion Program in the Meade County High School and Grayson County Middle School; * 2006 - Hosted Senior Tea for Grayson County High School; * 2006 - Presenter for Administrative Office of the Courts Continuing Judicial Education; * 2005 - Volunteer Judge for Breckinridge County Mock Trial team; * 2004 - Speaker - Grayson County Chamber of Commerce Leadership class; * 2003 - Organized and hosted the first Continuing Legal Education Program held in Breckinridge County, (Guardian Ad Litem Training); * 2002 - Elected first female Judge for the 46th Judicial District; * 1998 - Second chair defense counsel in Commonwealth vs. Sophol Phon (high profile Warren County death penalty case); * 1997 - Co-wrote $100,000 COPS Problem Solving Partnership Grant awarded to the Grayson County Sheriff’s Office and GUS (Growing Up Safe) to study and make recommendations for the effective investigation and prosecution of child sexual abuse; * 1997 - Awarded Certificate of Awareness for extraordinary work in the prosecution of rape and sexual abuse cases by Rape Victim’s Services of Hardin County; * 1996 - Kentucky Bar Association Continuing Legal Education Award; * 1993 - Organized GUS (Growing Up Safe) in Grayson County, a non-profit organization dedicated to assisting child abuse victims; Embry released the following statement: “I am proud to have served the 46th Judicial District as Division II District Judge since 2003. I will continue to be fair and reasonable with all people who come before the court without prejudging their cases before I have been informed of the facts. My time as judge, prosecutor, defense counsel, and private attorney provide me with the knowledge and broad ranging experience needed to be effective in every aspect and division of the District Court. Public service has been the chosen path of my career and I am both proud and humbled by that service - the people of these counties are good citizens and good neighbors. In the 24 years I have served the citizens of the 46th Judicial District, I have observed that it is the District Court, which most often affects the average person; I never forget it is the people’s court. I believe that the level of skill and experience in that court must be high. The dedication of the judge to that court must be to serve and to protect. I ask that you vote to re-elect Shan Embry District Judge on November 2 because based upon knowledge, experience and dedication, I am the person best able to do the job.”

Contact Judge Embry at sembry@usdol.net. Paid for by Committee to Re-elect Shan F. Embry, District Judge, Division II, Dan Drane, Treasurer.

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Friday, January 22, 2010

Dream From page A1 For the past two years, MPTTP, Inc., has held annual pulls in June in honor of Matt. Proceeds from the event go toward a dream that he always had: building a activity center for youth and families to enjoy in the community. This past Tuesday, Jan. 19 that dream began to become a reality. The MPTTP, Inc., and the Meade-Breck Recreation Center, Inc. committees have joined forces to save the recreation center — an existing building that the community has enjoyed for decades. During a meeting held Tuesday evening, the two organizations announced they are ready to start the first of a series of updates to the building. Stage one of the updates will consist of a 4,000 squarefoot addition along with several new features such as rest rooms, a state-of-the-art 36x46 foot kitchen and a 16x35 foot porch on the front and meeting room. The exterior will be

Court From page A4 Antonia Wallace, 26, speeding 15 mph over limit; operating on suspended/revoked operators license- failure to appear, send court notice.

Nicholas James Lee, 29, speeding 7mph over limitdefer 6 months; failure to produce insurance card- dismiss with proof, PINS. Antionne Bedonte, 22, speeding 15mph over limit; failure to produce insurance card- failure to appear, send court notice. Terri Renee Hurt, 34, operating on suspended/revoked operators license- amend to no license in possession, pled guilty, $50 fine. Debra J. Allen, 39, failure to produce insurance cardamend to no insurance, pled guilty, 90 days probated for 2 years. Marcus Anthony Lawrence, 31, one headlight; no/ expired registration plates; failure of non-owner operator to maintain required insurance, 1st offense- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Alberto Millan Gonzalez, 22, speeding 19mph over limit; no operators/moped license- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Peter B. Wilks, 20, speeding 15mph over limit- defer 6 months; failure to produce insurance card; no/expired registration plates- dismiss with proof. Steven W. Slone, 23, possession of marijuana; use/ possess drug paraphernalia, 2nd or greater offense- preliminary hearing 1/27/10. Joseph H. Peterson Jr., 22, alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offense- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 2/3/10. Christopher Michael Hulsey, 36, theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pled guilty, 10 days probated after 1 hour jail. Jennifer Jo Carman, 31, alcohol intoxication in a public place, 1st and 2nd offensepled guilty $25 fine. Richard J. Trapp, 38, theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 2/3/10. Kelly Thompson Timberlake, 40, assault 4th degree domestic violence, minor injury- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Christopher R. Williams, 26, non support- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Frederick Alexander Clay, 32, operating on suspended/ revoked operators license- to show proof, continued first appearance 2/10/10. Matthew Alan Herald, 28, failure to notify address change to department of transportation; failure to produce insurance card- dismiss with proof. Larry And Maysey, 50, leaving scene of accident/failure to render aid or assistance; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security, 1st offense- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Antonio D. Ferguson, 22,

NEWS

The News Standard - A9

dressed with fresh metal siding. The updated building will remain an asset to the adjacent St. Theresa’s Catholic Church. St. Theresa’s annual church picnic and fall festival will continue to be held in the building, though it will also be open for the public to rent for various needs such as basketball games, meetings, receptions and other gatherings. Both MPTTP and MeadeBreck Recreation Center representatives expressed plans to continue building updates after stage one. The MPTTP, Inc., aims to continue holding its annual truck and tractor pull in Matt’s memory. This year it’s scheduled for June 12 at the Meade County Fairgrounds in Brandenburg. Representatives said contributions are always welcome and anyone interested in donating can call 270-8632198. They hope to ensure the Meade-Breck Recreation Center will continued to be enjoyed by the community for years to come.

Nancy Pike, the wife of Matt Pike, and Gary Greenwell, Meade-Breck Recreation Center president, shake hands marking the start of the Matthew Pike Truck and Tractor Pull, Inc., and Meade-Breck Recreation Center, Inc. coming together to start decorative updates to an existing community building, honoring a loved one, Matt Pike.

speeding 10mph over limit; operating on suspended/ revoked operators license; failure to surrender revoked operators license- failure to appear, send court notice 1/27/10. Joshia A. McManama, 18, failure to notify address change to department of transportation; no/expired Kentucky registration receipt; speeding 26mph over/great; reckless driving; possession of marijuana; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/ security, 1st offense- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Joshia A. Mcmanama, 18, speeding 15mph over limit; license to be in possession; failure to produce insurance card- pled not guilty, pretrial conference 1/27/10. Sandra Ros Sally, 43, 3 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Amber M. Swink, 22, assault 4th degree domestic violence, minor injury- pretrial conference 4/7/10. Anna M. Guojardo, 20, theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 1/20/10. Johnny Lee Watson, 46, assault 4th degree domestic violence, no visible injury- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Randall L. Henderson, 24, rear license not illuminatedpled guilty $25 fine; possession of marijuana- pled guilty, 6 months probated, 10 days jail, 2 years probation, KAPS. Samuel Morton Barr, 28, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, aggravator, 2nd offense; possession of marijuana; use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense- pretrial conference 1/20/10. Benjamin Ferry, 45, theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 2/10/10. Chad M. Hall, 24, cultivation of marijuana, less than 5 plants, 1st offense; use/possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense; possession of marijuana- pretrial conference 1/20/10. Larry B. Hardesty, 21, disorderly conduct, 2nd degreejury trial 2/12/10. Christopher James Stepanian, 45, 2 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Michael Dea Hack, 47, 2 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pretrial conference 2/10/10. Joseph Roy Tyree, 38, failure to or improper signal- dismiss; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, etc. 1st offense- pled guilty, 30 days probated after 2 days jail, 2 years probation; possession of marijuana- pled guilty, 90 days probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation; possess open alcohol beverage container in a motor vehicle- pled guilty, $25 fine. Joseph F. Jecker, 56, assault 4th degree, minor injury- pretrial conference, failure to appear. Brady Jo English, 25, reckless driving; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, etc. aggravator,

1st offense- no pretrial conference, jury trial 3/19/10. Robin Eads Monroe, 27, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, etc. 2nd offense- pretrial conference 2/3/10. Edward Louis Whelan, 41, speeding 26mph over/greater; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, etc. aggravator, 1st offense; fleeing or evading police, 2nd degree; possess open alcohol beverage container in a motor vehicle- pretrial conference 2/3/10. Gregory Way Searcy, 50, speeding 17mph over limitpled guilty $34 fine; driving on DUI suspended license, 1st offense- pled guilty, 90 days probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation. Brian Wallace Murphy, 34, careless driving; operating on suspended/revoked operators license; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, etc. 3rd offensepretrial conference 2/3/10. Angela Jeannette Fowler, 41, careless driving; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, etc. aggravator, 1st offense- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Sean T. Murphy, 44, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, etc. 1st offense; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/ security, 1st offense; no/expired registration plates; no/ expired Kentucky registration receipt- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Laranda L. Wehmeyer, 23, 7 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $300- pretrial conference 3/31/10, jury trial 4/9/10. James Roger Lasley, 52, 5 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $5000- pretrial conference, failure to appear, continue 1/27/10. Timothy S. Woodrum, 18, possession of marijuana; use/ possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense- pretrial conference 2/3/10. Timothy S. Woodrum, 18, truancy – student 18 but not yet 21- pretrial conference 1/20/10. Nancy L. Crosby, 35, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/drugs, etc. aggravator 1st offense; operating on suspended/revoked operators license; controlled substance prescription not in original container, 1st offensepretrial conference 1/20/10. Travis Liner, 26, possession of marijuana- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Donald R. Wells, 55, criminal trespassing, 3rd degree; theft by unlawful taking/ display-all others- pretrial conference 1/27/10. Rebecca Jean Russell, 61, 4 counts of theft by deception include cold checks under $500- pled guilty, 10 days probated after 1 hour jail, 2 years probation. Victoria C. Weber, 19, operating motor vehicle under/ influence of alcohol/drugs, etc. less than 21 years of agepretrial conference 3/3/10, jury trial 3/12/10. Brenton Kyle Ross, 30, speeding 26mph over/greater; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, etc. 1st offense- pretrial

THE NEWS STANDARD/CHARLOTTE FACKLER

conference 3/3/10, jury trial 3/12/10. Erin M. Bennett, 23, possession of marijuana; use/ possess drug paraphernalia, 1st offense- pretrial conference 2/17/10, jury trial 2/26/10. Charles Edward Peak Jr., 55, 2 counts of illegal take/ purchase deer/wild turkeypled guilty, $100 fine, forfeit hunting for 1 year. Bradley Glen Arnold, 35, operating motor vehicle under/influence of intoxicated beverage, 1st offense- amend to reckless driving, pled guilty $100 fine; controlled substance prescription not in original container, 1st offense- pled guilty, 6 months probated for 2 years; possess controlled substance, 1st offense- dismiss with proof. Daniel Dejesus Urrutia, 31, speeding 16mph over limit; operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, etc. 1st offense- pretrial conference 2/3/10.

Jill Marie Pollock, 30, operating motor vehicle under/ influence of alcohol/drugs, etc. 2nd offense- pled guilty, 6 months probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation, KAPS/ ADE, license suspended 18 months. Larry Evans Mullins, 60, operating motor vehicle under/influence of alcohol/ drugs, etc. 2nd offense- pled guilty, 6 months probated after 14 days jail, 2 years probation, KAPS/ADE. Drew A. Bass, 25, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing, admitted violation, revoke 28 days. Matthew A. Pate, 23, probation violation for misdemeanor offense; non-payment of fines- probation revocation hearing 3/24/10. Joshua David Jupin, 25, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing, failure to appear.

Sandra K. Shelton, 42, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing 1/27/10. Gary Eugene Gould, 46, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing 2/24/10. Jason Burt Yates, 34, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing, remand. Danny Edward Embry, 52, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing 2/17/10. Charles Wil Ditto, 61, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing 2/10/10. John Stanford Lucas, 28, probation violation for misdemeanor offense- probation revocation hearing, revoked 30 days, pled guilty, 6 months probated after 10 days jail, 2 years probation, KAPS/ADE. District Court from 01/13/10 will continue in The News Standard next issue.

January 20—24 Kentucky Exposition Center

Your outdoor adventures begin…

Best Selection! Best Deals! Best Place to Buy! Take advantage of the season’s best prices on boats, RVs, and gear for all your outdoor adventures! Show highlights: There’s something for everyone! DockDogs: Watch canine athletes perform amazing feats NEW! Affordability Pavilion: Shop boats you can buy for about $250/month NEW! Meet SpongeBob SquarePants: Saturday, 11am–3pm FREE kids activities: Catch & release fishing, minnow races and casting contests Redneck Yacht Club: Live— Friday, Saturday & Sunday! Show times on web site.

Buy tickets and more at LouisvilleBoatRVShow.com Save $2 on tickets at Kroger with your Kroger PLUS Card. Discount coupons also available at participating SUBWAY® Restaurants.

Show hours: Wednesday Thursday & Friday Saturday Sunday

5pm—9pm Noon—9pm 10am—9pm 10am—5pm


YOUTH

A10 - The News Standard

Friday, January 22, 2010

Brandenburg Primary School All-Star singers kick off MCHS game with National Anthem performance Students from Brandenburg Primary School’s “AllStar Singers” performed a patriotic rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the start of Tuesday evening’s Greenwave basketball game against North Hardin High School. The ensemble is comprised of students from kindergarten through third grade.

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Students from Brandenburg Primary School sang The National Anthem before tip-off of the Greenwave basketball game Tuesday evening at the high school.

Stuart Pepper Middle School Honor Roll, 2nd grading period

7th Grade All A’s Cassidy Adams Brendon Adcock Elijah Ashmore Luke Babb Frederick Barham Emma Bell Brooklyn Bishoff Ashley Brown Alexandra Bruce Justin Carter Brittany Clouse Shelby Coles Kaylee Compton Sierra Cooper Taylor Coppersmith Nicolas Cox Debra Davis Ann DeVries Kayla Dowell Zachary Dowell Magdalyn Durbin Cassie Emert Kayla English Kaitlin Fackler Ryan Ford Richard Frost Kellen Gable Keston Gagel Mary Hack Jacilyn Hazelwood Rian Heibert Sadie Hobbs Margaret Huffines Corey Johnson Micah Kaiser Paige Kenny Erica Kessinger Hannah King Will King Michael Krimm Kristen Logsdon Addilyn Lynch Natalie McCombs Alec Melchor Kasey Mielke Allison Millay Angela Miller John Miller Levi Miller Taylor Miller Brianna Mingus Garrett Morgan Whitney Morgan Abby Naser Kristen Norton Weston Owen Ashley Padgett Ethan Pelletier Kristin Peters Savannah Phelps Jessa Pollard Adrienne Poole Mary Kate Powers Natalie Reichmuth Neeli Rhoads Briana Rice Hanna Risher Abigail Robinson Kahlan Robinson Tyler Robinson Tanya Scott Jaycee Serrano Brittany Shepperd Lane Snider Zachary Straney Darby Stull Kelsey Sutton Madeline Tabor Isaiah Terry Jolan Thomas Bailey Tighe Morgan Turner

Taylor Vanover Jesse Whelan Lillian White Miranda Wiglesworth John Wilson Riley Wilson Shelby Wooten Elissa Youart 8th Grade All A’s Kristen Bowen Kayla Brown Logan Burchett Angela Burnette Lucas Butler Cara Caro Sara Chism Jacob Coles Blaine Crigler Morgan Cruz Crystal Deweese Jaimelee Eaton Katie Fogle Jarrod Foushee Zachary Gardner Rilana Gonsalves Cova Haynes Whitney Hiner Nicole Humphrey Kaitlyn Ives Brooke Jent Raley Johnson Olivia Kasey Jasmyn Knott Kierra Kronka Jasmine Lancaster William Mathias Dustin McMahan Jacob McMurry Beajay Mewhorter Matthew Millay Matthew Miller Jordan Nichols Ashley Nikolao Chelsea Pipes Kaylee Plunkett Taylor Powers Adam Rockwood Rachel Sanders Austin Schroeder Kati Schuh Carrisa Schwartz Michael Scott Eric Smith Caitlin Stewart Julie Stivers Sarah Sutterley Aaron Thomas Tabitha Thomas Allison Waddle Brenna Wheatley Joseph Wiglesworth 7th Grade A&B Abbigayle Adams Slater Adams Tanner Age Sabrina Allen Erica Barnes Erica Bates Taylor Bishop Josie Board Carlea Brothers Anissa Brown Zachary Brown Mark Burkhead Charlene Campbell Jeremy Campbell, Jr. Brandi Carman Alexis Carter Tyler Carter

Megan Collins Tyler Compton Kimberly Cundiff Christopher Deal Hannah DeForrest Kelsey Desrochers Tori DeWitt Ryan Dowell Raychel Eaton Alma Embrey Kalem Fetters Alyson Foutch Vanessa Frazier Adalie Frye Cynthia Garcia Karlie Gardner Miranda Gregory Taelor Guenthner Stephan Hayes Madison Haynes Brittany Heath Allegra Hecht Brianna Henricksen Taylor Horton Michaela Hurd Kelsey Hurt Ryan Joyner Tiffany Judd Brianna Kenealy Kody Kennedy John Kinney Ian Klenk Taryne Knott Hailey Lacefield Ashton Lancaster Chelsea Lancaster Tyler Little Austin Long Hayden Lovo Deanndrea Luney Courtney Masters Marty Mattingly Kyleigh McCall Camille Mewhorter Jonathan Millay Austin Millay Trevin Montgomery Jesse Moore Tristan Morris Sean Morrow Ashlea Moses Abby Myers Autumn Nichols Lauren Nowland Michael Patterson Emma-Lee Payne Karoline Phelps Katie Phelps Brandon Phillips Wyatt Pike Courtney Pollock Brian Popham Natalie Prather Ariel Price Timothy Quetot Timothy Quiggins Jasmine Reynoso Austin Rice Savannah Rines Allyson Rodriguez Samuel Romine Lance Roney Makayla Russell Kayla Schmid Brady Schuh Ashley Shelton Erica Smith McKell Sowder Joseph Staples Courtney Stewart Nathaniel Tanguay Cody Tate

Brandelyn Taylor Jake Thomas Emily Thompson Dyllan Tucker Lauren Vaughn Joel Voelker Jonah Voelker Brenden Ward Julie Weatherholtz George Weick Gunner Wellman Cassidy Wernz Alexa Whelan Kayla White Deanna Wilcox Hannah Wilcoxon Joseph Williams, III Lisa Wilson Sawyer Winskye Jonathan Woods Trevor Yates 8th Grade A&B Dakota Abell Montana Adams Haley Adcock Katelyn Allen Chaselyn Allgeier Evan Allison Stephanie Anderson Jesse Ayer Amanda Beirman Daniel Belcher Kelsie Bewley Samantha Bigler Karen Blair Jessika Blehar Tyler Breeds Nicole Brooks Autumn Bruner Bridgette Burks Michael Carpenter Samantha Charles Kendrick Chism Tyler Chism Isaac Cioe Aaron Clutts Andrew Coppage Ashley Coulter Jeremy Cox Katelyn Cucino Kaitlin Daley Ashley Davidson Justin Deener Brandon Delap Elizabeth DeVries Sawntionna Ditto Nathan Duff Brianna Duncan Jadie Earley Austin Edelen Cara Ellis Joseph Embrey Hamilton English Roger Fackler Joseph Fogle Markeesha Fowler Chelsey Frank Rachel Franz Jenny Gerkins Keyan Gittings Margarita Gonzalez-Ramirez Brian Green, Jr. Deiven Greer Sarah Greer Courtney Hack David Hale Jasmine Hall Joshua Hardesty Lucas Hardesty Makayla Harper

William Harvey Alexandra Haynes Austin Haynes Stephanie Hekeler Devin Hendley Ashton Herron Damon Hillman Timothy Hobbs Mary Hood Corey Hubbard Sarah Jacobs Alexandra King Corey Knott Jena Kreiling Diana Kullman Krystin Lanham Alicia Lee Erica Lockard Collin Lynch Collin Machine Branden Martin Olivia Matthews Jacob Mattingly Jessica Mattingly Hannah McCleavy Trese McCormick Jessica McCoy William McDonald Tye McFarland Megan McGarrah Eric McGee Marisa Miller Shally Miller Walter Miller Benjamin Mingus Cody Moore Thomas Mundell Kristina Neben Josie Nevitt Nicholas O’Brien Daniel Orr Sarah Osborne Holli Otis Cortney patterson Kayla Patterson Kristen Patterson Makayla Pearce Toni Peterson Andrew Popham Tyler Price Joseph Psyck Justin Ray Micaela Ray Michael Ray, III Tredina Ready Katelyn Russell Hayley Schulz Rodney Simmons Jessica Slyfield Aaron Smith Sabrina Smith Natalie Spink Kaily Strandberg Lewis Swink Drew Taylor Brianna Terry Jamie Thomas Kelly Timberlake Ashlee Tomlin Harold Vaughn Katherine Wallace Masherra Warren Jordyn Wayne Samantha Weick Dillon Westbay Jacob Whelan Jennifer Whelan Shonte Williams Luke Wilson Robert Wilson Logan Young

NEWS* Program Garland Brown Backhoe & Plumbing

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The News Standard

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270-422-4272 • Quality parts • Guaranteed lowest prices • Nationwide parts locator • All parts tested and guaranteed • Free delivery • Free pickup on vehicles purchased • 10% off Military Discount on In-Stock Parts We also sell vehicles! TOP DOLLAR paid for antique, collectible and used cars, trucks and motorcyles in any condition. We accept cash, checks and most major credit cards! HOURS: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

FUNDRAISER FOR HAITI The 8th grade Titans will host a school-wide fundraiser for Haitian disaster relief. Students have chosen to send 100% of donations to “Doctors Without Borders.” (Visit doctorswithoutborders.org for more info) The fundraiser is Jan. 20-29. To donate, send a check to Stuart Pepper Middle School Attn: Amanda Love 1085 Old Ekron Rd., Brandenburg, KY 40108

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Meade County Youth Soccer Alliance

2010 Spring Registration Early Registration

$5 off if postmarked by Jan. 30, 2010 Brandenburg Food Court

Saturday, Feb. 6 ............ 10 AM - 2 PM Thursday, Feb. 18 .............. 6 AM - 8 PM Saturday, Feb. 20 ............. 10 AM - 2 PM

Coaches Meeting Saturday, March 6

All previous coaches and anyone wanting a coaching position MUST attend the coaches meeting. Call • 270-422-KICK (5425) Visit us at www.meadecountysoccer.com to obtain registration forms!

Show the community our shining stars! Submit student work to be published in our youth section — everything from essays and artwork to classroom accomplishments and extracurricular activities. E-mail student work, photos or accomplishments to editor@thenewsstandard.com or stop by the office today!

RiverRidge Marathon

*Newspapers Educating and Working for Students Local businesses and individuals work together with Meade County Schools and The News Standard to help enhance education through their local newspaper. To become a sponsor call us today at 270-422-4542.

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YOUTH Students take the stage for annual spelling b-e-e

The News Standard - A11

Friday, January 22, 2010

Staff Report The News Standard

LEFT: From left to right are third place winner Arielle Daley, second place winner Casey Emerick and first place winner Ceanna Johnson.

Students from all six Meade County elementary schools and Stuart Pepper Middle School participated in the district’s annual spelling bee Jan. 15 at Meade County High School. Seventy of the county’s savviest student spellers enjoyed the pressure of trying to out-perform their peers on stage in front of family and faculty. After several hours of competition, Ceanna Johnson of Flaherty Elementary was the top speller, and Flaherty Elementary School took the overall title. Below is a list of the individual winners and all who participated in last week’s spelling bee.

BOTTOM LEFT: Meade County High School principal Bill Adam presents the first place trophy to Ceanna Johnson of Flaherty Elementary School. BOTTOM RIGHT: The Flaherty Elementary School spelling bee team poses with their first place overall trophy. THE NEWS STANDARD/ CHARLOTTE FACKLER

Individual winners 1st place — Ceanna Johnson of Flaherty Elementary 2nd place — Casey Emerick of Stuart Pepper Middle School 3rd place — Arialle Daley of Battletown Elementary Battletown Elementary School spellers; school sponsor — Nicole Allyn Will Crosier; Arialle Daley; Gracie Fackler; Logan Hardesty; Desiree Meeks; Cayla Prather; Issac Singleton; Cailee Thomas; Emi White; Erica Hardesty (alternate); Josh Story (alternate); Amber Wolff (alternate) Ekron Elementary School spellers; school sponsor — Susan Meeks Ryleigh Board; Caitlin Coppinger; Clayton Kelly; Timothy McKinnon; Kevin Millay; Wyatt Moore; Eric Rodriquez; Clay Sipes; Bryan Wright; Veja Dawson (alternate); Shelbie Jantzen (alternate); Brannen Leslie (alternate)

School spellers; school sponsors — Emily Biddle, Ann Hartman and Cindy Richards Justin Akridge; Shawn DeRossett; Dionte Ditto; Chris Hardin; Ceanna Johnson; Kaylin Logsdon; Alexa McQuerry; Jared Ray; Brooke Spears; Wyatt Adkins (alternate); Caitlyn Neal (alternate) Muldraugh Elementary School spellers; school

Flaherty Elementary

Boys elementary basketball scores from Jan. 16

Flaherty White- 27, Battletown Red-10. Flaherty: Seth Sharriff, 4; Jacob Bewley, 16; Jasper Sipes, 2; Roger Young, 2; Matthew Hart, 3. Battletown: Blake Thomas, 4; Brady Risinger, 2; Zach Charles, 2. Ekron Gray- 20, Muldraugh- 5. Ekron: Tommy Maddox, 2; Josh Durbin, 14; Chase Medley, 2; Tyler Matte, 2. Muldraugh: Ethan

States

Movies

Davis, 1; Seth Davis, 4. David T. Wilson Yellow22, Payneville Yellow- 21. DTW Yellow: Fackler, 5; Smiley, 7; Wilson, 6; Crump, 4. Payneville: Jordan Brown, 6; Galvez, 2; Stivers, 2; Wortton, 2; Jesse Brown, 2; Mattingly, 5; Greco, 2. Flaherty Red- 24, Ekron Purple- 22. Flaherty: Riggs, 2; Gavin Priddy, 13; Cody Lee, 9. Ekron: Millay, 1; Curry, 15; Summit, 6. Ekron Maroon- 44, Flaherty Blue- 26. Ekron: K. Reed, 10; Reynolds, 8; Sell, 2; Dowell, 8; C. Reed, 4; Miller, 12. Flaherty: Garrett Ammons, 14; Hall, 2; Brian, 6; Cleaver, 2; Ditto, 2.

Math Geography

By Fifi Rodriguez

Answers: 1. Fear of horses; 2. Psalm 23; 3. Eldrick; 4. 144; 5. Hibernia; 6. Hundred Years War; 7. George Crum; 8. Pigs; 9. Exposure to cold causing red, swollen skin; 10. 70

David T. Wilson Green26, Battletown Black-18. DTW Green: Tommy Carey, 20; Hunter Johnson, 2; Jesse McPherson, 2; Jacob Crase, 2. Battletown: Tray Powers, 6; Logan Hardesty, 2; Kalby White, 5; Cody Burrel, 1; Dawson Gagel, 4.

1. PSYCHOLOGY: What is the excessive fear represented in “hippophobia”? 2. BIBLE: What Bible verse begins with the words: “The Lord is my shepherd ... “? 3. PERSONALITIES: What is Tiger Woods’ real first name? 4. MEASUREMENTS: How many square inches are in a square foot? 5. GEOGRAPHY: What was the ancient Roman name for Ireland? 6. HISTORY: The Battle of Agincourt took place in which major war? 7. INVENTIONS: Who is credited with inventing potato chips? 8. LANGUAGE: What kind of animal does the adjective “porcine” refer to? 9. MEDICINE: What causes chilblains? 10. MATH: What is the Arabic equivalent of the Roman numerals LXX?

sponsor — Mary Straney Star Denkhoff; Victoria Huber; Jacob Schwartz Payneville Elementary School spellers; school sponsor — Cheryl Vanover Hailey Blevins; Elizabeth Fackler; Cameron Galvez; Isabella Galvez; Alexis Goodin; Seth Griffin; Julia Mattingly; Dusty Shemwell; Kody Smith; Paulette Black (alternate); Logan Greco (alternate); Corey Johnston

Jan. 25 - Jan. 29

(alternate) Stuart Pepper Middle School spellers; school sponsor — Tammy Alcorn Nick Benock; Jacob Coles; Casey Emerick; Alex Haynes; Margaret Huffines; Brande Taylor; Jessa Pollard (alternate); Tabitha Thomas (alternate) David T. Wilson Elementary School spellers; school sponsor — Georgia

WEDNESDAY Choose One: Biscuit & Gravy Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

THURSDAY Choose One: Cinnamon Roll & Yogurt Cup Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

FRIDAY Choose One: Pancakes w/Syrup Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza or Burrito Choose Two: Corn - Tossed Salad Fresh Pears Mandarin Oranges In Addition: Vanilla Pudding

Choose One: Popcorn Chicken Spaghetti Choose Two: Glazed Carrots Steamed Broccoli w/ Cheese - Grapes Pineapple In Addition: Hot Buttered Texas Toast

Choose One: Hamburger or Cheeseburger or PB & J Uncrustable w/Mozzarella String Cheese Choose Two: Oven Baked Fries Lettuce, Tomato & Pickle Fresh Apple - Peaches

Choose One: Taco Salad or Oven Fried Chicken Choose Two: Baked Beans Lettuce, Tomato & Cheese Cup Fresh Orange Mixed Fruit

Choose One: Breaded Chicken Pattie Sandwich or Yogurt Munchable Choose Two: Baked Potato Green Beans Banana - Applesauce

Choose One: Biscuit & Gravy Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Pancakes Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Ham, Egg & Cheese on English Muffin Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Breakfast Pizza Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Cinnamon Roll & Yogurt Cup Cereal & Toast PB & J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/ Ham & Cheese; or Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal or PB&J Uncrustable Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Choose Two: Garden Salad - Glazed Carrots - Pineapple Fresh Apple In Addition: Cookie

Choose One Box Meal Grilled Garden Chicken Salad or Yogurt Box w/ choice of fruit & veggie; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Corn Dog or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal Choose Two: Oven Baked Fries - Fresh Mixed Veggies w/Dip - Applesauce - Fresh Orange In Addition: Mac & Cheese

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad w/Chicken Nuggets; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Taco Salad w/Tortilla Chips or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal or PB&J Uncrustable Choose Two: Corn - Lettuce & Tomato- Mixed Fruit Fresh Grapes

Choose One Box Meal Grilled Chicken Garden Salad; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Popcorn Chicken w/Hot Roll or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal Choose Two: Peas - Mashed Potatoes - Pears Strawberries

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/Cheese; or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Stuffed Breadsticks w/ Marinara or Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich Meal or PB&J Uncrustable Choose Two: Green Beans - Vegetable Medley- Banana - Mandarin Oranges

Choose One: Pancakes Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Breakfast Pizza Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One: Biscuit & Gravy Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/Ham & Cheese; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Chicken Pattie Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Pepperoni Pizza Choose Two: Garden Salad Fresh Veggies w/Dip Fresh Orange Applesauce

Choose One Box Meal Yogurt Box w/vegetable & choice of fruit; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Hamburger Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: BBQ Sandwich Choose Two: Peas -Mashed Potatoes - Fresh Apple Pineapple In Addition: Cookie

Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad w/ Chicken Nuggets; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Chicken Pattie Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Soft Taco Choose Two: Corn Lettuce & Tomato Mixed Fruit Fresh Orange

Choose One: Sausage, Egg & Chz on English Muffin Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit Choose One Box Meal Yogurt Box w/vegetable & choice of fruit; Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Hamburger Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Grilled Chicken Sandwich Choose Two: Green Beans Cooked Carrots Pears - Fresh Apple In Addition: Cookie

Choose One: Scrambled Eggs & Toast Cereal & Toast PB&J Uncrustable Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit Choose One Box Meal Garden Salad Meal w/Turkey & Chz Ham or Turkey Sub Sandwich; Chicken Pattie Meal or Main Line Entree Choice w/2 Sides: Fish on Bun Choose Two: Potato Wedges Vegetable Medley Peaches Banana

Breakfast

Stuart Pepper Middle

Breakfast All breakfast comes with Milk Choice

Lunch All lunch comes with choice of 1/2 pint drink

Meade County High

Breakfast All breakfast comes with Milk Choice

Lunch All lunch comes with choice of 1/2 pint drink

Week 2

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TUESDAY TChoose One: Breakfast Pizza Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice Fresh Fruit

MONDAY Choose One: Pancake on a Stick Cereal & Toast Choose One: Chilled Juice All breakfast comes Fresh Fruit with Milk Choice

All lunch comes with choice of 1/2 pint drink

Pronouncer — Amy Berry Judges — Martha Claycomb, Peggy Darnall and Sandara Stone



MEADE COUNTY SCHOOL MENUS

Primary & Elementary

Lunch

Whelan Matthew Barnes; Madeline Beavin; Jo Lynn Cannady; Robin Farrell; Hannah Gillenwater; Tyler Jackson; Lillie King; Chris Lancaster; Tessa McIntosh; Brigid DeVries (alternate); Lauren Fackler (alternate); Madissyn Stewart (alternate)

'DYLG7:LOVRQ 3HUIHFW$WWHQGDQFH QG1LQH:HHNV


A12 - The News Standard

FEATURE

Friday, January 22, 2010

Man considers ‘Home for Health’ a ministry, education

There’s a new preacher in town, and his focus is on living a healthy lifestyle. Well, 30-year-old Steve Day isn’t exactly a preacher, but he considers the new task he and wife Suzanne have undertaken to be a ministry. The couple and their three children hail from the state of Washington. They arrived in Powell County, Ky., in October of 2009 to take over operations at The Home for Health on Pecks Creek Road. Located at the end of a scenic roadway outside Stanton, Ky., the rambling log cabin home with accommodations for eight, was established 11 years ago by German native Volker Smith, a Lexington resident. According to Day, Smith had the facility built on his 300-acre property to serve as a place where people could come and learn how to restore their health. “This is his gift to God,” says the new manager. Although fees are charged for stays ranging for stays of from one to two weeks, the owner is “not interested in this becoming a money-making situation,” says Day. The hundreds of guests coming from all around the world have ranged from people facing illness

diagnosed as terminal, to people simply needing to lift their spirits. About 120 people per year have been served in the past, but Day hopes to increase that number by adding more staff. The organization’s stated number one goal is for all guests to gain a deeper walk with God that will be all-important in both overcoming and preventing illnesses. According to information on the Home for Health Web site, guests are invited to discover how healthy eating and healthy living have helped so many people once suffering from heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis and many other ailments. “You will be actively involved in learning to prepare healthy meals and receive instruction in nutrition and healthy living through lectures and video presentations from a biblical perspective. “Hands-on demonstrations and powerful natural therapies are utilized to boost the body’s vitality.” Day, a former body builder who did not always lead a healthy lifestyle while growing up as “a rebellious youth,” said he discovered the benefits of herbs and healthy eating while working at a

PHOTO BY DON WHITE

Steve and Suzanne Day stand outside the Home for Health, a place to learn about healthy living and to boost the spirits of those who have been diagnosed with illnesses. health food store in southern California. He also went through the personal trauma of losing all four of his grandparents to cancer, and came to believe there are ways to prevent and treat that dreaded disease beyond established accepted medical practices. “Traditional methods of treatment are not always

Cinnamon Apple Chips 2 tablespoons sugar substitute 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 4 Granny Smith or other tart apples Non-stick, butter-flavored cooking spray 1. Preheat the oven to 250 F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or aluminum foil. Slice each apple into four sections. Cut out core and the seeds, and then slice apples as thinly as possible. The slices don’t have to be uniform. 2. Place sugar and cinnamon in a large bowl and mix well. Add ap-

covery, vibrant living, diabetes, and the need of adopting a healthy lifestyle. For more information, call 606-663-6671. Columnist Don White has served as editor at several newspapers in Kentucky. His Kentucky Traveler features are published throughout the state. Contact him at thekytraveler.com.

Do You or Someone You Know Have Trouble Hearing or Understanding What They Hear? Last Month We Helped 29 People Hear Better!

Heart healthy snacks at home. Keep plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables refrigerated in small, sealed plastic bags, ready to grab and go. Whole-wheat pretzels, baked tortilla chips and rice cakes are delicious with low-fat toppings like spicy mustard or salsa. Spice up airpopped popcorn with a little cayenne pepper or garlic powder. Dried fruit like raisins or cranberries mixed with walnuts and whole-grain cereal are easy to pack in small plastic bags for a quick and healthy homemade trail mix. If you love chocolate like I do, two ounces of dark chocolate or an 8-ounce mug of hot chocolate are healthier snacks than a milk chocolate candy bar. Nonfat frozen yogurt or sorbet contains half the calories and are a better substitute for ice cream. These recipes for heart-healthy munchies ensure that you’ll avoid fattening junk food while enjoying a satisfying and nutritious midmeal snack.

claim to be believers, but they are sicker. There are a lot more atheists on the west coast and they aren’t as friendly, but they live a healthier lifestyle.” The Days are hopeful of meeting more people from the area at a free open house set for the weekend of Jan. 28-29. Topics will include cancer prevention and re-

Hearing loss?

Recipe of•the•week

February is a celebration of matters of the heart. Love is in the air this month, so remember to love yourself and take good care of your health. Avoid overeating or going hungry between meals by eating nutritious meals and snacks. Eating three small, wellbalanced meals and two or three nutritious snacks are good ways to protect your health and your heart. Research shows that people who eat a healthy breakfast, lunch and dinner along with two or three healthy snacks are less likely to overeat and gain weight. Avoid foods with lots of simple carbohydrates (sugars) like candy bars or soda. Healthy snacks like whole-grain breads and cereals contain complex carbohydrates. Combining complex carbohydrates with protein-rich foods such as low-fat yogurt, peanut butter or low-fat cheese creates a satisfying snack. Read food labels and check the nutrition information on packaged snacks. Just because something is labeled “low fat,” “all natural” or “pure” doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s nutritious. Many low-fat snacks contain unhealthy amounts of sugar and as many calories as full-fat snacks. Do the math when reading the serving-size information on the label, as most snack foods are meant to be two or more servings. You may need to double or triple the amount of fat, calories or sugar shown on the label to get an accurate calorie count. The best way to avoid eating junk food and save money is to make your own snacks

best,” says Day, also noting he has seen cancer cured through adherence to following a healthy lifestyle. Although living here only for a few months, the Days have found what they consider some odd circumstances regarding local lifestyles versus life on the west coast. “People here are so much friendlier, nicer and

ple slices and toss until most of both sides of the apples are well-coated. Place the apples, in a single layer, onto baking sheets. Spray apples with the cooking spray. Bake for 1 hour, stir and spray the apples with more of the cooking spray. 3. Continue baking until the apples are lightly browned and crisp, about 1 hour. Set aside to cool, and then transfer the apple crisps into an air-tight jar or a sealable plastic bag. Fruity Cheese Bread 2 slices dense, multigrain bread 1 tablespoon cream cheese 8 blueberries or 6 peach, apple, banana or strawberry slices, or a mixture of all 2 tablespoons peanut butter 1 teaspoon honey 1. Place bread slices on a plate. Spread with thin layer of cream cheese. Top evenly with fruit. 2. Place peanut butter and honey in a small, microwave-safe bowl and mix well. Heat on high for 15 seconds or until peanut butter melts. Drizzle peanut butter mixture over fruit. 3. Cut the fruity cheese bread in half and then into quarters. Serve immediately. Serves two. Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children’s author, culinary historian and the author of six cookbooks. She is known as The Kitchen Diva. Visit her Web site at www.divapro.com. (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

WE HAVE THE SOLUTION! LAST MONTH, WE HELPED 29 PEOPLE HEAR AND UNDERSTAND BETTER. AMAZINGLY, 72% OF THESE PEOPLE WERE EITHER CURRENT PATIENTS OR REFERRED BY CURRENT PATIENTS.

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BUSINESS Doe Run Inn has long history of good service, hospitality The News Standard - A13

Friday, January 22, 2010

By Lindsey Corley

lindsey@thenewsstandard.com Signature Kentucky cuisine with a beautiful country backdrop is right around the corner, being made fresh daily at Doe Run Inn. It started as a mill, one of seven on the creek at that time. Owner Jim Greer said there was too much competition and many of them went bankrupt. Doe Run, in fact, was a barn for about 50 years. It was at the turn of the last century, upon the discovery of sulfur water, that Doe Run (called at that time Sulfur Water Wells) began its rebirth and opened again as a resort touting the sulfur water as a tourist attraction. “Back then they thought that was a health tonic,” Greer said. In the 1940s, the resort turned into the Meade County Inn, run by the Haycrafts. Curtis and Lucille Brown took it over in the late ‘40s/ early ‘50s and became Doe Run Inn and Greer and his family took over just last year. Though he had restaurant experience, no one helping had any inn experience. “The biggest thing we’ve found was, as long as you keep the place clean, and take care of people, the rest of it you can learn as you need to,” Greer said. And learn it, he has. In the past year, a laundry list of changes have been made, including two new roofs, mortar on the new building, floor repair, new screening and Plexiglas, two new air conditioners, more than $10,000 into the kitchen and equipment and he’s reopened the cabin for guest lodging. He’s also worked on community outreach too, including an Easter egg hunt for the kids

THE NEWS STANDARD/LINDSEY CORLEY

ABOVE: Doe Run Inn, after a recent winter storm, has been a Meade County tradition for decades. RIGHT: Owner Jim Greer stands in the dining room in front of a painted mural. and a music festival during the fall, getting more involved with the Meade County Area Chamber of Commerce and developing a strong relationship with Fort Knox. Then, last year, a new chef was hired, Bret Donaldson, who is president of the Kentucky chapter of the American Culinary Federation. “So now we’re adding items to our menu that fit our comfort food theme, but that would aslo be attractive to foodies from Louisville and Indiana and Elizbethtown, people who like to travel and eat,” Greer said. Besides the new additions, including what Greer calls Doe Run Nosh — double fried cornbread and brown sugar molasses, served with every meal — the big sellers are still on the menu. Greer said the mainstays at Doe Run are the fried chicken and a host of mouthwatering

side dishes, including macaroni and cheese, mashed potatoes and green beans, and the signature dishes like country ham balls, lemon chess pie and the bleu cheese dressing are still around. And now, it’s even easier to get Doe Run fare — lunch delivery started Monday. Orders can be placed for a minimum of $25 and a $3 delivery charge. For those who want to come and enjoy the view, the lunch and dinner menus have been updated, including a soup and salad bar for lunch and the group and catering menus have been completely revamped, giving hungry diners of every budget a choice. Greer said people have always thought of Doe Run Inn as a place for special occasions, and while he maintains that as an important part of the repertoire, it’s equally a place to get good food, at a good price, in a short amount of time, especial-

ly for breakfast and lunch. “It’s insane for people to go to a fast food place and pay $6 for a burger, fries and a Coke, when they can come here, pay $7 and get the same thing with a hand-pattied burger, completely dressed, with everything made fresh to order and then sit on the back porch and watch deer cross the creek,” he said. In the next year, Greer hopes to put TVs in some of the guest rooms and is looking at possible promotions with local distilleries to host dinners for charity. For more information on Doe Run Inn, call 270-422-2982 or become a fan on Facebook or log on to the Web site at www. doeruninn.com. Doe Run Inn, located at 500 Doe Run Hotel Road in Brandenburg, is open Sunday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Friday and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Clock is ticking for homebuyers Dollars and Sense By David Uffington The $8,000 tax credit for first-time homebuyers has been extended, but only until the end of April. To take advantage of the credit, you must have a house under contract by that time and close within 60 days. Additionally, another category of homebuyer has been added: Those who have owned (and lived in) their current homes for at least five years may qualify for a $6,500 credit if they buy another home. If you’re ready to buy now, step one is to get yourself pre-approved. Don’t mistake “pre-qualified” for “pre-approved,” because they’re not the same thing. Pre-qualifications are preliminary, informal “running the numbers,” and often can be done by phone. The lender at the other end will ask about your income and expenses and determine if

you have the right debt-toincome ratio, and might do a fast credit check to see what your FICO score is. Pre-approval involves all of the above, with many extra steps, mostly involving showing paperwork to the lender. It’ll need to verify all your information. At the end of that process, if you’re qualified, you’ll be told that you’re pre-approved. This is the point where you ask for that pre-approval in writing. You’ll know your price range and won’t waste time on homes you can’t afford. That pre-approval also will help you when you submit an offer: The seller will know you’re serious. Additionally, you’ll likely be able to close faster as much of the paperwork will have been completed. Some caveats about buying a home in the winter: If there’s snow on the ground and the roof, it can hide a number of problems. Solution: Check Google maps

satellite photos of the house. Those photos are generally taken in the fall when there’s no snow on the ground and fewer leaves on the trees to block visibility. Google maps also will show you a street view in many locations. If the house doesn’t look the same as it does now, or if you see a blue tarp on the roof, ask questions. You also can check the yards of your potential neighbors and businesses around you. Unless you know the area very well, you could discover creeks, dumps and junkyards you didn’t know were there. David Uffington regrets that he cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Write to him in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475, or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com. (c) 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.

When you call, we listen!

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AGRICULTURE Meade Co. chapter hosts FFA Leadership Day for area youth Friday, January 22, 2010

A14 -The News Standard

By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com

More than 100 FFA members throughout the Lincoln Trail area met at Meade County High School Saturday morning and participated in an FFA Leadership Day, hosted by the Meade County FFA chapter and organized by FFA regional officers. Meade County FFA advisor and agriculture teacher Jeremy Hall said this marked the third year MCHS has hosted the day-long event, which helps promote and develop leadership and communication skills, value and responsibility for FFA members. “We try to use today to help (the students) build more experience ... with a more personal aspect,” Hall said. Different workshops were held throughout the high school that were student-led and student-focused. During the communication workshop, FFA members divided into teams and blindfolded one team member. The

blindfolded subject tried to stack a series of building blocks using the commands of his or her peers. During a leadership workshop, head by MCHS senior and FFA regional president Ashley Carter, students took part in a variety of activities that brought to light the importance of having good leadership within a successful organization and how to become a positive leader. “It’s a lot of fun,” Carter said. “Everybody’s working together and having fun ... and learning some valuable things, too.” The Meade County FFA is more than 100 members strong this year and touts a strong core of experienced officers. Carter is president of the Meade County FFA chapter, Amanda Jarboe is vice president, Joy Straney is secretary, Chris Cornelius is treasurer, Makayla Phillips is reporter and Shane Greenwell is sentinel. The group’s advisors are Hall and agriculture teacher Josh Mitcham.

THE NEWS STANDARD/LAURA SAYLOR

TOP: FFA students from various chapters pose together. FAR LEFT: MCHS sophomore Ty Adams writes a quote on a Leadership Day poster. MIDDLE: Allie Mattingly, of Nelson County, tries to stack building blocks while blindfolded during a workshop. ABOVE: MCHS senior regional president Ashley Carter heads a leadership class.

Keeping bees in Ky. Commodities Andy Mills

Ag & Natural Resources

Honey bees serve a vital role by pollinating fruits, vegetables, nuts and seed crops. Livestock, including horses and cattle, consume bee-pollinated crops such as alfalfa. Up to one-third of the food we consume depends in some way on honey bees. You can also raise these beneficial insects for the fresh honey and wax they produce. Hives located and managed on farm property help pollinate crops that keep Kentucky agriculture thriving. Some beekeepers raise bees simply as a fun family activity or hobby. In recent years, reports of disappearing pollinators have fueled a growing interest in beekeeping. The steady increase in the number of bee schools each year and the Kentuckians attending them is evidence of that. Beekeeping supply companies have reported an increase in sales. The number of beekeeping associations in Kentucky has doubled over the past 10 years. Whether you are a veteran beekeeper or a beginner eager to get started, bee schools offer you a wealth of information on the subject. Kentucky State University and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture team up each winter and spring to offer bee schools in sever-

al different locations around the state. These daylong educational workshops offer sessions for beginning beekeepers; comprehensive step-by-step programs that include everything from where to buy equipment to tips on harvesting your first honey crop. Experts from North Carolina State University and University of Georgia will address current issues and deliver talks on a variety of specialized subjects at the Frankfort and Bullitt County events. The series of bee schools kicks off on January 23 with the Eastern Kentucky Beekeeping School in Hazard, Ky. Additional schools in Kentucky are scheduled in Scottsville, Whitley City, Morehead, Henderson, Bullitt County and Graves County. The largest event is the Bluegrass Beekeeping School at KSU in Frankfort on March 13, which drew nearly 400 beekeepers and six vendors last year. For a complete list of dates, log onto the Kentucky State Apiarist Web site at www. kyagr.com/statevet/bees. Meade County has a newly formed beekeeping organization that meets for educational activities. If you are a beekeeper or aspiring to be one and want to receive notification of our beekeeping meetings, contact the Meade County Cooperative Extension Service at 270-422-4958. Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability or national origin.

The News Standard supports Meade County farming and agriculture by featuring local farmers, vegetable and flower producers, livestock owners, horse groups, and other agricultural-based individuals and organizations on the Agriculture Page each week. To have your story featured, e-mail editor@thenewsstandard.com,

or call us at 422-4542.

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Kentuckanna Livestock Market Owensboro, KY • per CWT for January 11, 2010

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Receipts: 70 • Last week: 199 • Last year: 359

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Compared to last week: Slaughter cows were steady to firm on light supply with very good demand. No test on slaughter bulls. No test on feeder cattle. Very light supply due to inclement weather. Slaughter cows were 43 percent of supply: Slaughter bulls 00 percent: Replacement cows 10 percent and feeders 47 percent: The feeder supply included 36 percent steers 26 percent heifers and 38 percent bulls. 22 percent weighed over 600 lbs. Slaughter Cows Breaker 75-80% Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 1 1150 1150 49.00 49.00 1 1040 1040 50.50 50.50 6 1200-1535 1357 44.50-50.00 46.76 1 1285 1285 42.00 42.00 Low Dressing 5 1605-1700 1654 44.50-48.50 46.78

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Miles Farm Center

159 Railway, Ekron Ky 40117 • (270)828-2822

BE AWARE OF LOCAL EMERGENCIES Call the Meade County Public Information Hotline for up-to-date information about weather emergencies, local flooding, road closures, storm shelter locations, school delays and/or cancellations and other pertinent community information by calling

270-422-1082. Visit the Meade County Emergency Management Web site for other sources of preparedness information at www.meadeema.com.


Volley for a good cause Teams are still needed for a second annual volleyball tourney

Sports, B2 Friday, January 22, 2010

Ben Achtabowski, Sports Editor 270-422-4542 sports@thenewsstandard.com

THE TEAMS Greenwave Basketball

District Overall W L W L Breck. Co. 3 0 8 5 3

1

4 12

Hancock Co. 3

2

9 9

Fred. Fraize 0

6

0 14

Meade Co.

Lady Waves Basketball

District Overall W L W L Hancock Co. 5 1 14 4

Meade Co.

3

1

9

7

Breck. Co.

1

2

7

5

Fred. Fraize 0

7

0

11

ELEMENTARY BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT Meade County elementary basketball tournament started yesterday and will continue tomorrow at JRA and Meade County High School. The championship game will be at 12:15 tomorrow. Admission to the games is $1. ON DECK Jan. 22-23 MCHS Wrestling WSAZ Invitational @ West Virginia

Chilly Golfing Hillcrest golfers open the New Year with a game of golf

Sports

Outdoors, B12

The News Standard

Weight lifted after Waves win over Hancock By Ben Achtabowski sports@thenewsstandard.com Meade County head coach Josh Hurt and his Lady Waves basketball team may not have looked like they lost weight during Jan. 14’s 55-49 victory over the Hancock County Hornets, but after the game they felt a big weight had been lifted. “We feel 20 pounds lighter … I feel 20 pounds lighter,” Hurt said. The Lady Waves have lost the last two meetings to the Lady Hornets and desperately needed a win over them to remain in the hunt for a No. 1 seed in the 11th District tournament. “It took a big weight off our shoulders,” said junior forward Scarlett Powers. “We’ve known that we can beat them. We just had to put out the effort and

show that we are better than them.” Hancock County’s stingy 3-2 zone defense and offensive star senior forward Hillary Jones has always been a tough matchup for Meade County. Jones hit the first eight points for Hancock County, including two 3-pointers within the first 4 minutes of the game. She finished the first half with 19 points and the Lady Hornets had the lead at the half, 27-21. As the Lady Waves came out of the locker room during halftime, the assistant coaches suggested playing a box and chaser defense on Jones. They had senior guard Carly Evans ghost Jones, while the other defenders played zone defense. “We went box and chaser on Jones,” Hurt said. “She went from 19 first half points to five in the

second half. Jones didn’t touch the ball that half. That was a really important adjustment; that’s no credit to me and all credit to the assistant coaches.” Jones only managed to take five shots in the second half to end with a game-high 24 points. “She might be 6-foot and a lot of players are taller than me, but if you’re 6-foot then I’m going to play like I’m 7-foot and if you weigh 200 pounds then I’m going to play like I weigh 300 pounds,” Evans said. “I knew I had to shut her down no matter what.” Hurt also found an offense that could break Hancock County’s 3-2 defense. “We put our guards on the outside and put our three posts in and said ‘give them the ball,’” he

See WEIGHT, B3

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Bliss Powers goes in for a lay-up against Hancock County.

The agony of defeat

Jan. 22 Lady Waves JV/V Basketball Breckinridge Co. 6:30/8 p.m. Jan. 23 Greenwave Freshman Basketball Ohio Co. @ McLean Co. 12:30 p.m. Greenwave Freshman Basketball @ McLean Co. 1:45 p.m. Lady Waves Freshman Basketball (Team A) @ Ohio Co. 12:30 p.m. Lady Waves Freshman Basketball (Team A) McLean Co. @ Ohio Co. 1:45 p.m. Jan. 25 7th and 8th Grade Boys Basketball @ Bluegrass 5:30 p.m. Jan. 26 Greenwave JV/V Basketball @ South Oldham 6/7:30 p.m. Jan. 27 Wrestling Senior night Bullitt Central

By Ben Achtabowski sports@thenewsstandard.com

7 p.m.

Jan. 28 7th and 8th Grade Boys Basketball @ East Hardin 5:30 p.m. Lady Waves JV/V Basketball Owensboro 6:30/8 p.m. SOCCER NEWS

Rineyville Community Youth Soccer League, RCYSL, are accepting Spring Soccer Sign-ups online go to RCYSL Web site: www.eteamz.com/ rineyvillesoccer and click on RCYSL Registration Form. Elizabethtown Youth Soccer, EYSA, are accepting Spring Soccer Sign-ups online go to EYSA Web site: www. elizabethtownyouthsoccer. com/ and click on “register online.” Meade County Youth Soccer, MCYSA, are accepting Spring Soccer Sign-ups online go to MCYSA Web site: meadecountysoccer.com/ and click on “register online.” Radcliff Youth Soccer League, RYSA, are accepting Spring Soccer Sign-ups starting Jan 16th go to RYSA Web site: radcliffyouthsoccer.org/ for additional information.

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

TOP: Cody Hoskins struggles against a Southern opponent. ABOVE: Dylan Pike puts Southern’s Zach Tucker on his back. Bo Wilson and Thomas Wilson wrestle a loose ball away from a Cloverport player last Friday night during the Homecoming game. Meade County beat Cloverport 62-34. THE NEWS STANDARD/ BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Right now, the Southern High School Trojans have the best of the Meade County Greenwave wrestling team. The Trojans marked their third straight win over the Greenwave on Saturday during the Region Dual Meet championship match by a final score of 43-27. “They’re the better team right now. They have proven it twice this year,” said Meade County head coach Bob Davis, whose team lost to Southern 37-36 earlier in the year. “We matched up a little better last time but I’m down two people.”

Last week, Meade County lost its heavyweight wrestler, senior Chaz Nevitt, and 160-pound Zach Uhlig. Nevitt has endured a knee injury since football season, while Uhlig broke his arm. The team may have been bitten by the injury bug while heading into the doldrums of January and February wrestling, but that’s just the nature of the game, according to Davis. “Every one of those wrestlers are injured right now,” he said. “If we get hurt, we get hurt. It’s just destiny right now. I hope we don’t get hurt. Right now, I just want them to get tougher.”

See DEFEAT, B2

Greenwave loses to powerhouse North Hardin, beats Cloverport By Ben Achtabowski sports@thenewsstandard.com The Meade County Greenwave looked like they were going to shoot with one of the best teams in the area, the North Hardin Trojans, during the first half on Tuesday night. But in the second half, the Trojans remained hot while the host Greenwave cooled off and eventually lost 85-59.

“I thought we played pretty well,” said Greenwave head coach Jerry Garris. “If you told me that we were going to shoot 55 percent the first half, I would have taken it. Then we shoot that well and we’re still down.” The first five field goals of the game were from beyond the 3-point line when North Hardin jumped to a 14-3 lead halfway through the opening quarter.

North Hardin ended up with eight 3-pointers in the first half and outscored the Greenwave 24-12 from the 3-point range. “Playing that kind of athletic team like North, you can’t train for it,” said sophomore guard Chase Garris, who hit three 3-pointers in the game. “You just have to go out there, see how it

See GREENWAVE, B3


B2- The News Standard

Defeat From page B1 Luckily for the Greenwave, its roster is 75 wrestlers strong. “We have 75 kids on the team so we’ll just go with what we got. If we have to put some kids that are inexperienced in there then that’s what we’ll have to do.” Despite being wounded, Greenwave kept the Southern match interesting. With both teams undefeated heading into the championship round, Southern jumped out to a 10-0 lead after 135-pound Garrett Kenealy, 140-pound Austin Bejosano and 145-pound Joey Carter all lost their matches. Kenealy had his Southern opponent on his back twice during the match, including a near pin with time running out in the second period. The match was neck-and-neck with the score tied at 15 with 10 seconds left, but Southern scored a takedown with 8 seconds left in the match to seal the first points of the dual. “We had them on their back a lot today, but we couldn’t get that pin. Garrett Kenealy had him on his back,” Davis said. “(Garrett) will pin that kid eventually. Garrett is coming on right now. He has improved leaps and bounds this year.” Senior 145-pound Mike Brown put the Greenwave on the board with a 17-1 technical fall, but Southern answered back in the 160-pound bout when Uhlig’s replacement, sophomore Cody Hoskins, was pinned with 12 seconds left in the match making the score 16-5. During Brown’s match, Greenwave captain 215-pound Tyler Crow tried to warn his team of Southern’s favorite moves. “Southern loves the cradle,” Crow said. “I’ve wrestled with this team for a while and you’ll know what certain teams like to do. Southern is a cradle team. They were taking our head right to our knee and we were letting them. It’s a big ball of joy for them because once they get you into a cradle they get to do what they want to do to you.” Nelson Mason Jr. breathed some life into Meade County when he pinned his opponent 1:48 into the 171-pound match to make the score 16-11. One-hundred and eighty-nine-pound Brandon Simota was pined 36 seconds into the second period while Crow continued his undefeated season with a pin 33 seconds into the match to make the score, 22-17 Southern. Crow remains No.1 in the state at the 215-pound slot, but will face stiff competition as Meade County

travels to West Virginia for the WSAZ Invitational where schools from several states will compete. “Tyler is going to have to work at that tournament,” Davis said of the WSAZ Invite. “We’re going to have to go outside the state to give him some competition and this tournament is going to give it to him. This tournament will challenge all of our wrestlers” With the score 22-17, senior Cole Abersold replaced Nevitt at the heavyweight and was pinned with 1:22 left in the second period. Seventh-grader Chris Abernathy has anchored the 103 pound all season long for the Greenwave and faced a Southern opponent who pinned him earlier in the year. Abernathy came back from a 12-4 deficit to make the score 15-10 with 30 seconds left in the match. However time ran out before he could complete the comeback. “I’m really proud of that kid,” Davis said. “Last time (Abernathy) wrestled him he got pinned in the first period. Now, he should have beaten him.” During the 112-pound match, Lance Kelly was pinned with 16 seconds left in the first period, which put the match out of reach for Meade County, 37-17. Despite having the match virtually over, 119-pound Dylan Pike had other plans. After facing Southern’s Zack Tucker earlier in the year and losing, Pike wanted to send a statement to him about the individual regional tournament next month. “Dylan is in his head now,” Davis said. “That kid can’t handle it right now. He can’t stand to lose. He’s going to charge Dylan next time. It will be good next time. I look forward to it.” Pike jumped out to a 13-2 lead in the second period and eventually scored a technical fall, 17-2 in the third period, sending a frustrated Tucker into the locker room. “That definitely encouraged me,” Pike said, who has only one loss this season. “I’ll have to wrestle him again in the individual and I look forward to it. I’m definitely in his head.” “He had to wrestle smart against him,” Crow said. “(Dylan) wrestled to a ‘T;’ it was beautiful. He did everything a wrestler needs to do and he came out on top. It really ticked that kid off.” After Pike’s 5-point win, Brandon Scott scored an 18-3 technical fall then James Childress was pinned in the first round to make the final score 4327. “We’re definitely rivals,” Crow said of Meade County and Southern. “Especially after this weekend. We’ll know we’ll have to

Meade County Greenwave

Quick Hits Volleyball: Team spots still available for Feb. 6 tourney The second annual Chelsea Stinnett Memorial Community Volleyball Tournament is still accepting teams for the tournament to be held on Feb. 6 at the Meade County High School. There will be no entry fee penalty for teams before Feb. 6. The fee is $100 per team. All teams must have at least six players and there must be two females on the court at all times. Men cannot spike and underhand serving only. Players must be at least 18 years of age. Mail entry forms to Jennifer Smith, 938 Old State Road, Brandenburg, KY 40108. Make checks payable to Meade County Lady Waves Volleyball.

Basketball: Greenwave aid cancer awareness weekend The Meade County Greenwave Basketball team will participate in the National Coaches vs. Cancer Awareness Weekend, better known as Suits and Sneakers weekend. College and Kentucky high school basketball coaches will participate. After the first quarter of Jan. 29’s Meade County game against Breckinridge County buckets will be passed through the crowd for donations. Also you cant text “Coach” to 20222 to donate $5 to Coaches vs. Cancer.

SPORTS

Friday, January 22, 2010

fight for it next time we see them.” Meade County will travel to West Virginia for the WSAZ Invitational today and tomorrow. Senior night will take place Jan. 27 and Meade County High School. Results of the Region Duals at Meade County: Team Results: Meade County, 77-6, over Bullitt Central Meade County, 72-12, over DeSales Meade County, 54-27, over PRP Southern, 43-27, over Meade County Individual results: 103: Chris Aberathy, 2-2 112: Lance Kelly, 2-2 119: Dylan Pike, 4-0 125: Brandon Scott, 4-0 130: James Childress, 3-1 135: Garrett Kenealy, 2-2 140: Austin Dejasano, 2-2 145: Joey Carter, 3-1 152: Mike Brown, 3-1 160: Cody Hoskins, 3-1 171: Junior Mason, 4-0 189: Brandon Simota, 2-3 215: Tyler Crow, 4-0 285: Cole Abersold, 2-2

CLOCKWISE (from top left): Mike Brown picks up his opponent. Brandon Simota gains position on a Southern wrestler. Garrett Kenealy earns a pin.

THE NEWS STANDARD/ BEN

ACHTABOWSKI


Friday, January 22, 2010

Weight From page B1 said. “Sometimes I think myself stupid. Tonight we just went really simple. We put one post on one side and the other on the other side, and then we put one in the middle and said ‘try to guard all three.’ They couldn’t and they started to get in foul trouble.� In the first half Meade County quarreled with foul trouble — 13 first-half fouls to Hancock County’s six. Senior starting guard Mallory Wathen had four fouls in the first half, and senior starting point guard Caroline Wilson had three. “It’s just part of basketball,� said Evans, who had three steals in the game. “You have to overcome that stuff and keep playing. We just weren’t playing good defense. We were reaching and not using our feet.� The roles were reversed in the second half, when the Lady Hornets committed the first seven fouls and Meade County went on an 11-0 run. During that time Meade County took the lead, 29-27, after Scarlett Powers made a lay-up with 4:28 left in the third quarter. “We’ve been jump shot oriented with four perimeter players,� Hurt said. “When you shoot jumpers you don’t collect fouls. No one fouls jump shooters. We went two posts in and really pounded the block (in the second half). When we get a big on a little they have to foul. Some of those adjustments we made contributed to (Hancock County’s) fouls.� Scarlett Powers and Bliss Powers made up for 30 of Meade County’s 55 points and scored 28 points in the paint. “You have to have the guards set you up,� Scarlett Powers said, who had a team-high 18 points and 10 rebounds. “They made some great passes. Then you have to just play hard in the post, box out and

get those rebounds.� The Lady Hornets fought their way back to cut the lead to one, 40-39, after Chelsea Wimmer hit a jumper with 6:35 left in the game. But Bliss Powers made a lay-up during the ensuing drive; she ended the night with 12 points and eight rebounds. Hancock County made it a one-point game a minute later, but Evans hit the biggest shot of the night when she drilled a 3-pointer to make the score 45-41. “Carly was exceptional,� Hurt said. “They cut it to one and she hit that big three. She guarded Jones the second half. She had deflections, steals and energy. She’s fast and athletic and hard to stop. She was one of the differences of the game.� Evans finished with 17 points and eight rebounds. “I was more confident toward the end of the game,� she said, despite playing the last two minutes with leg cramps. “Even with the charley horse at the end I knew I had to keep pushing. I was determined to win. If I can get my team to believe what I believe then we’re good.� Meade County kept its space from Hancock to end the game with a two-possession lead heading into the final minute and closed out the game by making several free throws. “We knew we had to come out strong and put in our best effort to win,� Scarlett Powers said. “We did a good job getting down to business in the second half.� With the victory the Lady Waves are tied for first in the district and if they beat Breckinridge County tonight the team will clinch the No.1 seed for the tournament. Tonight’s game will begin at 7:30 p.m. at Meade County. Meade County 9 12 19 15—55 Hancock County 9 16 7 15—49 Lady Waves outscore Cloverport The Lady Waves cap-

SPORTS

tured their third 11th district win, 80-17, over the Cloverport Frederick Fraize Lady Aces Friday night. Meade County’s defense held the Lady Aces to less than six points in every quarter including a twopoint third quarter. Frederick Fraize also had 28 turnovers. Eleven Lady Waves found themselves in the scoring column as Evans led the team with 11 points. Sophomore LeAnna Luney had 10 points alongside junior Tiffany Brown. Nicole Smith, Scarlett Powers and Wathen all had nine points. Waves shut down North Bullitt The Lady Waves held the North Bullitt Lady Eagles to a one-point third quarter to give Meade County a 79-34 win on Saturday. Wilson had 18 points, five rebounds and five steals, while Scarlett Powers had a double-double with 13 points and 10 rebounds. Evans had 12 points. The Lady Waves shot nearly 54 percent from the field and outrebounded the Lady Eagles 41-20. Meade County also collected 12 steals in the game. Waves win six straight The Lady Waves won their sixth game in a row at Owensboro Apollo Monday night. Meade County shot 46 percent from the field and 61 percent from the 3-point line to give them the 65-39 win. Wathen led all scorers with 14 points (four 3-pointers), four assists and three rebounds. Wilson had 13 points, four rebounds, four assists and two steals. Scarlett Powers had 12 points and 13 rebounds and Evans had a double-double with 10 points and 10 rebounds. Bliss Powers added eight points. The Lady Waves defense held all-region post player Bre White to 10 points and six rebounds.

CLOCKWISE (From bottom left): Coach Josh Hurt directs his players who are about to substitute into the game against Hancock County. Caroline Wilson dribbles past a Hancock defender. LeAnna Luney drives to the basket against Cloverport. Carly Evans shoots a jumper. Scarlett Powers posts up.

THE NEWS STANDARD/ BEN ACHTABOWSKI

REMEMBER LAST WINTER?

Greenwave From page B1 comes out. Defendingwise we did what we can, but they shot the lights out on us tonight. Sometimes that happens.� The two teams headed into halftime with the Trojans up 43-30. “I told them during halftime we have to keep shooting and scoring,� Jerry Garris said. “Then they come out and shoot better and we shoot worse. Every time we cut it to seven or eight, we make a defensive mistake and then they’re up by 13 real quick. Every time we were in a situation to do something we made a mistake.� Meade County slumped its field goal percentage from 55 percent to 31 percent in the second half. North Hardin shot 60 percent in the second half and made six more 3-pointers. Freshman guard Jordan Brangers came off the bench to hit eight 3-pointers — a record for a North Hardin freshman. Sophomore forward Thomas Wilson led the Greenwave with 17 points as he made 8-of-11 shots and had seven rebounds and five steals. “He’s starting to shoot,� Jerry Garris said of Wilson, who also plays on the football team. “It happens every year with football players. This is about the time they start to get into football shape. It just takes those football kids into basketball condition. It’s just a different type of conditioning.� Sophomore guard Cheaney Schwartz had 14 points, while Bo Wilson had 11 points and Chase Garris finished with nine points and nine assists. The Greenwave will make up its game at John Hardin with a varsityonly matchup tomorrow

The News Standard - B3

Thank you for your help and patience after last winter’s ice storm. Hopefully we will never see another storm like it. But if we do, will you be ready?

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CHECKLIST: KEEP EMERGENCY SUPPLIES ON HAND INCLUDING: s&LASHLIGHTWITH&RESH"ATTERIES s!PORTABLE BATTEROPERATEDRADIOORTELEVISION s!./!!7EATHERRADIOFORWARNINGS s!WIND UPORBATTERY POWEREDALARMCLOCK s7ATER.ONPERISHABLEFOOD #ANNEDFRUIT POWDEREDMILK PEANUTBUTTER BREADCRACKERS s)FYOUHAVEABABY EXTRADIAPERSOTHERINFANTCAREITEMS s&IRSTAIDKIT s%SSENTIALMEDICINESANDPRESCRIPTIONINFORMATION s%XTRAPAIROFGLASSES HEARINGAIDBATTERIES EXTRAWHEELCHAIRBATTERIES OXY GEN MEDICATION CATHETERS FOODFORGUIDEORSERVICEDOGS OROTHERSPECIAL EQUIPMENTYOUMIGHTNEED

THE NEWS STANDARD/BEN ACHTABOWSKI

Isaiah Satram tries to get around a North Hardin defender on Tuesday night. at 7 p.m. Meade takes down Aces Meade County’s 62-34 win over the Cloverport Fredrick Fraize Aces last Friday wasn’t the Greenwave’s prettiest this season, but it was an 11th District win. “It wasn’t pretty,� Garris said. “It was one of those deals that you hope it doesn’t happen but you can see it coming. It’s just the part of youth. They don’t understand you have to come and play every night.“ Meade County jumped out to a 10-3 lead in the first quarter, but the game was still competitive head-

ing into halftime with the Greenwave only up 20-12. “It’s a win and a district win,� Garris said. “I’m not mad at them. I’m just disappointed at our effort tonight.� The Greenwave scored 24 points in the fourth quarter to put the game away. Meade County scored 34 second-chance points while shooting 48 percent from the field. The Greenwave also had 21 steals on 29 turnovers by the Aces. Thomas Wilson was the Greenwave high-scorer with 13 points and six rebounds. Schwartz had 12 points and six rebounds and Bo Wilson added 11 points and six steals.

s(AVEEITHERACELLPHONEORHARDWIREDSINGLE LINETELEPHONE#ORDLESSPHONESWILL NOTWORKWITHOUTELECTRICITY s)FYOUHAVEANELECTRICGARAGEDOOROPENERlNDOUTWHERETHEMANUALRELEASE LEVERISLOCATED ANDLEARNHOWTOOPERATEIT3OMETIMESGARAGEDOORSCANBEHEAVY SOGETHELPTOLIFTIT)FYOUREGULARLYUSETHEGARAGEASTHEPRIMARYMEANSOFENTER INGYOURHOMEUPONRETURNFROMWORK BESURETOKEEPAKEYTOYOURHOUSEWITH YOU INCASETHEGARAGEDOORWILLNOTOPEN s0ROTECTSENSITIVEELECTRICEQUIPMENT SUCHASCOMPUTERS 6#2SANDTELEVISIONS BYINSTALLINGSURGESUPPRESSOROROTHERPOWERPROTECTIONDEVICES s-AKESUREYOURSMOKEALARMSHAVEFRESHBATTERIES%VENTHOSEALARMSTHATARE WIREDTOYOURHOMESELECTRICALSYSTEMSHOULDHAVEAFRESHBACK UPBATTERY s(AVEANEMERGENCYPLANINPLACE INCLUDINGBACK UPPOWERSUPPLY IFAMEMBER OFYOURHOUSEHOLDDEPENDSONLIFESUPPORTORNEEDSOTHERMEDICALEQUIPMENT

For information on Meade County RECC & money saving tips, check out www.mcrecc.coop or call 1-877-276-5353.


FUN & GAMES

B4 - The News Standard

ACROSS 1 Pingpong tactic 4 Vacationing 7 Whirled 11 Help a hoodlum 13 Apiece 14 Skin opening 15 Ark-itect 16 Earl Grey, for one 17 Egress 18 Rise 20 Burr-Hamilton event 22 Present 24 River mouths 28 Convertible alternative 32 Type of cotton thread 33 Lotion additive 34 Japanese pond carp 36 Nothing (Sp.) 37 Beatles drummer 39 Telecast 41 Girl who isn't "girly" 43 Recede 44 Conception 46 Old photo tint 50 Sow's mate 53 Upper limb 55 Consumes 56 Desertlike 57 OId Oldsmobile 58 Staircase component 59 Jewels 60 Tree fluid 61 Type squares DOWN 1 "Auld - Syne" 2 Reed

Friday, January 22, 2010

Strange but True By Samantha Weaver

•It was American political scientist, economist, psychologist and professor Herbert Simon who made the following sage observation: "What information consumes is rather obvious: It consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it." •Those who study such things claim that the act of licking a stamp burns one-tenth of a calorie. •The shortest song in the world is "You Suffer," recorded in 1986 by the British band Napalm Death. It lasts precisely 1.316 seconds.

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 19 21

instrument Throb Choose Nourish Charlatan Events for Akeelah Plague Swiss canton Profit USAF air show group Cauldron Moray or conger

23 25 26

27 28 29 30 31 35

Stir-fry pan Despot "Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself" author Line of fashion? Possesses, old-style Vocal range Wander Burst Rage

38 40 42 45 47 48 49 50 51 52 54

•Stanley Mason was an inventor who really got around, in a manner of speaking. In addition to coming with the idea for the granola bar, he also created the squeezable ketchup bottle, the disposable diaper, heated pizza boxes and the dental floss dispenser.

Scepter Out of use, in the dict. Century divisions Vicinity Top of the head Particular Venomous vipers Satchel Raw rock Intention Swabbie’s tool

•There are more Polish people living in Chicago than in any city on Earth except for Warsaw, Poland's capital. •You might be surprised to learn that the most dangerous profession in the country -- in terms of the percentage of people holding that profession who have been killed -- isn't firefighter or police officer, it's president of the United States. A total of 9 percent of our presidents have been assassinated. (c) 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.

Horoscopes HOCUS-FOCUS

By Henry Boltinoff © 2008 King Features Synd., Inc.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You need to be certain that all the right conditions are in place before you take that first step. It can't hurt to listen to good advice from those who have your best interests at heart. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Be careful not to get involved in other people's disputes unless you know the facts behind the disagreements. That's the best way to be assured of making wise and honest decisions. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You still need to be careful about how you're going to spend those energy reserves you finally got around to restoring. Best advice: Avoid overdoing it. Let things take their course. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your aspect continues to favor travel — alone or with that special person. So if you've been putting off making those getaway plans, it's still a good time to get started on them. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Those so-called golden opportunities that continue to dazzle the Lion still need to be carefully checked out. Be suspicious about anything that looks like the "perfect" prospect. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Changes at the workplace could make it more difficult to do things the way you prefer. But the wise Virgo who shows some flexibility could find it paying off in a big way. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might want to check out the explanation you were given for a sudden shift in your duties. There's a possibility that you haven't been told all the facts that you deserve to know. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Having confidence in your abilities is important, especially when you could be facing a new challenge, whether it's in the workplace or in a personal relationship. Good luck. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) A new work-related opportunity might not be all that it seems. Before making any decisions, you might want to check with others who have had some experience in that area.

Last Week’s Solutions

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) A situation involving someone close could benefit from your timely intervention. Avoid being judgmental. There'll be plenty of time later for those "little talks" you like to have. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Travel could be a surprise element in that new project. Be prepared for other previously undisclosed aspects that also might come to light as you proceed with the work. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Try to balance your work-related responsibilities with the time you're spending on your recently revived social life. An old friend might be planning to return after a long absence. BORN THIS WEEK: Your sensitivity makes you aware of the needs of others. Have you considered a career as a counselor? (c) 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


Friday, January 22, 2010

VIEWING

The News Standard - B5

s in w e n f o e Coverag l Kentucky entra C h t na! r o a i N d n I ern h t u o S and News, weather, obituaries, Kentucky News Network Sports reports, monthly coverage of Meade County Fiscal Court & Brandenburg City Council meetings and Meade County High School Calendar Events. WMMG newscasts keep our community informed! • Monday - Friday, 6, 7, 8 a.m., Noon, 5 p.m. •Saturday & Sunday, 8 a.m., Noon 1715 By-Pass Road., Box 505, Brandenburg, KY 40108 270-422-4440 • 270-422-3464 fax email: wmmg93.5@bbtel.com


MARKETPLACE

B6 - The News Standard

Friday, January 22, 2010

Shop for all the deals at the

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Square hay bales for sale. Red clover, fescue, second cut. Good quality. 270-5470880 FARM FRESH EGGS from free-range, pastured chickens. $3.00 dozen. Call Amy at 270-422-7402. Free weekly delivery to Doe Valley.

FUNDRAISER FOR HAITI 8th grade Titans will be hosting a SCHOOL-WIDE FUNDRAISER for Haitian disaster relief. The students have chosen to send 100% of all donations to an organization called More information about the organization can be found at

http://doctorswithoutborders.org/.) The fundraiser will run from January 20-January 29 If you are interested in donating, you can help by sending a check to:

Horse Shoeing-Farrier Service. Accepting new clients. 30 years experienced. Jerry Chee 270-422-4060. Or call cell 270-668-4306.

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SPMS Meade County’s Got Talent Show for Relay for Life will be on March 4, 2010. Sign ups will be held at the food court on Feb. 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meade County Youth Soccer, MCYSA, is accepting spring soccer sign-ups online at www. meadecountysoccer.com. Click on ‘Register Online’. Early registration is $5 off and must be postmarked on or before Jan. 30, 2010. Registration at the Food Court: Feb. 6th 10 a.m.-12 p.m., Feb. 18th 6-8 p.m. and Feb. 20th 10 a.m.2p.m. The 2nd Annual Chelsea Stinnett Memorial Community Volleyball Tournament will be held Saturday, Feb. 6. Teams are now forming. For more information, please contact Jennifer Smith at Jennifer. smith@meade.kyschools. us or Loraine Himmelhaver at Loraine.himmelhaver@ meade.kyschools.us or Regina Roberts at regina. roberts@meade.kyschools. us Meade County High School Alumni Hall of Fame is now accepting nominations. Send nominee’s name, the year they graduated, and a list of their accomplishments or achievements as well as why this person should be inducted to the Meade County High School Hall of Fame to Tony Allen, 551 Lawrence Street, Brandenburg, KY 40108 by Feb. 28, 2010. The selection committee will meet in March to vote on the new inductees. The Harrison County Hospital Foundation is now taking applications for vendors to participate in the Taste of Harrison County event. This event highlights the wonderful food and drink of the establishments in Harrison County and will take place Thursday, April 8, 2010 from 6-8 p.m. in the Parvin Baumgart Education Center at Harrison County Hospital. The Hardin Memorial Hospital WOW Mobile (Wellness on Wheels) will not be making its regular monthly site visits during the months of December, January, and February. They will continue their monthly visits to the Kroger parking lot in March 2010. For more information, please call 270-737-4464 or visit www.hmh.net Free Homework Help!! Live Tutor!! 4-10 p.m. Daily. Math · Science • Social Studies • English. Grades K-12, College Intro and Adult Learners. This is a program supported by the Meade County Public Library. 270422-2094

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Childbirth Education Classes are offered at Harrison County Hospital in Corydon, Ind. Free if delivering at HCH, $20 if delivering at another facility. Call 812-738-7830 ext. 2012 for information and registration. The EMS Training Center at 245 Atwood Street, Corydon, Ind. offers Healthcare Provider CPR and CPR Renewal classes monthly. Please call 812-738-7871 for more information. Free English Classes – Call 270-422-5884. U.S. Citizenship and social security number not required. Meade County Adult Education Center. Ask for Dianne or Melissa for information on class dates and times.

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3 BR, 1 BA house for rent in Brandenburg. Dishwasher, W/D hookup, shed. References required. $450/ mo plus deposit. Call 270945-9900 1 bedroom apartment for rent. Stove, fridge, washer and dryer furnished. $425/ month. Deposit required. No pets. Valley View Apartments, Payneville. Call 270-496-4426 or 270496-4130 Office Space For Lease: Approx. 650 sq. ft. Available Jan. 1, 2010 – 1120 High Street – Brandenburg. Call 270-422-3550 The Meade County Senior Center building and grounds is open for rent after 3 p.m. any Thursday. Call 270-422-5200 for more information.

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478 Broadway Brandenburg, KY 40108

270-422-3213

10% OFF WITH THIS AD TAX SERVICE

2 LOCATIONS IN MEADE COUNTY

CALL 270-422-1140

422-2980 Office 547-0566 Cell Fully Insured

Knott’s Body Shop 999 Lawrence St, Brandenburg

422-1202

• Stamping • Commercial

Concrete

®

Serving Meade and Breck Counties with 35 years of Service

WARDRIP TRUCKING & BY-PASS STONE

(270) 422-4121

Storage Storag ge

Yardwork Fountains • Mulch • Carports

422-7744 151 Shannon Lane Brandenburg, Ky 40108

• Colored Concrete • Residential

Call bILL yOUART • 547-4692 • 547-0880 (CELL)

TO SERVE YOU!

• BRANDENBURG • • FLAHERTY •

Service & Sales Jeff Adkisson • Owner/Operator

concrete service

Trucking g

Taxe Taxes

JACKSON HEWITT

FREAETES! ESTIM

YOUART’S

MP FENCING

“We Love Our Customers”

Located across from St. John’s Church 500 East Broadway Brandenburg

All your FISHING & OUTDOOR needs!

Concrete

Cleaners and Alterations

Open 9AM ‘til Electronic Filing & Fast Refunds

barrautomotive@bbtel.com Automotive & Diesel Repair

Body y Repair Rep pair

COMPLETE AUTO BODY REPAIR Bait & Tackle SERVICE

Equipment Eq quip pment

LOVE

(270)422-3827

WILSON’S

2070 A Bypass Rd. Brandenburg, KY. 40108

Nationwide Locating Service for Parts • Foreign & Domestic Late Model Parts & Rebuilders Locally owned by David and Kathy Masterson

Livers Bookkeeping & Tax Service

Barr Automotive Inc

270-422-7442 270.422.1090 2605 Brandenburg Rd.

BUY • SELL • TRADE

Dry Cleaner

Bait

, . Fast, Friendly Service You Can Trust! Timmy Barr, Owner

Why b uy n when ew used ado!

www.mastersonautoparts.com

Automotive

120 Shamrock Road Brandenburg, Ky

“Great concrete at great prices”

DIXIE YARD WORKS 7070 N. Dixie Hwy. E-town, Ky 42701

270-735-1668 Look For The Big Grey Elephant!

• Landscaping Rock • Stepping Stones

• Concrete • Statuary • Top Soil • Flagstone •

DIVORCE with or without Children $125. With FREE name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs/ 7days: 1-888-789-0198; www. CourtDivorceService.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT

349 Pine Ridge Dr. Brandenburg, Ky 40108 Local: 270.422.1879 Cell: 502.594.6579

Doctors Without Borders

2 six month old mule colts $200 each. 1 Sorrel Mare mule $300. 2 register Belgians work together as a team $1000 each. Call 270-668-1800

HYDE

• Sidewalks • Driveways • Concrete • Aggregate • Stone • Retaining Walls

Knott’s Body Shop is looking for full time help. Must be experienced in auto body repair. Call or stop by. 999 Lawrence Street, Brandenburg. 270422-1202

Retaining Wall • Storage Buildings •

FREEZER BEEF – All natural steroid hormone antibioticfree grain fed Angus. Delivered to Country Tyme Meat Processing. $1 per pound live weight. Pike Farms 270-496-4268


MARKETPLACE

Friday, January 22, 2010

Ky Health Training: Certified Clinical Medical Assistant, EKG Technician, Nurse Aide Training, Phlebotomy training. Lexington & Georgetown. Day, Night, Weekend classes. 859-9632901, 888-274-2018 www. nurseaidetrainingcenter. com

BIG SALE!!

If you own land and need a single, double, or triplewide home...call Oakwood NOW! Unbeatable deals and special financing packages are available on older models and select new models. Limited or no credit O.K., because we own the bank. SALE ENDS SOON... DON’T MISS OUT!!!

Oakwood Homes 1-888-280-8898

Mention this ad and get a FREE

Pet Adoptions will take place at Orscheln Farm and Home in Radcliff, Ky. on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. If you are thinking of volunteering, stop by and see how you can help or PINS at 270-422-3838. Get all your local news delivered to you TODAY from The News Standard! Call 270-422-4542. Report suspected illegal activity in your neighborhood by calling the Meade County Sheriff’s Department anonymous tip line at 270-422-4673 or email drugtips@bbtel.com.

13 acres mini farm 10 miles from Brandenburg. Beautiful home site, wooded and open, electric. 8165 Hwy. 79 Guston, Ky 40142 4 br., 1.5 ba., 2 acres 1-877-201-3835 Code #626

270-547-4222 1-866-865-5263

0.9 of an acre, good building lot with county water. Located on Hwy. 86. $4,000. 1-866865-5263 www.kylandco.com 17 acres, all wooded. $1,800 per acre. Located in Rosetta, additional land available. 1-866865-5263 www.kylandco.com 14.6 acres, open in front, balance wooded. Excellent building site with county water. $31,900. Financing Available for Everyone! 1-866-8655263 www.ky-landco.com 5 acres located in Hudson with county water. $15,500. $500 down. $166 per month. 1-866865-5263 www.kylandco.com 5.1 acres with large barn, county water. $39,900. $2,000 down. $421 per month. 1-866865-5263 www.kylandco.com 3.3 acres with tractor shed, county water, additional land available. $34,900. $900 down. $377 per month. 1-866865-5263 www.kylandco.com

McGeheeHumphreyDavis Realty and Auction We offer owner financing on most all our properties with no prequalifications! *Please visit our website at www.mhdrealty.com*

Use your tax refund as a down payment! 30 wooded acres, private and secluded, western Meade Co, $44,900 2 bedroom, 1 bath home on 1+ acre off Hwy 1638, move in ready, $44,900 Great building site, 2 acres off US 60 at Shot Hunt, all utilities on lot, $29,900 6 acres, mostly wooded, septic, electric, county water, singlewides ok., $39,900 9 acres, wooded hillside, Payneville, cistern, electric, septic, $29,900 1.5 acres, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, Big Springs, $59,900

PUBLIC NOTICE The Meade County Board of Education is accepting sealed bids for a sewage treatment facility for Flaherty Primary. Bids will be received in the office of the Superintendent, 1155 Old Ekron Road, Brandenburg, Kentucky 40108 until February 9, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. A pre-bid meeting will be held January 27, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at the Flaherty Primary Construction Site. For further information contact Rodney Pickering, Meade County Board of Education at 270-422-7500 or Justin McElfresh, Sherman, Carter, Barnhart at 502-721-6100.

ATTENTION

All Battletown Residents

1457 Needham Rd. Eastview, Ky 42732 3 br.. 2 ba., 1,764 sq. ft. 8.041 acres 1-877-201-3835 Code # 638

Lot 16, 2.343 acres Meadow Glenn Ln. Vine Grove, Ky 42701 great location behind the First Federsal Savings Bank building in Flaherty 1-877-201-3835 Code #639

1770 Cedar Flat Rd Battletown, Ky 40104 3 br., 2.5 ba., 1,500 sq. ft., 3.2 acres 1-877-201-3835 Code # 627

1-4 acres Meade County Water, septic, electric, near Fort Knox. Perfect for deer hunting: properties 31 acres to 112 acres, you may combine. Properties are in Breckinridge, Meade, and joining counties in Kentucky.

FOR SALE

Built in 2005, 3 br. (opt. 4th br.), 2 ba. located in the Indian Oaks Subdivision in Brandenburg, Ky. (Meade County). Main level is 1,750 sq. ft. w/ additional 600+ finished in the bsmt. Open Floor plan, large living room w/ vaulted ceiling. Large master br. w/ ba. and walk in closet. Large kitchen w/ plenty of cabinet space, 2 pantries; 2 1/2 car garage. Nice family room, bonus room-currently 4th br., extra storage located in the basement. Home is on a parklike 1.7 acres w/ mature shade. County water, blacktop road frontage. 12 min. W. of Fort Knox, 35 min. SW of Louisville, 25 min. NW of Elizabethtown, 15 min. NW of Radcliff and 20 min. S. of Corydon, Ind. Excellent schools, shopping and doctors are only 3 minute drive away! Asking $179,900 Call 270-945-1568 for more info!

English Estates

www.commitmentrealty.com

270-422-4499 800-985-0621 “It’s not just about selling real estate, it’s about making dreams a reality.”

Kentucky Land Co. of Radcliff 525 N. Dixie Radcliff, Ky. 40160

270-828-2222

www.kentucky-land.com Wooded building lots, located near Otter Creek Park, in Forest Ridge Estates, county water, streets will be paved, “restricted to houses”. $24,900 Financing Available for Everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270828-2222. Building lots in Milstead Estates, located near Flaherty in Hwy 144, city water available, streets will be paved “restricted to houses.” $29,900. Financing Available for Everyone! www.kentuckyland.com, 270-8282222. 2 acres and Mobile Home, 2 bedrooms, one bath, city water, central heat and air, All electric, located off Hwy. 1638 on Rock Heaven Road at Otter View. $39,900. We can finance you with a reasonable down payment. www. kentucky-land.com, 270828-2222. 5 acres set-up for Double-Wide Home, with city water, septic, electric, located between Otter Creek Park and Doe Valley off Hwy. 1638 and Hwy. 933 in the Woods. $39,900. Financing Available for Everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270828-2222. 4 acres, water well, lays excellent, located on Shumate Road near Ekron. $24,900. Financing Available for Everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270828-2222. One acre set-up for mobile home or double wide with city water, septic system, electric and drive-way. Located off Old Ekron Road in Popular Hills. $27,900. Financing Available for Everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270828-2222. 2 acre lots of U.S. Hwy. 60 and HobbsReesor Road with set-up with new septic system, city water, electric service and drive-way. $27,900. Financing Available for Everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270828-2222.

le?

y for sa a lt

Plac

it h e

e

Battletown Community Park will hold the annual meeting for election of officers on Wednesday, February 3rd at 7 p.m. in the big park bldg. Snow or icy weather will cancel this meeting - listen to WMMG for cancellations. “All offices will be open” President -Vice President -Secretary- Treasurer and Chaplain, also needed are members to help, a handful of people can not make it work properly. The officers at present have all made the decision to resign their positions, so in order for the park to stay open, people have to step up and fill the positions. Should no one step forward, the bills will be paid until the funds are gone and then the park will be closed until further action is taken, whatever that may entail. Now is the time that people need to be sending out fundraising letters and making plans for the coming year of activities, so if you feel you are the one to help keep the park alive, please step up, it is your community! Any questions please feel free to call President - Kim Jett 270-497-4579.

5 acres and 10 acres wooded tracts, Breckinridge Co., only 25 miles from Fort Knox.

Call MW at 270-668-4035 www.mwlandforsale.com

Real Estate Development We buy and sell land

422-4977 877-6366 547-4977 First-Time Home Buyers call about government insured Home Loans! Stimulus available until April 2010. Homeowners call about refinance! 859-296-4495, Pro-Mortgages, LLC, EHL, LO# 13806, 17836.

24 acres mini farm near Irvington. Nice home site, pasture, trees, electric.

2

FREE Heavy Equipment Operator Training Must be LAID OFF, Collecting Unemployment or exhausted Benefits. Funding thru STATE WIA Program. AMERICAN HEAVY EQUIPMENT TRAINING 866-280-5836

Kentucky Land Co. of Irvington

LAND FOR SALE

24 54

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-4609765 www.CenturaOnline. com

MOUNTAIN FEIST PUPPIES ready for new homes. Five females, three males. Tails docked, dew claws removed, first set of shots. $100 each. 270-536-3227

Re

Nationwide Foreclosed Home Auction 700+ Homes/ Bids Open: 2/8. Open House: 1/30, 31 & 2/6. View Full Listings www. Auction.com

re • 42

Lots for Sale • Protective Covenants • Black top roads • Close to Schools, Hospitals & Stores • 1.5 miles West of Brandenburg ByPass, subdivision on right 1.638 acres ............. LOT 8........................ $19,900 1.696 acres ............. LOT 28...................... $19,600 1.224 acres .............. LOT 42...................... $13,900 1.572 acres .............. LOT 48...................... $15,290 1.296 acres .............. LOT 49...................... $14,500 1.27 acres ................ LOT 50...................... $14,400 1.232 acres .............. LOT 51...................... $13,900

Indian Oaks

Lots for Sale • Protective Covenants • Black top roads • Close to Schools, Hospitals & Stores • County Water • Wooded lots • 2.5 miles South of Brandenburg By-Pass, subdivision on left 3.46 acres ............... LOT 10...................... $25,500 2.5297 acres ........... LOT 14...................... $17,000 2.5399 acres ............ LOT 15...................... $17,000 2.250 acres .............. LOT 16.......................$16,500

Meade Springs

Lots for Sale • Protective Covenants • Black top roads • Close to Schools, Hospitals & Stores • 1 mile South of Brandenburg By-Pass, turn left on Meade Springs Road, property on right 4.092 acres .............. LOT 29...................... $35,000 4.988 acres .............. LOT 30...................... $42,000

Hardesty-Raymond Road Lots for Sale • Black top roads •Country Living is were you want to be, then this is the place for you!

6 acres ...................LOT 9........................... $30,000

OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE

Call 270-668-4857

COUNTRY VILLAGE

Motel Reasonable Rooms Rates & Cabins Nice & Clean Nightly, Weekly & Monthly Rates

(270) 422-2282

Furnished Apartment

For Rent One Bedroom • Utilities Included

(270) 422-2282

Storage Sheds Most All Sizes Available $29.50 and up Easy Access • Call for Availability

(270) 422-2282

Burglar alarms installed. 270-668-7166

STAY AND PLAY at one of Kentucky’s top golf courses, Cherry Blossom, Georgetown. Call 502570-9489 about Stay and Play, including furnished townhome, golf for four.

BRANDENBURG ALANON: Alcohalt House, 2255 Fairgrounds Road. Meets Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday at 8 p.m. Open to all. Call 270-4221050 for more information. OPEN DOOR ALATEEN GROUP: Alcohalt House, 2255 Fairgrounds Road. Meets Thursdays at 8 p.m. These meetings are for Al-Anon and Alateen members only. You qualify for membership if your life has been or is being deeply affected by close contact with a problem drinker. Please come to any AlAnon or Alateen Opened or Closed meetings! Call 270-422-1050 for more information. Subscribe to The News Standard, TODAY!

Notice: Transportation to NA and AA meetings will be provided from MACC Ministries for Brandenburg and Irvington. For more information, call Glenn at 270-497-4378. A L C O H O L I C S ANONYMOUS: Meetings are held at the Acceptance Place, 1370 Hwy.79 in Irvington. Meetings are every Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sundays at 8 p.m. For more information, call 270-547-0347 or 270547-0445. N A R C O T I C S ANONYMOUS: Meetings are held at the Acceptance Place 1370 Hwy. 79 in Irvington. Meetings are Monday, Tuesday, and Thursdays at 8 p.m. For more information, call 270547-0347 or 270-5470445. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: Look Good, Feel better, 3rd Monday of each month. 10:15 a.m. until 12 p.m. at Hardin Memorial Hospital. Call Program Care at 270-706-1493. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: Man to Man Prostate Cancer Education and Support, 2nd Tuesday of each month. 6 p.m. in the 5th floor boardroom at Hardin Memorial Hospital. Call Program Care at 270-706-1493 or Karen at 270-706-1250. DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP: Support groups typically meet on the 1st Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. and the 1st Friday of each month at 10 a.m. at Hardin Memorial Hospital. Registration is required. Call to register or for more information, call 270-7065092 or 270-706-5071. WEIGHT MANAGEMENT: T.O.P.S group meets at Buck Grove Baptist Church every Tuesday at 6 p.m. For more information, call Lena at 270-422-2692.

The News Standard - B7

LYMPHEDEMA SUPPORT GROUP: Meets the 3rd Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m. at the Hardin Memorial Hospital Therapy and Sports Medicine Center at 1111 Ring Road, Elizabethtown. For more information, call 270706-5010 or e-mail Beth Greenwell at bgreenwell@ hmh.net BARIATRIC SUPPORT GROUP: Meets the 3rd Monday of each month, in 5A at 6 p.m. at Hardin Memorial Hospital. Individuals who have had surgery, as well as those who are considering having the surgery are welcome. For more information, call Marcia Barnes, R.N. at 270-706-1559. HOPE & HEALING GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: Free monthly support group for anyone who has experienced the death of a friend or family member. First Tuesday of every month. Call for next meeting date and time. Harrison County Hospital in Corydon, Ind. 812-738-7893. SLEEP DISORDERS: AWAKE meeting – Meetings are the 3rd Tuesday each month at the Parvin Baumgart Education Center at Harrison County Hospital in Corydon, Ind. A health awareness group for people affected by sleep apnea and/or sleep disorders. Call 812-738-7892 for more information.

BIH Trucking Company. Driver Trainees Needed! No CDLNO PROBLEM! Earn up to $900/ week. Company endorsed CDL Training. Job assistance. Financial assistance. 888-780-5539

CDL-A TEAM DRIVERS with Hazmat. Split $.68 for all miles. O/Op teams paid $1.40 for all miles. Up to $1500 Bonus. 1-800-835-9471

Driver- One Company for All Drivers! Van & Flatbed- High Miles. Great Equipment. Variety of Runs. Class-A CDL. Western Express. 888-801-5295

Drivers- CDL-A Flatbed up to .41CPM. Good Home Time. $1,000 sign-on bonus. Heath, dental, vision. OTR experience required. No felonies. 800-441-4271 xKY-100

Drivers- IMMEDIATE NEED! OTR tanker positions available NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker REQ’D. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter today! 877-484-3061 www.oakleytransport.com

Flatbed Company & O/O Drivers Needed. O/O Must have own trailer and equipment. Excellent pay & Benefits, Home weekends, Low deadhead miles. Call M-F 8am-4pm. 800525-3383 ext. 106 www.tlexpress.com

FREE CDL Class-A Training Must be LAID OFF, Collecting Unemployment or exhausted benefits. Funding thru STATE WIA Program. Must meet hiring Requirements of Major Trucking Companies. TRUCK AMERICA TRAINING 866244-3644

Second Annual Chelsea Stinnett Memorial Community Volleyball Tournament All proceeds will go to the Meade County Ladywave Volleyball Team

February 6, 2010 If we have more than 14 teams, we will play Friday night from 7-9 and resume play Saturday morning.

The tournament will be held at Meade County High School For rules and more information contact Jennifer Smith (Varsity Coach)

jennifer.smith@meade.kyschools.us

Bring in the

New Year

with a new subscription to The News Standard

10% off

through the month of January, 2010

$

Only 23

40

Call The News Standard at 270-422-4542 * Available for new subscribers only!

Subscribe to The News Standard today! Only $26 for a year subscription! Please fill out this subscription form and send check or money order to: The News Standard 1065 Old Ekron Rd., Brandenburg, Ky 40108

Name: ___ Phone: __ Address: _____ City, State, ZIP: _____ Signature: ___


MARKETPLACE

B8 - The News Standard NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that Louisville Gas and Electric Company seeks approval by the Public Service Commission, Frankfort, Kentucky of an adjustment of electric and gas rates and charges to become effective on and after March 1, 2010. LG&E CURRENT AND PROPOSED ELECTRIC RATES

$5.00 per month $0.06714 per kWh

$15.00 per month $0.06610 per kWh

Volunteer Fire Department Service – Rate VFD Current Rate Customer Charge: Energy Charge: Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: Energy Charge: Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge.

$5.00 per month $0.06714 per kWh

$15.00 per month $0.06610 per kWh

General Service - Rate GS

Energy Charge: Minimum Charge: Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: Energy Charge: Minimum Charge:

Adjusted Maximum kW Load for Billing Purposes = Maximum kW Load Measured X 90% Power Factor (in Percent) Power Factor Provision: Eliminated. Minimum Charge: As determined above with the monthly billing demand. Proposed Industrial Time-of-Day Primary Service Rate ITODP Basic Service Charge (per Month)

Residential Service - Rate RS Current Rate Customer Charge: Energy Charge: Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: Energy Charge: Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge.

Current Rate Customer Charge:

Friday, January 22, 2010

$10.00 per meter per month for single-phase service $15.00 per meter per month for three-phase service $0.07579 per kWh The Customer Charge. $20.00 per meter per month for single-phase service $35.00 per meter per month for three-phase service $0.08117 per kWh The Basic Service Charge.

$300.00

Energy Charge (per kWh)

$0.02936

Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month) Peak Demand Period

$4.92

Intermediate Demand Period

$3.42

Base Demand Period

$4.12

Summer Period - Five Billing Periods of May through September Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm. (10am-10pm), Peak (1pm-7pm) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Winter Period - All Other Months Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm (6am-10pm), Peak (6am-12noon) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Where: the monthly billing demand for the Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 50% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 250 kVA, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum 75% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Determination of Maximum Load: The load will be measured and will be the average kVA demand delivered to the customer during the 15-minute period of maximum use during the appropriate rating period each month. Power Factor Provision: Eliminated. Minimum Charge: As determined above with the monthly billing demand.

Industrial Power Service - Rate IPS

Commercial Power Service Time-of-Day Rate CTOD

Current Rate

Current Rate: Secondary

Customer Charge (per Month)

Primary

Secondary

$90.00

$90.00

$0.02611

$0.02611

Winter Rate

$12.51

$10.75

Basic Demand

Summer Rate

$15.10

$13.34

Peak Period Demand

Energy Charge (per kWh) Demand Charge (per kW per month of billing demand)

Customer Charge (per Month)

Proposed Rate (Industrial Power Service Rate IPS is proposed to be combined with the current the Commercial Power Service Rate CPS and titled “Power Service Rate PS”) Commercial Power Service - Rate CPS Current Rate Secondary Customer Charge (per Month)

Summer Rate

$11.29

$10.50

Winter Rate

$8.23

$7.70

Proposed Commercial Time-of-Day Secondary Service Rate CTODS Basic Service Charge (per Month)

$200.00

$65.00

$65.00 $0.02956

Winter Rate

$11.93

$10.35

Peak Demand Period

Summer Rate

$14.99

$13.15

Intermediate Demand Period

$4.28

Base Demand Period

$4.14

Proposed Rate (Commercial Power Service Rate CPS is proposed to be combined with the current Industrial Power Service Rate IPS and titled “Power Service Rate PS”) Power Service Rate PS Current Rate This rate schedule is not currently available. Proposed Rate Secondary Basic Service Charge (per Month) Energy Charge (per kWh)

Primary

$90.00

$90.00

$0.03323

$0.03323

Demand Charge (per kW per month of billing demand) Winter Rate

$13.32

$11.48

Summer Rate

$15.57

$13.73

Summer Period - Five Billing Periods of May through September Winter Period - All Other Months Where the monthly billing demand is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 50 kW for secondary service or 25 kW for primary service, or b) a minimum of 50% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 60% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or facilities specified by Customer. Power Factor Provision: Eliminated. Determination of Maximum Load: The load will be measured and will be the average kW demand delivered to the customer during the 15-minute period of maximum use during the month. Company reserves the right to place a kVA meter and base the billing demand on the measured kVA. The charge will be computed based on the measured kVA times 90 percent of the applicable kW charge. In lieu of placing a kVA meter, Company may adjust the measured maximum load for billing purposes when the power factor is less than 90 percent in accordance with the following formula: (BASED ON POWER FACTOR MEASURED AT THE TIME OF MAXIMUM LOAD) Adjusted Maximum kW Load for Billing Purposes = Maximum kW Load Measured X 90% Power Factor (in Percent) Minimum Charge: As determined above with the monthly billing demand. Industrial Time-of-Day Rate ITOD Current Rate Secondary Customer Charge (per Month)

Primary

$120.00

$120.00

$0.02616

$0.02616

$4.91

$3.85

Summer Rate

$10.05

$9.35

Winter Rate

$7.46

$6.76

Energy Charge (per kWh) Demand Charge (per kW per month) Basic Demand

Energy Charge (per kWh)

$0.03344

Maximum Load Charge (per kW per month)

Determination of Billing Demand: The monthly billing demand shall be the highest average load in kilowatts recorded during any 15-minute interval in the monthly billing period; but not less than 50% of the maximum demand similarly determined for any of the four billing periods of June through September within the 11 preceding months; nor less than 25 kilowatts (10 kilowatts to any customer served under this rate schedule on March 1, 1964). Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge plus the monthly billing demand.

Peak Period Demand

Basic Demand Charge: Applicable to highest average load in kilowatts recorded during any 15-minute interval in the monthly billing period. Peak Period Demand Charge: Applicable to highest average load in kilowatts recorded during any 15-minute interval of the peak period in the monthly billing period, but not less than 50% of the maximum demand similarly determined for any of the four billing periods of June through September within the 11 preceding months. Power Factor Provision: Above demand charge reduced .4% for each one percent for power factor above 80% and increased .6% for each one percent for power factor below 80%. Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge plus the Demand Charge computed upon the billing demand for the month. Proposed Rate (Secondary service under Industrial Time-of-Day Rate ITOD will be provided under proposed Industrial Time-of Day Secondary Service ITODS. Primary service under Industrial Time-of-Day Rate ITOD will be served under proposed Industrial Time-of-Day Primary Service ITODP.)

$5.81

Summer Period - Five Billing Periods of May through September Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm. (10am-10pm), Peak (1pm-7pm) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Winter Period - All Other Months Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm (6am-10pm), Peak (6am-12noon) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Where: the monthly billing demand for the Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 50% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 250 kW, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 75% the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Determination of Maximum Load: The load will be measured and will be the average kW demand delivered to the customer during the 15-minute period of maximum use during the appropriate rating period each month. Company reserves the right to place a kVA meter and base the billing demand on the measured kVA. The charge will be computed based on the measured kVA times 90 percent of the applicable kW charge. In lieu of placing a kVA meter, Company may adjust the measured maximum load for billing purposes when the power factor is less than 90 percent in accordance with the following formula: (BASED ON POWER FACTOR MEASURED AT THE TIME OF MAXIMUM LOAD) Adjusted Maximum kW Load for Billing Purposes = Maximum kW Load Measured X 90% Power Factor (in Percent) Minimum Charge: As determined above with the monthly billing demand. Proposed Commercial Time-of-Day Primary Service Rate CTODP Basic Service Charge (per Month)

$200.00

Energy Charge (per kWh)

$0.03344

Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month) Peak Demand Period

$5.70

Intermediate Demand Period

$4.20

Base Demand Period

$2.99

Summer Period - Five Billing Periods of May through September Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm. (10am-10pm), Peak (1pm-7pm) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Winter Period - All Other Months Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm (6am-10pm), Peak (6am-12noon) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Where : the monthly billing demand for the Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 50% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 250 kVA, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 75% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Determination of Maximum Load: The load will be measured and will be the average kVA demand delivered to the customer during the 15-minute period of maximum use during the appropriate rating period each month. Minimum Charge: As determined above with the monthly billing demand. Retail Transmission Service - Rate RTS Current Rate Customer Charge (per Month)

$120.00

Energy Charge (per kWh)

$0.02616

Demand Charge (per kVA per month) Basic Demand

$2.36

Peak Period Demand

Proposed Industrial Time-of-Day Secondary Service Rate ITODS $300.00 $0.02936

Maximum Load Charge (per kW per month)

Base Demand Period

$2.64

Basic Demand Charge: Applicable to highest average load in kilowatts recorded during any 15-minute interval in the monthly billing period. Peak Period Demand Charge: Applicable to the highest average load in kilowatts recorded during any 15-minute interval of the peak period, as defined herein, in the monthly billing period, but not less than 50% of the maximum demand similarly determined for any of the four billing periods of June through September within the 11 preceding months. Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge plus the Demand Charge computed upon the billing demand for the month. Proposed Rate (Secondary service under Commercial Time-of-Day Rate CTOD will be provided under proposed Commercial Time-of Day Secondary Service CTODS. Primary service under Commercial Time-of-Day Rate CTOD will be served under proposed Commercial Time-of-Day Primary Service CTODP.)

Primary

Demand Charge (per kW per month of billing demand)

Intermediate Demand Period

$3.65

$0.02956

Energy Charge (per kWh)

Peak Demand Period

$0.02960

Demand Charge (per kW per month)

reduced 0.4% for each one percent for power factor above 80% and increased 0.6% for each one percent for power factor below 80%. Determination of Billing Demand: The monthly billing demand shall be the highest average load in kilowatts recorded during any 15-minute interval in the monthly billing period; but not less than 50% of the maximum demand similarly determined for any of the four billing periods of June through September within the 11 preceding months; nor less than 25 kilowatts (10 kilowatts to any customer served under this rate schedule on March 1, 1964). Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge plus the monthly billing demand.

Energy Charge (per kWh)

$90.00

$0.02960

Energy Charge (per kWh)

Power Factor Provision: For customers of 150 kW or more, the above demand charge shall be

Basic Service Charge (per Month)

Primary

$90.00

$5.50

$8.15

Winter Rate

$5.90

Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge plus the Demand Charge computed upon the billing demand for the month. Proposed Rate

$4.00

Basic Service Charge (per Month)

$5.48

Energy Charge (per kWh)

Summer Period - Five Billing Periods of May through September Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm. (10am-10pm), Peak (1pm-7pm) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Winter Period - All Other Months Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm (6am-10pm), Peak (6am-12noon) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Where: the monthly billing demand for the Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 50% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 250 kW, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 75% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Determination of Maximum Load: The load will be measured and will be the average kW demand delivered to the customer during the 15-minute period of maximum use during the appropriate rating period each month. Company reserves the right to place a kVA meter and base the billing demand on the measured kVA. The charge will be computed based on the measured kVA times 90 percent of the applicable kW charge. In lieu of placing a kVA meter, Company may adjust the measured maximum load for billing purposes when the power factor is less than 90 percent in accordance with the following formula: (BASED ON POWER FACTOR MEASURED AT THE TIME OF MAXIMUM LOAD)

Summer Rate

$500.00 $0.02936

Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month) Peak Demand Period

$4.55

Intermediate Demand Period

$3.05

Base Demand Period

$2.61

Summer Period - Five Billing Periods of May through September Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm. (10am-10pm), Peak (1pm-7pm) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Winter Period - All Other Months Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm (6am-10pm), Peak (6am-12noon) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Where: the monthly billing demand for the Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 50% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 250 kVA, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 75% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Continued On Next Page


MARKETPLACE

Friday, January 22, 2010

Determination of Maximum: The load will be measured and will be the average kVA demand delivered to the customer during the 15-minute period of maximum use during the appropriate rating period each month. Minimum Charge: As determined above with the monthly billing demand. Industrial Service Rate IS Current Rate Customer Charge (per Month)

$120.00 Secondary

Energy Charge (per kWh)

Primary

$0.02616

Transmission

$0.02616

$0.02616

Demand Charge (per kVA per month) Standard Load Charge

The News Standard - B9

4 Sided Colonial

5,800

0.083

4 Sided Colonial

9,500

0.117

19.65

4 Sided Colonial

16,000

0.181

20.77

Acorn

5,800

0.083

19.45

Acorn

9,500

0.117

21.71

Acorn (Bronze Pole)

9,500

0.117

22.81

Acorn

16,000

0.181

22.72

Acorn (Bronze Pole)

16,000

0.181

23.76

Contemporary

Basic Demand

$4.92

$3.86

$2.70

Winter Rate

$7.47

$6.77

$6.76

Summer Rate

$10.06

$9.36

$9.35

$2.38

$1.83

$1.24

Peak Period Demand

Additional Fixture Contemporary

Fluctuating Load Charge

Additional Fixture Contemporary Additional Fixture

Basic Demand Peak Period Demand Winter Rate

$3.64

$3.29

$3.29

Summer Rate

$4.94

$4.59

$4.58

Minimum Charge: The Minimum Charge shall be the Demand Charge. Proposed Rate: (Industrial Service Rate IS is proposed to be retitled “Fluctuating Load Service Rate FLS”) Basic Service Charge (per Month)

$500.00 Primary

Energy Charge (per kWh)

Transmission $0.03553

$0.03271

Maximum Load Charge (per kVA per month)

32.20 17.31

50,000

0.471

36.65 20.21 25.45

Cobra Head

28,500

0.294

27.83

Cobra Head

50,000

0.471

32.34

5,800

0.083

32.37

* London (10��� Fluted Pole)

5,800

0.083

34.33

* London (10’ Smooth Pole)

9,500

0.117

33.13

* London (10’ Fluted Pole)

9,500

0.117

35.09

* Victorian (10’ Smooth Pole)

5,800

0.083

31.42

* Victorian (10’ Fluted Pole)

5,800

0.083

32.08

* Victorian (10’ Smooth Pole)

9,500

0.117

33.37

9,500

0.117

34.02

* London (10’ Smooth Pole)

$1.75

$1.75

* Bases Available:

Base Demand Period

$1.75

$1.00

Old Town/Manchester

$ 2.90

Chesapeake/Franklin

2.90

Jefferson /Westchester

2.90

Norfolk /Essex 3.07 Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option. 4 Sided Colonial 4,000 0.124 $16.35 4 Sided Colonial

8,000

0.210

Cobra Head

8,000

0.210

17.92 21.89

Cobra Head

13,000

0.298

23.31

Cobra Head

25,000

0.462

26.69

Overhead Service Type of Fixture

Approx

kW

Monthly

Lumens

Rating

Charge

High Pressure Sodium Cobra Head

16,000

0.181

$11.79

Cobra Head

28,500

0.294

14.19

Cobra Head

50,000

0.471

18.69

Approx

kW

Monthly

Directional Flood

16,000

0.181

13.44

Lumens

Rating

Charge

Directional Flood

50,000

0.471

19.68

High Pressure Sodium 4 Sided Colonial

6,300

0.110

$16.38

4 Sided Colonial

9,500

0.145

16.88

4 Sided Colonial

16,000

0.200

17.84

6,300

0.110

16.71

Acorn

9,500

0.145

18.65

Acorn (Bronze Pole)

9,500

0.145

19.60

16,000

0.200

19.52

Acorn

0.294 0.294

0.181

Intermediate Demand Period

Acorn

28,500 28,500

0.471

* Victorian (10’ Fluted Pole)

Type of Fixture

28.96 15.26

16,000

$2.75

Current Rate Underground Service

0.181 0.181

50,000

$2.75

Lighting Service - Rate LS

16,000 16,000

Cobra Head

Peak Demand Period

Summer Period - Five Billing Periods of May through September Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm. (10am-10pm), Peak (1pm-7pm) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Winter Period - All Other Months Weekdays: Base (all hours), Interm (6am-10pm), Peak (6am-12noon) Weekends: Base (all hours), Interm. (N/A), Peak (N/A) Where : the monthly billing demand for the Peak and Intermediate Demand Periods is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period, or b) a minimum of 60% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, and the monthly billing demand for the Base Demand Period is the greater of: a) the maximum measured load in the current billing period but not less than 20,000 kVA, or b) a minimum of 75% of the highest billing demand in the preceding eleven (11) monthly billing periods, or c) a minimum of 75% of the contract capacity based on the maximum load expected on the system or on facilities specified by Customer. Minimum Charge: As determined above with the monthly billing demand. Determination of Maximum Load: The load will be measured and will be the average kVA demand delivered to the customer during the 5-minute period of maximum use during the appropriate rating period each month.

$19.07

Open Bottom 9,500 0.117 10.46 Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option. Cobra Head 8,000 0.210 $10.16 Cobra Head

13,000

0.298

11.59

Cobra Head

25,000

0.462

14.96

Directional Flood

25,000

0.462

16.31

8,000

0.210

9.90

Open Bottom

Acorn (Bronze Pole)

16,000

0.200

20.41

Contemporary

16,000

0.200

24.88

Contemporary

28,500

0.312

27.66

Additional Pole Charge After the effective date, the Company may furnish any additional required facilities at an additional charge based upon the application of the monthly rate set forth in the Excess Facilities Rider applied to the current cost of the facilities as periodically updated.

Contemporary

50,000

0.495

31.49

Metal Halide Commercial and Industrial Lighting

Cobra Head

16,000

0.200

21.86

Directional Fixture Only

12,000

0.150

$12.09

Cobra Head

28,500

0.312

23.91

Directional Fixture/Wood Pole

12,000

0.150

14.35

Cobra Head

50,000

0.495

27.78

Directional Fixture/Metal Pole

12,000

0.150

21.74

* London (10’ Smooth Pole)

6,300

0.110

27.81

Directional Fixture Only

32,000

0.350

17.38

* London (10’ Fluted Pole)

6,300

0.110

29.49

Directional Fixture/Wood Pole

32,000

0.350

19.65

* London (10’ Smooth Pole)

9,500

0.145

28.46

Directional Fixture/Metal Pole

32,000

0.350

27.04

* London (10’ Fluted Pole)

9,500

0.145

30.15

Directional Fixture Only

107,800

1.080

35.97

* Victorian (10’ Smooth Pole)

6,300

0.110

26.99

Directional Fixture/Wood Pole

107,800

1.080

39.12

* Victorian (10’ Fluted Pole)

6,300

0.110

27.56

Directional Fixture/Metal Pole

107,800

1.080

45.62

* Victorian (10’ Smooth Pole)

9,500

0.145

28.67

Contemporary Fixture Only

12,000

0.150

13.35

* Victorian (10’ Fluted Pole)

9,500

0.145

29.23

Contemporary Metal Only

12,000

0.150

23.02

Contemporary Fixture Only

32,000

0.350

19.15

Contemporary Metal Only

32,000

0.350

28.81

* Bases Available: Old Town / Manchester

$ 2.49

9.62

Chesapeake / Franklin

2.49

Contemporary Fixture Only

107,800

1.080

38.90

Jefferson / Westchester

2.49

Contemporary Metal Only

107,800

1.080

48.56

Norfolk / Essex 2.64 Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service prior to July 22, 2007. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 4 Sided Colonial 4,000 0.124 $16.35 4 Sided Colonial

8,000

0.210

17.92

Cobra Head

8,000

0.210

21.89

Cobra Head

13,000

0.298

23.31

Cobra Head

25,000

0.462

26.69

Overhead Service Type of Fixture

Approx

kW

Lumens

Rating

Restricted Lighting Service – Rate RLS Current Rate OUTDOOR LIGHTING Type of Unit

Rate Per Month Per Unit Installed Prior to Installed After December January 1, 1991 31, 1990

Overhead Service Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service prior to July 22, 2007. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt $ 7.89 N/A

Monthly

175 Watt

8.82

Charge

250 Watt

10.18

11.65

400 Watt

12.54

14.15

1000 Watt

23.44

26.08

High Pressure Sodium

$10.22

Cobra Head

16,000

0.200

$10.13

Cobra Head

28,500

0.312

12.19

Cobra Head

50,000

0.495

16.06

100 Watt

$ 8.71

$ 8.71

Directional Flood

16,000

0.200

11.55

150 Watt

11.02

11.02

Directional Flood

50,000

0.495

16.91

250 Watt

13.00

13.00

Open Bottom 9,500 0.145 8.99 Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service prior to July 22, 2007. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option Cobra Head 8,000 0.210 $10.16

400 Watt

14.13

14.13

N/A

32.96

Cobra Head

13,000

0.298

11.59

Cobra Head

25,000

0.462

14.96

Directional Flood

25,000

0.462

16.31

8,000

0.210

Open Bottom

High Pressure Sodium Vapor

1000 Watt Additional Pole Charge

9.90

Additional Pole Charge

9.62

1.75

Underground Service Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service prior to July 22, 2007. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt – Top Mounted $13.13 $13.12 175 Watt – Top Mounted

13.91

14.88

$11.65

High Pressure Sodium Vapor

Metal Halide Commercial and Industrial Lighting

70 Watt – Top Mounted

$11.65

Directional Fixture Only

12,000

0.207

$10.39

100 Watt – Top Mounted

15.31

15.47

Directional Fixture/Wood Pole

12,000

0.207

12.33

150 Watt – Top Mounted

N/A

18.48

Directional Fixture/Metal Pole

12,000

0.207

18.68

150 Watt

20.63

20.63

Directional Fixture Only

32,000

0.450

14.93

250 Watt

23.72

23.72

Directional Fixture/Wood Pole

32,000

0.450

16.88

400 Watt

26.44

26.44

Directional Fixture/Metal Pole

32,000

0.450

23.23

1000 Watt

N/A

59.20

Directional Fixture Only

107,800

1.080

30.90

Directional Fixture/Wood Pole

107,800

1.080

33.61

Directional Fixture/Metal Pole

107,800

1.080

39.19

Contemporary Fixture Only

12,000

0.207

11.47

Contemporary Metal Only

12,000

0.207

19.78

Contemporary Fixture Only

32,000

0.450

16.45

Contemporary Metal Only

32,000

0.450

24.75

Contemporary Fixture Only

107,800

1.080

33.42

Contemporary Metal Only

107,800

1.080

41.72

Proposed Rate Underground Service Type of Fixture High Pressure Sodium

Rate Per Month Per Unit Decorative Lighting Service Fixtures Acorn with Decorative Basket 70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$16.19

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

17.06

8-Sided Coach 70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$16.35

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

17.24

Poles Approx

kW

Monthly

10’ Smooth

Lumens

Rating

Charge

10’ Fluted

$ 9.20 10.98 Continued On Next Page


MARKETPLACE

B10 - The News Standard

Bases Old Town/Manchester

$ 2.95

Chesapeake/Franklin

3.17

Jefferson/Westchester

3.19

Norfolk/Essex

3.36

175 Watt

8.25

$10.04

250 Watt

9.57

11.46

400 Watt

11.64

13.95

400 Watt (metal pole)

16.15

N/A

1000 Watt

22.12

25.83

100 Watt

$ 8.44

$ 8.44

150 Watt

10.05

10.05

250 Watt

12.02

12.02

400 Watt

12.92

12.92

N/A

29.05

12.15

14.68

175 Watt

16.18

23.12

250 Watt

17.54

24.05

400 Watt

20.85

27.09

400 Watt on State of KY Pole

20.95

27.09

N/A 25.83

100 Watt

$ 9.82

$ 9.82

150 Watt

11.70

11.70

150 Watt Flood

12.10

12.10

250 Watt

13.99

13.99

400 Watt

15.04

15.04

1000 Watt

N/A

33.81

High Pressure Sodium Vapor

Underground Service Mercury Vapor--Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt – Top Mounted

$11.17

175 Watt – Top Mounted

12.15

$13.86 14.68

175 Watt

16.18

23.12

250 Watt

17.54

24.05

400 Watt

20.85

27.09

400 Watt on State of KY Pole

20.95

20.95

70 Watt – Top Mounted

N/A

$13.64

100 Watt – Top Mounted

$14.22

14.22

High Pressure Sodium Vapor

150 Watt – Top Mounted

N/A

20.66

150 Watt

23.99

23.99

250 Watt

25.62

25.62

250 Watt on State of KY Pole

25.62

25.62

400 Watt

27.88

27.88

400 Watt on State of KY Pole

27.88

27.88

N/A

64.37

1000 Watt

Incandescent--Incandescent is restricted to those fixtures in service. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option

High Pressure Sodium Vapor 70 Watt – Top Mounted

N/A

$11.72

100 Watt – Top Mounted

$12.22

12.22

150 Watt – Top Mounted

N/A

17.75

20.61

20.61

150 Watt

13.95

16.15

Underground Service Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service prior to July 22, 2007. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt – Top Mounted $11.17 $13.86 175 Watt – Top Mounted

11.46

11.64

22.12

High Pressure Sodium Vapor

1000 Watt

9.57

400 Watt 400 Watt (metal pole)

Rate Per Month Per Unit Installed Prior to Installed After January 1, 1991 December 31, 1990

Overhead Service Mercury Vapor - Mercury Vapor is restricted to those fixtures in service prior to July 22, 2007. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt $ 7.17 N/A

250 Watt

1000 Watt

PUBLIC STREET LIGHTING Type of Unit

Friday, January 22, 2010

250 Watt

22.01

22.01

250 Watt on State of KY Pole

22.05

22.05

400 Watt

23.95

23.95

400 Watt on State of KY Pole

23.95

23.95

1000 Watt

N/A

100 Watt

$ 8.35

$ 8.35

300 Watt

11.89

11.89

Rate Per Month Per Unit Decorative Lighting Service Fixtures Acorn with Decorative Basket

55.30

70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$18.38

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

19.28

8-Sided Coach Rate Per Month Per Unit Decorative Lighting Service Fixtures

70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$18.60

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

19.89

Poles

Acorn with Decorative Basket

10’ Smooth

70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$15.79

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

16.56

8-Sided Coach 70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$15.98

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

17.09

Poles

$10.71

10’ Fluted

12.78

Bases Old Town/Manchester

$3.43

Chesapeake/Franklin

3.69

Jefferson/Westchester

3.71

Norfolk/Essex 10’ Smooth 10’ Fluted

10.98

Bases Old Town/Manchester

$ 2.95

Chesapeake/Franklin

3.17

Jefferson/Westchester

3.19

Norfolk/Essex

3.36

Proposed Rate OUTDOOR LIGHTING Type of Unit

Rate Per Month Per Unit Installed Prior to Installed After December January 1, 1991 31, 1990

Overhead Service Mercury Vapor--Mercury Vapor is restricted to those ixtures in service. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt $ 7.89 N/A 175 Watt

8.82

250 Watt

10.18

11.65

400 Watt

12.54

14.15

1000 Watt

23.44

26.08

1000 Watt Flood

26.21

26.21

$10.22

100 Watt

$10.14

$10.14

150 Watt

12.83

12.83

250 Watt

15.13

15.13

400 Watt

16.45

16.45

N/A

38.37

High Pressure Sodium Vapor

1000 Watt

3.91

$ 9.20

Additional Pole Charge

2.04

Underground Service Mercury Vapor--Mercury Vapor is restricted to existing fixtures in service. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt – Top Mounted $13.13 $13.12 175 Watt – Top Mounted

13.91

14.88

400 Watt – Top Mounted

16.11

16.11

High Pressure Sodium Vapor 70 Watt – Top Mounted

$13.56

$13.56

100 Watt – Top Mounted

17.82

18.01

150 Watt – Top Mounted

N/A

21.51

150 Watt

24.01

24.01

250 Watt

27.61

27.61

400 Watt

30.78

30.78

1000 Watt

N/A

68.91 Rate Per Month Per Unit

Decorative Lighting Service Fixtures Acorn with Decorative Basket 70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$18.85

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

19.86

8-Sided Coach 70 Watt High Pressure Sodium

$19.03

100 Watt High Pressure Sodium

20.07

Lighting Energy Service - Rate LE $0.04871 per kWh $0.05465 per kWh

Current Rate Proposed Rate

Traffic Energy Service - Rate TE Current Rate Customer Charge: $2.80 per delivery per month Energy Charge: $0.05903 per kWh Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: $3.14 per delivery per month Energy Charge: $0.06623 per kWh Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge. Cable Television Attachment Charges – Rate CTAC Current Rate Attachment Charge: For each attachment to a pole on which three parties have attachments For each attachment to a pole on which two parties have attachments

$0.38 per month $0.53 per month

Proposed Rate Attachment Charge: $8.55 per year for each attachment to pole Billing: Attachment Charges to be billed semi-annually based on the number of pole attachments being maintained on December 1 and June 1.

Curtailable Service Rider 1 – Rider CSR1 Current Rate Demand Credit of: Primary ($5.20) per kW Transmission ($5.10) per kW Non-Compliance Charge Primary $16.00 per kW Transmission $16.00 per kW Proposed Rate Curtailable Service Rider 1 is proposed to be consolidated with Curtailable Service Riders 2 and 3 into a single Curtailable Service Rider. Curtailable Service Rider 2 – Rider CSR2 Current Rate Demand Credit of: Primary ($5.55) per kW Transmission ($5.48) per kW Non-Compliance Charge Primary $16.00 per kW Transmission $16.00 per kW Proposed Rate Curtailable Service Rider 2 is proposed to be consolidated with Curtailable Service Riders 1 and 3 into a single Curtailable Service Rider. Curtailable Service Rider 3 – Rider CSR3 Current Rate Demand Credit of: Primary ($3.20) per kW Transmission ($3.10) per kW Non-Compliance Charge Primary $16.00 per kW Transmission $16.00 per kW Proposed Rate Curtailable Service Rider 3 is proposed to be consolidated with Curtailable Service Riders 1 and 2 into a single Curtailable Service Rider. Curtailable Service Rider – Rate CSR Current Rate This rate schedule is not currently available. Proposed Rate Demand Credit of: Primary ($5.20) per kW Transmission ($5.10) per kW Non-Compliance Charge Primary $16.00 per kW Transmission $16.00 per kW Automatic Buy-Through Provision The buy-through provision is a formulaic determination in accordance with the tariff. Current Rate Proposed Rate

Load Reduction Incentive Rider – Rider LRI Up to $0.30 per kWh No change is proposed from the current charge.

Small Capacity Cogeneration and Small Power

Poles 10’ Smooth

$10.71

10’ Fluted

12.78

Bases

Production Qualifying Facilities – Rate SQF Current Rate Company will purchase such energy from Seller at the Rate A or B, set out below: Rate A: Time Differentiated Rate

Old Town/Manchester

$3.43

Chesapeake/Franklin

3.69

2. Winter Billing Months of December, January, and February (on-peak)

Jefferson/Westchester

3.71

3. During All Other Hours (off-peak)

Norfolk/Essex

3.91

PUBLIC STREET LIGHTING Type of Unit

1. Summer Billing Months of June, July, August, and September (on-peak)

Overhead Service Mercury Vapor--Mercury Vapor is restricted to existing fixtures in service. Upon failure, existing fixtures will either be removed from service or replaced with available lighting at the customer’s option 100 Watt

$ 7.17

N/A

175 Watt

8.25

$10.04

$0.03734 $0.03759

Rate B: Non-Time Differentiated All kWh purchased by company

Rate Per Month Per Unit Installed Prior to Installed After January 1, 1991 December 31, 1990

$0.07690

$0.04262

Proposed Rate No change is proposed.

Large Capacity Cogeneration and Small Power Production Qualifying Facilities – Rate LQF Current Rate The energy component payments and capacity component payments are formulaic determinations in accordance with the tariff. Proposed Rate No change is proposed. Continued On Next Page


MARKETPLACE

Friday, January 22, 2010 Standard Rider for Excess Facilities – Rider EF Current Rate Charge for distribution facilities: Carrying Cost: 0.94% Operating Expenses: 0.68% Proposed Rate Monthly Charge for Leased Facilities: 1.73% Monthly Charge for Facilities Supported By a One-Time CIAC Payment: 0.87%

Standard Rider for Redundant Capacity Charge – Rider RC Current Rate Capacity Reservation Charge Secondary Distribution $1.43 per kW per month Primary Distribution $1.06 per kW per month Proposed Rate Capacity Reservation Charge Secondary Distribution $1.56 per kW per month Primary Distribution $1.43 per kW per month Standard Rider for Supplemental or Standby Service – Rider SS Current Rate Contract Demand per kVA per month: Secondary $7.62 Primary $6.67 Transmission $5.63 Minimum Charge: Electric service actually used each month will be charged for in accordance with the provisions of the applicable rate schedule; provided, however, the minimum billing under that rate schedule shall in no case be less than an amount calculated at the appropriate rate above applied to the Contract Demand. Proposed Rate Contract Demand per kVA per month: Secondary $8.57 Primary $7.49 Transmission $6.32 Minimum Charge: No change is proposed. Small Green Energy Rider SGE Current Rate $5.00 per 300 kWh block per month Proposed Rate No change is proposed in this proceeding. There is a separate proceeding under Case No. 2009-00467. Large Green Energy Rider LGE Current Rate $13.00 per 1,000 kWh block per month Proposed Rate No change is proposed in this proceeding. There is a separate proceeding under Case No. 2009-00467.

Brownfield Development Rider BDR Current Rate Electric loads to be served on the rate schedule normally applicable and Customer will be subject to and comply with all Terms and Conditions except: a) for the twelve consecutive monthly billings of the first contract year, the demand charge shall be reduced by 50%; b) for the twelve consecutive monthly billings of the second contract year, the demand charge shall be reduced by 40%; c) for the twelve consecutive monthly billings of the third contract year, the demand charge shall be reduced by 30%; d) for the twelve consecutive monthly billings of the fourth contract year, the demand charge shall be reduced by 20%; e) for the twelve consecutive monthly billings of the fifth contract year, the demand charge shall be reduced by 10%; and f) all subsequent billing shall be at the full charges stated in the applicable rate schedule. Proposed Rate No change is proposed.

Residential Responsive Pricing Service - Rate RRP Current Rate Customer Charge: $10.00 per month Energy Demand Charge: Low Cost Hours Medium Cost Hours High Cost Hours Critical Cost Hours Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: $20.00 per month Energy Demand Charge: Low Cost Hours Medium Cost Hours High Cost Hours Critical Cost Hours Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge

$0.04628 per kWh $0.05859 per kWh $0.11278 per kWh $0.30743 per kWh

$0.04556 per kWh $0.05768 per kWh $0.11103 per kWh $0.30267 per kWh

General Responsive Pricing Service - Rate GRP Current Rate Customer Charge:

$20.00 per meter per month for single-phase service $24.00 per meter per month for three-phase service

Energy Demand Charge: Low Cost Hours $0.05318 per kWh Medium Cost Hours $0.06808 per kWh High Cost Hours $0.14247 per kWh Critical Cost Hours $0.30861 per kWh Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: $30.00 per meter per month for single-phase service $45.00 per meter per month for three-phase service Energy Demand Charge: Low Cost Hours $0.05696 per kWh Medium Cost Hours $0.07291 per kWh High Cost Hours $0.15258 per kWh Critical Cost Hours $0.33052 per kWh Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge. Real-Time Pricing Rider RTP Current Rate Billing under this Rider is formulaic. Proposed Rate No change is proposed. Standard Rider for Low Emission Vehicle Service – Rider LEV Current Rate This Rider is not currently available. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: $15.00 per month Energy Demand Charge: Off-Peak Hours $0.04556 per kWh Intermediate Hours $0.06449 per kWh Peak Hours $0.12414 per kWh Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge. Current Rate Proposed Rate

Returned Payment Charge $10.00 No change is proposed from the current charge.

Current Rate Proposed Rate

Meter Test Charge $60.00 No change is proposed from the current charge.

Current Rate Proposed Rate

Disconnect/Reconnect Service Charge $29.00 No change is proposed from the current charge. Meter Pulse Charge

Current Rate Where a customer desires and Company is willing to provide data meter pulses, a charge of $9.00 per month will be made to those data pulses. Time pulses will not be supplied. Proposed Rate Where a customer desires and Company is willing to provide data meter pulses, a charge of $9.00 per pulse per month will be made to those data pulses. Time pulses will not be supplied. Meter Data Processing Charge Current Rate A charge of $2.75 per report will be made to cover the cost of processing, generating, and providing a recorder metered customer with profile reports. Proposed Rate No change is proposed from the current charge; however, if a customer is not recorder metered and desires to have such metering installed, the customer will pay all costs associated with installing the recorder meter. Current Rate Proposed Rate

Home Energy Assistance Program $0.15 per meter per month No change is proposed from the current charge.

Customer Deposits Current Rate For Customers Served Under Residential Service Rate RS $135.00 (For Combination Electric and Gas Residential Customers the total deposit would be $295.00) For Customers Served Under General Service Rate GS $220.00 For all other Customers not classified herein, the deposit will be no more than 2/12 of Customer’s actual or estimated annual bill where bills are rendered monthly. Company may offer customers the option of paying all or a portion of their deposits in installments over a period not to exceed the first four (4) normal billing periods. Service may be refused or discontinued for failure to pay and/or maintain the requested deposit. Proposed Rate For Customers Served Under Residential Service Rate RS $160.00 (For Combination Electric and Gas Residential Customers the total deposit would be $275.00) For Customers Served Under General Service Rate GS $220.00 For all other Customers not classified herein, the deposit will be no more than 2/12 of Customer’s actual or estimated annual bill where bills are rendered monthly. Company may offer customers the option of paying all or a portion of their deposits in installments over a period not to exceed the first four (4) normal billing periods. The option to pay deposits by installments will not be offered to customers required to make a deposit as a condition of reconnection following disconnection for non-payment. Service may be refused or discontinued for failure to pay and/or maintain the requested deposit. LG&E CURRENT AND PROPOSED GAS RATES (Includes Gas Supply Cost Component Filed December 30, 2009 to be effective February 1, 2010) Residential Gas Service - Rate RGS Current Rate Customer Charge: $9.50 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Distribution Cost Component $0.21349 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.74843 Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge.

The News Standard - B11

Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: $26.53 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Gas Supply Cost Component $0.53494 Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge. Volunteer Fire Department Service – Rate VFD Current Rate Customer Charge: $9.50 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Distribution Cost Component $0.21349 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.74843 Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge: $26.53 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Gas Supply Cost Component $0.53494 Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge. Firm Commercial Gas Service - Rate CGS Current Rate Customer Charge if all of the customer’s meters have a capacity < 5000 cf/hr: $23.00 per delivery point per month Customer Charge if any of the customer’s meters have a capacity ≥ 5000 cf/hr: $160.00 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Distribution Cost Component $0.17052 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.70546 Off-Peak Pricing Provision: The “Distribution Cost Component” applicable to monthly usage in excess of 100,000 cubic feet shall be reduced by 5.0¢ per 100 cubic feet during the 7 off-peak billing periods of April through October. The first 100,000 cubic feet per month during such period shall be billed at the rate set forth above. Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge if all of the customer’s meters have a capacity < 5000 cf/hr: $30.00 per delivery point per month Basic Service Charge if any of the customer’s meters have a capacity ≥ 5000 cf/hr: $170.00 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Distribution Cost Component $0.19795 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.73289 Off-Peak Pricing Provision: No Change. Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge. Firm Industrial Gas Service - Rate IGS Current Rate Customer Charge if all of the customer’s meters have a capacity < 5000 cf/hr: $23.00 per delivery point per month Customer Charge if any of the customer’s meters have a capacity ≥ 5000 cf/hr: $160.00 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Distribution Cost Component $0.16524 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.70018 Off-Peak Pricing Provision: The “Distribution Cost Component” applicable to monthly usage in excess of 100,000 cubic feet shall be reduced by 5.0¢ per 100 cubic feet during the 7 off-peak billing periods of April through October. The first 100,000 cubic feet per month during such period shall be billed at the rate set forth above. Minimum Charge: The Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Basic Service Charge if all of the customer’s meters have a capacity < 5000 cf/hr: $30.00 per delivery point per month Basic Service Charge if any of the customer’s meters have a capacity ≥ 5000 cf/hr: $170.00 per delivery point per month Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet: Distribution Cost Component $0.19795 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.73289 Off-Peak Pricing Provision: No Change. Minimum Charge: The Basic Service Charge. As-Available Gas Service – Rate AAGS Current Rate Customer Charge: $275.00 per delivery point per month Charge Per Mcf Distribution Cost Component $0.5252 Gas Supply Cost Component 5.3494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $5.8746 Customer shall be charged a per Mcf penalty charge equal to $15.00 plus the mid-point price posted in Gas Daily for Dominion--South Point on the day to which a notice of interruption of service is applicable, plus any other charges under this rate schedule for such unauthorized usage by Customer that occurs following the conclusion of the eighteen (18) hour notice of interruption by Company to Customer. Proposed Rate No change is proposed from the current charge. Firm Transportation Service (Non-Standby) Rate FT (Includes Daily Demand Charge Filed December 30, 2009 to be effective February 1, 2010) Current Rate Administration Charge: $230.00 per delivery point per month Distribution Charge Per Mcf $0.43 Utilization Charges for Daily Imbalances: Daily Demand Charge $0.1876 Daily Storage Charge 0.1833 Utilization Charge Per Mcf $0.3709 Proposed Rate No change is proposed from the current charge. Distribution Generation Gas Service - Rate DGGS Current Rate Customer Charge: $160.00 per month per delivery point Demand Charge per 100 cubic feet of monthly billing demand: $0.9400 Plus a Charge Per 100 Cubic feet Distribution Cost Component $0.02561 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.56055 Minimum Monthly Demand Charge: The Demand Charge per 100 cubic feet times ten (10). Minimum Charge: The total monthly minimum bill shall be the sum of the minimum monthly Demand Charge and the monthly Customer Charge. Proposed Rate Availability: Applicable firm natural gas sales service to facilities installed and operating on and after ninety (90) days after the effective date of Rate DGGS. Basic Service Charge if all of the customer’s meters have a capacity < 5000 cf/hr: $ 30.00 per delivery point per month Basic Service Charge if any of the customer’s meters have a capacity ≥ 5000 cf/hr: $170.00 per delivery point per month Demand Charge per 100 cubic feet of monthly billing demand: $1.0110 Plus a Charge Per 100 Cubic feet Distribution Cost Component $0.02744 Gas Supply Cost Component 0.53494 Total Charge Per 100 Cubic Feet $0.56238 Minimum Charge: The total monthly minimum bill shall be the sum of the minimum monthly Demand Charge and the monthly Basic Service Charge. Gas Transportation Service/Standby - Rider TS (Includes Pipeline Supplier’s Demand Component Filed December 30, 2009 to be effective February 1, 2010) Current Rates Administrative Charge: $153.00 per delivery point per month.

Distribution Charge Per Mcf Pipeline Supplier’s Demand Component Total

CGS

IGS

AAGS

$1.7052

$1.6524

$0.5252

0.9845

0.9845

0.9845

$2.6897

$2.6369

$1.5097

Plus: Any and all charges billed directly to Company by other parties related to the transportation of customerowned gas. Proposed Rate No change is proposed from the current Administrative Charge. Charges per Mcf under Rider TS reflect proposed charges for Rates CGS, IGS, AAGS

Distribution Charge Per Mcf Pipeline Supplier’s Demand Component Total

CGS

IGS

AAGS

$1.9795

$1.9795

$0.5252

0.9845

0.9845

0.9845

$2.9640

$2.9640

$1.5097

Gas Meter Pulse Service Rider Current Rate This Rider is not currently available. Proposed Rate Applicable to all commercial and industrial customers that request the Company to install a gas meter pulse generator which is a meter-related service not otherwise provided by the Company. This service is only available for customer metering sites using positive displacement meters, orifice meters, or ultrasonic metering technology, so long as the meter capacity is 3,000 cubic feet per hour or greater. Charge for Installation of Meter Pulse Equipment For Customers Served Under Rate Schedule FT Monthly Charge: $ 8.20 For Customers Not Served Under Rate Schedule FT Monthly Charge: $21.30 If replacement of the Gas Meter(s) is necessary for the installation of a pulse generator, then Customer shall be responsible for the actual meter and meter installation cost of such Gas Meter(s). If the Company is required to make additional visits to the meter site due to the inability to gain access to the meter location or the necessary Communication Link has not been properly installed by Customer, or the Customer’s Communication Link is not working properly, the Company may charge the Customer for any additional trip to the site at a per-visit rate of $150.00. Pooling Service Rider to Rate TS - Rider PS-TS Current Rate In addition to any charges billed directly to TS Pool Manager or Customer as a result of the application of Rider TS or this rider, the following charge shall apply: PS-TS Pool Administration Charge: $75 per customer in TS Pool per month Proposed Rate No change is proposed from the current charge. Pooling Service Rider to Rate FT - Rider PS-FT Current Rate Continued On Next Page


OUTDOORS

B12 - The News Standard

Friday, January 22, 2010

Lunar Calendar Friday

Saturday

Sunday

4:16-6:16 p.m. 4:46-6:46 a.m.

5;04-7:04 p.m. 5:34-7:34 a.m.

5:57-7:57 p.m. 6:27-8:27 a.m.

Monday 6:55-8:55 p.m. 7:25-9:25 a.m.

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

7:57-9:57 p.m. 8:27-10:27 a.m.

9:00-11:00 p.m. 9:30-11:30 a.m.

10:03 p.m.-12:03 a.m. 10:33 a.m.-12:33 p.m.

Darker shades of gray indicate the best fishing or hunting potential based on the phase of the moon. = New Moon

Rabbits love grassy areas Submitted by the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Department FRANKFORT — With most other hunting seasons over, many hunters turn to small game at this time of year. Kentucky’s rabbit and quail populations have both declined due to large-scale changes in agriculture. Fescue replaced native grasses, and clean fence lines replaced the shrubby rows small game need. However, rabbits are more adaptable than quail and their numbers haven’t fallen nearly as much. Hunters should be able to find them if they can locate the right habitat. “A well-managed native grassland — or even a poorly managed native grassland — can hold large numbers of rabbits,” said John Morgan, small game program coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “If you can find a farm that has implemented Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) practices, that would be an excellent place to hunt. The more brushy areas, the better. Shooting may be more of a challenge, but it’s a good opportunity to jump rabbits.” The CRP provides financial assistance to farmers to improve wildlife habitats, such as converting fescue fields to native grasslands. It is one of several costshare programs Kentucky Fish and Wildlife offers

private landowners. Morgan said habitat initiatives on both public and private lands are almost guaranteed to succeed when it comes to rabbits. Department efforts aimed at increasing quail populations throughout the state benefit rabbits as well. Peabody Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Ohio, Hopkins and Muhlenberg counties is a good choice for those who want to try rabbit hunting on public land. The WMA offers more than 45,000 acres and is open under statewide regulations for rabbit hunting. Hunters must purchase a $15 Peabody hunting permit, available wherever licenses are sold, in addition to a hunting license. “It’s the largest, most expansive grassland complex in the state,” Morgan said. “Public land gets extensive hunting pressure. A place like Peabody can take that pressure.” The recent snowfall offers hunters without dogs a unique opportunity to track rabbits. While a beagle can track a rabbit by scent, snow allows hunters to track by sight. “You can use people to replace beagles,” Morgan said. “Find a fresh rabbit track, and follow it until a rabbit hops by.” Though rabbit numbers are on a long-term decline, surveys show a short-term increase in populations this year. Rural mail carriers help Kentucky Fish

= Full Moon

Country Club members enjoy a New Year’s round of golf

and Wildlife monitor small game numbers, and their sightings indicate rabbit numbers are up from last year. Hunters can also help with these counts. You can download and print your own small game hunter log online at www.fw.ky. gov/smallgamelogs.asp. At the end of the season, turn in your survey to receive a free hat and annual report. For more information on habitat improvement programs such as CRP, call Kentucky Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-858-1549 and ask for the name of the private lands biologist serving your area. You can also find your private lands biologist online at the department’s website, fw.ky.gov. Search under the term, “Wildlife Private Lands Biologists.” The biologist can help you choose the most appropriate program for your land, apply for assistance and implement improvements. Rabbit hunting requires either an annual or shortterm Kentucky hunting license for hunters ages 12 and over. Hunters ages 12-15 can purchase a youth hunting license at a reduced price. For complete small game hunting regulations, pick up a copy of the 200910 Kentucky Hunting & Trapping Guide, available online at fw.ky.gov and wherever licenses are sold.

Local shop gives NASP discounts Brandenburg Huntin’ & Fishin’ Supplies would like to offer discount cards made exclusively for NASP team members. The 2010 season is here and most schools have made their team selections. This discount will be made available on not only NASP related items and services, but it will also include store wide savings

including archery range time. To get team cards please e-mail or fax a roster in as soon as possible. There is also special pricing for all schools and coaches. For more information e-mail sales@ brandenburghuntinandfishin.com or call 270-422-221.

In addition to any charges billed directly to FT Pool Manager or Customer as a result of the application of Rate FT or this rider, the following charge shall apply: PS-FT Pool Administration Charge: $75 per customer in FT Pool per month Proposed Rate No change is proposed from the current charge. Excess Facilities – Rider EF Current Rate Charge for distribution facilities: Carrying Cost: Operating Expenses: Proposed Rate Monthly Charge for Leased Facilities: Monthly Charge for Facilities Supported By a One-Time CIAC Payment:

0.94% 0.68%

$8.92

General Service

$13,879,697

12.18%

$28.11

12.18%

Power Service

$21,442,743

12.18%

$574.78

12.18%

$5,576,623

12.18%

$5,135.01

12.18%

$10,596,615

12.18%

$15,958.76

12.18%

Retail Transmission

$2,464,135

12.19%

$44,002.41

12.19%

Lighting

$1,847,743

12.22%

N/A

N/A

$313,898

73.76%

N/A

N/A

Disconnect/Reconnect Service Charge

Current Rate Proposed Rate

Inspection Charge $135.00 No change is proposed from the current charge.

Current Rate Proposed Rate

Home Energy Assistance Program $0.15 per meter per month No change is proposed from the current charge.

The estimated amount of the annual change and the average monthly bill to which the proposed electric rates will apply for each electric customer class is as follows:

0.87%

$80.00 No change is proposed from the current charge. $29.00 No change is proposed from the current charge.

The foregoing rates reflect a proposed annual increase in electric revenues of approximately 12.1% and gas revenues of approximately 7.7% to Louisville Gas and Electric Company.

Mthly Bill % Increase 12.19%

$10.00 No change is proposed from the current charge.

Current Rate Proposed Rate

Copies of the proposed tariffs containing text changes may be obtained by contacting Lonnie E. Bellar, Louisville Gas and Electric Company at P. O. Box 32010, Louisville, Kentucky, 502-627-4830.

Electric Rate Class Residential

Meter Test Charge Current Rate Proposed Rate

Rider PS-TS, Pooling Service Rider PS-FT, Excess Facilities Rider EF, Gas Supply Clause GSC, Demand Side Management Cost Recovery Mechanism DSM, School Tax Adjustment Clause, and the Terms and Conditions.

1.73%

Returned Payment Charge Current Rate Proposed Rate

SUBMITTED PHOTO

TOP: The Hillcrest Country Club held its annual Polar Bear Classic on Jan. 1. Everyone enjoyed eating breakfast at the club before the grand event started. The participants were: Eddie and Gaye Kasey, Mark Keys, Joe and Marlene Cook, Cricket and Jean Morton, Ed Abner, Wayne Patterson, Vernon Duff, Joe and Randy Powers, Don and Betsy Reyner.ABOVE: The winners were: Eddie and Gaye Kasey and Mark Keys.

Customer Deposits Current Rate For Customers Served Under Residential Gas Service Rate RGS $160.00 (For Combination Gas and Electric Residential Customers, the total deposit would be $295.00) For Non-Residential Gas Customers, the deposit will be no more than 2/12 of Customer’s actual or estimated annual bill where bills are rendered monthly. Proposed Rate For Customers Served Under Residential Gas Service Rate RGS $115.00 (For Combination Gas and Electric Residential Customers, the total deposit would be $275.00) For Non-Residential Gas Customers, the deposit will be no more than 2/12 of Customer’s actual or estimated annual bill where bills are rendered monthly. Company may offer customers the option of paying all or a portion of their deposits in installments over a period not to exceed the first four (4) normal billing periods. The option to pay deposits by installments will not be offered to customers required to make a deposit as a condition of reconnection following disconnection for non-payment. Service may be refused or discontinued for failure to pay and/or maintain the requested deposit. Louisville Gas and Electric Company proposes to change the text of the following electric tariffs: Residential Rate RS, Volunteer Fire Department Rate VFD, General Service Rate GS, Industrial Power Rate IPS, Commercial Power Rate CPS, Industrial Time-of-Day Rate ITOD, Commercial Time-of-Day Rate CTOD, Retail Transmission Service Rider RTS, Industrial Service Rate IS, Lighting Service Rate LS, Restricted Lighting Service RLS, Lighting Energy Service Rate LE, Traffic Energy Service Rate TE, Cable Television Attachment Charges Rate CTAC, Special Charges, Curtailable Service Rider CSR, Excess Facilities Rider EF, Supplemental/Standby Service Rider SS, Intermittent/Fluctuating Loads Rider IFL, Temporary/Seasonal Service Rider TS, Residential Responsive Pricing Service Rate RRP, General Responsive Pricing Service Rate GRP, Real Time Pricing Rate RTP, Demand Side Management Cost Recovery Mechanism DSM, Environmental Cost Recovery Surcharge ECR, School Tax Adjustment Clause, and the Terms and Conditions. Louisville Gas and Electric Company proposes to change the text of the following gas tariffs: Residential Gas Service Rate RGS, Volunteer Fire Department Rate VFD, Firm Commercial Gas Service Rate CGS, Firm Industrial Gas Service Rate IGS, As-Available Gas Service Rate AAGS, Firm Transportation Service Rate FT, Distributed Generation Gas Service Rate DGGS, Gas Transportation Service/Standby Rider TS, Pooling Service

Annual $ Increase $36,859,770

Commercial TOD Industrial TOD

CTAC

Annual % Increase 12.19%

Mthly Bill $ Increase

The estimated amount of the annual change and the average monthly bill to which the proposed gas rates will apply for each gas customer class is as follows: Gas Annual Annual Mthly Bill Mthly Bill Rate Class $ Increase % Increase $ Increase % Increase Residential $16,197,217 8.75% $ 4.65 8.75% Commercial

$ 5,362,513

6.20%

$ 17.45

6.20%

$ 363,149

5.23%

$ 137.24

5.23%

As-Available

$0

0.00%

$0

0.00%

Firm Transportation

$0

0.00%

$0

0.00%

Industrial

LG&E is proposing to increase the required Customer Deposit for residential electric customers served under Residential Rate RS from the current amount of $135.00 to $160.00 (19% increase), and proposes to decrease the required Customer Deposit for residential gas customers served under Residential Gas Servicer Rate RGS from the current amount of $160.00 to $115.00 (28% decrease). The Customer Deposit for combined gas and electric residential service, if required, would decrease from the current amount of $295.00 to $275.00 (7% decrease). LG&E does not propose to change the Customer Deposit amount required for non-residential electric customers served under General Service Rate GS, which is currently $220.00 (0% increase). The rates contained in this notice are the rates proposed by Louisville Gas and Electric Company; however, the Public Service Commission may order rates to be charged that differ from the proposed rates contained in this notice. Notice is further given that any corporation, association, body politic or person with a substantial interest in the matter may by written request, within thirty (30) days after publication of the notice of the proposed rate changes, request to intervene. The motion shall be submitted to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P. O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, and shall set forth the grounds for the request, including the status and interest of the party. Intervention may be granted beyond the thirty (30) day period for good cause shown. Any person who has been granted intervention may obtain copies of the application and any other filings made by the utility by contacting Lonnie E. Bellar, Vice President – State Regulation and Rates, Louisville Gas and Electric Company, 220 West Main Street, Louisville, Kentucky, 502-627-4830. A copy of the application and testimony shall be available for public inspection at the offices of Louisville Gas and Electric Company or the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, Frankfort, Kentucky.

A copy of this Notice and the proposed electric and gas tariffs, once filed, shall also be available for public inspection on Louisville Gas and Electric Company’s website at www.eon-us.com. Louisville Gas and Electric Company 220 West Main Street P. O. Box 32010 Louisville, Kentucky 40232 502-627-4830

Public Service Commission 211 Sower Boulevard P. O. Box 615 Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 502-564-3940


Friday, January 22, 2010

HOMECOMING

The News Standard - B13

Homecoming court shows off best of MCHS

PHOTOS BY BEN ACHTABOWSKI

The 2009 Homecoming court was announced in between basketball games last Friday. FAR LEFT COLUMN (from top to bottom): Jessie Morgan and Daniel DeRossett; Chelsea Stull and Quinten Lynch; Jessie Soderstrom and Kyle Kingsbury; Olivia Wright and Dylan Pike; Kate Stroud and Todd Trent. MIDDLE COLUMN (Top to bottom): Homecoming King and Queen Tyler Crow and Kate Stroud; Homecoming Prince and Princess Kyle Kingsbury and Chelsea Stull; junior class reps Kelly Claycamp and Matt Wise; sophomore class reps Ashley Funk and Dalton Morgan; freshmen class reps Dawneisha Tubbs and Tate Wilson; flower girl Cheyenne Hardesty and crown bearer Will Mitcham. ABOVE COLUMN (From top to bottom): Carly Evans and Zack Thacker; Travis Beck and Tirzah Anderson; Caroline Wilson and Will Campbell; Paige Long and Tyler Crow; Allie Bogard and Zach Brown.


B14 - The News Standard

Reunion

Pollock sisters’ holiday reunion

Clockwise, from top left, are Lorene Whitworth, Monnie Clopton, Eula Mattingly and Maxine Wafford.

Even though it’s been a few years, four Pollock sisters reunited for a holiday tradition. The December get-together started many years ago to combine the celebrations of birthdays (Eula turned 97 on Dec. 10 and Maxine turned 86 on Dec. 15) and Christmas. They all met at Eula’s in Rhodelia for a very appetizing potluck lunch. While they filled up on great food, they caught up on what was happening in each other’s lives. The afternoon flew by as they had a wonderful time sharing lots of memories, pictures, and laughs. Although they are the only four remaining out of ten siblings, they had an abundance of stories to tell with there being a more than 21 year difference between the youngest, Lorene, and the oldest, Eula. Sentiments and memories flowed as they remembered their siblings that have passed on: Donald, Della, Arthur, Evelyn, Lamar, and Leo. Before they knew it, it was time to go. They ended the afternoon pleasantly exhausted as they said goodbye.

HERITAGE

Marriages

Brittany Renae Lukat, 22, of Guston, daughter of Constance Louise Poole and James Sheridan Adcock, to Brandon Keith Damron, 27, of Guston, son of Jamie Ann Rebstock and Brian Glenn Damron. Melanie Jean Langdon, 19, of Louisville, daughter of Patricia Ann Bullock and Tilmon Durando Langdon, to Thomas Brennen Duggins, 22, of Vine Grove, Ky., son of Debra L. Bratcher and Thomas J. Duggins.

Birthdays

January 22 Richard Ditto Jr., Barbara Amburgey and Marty Claycomb, Kathy Coultas Kelly January 23 Jace Blehar, Gracie Fackler, Becky Durbin, Colleen Ledford, Bill Pipes and Craig Hardesty January 24 Pam Chapman, Linda Stinebruner and Carole

The fall 2009 academic honors’ list includes a total of 539 students, with 196 achieving a 4.0 grade point average and having been named to the President’s List. Others who have achieved a grade point average of 3.5-3.99 are named to the Dean’s List; there are 343 named to that list. Campbellsville Univer-

IRTHDAY

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bellsville; Steven Lee French, master of arts in special education, of Stanford, Ky., a graduate of Meade County High School in Brandenburg, the son of Larry and Connie French, both of Stanford, and a member of Pleasantview Baptist Church in Stanford; Justin Allen Shartzer, bachelor of science in art with a minor in psychology, of Campbellsville, Ky., a graduate of Breckinridge County High School and the son of Doug and Shirley Shartzer, both of Lodiburg, Ky.; Dr. Wesley Roberts, professor of music, played the organ for the ceremony. The CU Graduate Flute Quartet, director, associate professor of music, played special music. Dr. C. Mark Bradley, professor of music, led in the singing of hymns. Dr. Helen Mudd, associate professor of social work, gave the benediction. Campbellsville University is a private, comprehensive institution located in South Central Kentucky. Founded in 1906, Campbellsville University is affiliated with the Kentucky Baptist Convention and has an enrollment of 3,006 students who represent 97 Kentucky counties, 30 states and 37 foreign nations. Listed in U.S.News & World Report’s 2010 “America’s Best Colleges,” CU is ranked 23rd in “Best Baccalaureate Colleges” in the South, tied for fifth in “most international students” and fourth in “upand-coming” schools in baccalaureate colleges in the South. CU has been ranked 17 consecutive years with U.S.News & World Report. The university has also been named to America’s Best Christian Colleges® and to G.I. Jobs magazine as a Military Friendly School. Campbellsville University is located 82 miles southwest of Lexington, and 80 miles southeast of Louisville. Dr. Michael V. Carter is in his 11th year as president.

Two local names on Campbellsville University’s President’s List CAMPBELLSVILLE — Campbellsville University Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Frank Cheatham has announced the academic honors’ list for the fall 2009 semester. The academic honors’ list recognizes students who achieve a grade point average of 3.50 or above for the semester with a course load of at least 12 hours.

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Local students graduate from Campellsville University during mid-year ceremony (to live in harmony and respect for people on our planet); leadership (to take others to a higher destiny); and scholarship (to be informed, to be committed learners and to live your life through the power of knowledge and wisdom.” DeMarcus Steven Edward Compton, a December graduate, said the graduates had “run the good race and fought the winning battle” and told them now to “show what you are made of to lead lives as Christian servant leaders.” Ginger Shely Warren, president of the CU Alumni Association and class of 2000 member, said faculty and staff at CU had fostered zeal for lifelong learning. She urged the graduates to keep in touch with CU and stay connected with their alma mater. Co-valedictorians of the graduating class were Sarah Ellen Adkins of Somerset, Ky., and Joshua Ryan Petrey of Eubank, Ky., who both had 4.0 grade point averages. Christa Miriam Hatfield of Willisburg was salutatorian. The following students received degrees: nine, master of arts in music; two master of arts in social science; 40, master of arts in special education (learning and behavior disorders); four, master of business administration; one, master of music in church music; one, master of music in performance; seven, master of science in counseling; four, master of theology; Five, Bachelor of Arts; two, Bachelor of Music; and 71, Bachelor of Science; 16, Bachelor of Science in business administration; three, Bachelor of Social Work; and three, Associate of Science. The local graduates include: Jessica Lynne Oliver, bachelor of science in history with a minor in sports management, of Brandenburg, a graduate of Meade County High School, a member of Ekron Baptist Church and attends Living Grace Church in Camp-

HAPPY

Natasha Raelynn Price, 22, of Gastonia, N.C., daughter of Belinda Lynette Crane and Donophan Carson Price, to Johnathan Wayne Blanton, 23, of Gastonia, N.C., son of Elizabeth Ann Marah and Phillip Eric Blanton. Scarlet Rosanne Bailey, 23, of Brandenburg, daughter of Brenda Caroll Bailey and Walter Collins, to John Franklin Carter, 36, of Brandenburg, son of Shirley Ann Fletcher Harless and Stanley Stuart Carter.

Higher Education CAMPBELLSVILLE — “Much of what we have made you learn does not kick in until you are older, wiser. But one day you will thank God that the professors here have told you about places to go when life has caused you to ask why.” Dr. R. Alton Lacey, president of Missouri Baptist University and director and chair of the International Association of Baptist Colleges and Schools, addressed 168 graduates at Campbellsville University Dec. 11 in the third December graduation in the university’s history. The students were told to be “bolder, more resilient and more willing to take risks” by Lacey in the Ransdell Chapel. He urged them to embrace and manage change. “Use the knowledge that you have obtained here to lead by example and do not be afraid of change,” he said. Lacey said, “I challenge you to take as your example the One who rejected the throne in favor of servant hood and the cross. This is the noblest expression of a truly enlightened mind. “There are millions who are hungry. Feed them. Multitudes cannot read or write. Teach them. Masses of men, women and children have never experienced freedom. Liberate them. All about us are persons who know nothing about pain. Relieve them. Countless numbers still walk in spiritual darkness. Show them the Light.” Lacey was presented the Campbellsville University Leadership Award by Dr. Jay Conner, chair of the CU Board of Trustees; Dr. Michael V. Carter, president of CU; and Dr. Frank Cheatham, vice president for academic affairs. Conner also gave the invocation, and Cheatham presented the graduates. Carter urged the graduates to “make a difference for yourself and many others.” He urged them to live by the Campbellsville University seal of fellowship

Friday, January 22, 2010

sity’s fall 2009 academic honors’ list includes the following students named to the President’s List: Sarah Catherine Smith, a senior from Brandenburg. Montina Marie Thomas, a senior from Brandenburg. Campbellsville University is a private, comprehensive institution located in South Central Kentucky.

MEADE COUNTY OFFICES PVA Judge/Exec. Attorney Clerk Sheriff Jailer Coroner Surveyor

Rebecca Richardson (D), Dennis Farmer (D) Harry Craycroft (D) Jessica Brown Roberts (D) Katrina Fitzgerald (D) Clifford Wise (D), John Stinebruner (R) Troy Seelye (D), Joe Wood (D) William R. “Bill” Adams (D) No papers yet filed MEADE COUNTY MAGISTRATES

D1 —

Muldraugh, Woodland, Grahamton

Chris Cottrell (D), Charles E. Coghill (D)

D2 — D3 —

Herbert “Herbie” Chism II (D), John Eugene Jones (R) Mark D. Hubbard (D)

D4 —

B’burg East, B’burg West, Ashton

Gary P. Chapman (R)

D5 —

Ekron, Buck Grove, Garrett

Harold E. Davidson (D)

D6—

Randall Hardesty (D)

Rock Haven, Doe Valley, Weldon Flaherty, Guston, Otter Creek

Payneville, B’town, Wolf Creek

MEADE COUNTY CONSTABLES D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6

Christopher D. Williams (R), Henry Bailey (D) James R. Tanner (D) No papers yet filed Jason L. Fore (D) James P. Harris (R) No papers yet filed MAYOR Kenneth H. Toler (NP)

Muldraugh

STATE State Rep. Dis. Judge — D1 Dis. Judge — D2 Cmwlth Aty. —D46

AND

DISTRICT OFFICES

Jeff Greer (D) Steve Crebessa (NP) Darren Sipes (NP), Shan F. Embry (NP) Susan Streible (D)

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2010.01.22 The News Standard