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Business, A6

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District dominance

Browse hard-to-come-by trinkets and everyday items at The Finde it Shoppe.

Both basketball teams bowed out of playoffs, but not before winning districts.

Friday, March 7, 2008

The Sprint Cup Series quickly goes from penthouse to outhouse.

The News Standard

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Meade County's Paper for the People Meade County, Kentucky

Volume 2. No. 22

$1.7 million sale, every acre of Buttermilk Falls committed By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com Brandenburg Mayor David Pace made two special announcements regarding the Buttermilk Falls Industrial Park on Tuesday, one of which was the $1.7 million dollar sale of 104 acres to Meade County Energy, LLC. Pace, who also serves as the Brandenburg-Meade

County Industrial Authority chair, made the announcement at Brandenburg City Hall on Tuesday to a crowd of former and current city and county officials. In addition to the sale of land, Pace also said that a recent option contract was signed by an unnamed party for about 400 acres. “This is one of the biggest days on the Industrial Authority’s behalf in a long

time,” Pace said. He thanked previous Fiscal Court members who “went out on a line” to help purchase the 550 acres from Arch Chemicals at the end of 2005. He also commended current city council members, current Fiscal Court members, BrandenburgMeade County Industrial Authority members, County Judge/Executive Harry Craycroft, former County Judge/

Executive William Haynes, county magistrates and other personnel who stayed committed to bringing industry to the county. He said that in roughly 26 months from the time the deed was signed under the Industrial Authority’s name — which as a Brandenburg and Meade County entity made the land property of both the city and county — every bit of the 550 acres is

either purchased or committed. “This is one of the biggest deals in Meade County in years,” he said. “And for the children of our community to have a future.” Meade County Energy, LLC — which is owned by Harry and Judy Lusk — will work with AgriFuels to build a 55 million-gallon ethanol plant in the industrial park. The companies

Muldraugh City Hall revives insurance tax

See TAX, A10

See SALE, A2

Disaster center opens in county

By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com MULDRAUGH — An amendment to Ordinance No. 277 that would implement an 8.5 percent tax on life and health insurance premiums was initially shot down by city council members, but later came to pass at a special session this week. During a special meeting held Feb. 26 at Muldraugh City Hall, city council members voted 4-2 that the first reading of Ordinance No. 277 be tabled. The ordinance was revised and during another special meeting held Friday, two drafts of the ordinance were presented — one that taxed 8.5 percent of only life insurance premiums, and the original draft that taxed 8.5 percent of health and life insurance premiums. The original draft passed, and will take effect in July. The tax on insurance has been mulled over by city council members for several months as a way for the city to generate funds for the police department because its staff and funding is dwindling. During the Feb. 26 meeting, councilmen John Haynes, Donnie Basham, Ralph Lee and councilwoman Brenda Carlberg passed dissenting votes to have the first reading of the ordinance, and instead opted to have the ordinance only tax life

will also work in conjunction with the Meade County Riverport as it also develops along the Ohio River. The scope of the project is to “explore production of ethanol, not dependent on corn as the feedstock used for production, even though it will start operations using corn,” according to a press release from Meade County

By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com

THE NEWS STANDARD/CHELSEY GARRIS

Workers have been making repairs to Meade-Olin park as often as possible since the Feb. 5 tornado that left it in shambles. Wet weather has hindered progress, and baseball season is quickly approaching.

Ballpark repairs bogged by rain By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com BRANDENBURG — Fiscal Court welcomed Meade County Parks Director Danny Tate to a special meeting where he gave an update on the status of repairs being made to Meade-Olin Park. During a special meeting held Tuesday at the courthouse, Tate told Fiscal Court that workers have been making repairs to the park since the Feb. 5 tornado that left the ballpark in shambles, but wet weather has been slowing progress. “We’ve had a wet few weeks that’s been making it

hard out there,” Tate said. Tate said light poles have been ordered and should hopefully arrive next week, and once the lights are working there will be a lot of night work done to get the fields cleaned up and other construction projects completed. He said he was on a very tight schedule because the Meade County baseball and softball teams begin their season in three weeks, and little league games begin in five weeks. Meade County Judge/Executive Harry Craycroft said baseball and softball coaches are on their own as far as practice, because it’s unsafe for anyone to be on the

See BALLPARK, A10

Personnel from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Small Business Administration are presently on hand at the Meade County Fairgrounds, offering one-onone assistance to local residents who are trying to recoup from February tornado damage. The disaster recovery center is set up inside a large RV located next to the Farm Bureau Building, and is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Saturday, March 8. The center opened Monday and is equipped with personnel offering crisis counseling and hazard mitigation, as well as FEMA and Small Business Administration agents. Individuals and business owners whose properties have sustained damage caused by the tornado that tore through the county Feb. 5 are encouraged to apply for federal and state disaster aid by registering over the phone, then visiting the local recovery center for more information. “The important thing is for people to register before they see us by calling over the

See DISASTER, A2

Local landmark links ‘Honest Abe’ to Meade County By Jorena D. Faulkner jorena@thenewsstandard.com The bicentennial birthday of the 16th president of the United States — Abraham Lincoln — will be celebrated Feb. 12, 2009. The National Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Inaugural Ceremony was to be held Feb. 12, 2008 at the Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site in Hodgenville, however an unexpected snow and ice storm terminated the activities due to the outside event location. But not to worry, Kentucky will be commemorating this presidential connection with a yearlong celebration of “all things Abe.” The Kentucky Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission in conjunction with the Kentucky His-

torical Society have come together to establish Lincoln as a Kentuckian, on both a state and national level, by telling the critical role that Kentucky and Kentuckians played in the life and career of Abraham Lincoln. The celebration hopes to incorporate the relevance of the Lincoln story into educational programming across the state, strengthen the long-term legacy of Kentucky’s Lincoln sites and museums, and enhance Kentucky’s heritage tourism industry, according to The Kentucky Historical Society. James C. Klotter, the State Historian of Kentucky and Professor of History at Georgetown College, is well acquainted with President Lincoln — historically referred to as “The Great Emancipator.” Hav-

ing written several books including “A New History of Kentucky” and “Faces of Kentucky,” Klotter has been speaking at recent bicentennial events about the importance of Lincoln‘s Kentucky heritage, of Lincoln’s influence on Kentucky, and Kentucky’s influence on Lincoln. “I think that the two each influenced the other,” Klotter said. “That is, Lincoln influenced Kentucky, and Kentucky influenced Lincoln. Kentucky’s influence on Lincoln is clear in a sense that Lincoln was born here. The Jesuits have a saying ‘give us a boy for seven years and you can have the man.’ In a sense, we’ll shape him if we have him the first seven years of life. Well, Kentucky had Lincoln for that long. We shaped him.”

“The second thing, I think, is that we obviously influenced Lincoln after he left the state by his parents and step-mother, all three of his law partners were Kentuckians, and of course he married a Kentucky woman, his best friend was a Kentuckian — so Kentucky continues to influence Lincoln after he leaves the state.” Lincoln realized early on the value of the Commonwealth as a strategic stronghold to the Union during the Civil War. “He recognizes the importance of Kentucky to the Union,” Klotter said. “You know there’s that famous quote where Lincoln says, ‘I think to lose Kentucky, is nearly the same as to lose the entire

See ABE, A10

COURTESY PHOTO

Thomas Lincoln helped build the mill at historical Doe Run Inn.

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THE NEWS STANDARD

Page A2

Friday, March 7, 2008

Residents frustrated about county road policy By Laura Saylor editor@thenewsstandard.com Several Meade County residents attended a Fiscal Court work session on Tuesday to voice frustration regarding the condition of their private road. Nearly a dozen people living on Ditto Lane — located at the Hardin-Meade County line on state Route 144 — were in attendance at the Fiscal Court work session held Tuesday evening at the courthouse. The group has tried to have the lane accepted into the county’s road service district since 1993, but felt it has been neglected by county officials over the years. Residents’ major concerns were that county garbage

trucks were contributing to the road’s poor condition, yet because garbage collection is mandatory in the county they found themselves in a Catch-22; also, property values would increase if the dirt lane was more passable, and residents were upset about spending thousands of dollars to fill potholes while their petition to have the road county-maintained has fallen through the cracks. Only a segment of Ditto Lane that is two-tenths of a mile long is what residents say is impassable and needs to be county-maintained. Meade County Judge/ Executive Harry Craycroft and county magistrates couldn’t shed a lot of light on why the Ditto Lane peti-

tion hadn’t carried through in 1993, since they were elected years later. Craycroft offered to have Mark Popham, Meade County road supervisor, and magistrate Tom Goddard view the portion of Ditto Lane that’s in question and discuss with residents what type of work would need done to bring it up to county road specifications. “They can help draw up an estimate of what it cost … and then we can go from there,” he said. Fiscal Court imposed a moratorium on accepting private roads into the public road system last year, giving Fiscal Court members time to amend the county’s current policy on accepting and maintaining private roads.

Several factors spurred Fiscal Court’s reasoning for adjusting the current county road ordinance. Currently, the county is sometimes losing big money once it accepts private roads and begins maintaining them because the inflation rate set in the ordinance isn’t enough to cover the rising costs of fuel, labor and materials. Craycroft said in one instance, property owners paid $26,000 to have their private road accepted in the county road system, yet the county spent $40,000 maintaining it. Presently, 51 percent of registered voters who are property owners along the road must want the road adopted by the county before

it can be accepted. Property owners who don’t want the road adopted sometimes refuse to pay road fees if their road becomes part of the county road system. County Attorney Margaret Matney said during a February meeting that because of this, collecting fees can become a nightmare for those people who refuse to pay. She spoke with several county attorneys in surrounding counties since the February Fiscal Court meeting, and inquired about their road policies. “I have yet to find a county that does it,” Matney said in regard to a road ordinance similar to Meade County’s. Fiscal Court members

suggested raising the inflation rate set in the ordinance from five percent to 10 percent to help cut back the amount of money the county spends maintaining recently-adopted roads. Also discussed was expediting the lien process against delinquencies from one year to 120 days. Magistrate Steve Wardrip said he hates to put a hardship on people who don’t want their road countymaintained because they can’t afford the road fee. Fiscal Court members said they want to be fair and adopt a road if property owners along the road want it to be a county road, but don’t want to strap property owners along the same road who can’t afford it.

Woman turns herself in after hit and run on Route 144 Staff report

THE NEWS STANDARD/LAURA SAYLOR

Former and current city and county officials were present to receive a $1.7 million check for land purchased at Buttermilk Falls. Pictured left to right are Brandenburg city councilwoman Maggie Love, councilwoman Patsy Lusk, former Meade County Judge/Executive William Haynes, Industrial Authority member Jeanna Turner, Meade County Judge/Executive Harry Craycroft, Brandenburg Mayor David Pace, Industrial Authority member Carl Austin, former magistrate Harold Davidson, magistrate Herbie Chism, magistrate Mark Hubbard, councilman Bruce Fackler, magistrate Steve Wardrip, magistrate Tony Staples and magistrate Randall Hardesty.

Sale From page A1

Energy, LLC. The ethanol plant is expected to create more than 100 jobs in the county. Pace didn’t disclose the name of the firm that signed the option contract with the Industrial Authority for the approximate 400 acres. The

Disaster From page A1

phone,” said Robin Wright, manager of the Meade County FEMA disaster recovery center. “They will be given a registration number and will go through all the basic information … and then when they see us they can spend time asking all the other questions and getting extra information they need.” More than a dozen Meade County residents visited the recovery center on Monday, and those who attended were a mixture of individuals and business owners, Wright said. “Of course, there are a lot of farmers in the area who are also applying,” said William C. Lindsey, a FEMA public information officer who was also on site. Lindsey said the agents on hand understand each individual’s needs are unique and the benefit of visiting the disaster center is having one-on-one conversations with people who listen and offer the best assistance they can. “Once people sit down and start working with us I think they get a sense of connection,” he said. “It’s good to be able to talk with someone face-to-face, and to know they’ve seen disasters like this before and can offer help.” After registering with

option is for 90 days with three additional 90-day periods available, and the option can be signed anytime within those 90 days. The price agreed upon is $25,000 per acre. Pace said it hasn’t always been an easy road and the Industrial Authority had been met with criticism over the last two years, but this recent progress toward developing the plant is a huge success for everyone who stayed dedicated to

the project, and to the citizens of Meade County. “We can make this park one of the premiere sites in Kentucky,” he said. Craycroft also thanked everyone who helped forward progress of the development of the industrial park, and said it was a great day for the city and county. “We look forward to getting this plant going and putting Meade County on the map,” he said.

FEMA, individuals are eligible to receive federal grants and other assistance, such as rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes are unlivable; grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance to make damaged dwellings safe; grants to replace personal property and help meet medical, dental, transportation and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs; low-interest loans up to $200,000 for primary residence and $40,000 for personal property, including renter losses; loans up to $1.5 million for businesses and loans up to $500,000 for farmers, ranchers or aquaculture operators. The Small Business Administration offers lowinterest loans to homeowners and business owners to help repair or replace disaster damaged real estate, personal property or small businesses. Richard LaPrad, a Small Business Administration disaster assistance team leader, said there are several options for small business owners to consider. He is also stationed at the disaster recovery center, and will be available for local business owners to talk with. Lindsey cautioned everyone who sustained damage to their home, property or business to be wary of illegitimate calls or visits

from non-FEMA and nonSmall Business Administration employees. FEMA and Small Business Administration workers will never ask for fees, and will be willing to show their credentials proving they are government employees. “With any contractor, have a contract in writing that covers everything from the scope of the work to be done to an estimated completion date, and make sure they are insured,” he said. He and Wright commended their welcome to the county by Brandenburg Mayor David Pace and Ron Dodson, director of Meade County Emergency Management. Lindsey said the community had done a great job of coming together and recovering from the storm damage as a whole. “The volunteer organizations here have been a huge help,” Wright said. “We can see how active they are in helping the community.” To register for federal disaster assistance — which is recommend every individual does before visiting the disaster center — call 1-800-621-3362, or call 1-800462-7585 for the speech and hearing impaired, or apply online at www.fema.gov. For more information about Small Business Administration disaster assistance, call 1-800-659-2955 or visit www.sba.gov. The deadline for applications for physical damages to homes, personal property or businesses is April 21, 2008.

Report A Crime... 270-422-HOPE (4673)

A Bardstown woman was killed Saturday night on state Route 144 in Meade County after being struck by a vehicle. Bille Jo Webb, 28, was walking along state Route 144 near Boonedock’s — two miles west of Vine Grove — when she was hit by an unknown vehicle, according to a Kentucky State Police news release. The car was described by witnesses as a blue mid-size sport utility vehicle with

Alcohol was suspected to be involved with the accident, but was not confirmed. The victim was removed from the scene by a LifeNet Air Ambulance and was taken to the University of Louisville Hospital. An autopsy was scheduled for Sunday, March 2. Constable Henry Bailey and personnel from the Meade County Sheriff’s Department, Meade County EMS and the Flaherty Fire Department reported to the accident.

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St. Christopher School Gym, 1225 S. Wilson Rd., Radcliff Selling a huge line of personal property from different households to include: Furniture: Entertainment center, Wall mirror, 2 arm chairs, Floor lamp, Desk lamp, Kitchen table w/2 chairs, Kitchen table with leaf, 2 folding cots, round brass/glass table, File cabinet, 2 swivel bar stools, Small butcher block table, Shelf unit 2/glass doors, 2 shelf units, Wicker rocking chair, bookcase and more items not yet inventoried. Antiques and Collectibles: 2 Wheat cradles, White baby cradle, Letter cutter/saw sharpener, Cast iron Kitchen step stove, Oak dresser, 1/2 gallon jar lamp dated 1859, Single bed, Large corn sheller, Large rug loom, Chifforobe, Crock jars, Old military uniforms and medals, 22 primitive church pews from Stithton Baptist church, Ky. Derby glasses, Louisville Stoneware pottery, Union Pacific RR brass spittoon, Victorian walnut chairs, Ladderback chairs, silver plate items, milk glass items, rockers, Wingback chair, Peddle sewing machine stand, picture frames, stemmed crystal, J.E.G. Meakin soup tureen, Niwood berry and table set, ironstone items, Old stamps and books, Iron trivets, Bird of America books prints by Audubon, Blue granite pail, Taylor lemonade jar, tools, Ruby glass pitcher and glasses, 8 Audubon bird prints, Missionary buffet and more items not yet inventoried. Miscellaneous: A huge assortment of artificial flowers and related floral arrangement items, Panasonic Stereo w/2 speakers, Fischer dual tape deck, ProForm Electronic treadmill and many more items not yet inventoried. Vehicles: Note: Vehicles will sell promptly at 11:00 A.M. CARS/TRUCKS: 1972 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu, 1997 Ford F-150 Pickup Truck Extended Cab 3d Door 4x4, 2000 Honda S2000 6 speed Convertible sports car, 2002 Dodge Pickup truck 2500 Extended Cab Cummings Diesel 4x4, 2003 Ford Escape, 2003 Jeep Liberty, 2005 Ford Ranger Pickup truck, 2005 Dodge Magnum SXT. MOTORCYCLES: 2006 Victory Vegas with 467 miles, 2006 Harley Davidson FLSTFI Fat Boy with 10764 miles, 2005 Vento V-Thunder with 1605 miles. More cars, trucks and motorcycles may added. All vehicles are subject to sale prior to auction. Guns: NOTE: Guns sell immediately following the vehicles. EIG-Eibar 9mm rifle, JC Higgins .22 cal rifle, Waffen Fabrick rifle, Noble 410 ga. shotgun, Eagle Arms AR 15, Praduzeca 44 Model 98 rifle, Ithaca .22 cal rifle, Unknown old military rifle, Japanese military rifle, Japanese rifle sporterized, Belgique rifle, Largo .38 cal pistol, H&R .38 CTGE Pistol, Colt .357 Trooper pistol, Marathon .32 inline BP rifle , Pedersoli .54 cal BP rifle, Narain Jaganath BP shotgun, F. Llipetta .44 cal BP pistol, F. Llipetta .36 cal BP pistol, unknown .36 cal BP pistol and more to be added. Terms and Conditions: A 10% buyers premium will be added to all winning bids to determine sales price. All items to be removed day of auction unless coordination made for large items. Payment to be by check, cash, or Vias/MC. Auctioneers Note: Please check our website at www.ActionAuctionInfo.com for up to date information and pictures. Refreshments will be available. Portions of the sale may be conducted with two auction crews, so bring someone to bid for you if necessary.

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damage to the grille and passenger side headlamp. An investigation to locate the driver of the vehicle was ongoing until Carmen Stevens, 37, of Rineyville, Ky., turned herself in Monday as the driver of the SUV. She was lodged in the Meade County jail on two outstanding warrants. The accident is still being investigated and will be presented to a grand jury when complete, according to Kentucky State Police Post 4 in Elizabethtown, Ky.

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VIEWPOINTS

Friday, March 7, 2008 Letter to the Editor

Page A3

Dear Editor, I have been watching our high school girls basketball team for four years now and as a dedicated fan I feel that there should be more fans in the stands. These girls take time from their free time, away from classes, to represent our school, our town and county. I know that I might rub someone wrong, but sometimes when the boys play first the crowd thins before girls halftime, even when the fame is close. On the other hand, when the girls play first the crowd doesn’t get bigger until about halftime. I have seen these girls play hard-nose basketball and I think that if some would watch once they would come back. When the girls and boys both play you only pay one admission. When there is a boys or girls game, there is also a junior varsity game. We need to remember that this is a time to see future varsity players. I wish to tell the girls to remember that all year is what makes a team great. Spirit is what they have always showed me. I wish to thank all of the girls that have made my evenings enjoyable during the winter months. I definitely thank the boys team for the same reason. They make me proud that I live in this town and county. Bill Bassett Meade County

Brain injury or stress? Veterans Post Freddy Groves All military personnel returning from Iraq are now being screened for concussion. Sounds like one step in a medical evaluation — except it’s a bigger deal than it might first appear. A recent study of 2,525 infantry soldiers published in the New England Journal of Medicine, concludes that those who suffered concussions (mild traumatic brain injury) were more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder than those who hadn’t. Additionally, it’s the PTSD that causes a lot of the subsequent physical symptoms, not the brain injury. Some doctors were initially skeptical. (As was I.) Returning soldiers often experience memory loss, sleep disturbances, headaches and problems concentrating — all of which are symptoms of both traumatic stress and brain injury. The one key symptom was headache — more often aligned with brain injury than PTSD. Another key point is whether a soldier

Stop ‘Monopoly’ players from passing ‘Go’

lost consciousness during a brain injury, such as during a blast. Forty percent of those who did also met the criteria for PTSD, especially when the event was combined with altered mental state (confusion) immediately afterward. While I was initially skeptical about the study, I’m not now. The research seems pretty solid. What worries me is that those who are in charge of determining a soldier’s disability compensation might well take the easy way out: “Oh, you don’t have brain injury; it’s just PTSD, which we can fix. No money for you.” I fear too that cases of genuine brain injury will be missed, leaving soldiers to suffer long-term effects when they’re treated for the wrong thing. Whether it ends up being labeled PTSD or TBI, evaluators need to remember that it was the traumatic brain injury that started it. You can find the study at http://content.nejm.org in the Jan. 31, 2008 issue. Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail. com.

ABC’s John Stossel in a “20/20” report examined America’s education system in a segment called “Stupid in America.” It wasn’t pretty. Teacher unions and bought-andsold politicians don’t look so good when a reporter of Stossel’s ilk tells the unvarnished truth about public schools. The unions moaned, and one in New York, which planned to give Stossel an award, pulled it after the piece aired. But many levelheaded viewers — including teachers — cheered. Stossel’s investigation showed how students keep falling way behind their peers in other countries where school choice prevails. Unions staunchly oppose giving parents the freedom to determine where students go to school, and where the money their taxes provide for schools goes. “Now, my tiny brain can’t imagine what experiments might blossom if we had a market in education, because markets work without central planners trying to picket,” Stossel said during a speech at the Heritage Foundation’s spring 2006 President’s Club in Washington, DC. Unions don’t like that kind of talk but cannot refute it. Stossel and others know that bureaucracy makes it nearly impossible to fire teachers in public schools — even ones accused of making sexual advances toward students. He also knows that school choice would result in some teachers — good ones — getting big pay raises based on stu-

That’s because the school districts dent performance. “Government can’t run steel mills these special-needs students left or airlines,” Stossel also has said. would still receive the same amount “Why should we think a govof money from other local ernment monopoly would be and federal revenue sources Bluegrass without the responsibility, good at educating kids?” Americans have benefited or cost, of teaching as many Beacon greatly from the break-up of kids. monopolies so we have better •Second, House Bill 578 choices. would make Kentucky the It’s spring, and just like 41st state (plus the District Chicago Cub fans, Kentuckof Columbia) with charter ians should have hope. Beschools. Herbert J. Walberg cause school-choice bills filed of the Hoover Institution in the Legislature provide a said in an interview with the reason for it. Cato Institute about his book, •House Bill 397 would offer Jim Waters “School Choice: The Findscholarships for Kentucky’s ings,” that charter schools are 109,000 special-needs children to at- “growing like lightning” throughout tend schools of their liking. the country. School districts often claim specialWhy? Because charter schools alneeds students represent the most low low-income parents, those who costly group for which to provide a couldn’t afford to pay private-school “free and appropriate education,” as tuition, the opportunity to enjoy the the federal law requires. benefits of school choice. Why should The research backs up this claim. a parent’s zip code or small paycheck Vicki Murray of the Pacific Research keep a student from enjoying the Institute, who wrote a report on benefits of quality education? Kentucky’s proposed special-needs And the more residents who show bill, found that every special-needs support, the less chance opponents student who receives a scholarship of education freedom have to stop “could save the state and local school the school-choice storm. districts approximately $5,100 each.” Let’s strike lightning together. If just one percent of Kentucky’s special-needs students — approxiJim Waters is the director of policy and mately 1,100 — could have partici- communications for the Bluegrass Instipated in this type of scholarship pro- tute, Kentucky’s free-market think tank. gram in 2005, the state and school You can reach him at jwaters@bipps.org. districts would have saved an esti- You can read previously published colmated $5.7 million. umns at www.bipps.org.

Local community needs to help children find the right path It was a warm spring day things to do. in 1979 when my seventh The local roller rink and grade band class boarded the bowling alley offered hours bus to a competition of supervised activat Western Kentucky ity, fun and music. Away with The movie theater University. Winning was the last thing in town had a great Words on our 13-year-old, matinee. My friends hormonally chaland I met at the lolenged minds as we cal video arcade; fought our way to other friends were the back row of seats dedicated to church for a game of Truth youth groups. The or Dare. I’d never community center alplayed before and I ways had something was nervous; sweaty going on for the kids Jorena Faulkner and teenagers in the palms and rapid heartbeat a warning area. Yes, those were that I was about to tread new the days. Unfortunately, for territory. In that back seat, the most part, they’re long I received my first kiss on a gone. dare. Fast forward to 2008, my In those days, kissing was 13-year-old son is sitting in about all we knew to do. Of front of me with a letter from course the rumor mill and his middle school that he bathroom walls provided says I must sign. As I begin sketchy — at best — ideas reading, my eyes automatiabout the birds and the bees. cally focus on the word “sexIn our malinformed little ual” and once again, I feel minds, it just sounded too that rapid heartbeat warning gross. Plus, we had better me that I am about to tread

new territory. Territory I’ve been hoping to evade for most of my child’s growing years; but the time has finally come. And in a community with very little else for young teens to do other than prove or disprove bathroom wall theory, not a minute too soon, in my opinion. The Stuart Pepper Middle School will be presenting a course entitled “Choosing the Best Path” (www.choosingthebest.org) for the seventh graders, which focuses on sexual abstinence. During the weeklong class students discuss sex, the risks of STD, HIV and AIDS, teen pregnancy, safe sex, setting boundaries and so on. The letter provides data from an independent study of the program showing that after 12 months, there was a 47 percent reduction in the initiation of teen sex among those students who received the program, compared to a group who did not.

I check “YES my child can attend class for Choosing the Best Path,” sign it, and hand it back to him. I am grateful that the school system is doing everything they can to ensure my child is armed with the knowledge to make a better choice. I applaud their proactive stance of preventative maintenance via education. However, I personally don’t believe that all of the teens having sex in Meade County are necessarily uneducated in the ways of abstinence or the dangers of promiscuity. I think they are unsupervised and bored. According to Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance in 2003, four percent of female high school students and eight percent of male high school students in Kentucky reported having sexual intercourse before age 13. That same year, 54 percent of female high school students and 50 percent of male high school students in Kentucky,

the wind, when there’s nothing better to do. I think this community should seriously commit to providing more safe and positive alternatives for our young people. A teen activity center, community center or community playhouse would be a good place to start. Promoting the establishment of local businesses, who offer affordable kid and teen-friendly activities, comes with an even greater benefit to our children — the expansion of their job market. Many of the teens I spoke with simply wanted to work. I’d take a job over an unwanted pregnancy any day. I guess the bottom line is — we have to make a concerted community effort to help our children choose the best path, because unless we begin to lay the foundation — and soon — the best we can offer is a muddy trail straight into the statistic pool.

To Reach Us

The News Standard

News Laura Saylor, editor - editor@thenewsstandard.com Jorena Faulkner, staff writer - jorena@thenewsstandard.com Felicia Thompson, youth writer - thompson@thenewsstandard.com Chelsey Garris, youth writer - chelsey@thenewsstandard.com Sean Lowe, youth writer - lowe@thenewsstandard.com

1065 Old Ekron Road Brandenburg, Kentucky 40108 Phone 270-422-4542 • Fax 270-422-4575

Advertising

Sue Shacklette Cummings Publisher

Charlotte C. Fackler

Laura Saylor

General Manager

Editor

The ultimate goal of The News Standard’s Viewpoints page is to encourage frank and lively discussion on topics of interest to Meade County. Editorials are the opinion of newspaper management. Columns represent the view of the writer and do not necessarily represent the view of the management. The News Standard welcomes and encourages letters to the editor. All letters must be no more

reported having had sexual intercourse. It concerns me that this community doesn’t have much more for teenagers to do other than experiment down at the “Boat Dock.” These kids need supervision. They need positive alternatives to necking down at Otter Creek or underage drinking at the lake. Our collective motto should be “less pamphlet, more parent and community responsibility.” In talking to several local teens about the issue, the resounding consensus is that there’s nothing to do around here. They feel forgotten and misplaced. Many cannot wait to “grow up” and “get out of town.” Some admit to having sex. Is it because they’re uniformed about the issues of teen pregnancy, or the rising danger of STDs? No. They’re fully aware that they are growing up in a different era. But caution is thrown to

than 500 words and must include a signature, town of residence and phone number for confirmation. Letters may be edited for grammar, space and clarity. Letters may be handwritten, typed or e-mailed. Letters on redundant topics will not be published. Letters will appear as space permits. Letters are due by 5 p.m. Tuesday before publication. Letters may be faxed, mailed or sent by e-mail to editor@thenewsstandard.com.

ads@thenewsstandard.com Angelika Gilley, Clorisa Fiveash or Tennille Trent, sales Cheri Pendleton or Shelby Snider, graphic designers

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VIEWPOINTS

Friday, March 7, 2008 Letter to the Editor

Page A3

Dear Editor, I have been watching our high school girls basketball team for four years now and as a dedicated fan I feel that there should be more fans in the stands. These girls take time from their free time, away from classes, to represent our school, our town and county. I know that I might rub someone wrong, but sometimes when the boys play first the crowd thins before girls halftime, even when the fame is close. On the other hand, when the girls play first the crowd doesn’t get bigger until about halftime. I have seen these girls play hard-nose basketball and I think that if some would watch once they would come back. When the girls and boys both play you only pay one admission. When there is a boys or girls game, there is also a junior varsity game. We need to remember that this is a time to see future varsity players. I wish to tell the girls to remember that all year is what makes a team great. Spirit is what they have always showed me. I wish to thank all of the girls that have made my evenings enjoyable during the winter months. I definitely thank the boys team for the same reason. They make me proud that I live in this town and county. Bill Bassett Meade County

Brain injury or stress? Veterans Post Freddy Groves All military personnel returning from Iraq are now being screened for concussion. Sounds like one step in a medical evaluation — except it’s a bigger deal than it might first appear. A recent study of 2,525 infantry soldiers published in the New England Journal of Medicine, concludes that those who suffered concussions (mild traumatic brain injury) were more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder than those who hadn’t. Additionally, it’s the PTSD that causes a lot of the subsequent physical symptoms, not the brain injury. Some doctors were initially skeptical. (As was I.) Returning soldiers often experience memory loss, sleep disturbances, headaches and problems concentrating — all of which are symptoms of both traumatic stress and brain injury. The one key symptom was headache — more often aligned with brain injury than PTSD. Another key point is whether a soldier

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lost consciousness during a brain injury, such as during a blast. Forty percent of those who did also met the criteria for PTSD, especially when the event was combined with altered mental state (confusion) immediately afterward. While I was initially skeptical about the study, I’m not now. The research seems pretty solid. What worries me is that those who are in charge of determining a soldier’s disability compensation might well take the easy way out: “Oh, you don’t have brain injury; it’s just PTSD, which we can fix. No money for you.” I fear too that cases of genuine brain injury will be missed, leaving soldiers to suffer long-term effects when they’re treated for the wrong thing. Whether it ends up being labeled PTSD or TBI, evaluators need to remember that it was the traumatic brain injury that started it. You can find the study at http://content.nejm.org in the Jan. 31, 2008 issue. Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail. com.

ABC’s John Stossel in a “20/20” report examined America’s education system in a segment called “Stupid in America.” It wasn’t pretty. Teacher unions and bought-andsold politicians don’t look so good when a reporter of Stossel’s ilk tells the unvarnished truth about public schools. The unions moaned, and one in New York, which planned to give Stossel an award, pulled it after the piece aired. But many levelheaded viewers — including teachers — cheered. Stossel’s investigation showed how students keep falling way behind their peers in other countries where school choice prevails. Unions staunchly oppose giving parents the freedom to determine where students go to school, and where the money their taxes provide for schools goes. “Now, my tiny brain can’t imagine what experiments might blossom if we had a market in education, because markets work without central planners trying to picket,” Stossel said during a speech at the Heritage Foundation’s spring 2006 President’s Club in Washington, DC. Unions don’t like that kind of talk but cannot refute it. Stossel and others know that bureaucracy makes it nearly impossible to fire teachers in public schools — even ones accused of making sexual advances toward students. He also knows that school choice would result in some teachers — good ones — getting big pay raises based on stu-

That’s because the school districts dent performance. “Government can’t run steel mills these special-needs students left or airlines,” Stossel also has said. would still receive the same amount “Why should we think a govof money from other local ernment monopoly would be and federal revenue sources Bluegrass without the responsibility, good at educating kids?” Americans have benefited or cost, of teaching as many Beacon greatly from the break-up of kids. monopolies so we have better •Second, House Bill 578 choices. would make Kentucky the It’s spring, and just like 41st state (plus the District Chicago Cub fans, Kentuckof Columbia) with charter ians should have hope. Beschools. Herbert J. Walberg cause school-choice bills filed of the Hoover Institution in the Legislature provide a said in an interview with the reason for it. Cato Institute about his book, •House Bill 397 would offer Jim Waters “School Choice: The Findscholarships for Kentucky’s ings,” that charter schools are 109,000 special-needs children to at- “growing like lightning” throughout tend schools of their liking. the country. School districts often claim specialWhy? Because charter schools alneeds students represent the most low low-income parents, those who costly group for which to provide a couldn’t afford to pay private-school “free and appropriate education,” as tuition, the opportunity to enjoy the the federal law requires. benefits of school choice. Why should The research backs up this claim. a parent’s zip code or small paycheck Vicki Murray of the Pacific Research keep a student from enjoying the Institute, who wrote a report on benefits of quality education? Kentucky’s proposed special-needs And the more residents who show bill, found that every special-needs support, the less chance opponents student who receives a scholarship of education freedom have to stop “could save the state and local school the school-choice storm. districts approximately $5,100 each.” Let’s strike lightning together. If just one percent of Kentucky’s special-needs students — approxiJim Waters is the director of policy and mately 1,100 — could have partici- communications for the Bluegrass Instipated in this type of scholarship pro- tute, Kentucky’s free-market think tank. gram in 2005, the state and school You can reach him at jwaters@bipps.org. districts would have saved an esti- You can read previously published colmated $5.7 million. umns at www.bipps.org.

Local community needs to help children find the right path It was a warm spring day things to do. in 1979 when my seventh The local roller rink and grade band class boarded the bowling alley offered hours bus to a competition of supervised activat Western Kentucky ity, fun and music. Away with The movie theater University. Winning was the last thing in town had a great Words on our 13-year-old, matinee. My friends hormonally chaland I met at the lolenged minds as we cal video arcade; fought our way to other friends were the back row of seats dedicated to church for a game of Truth youth groups. The or Dare. I’d never community center alplayed before and I ways had something was nervous; sweaty going on for the kids Jorena Faulkner and teenagers in the palms and rapid heartbeat a warning area. Yes, those were that I was about to tread new the days. Unfortunately, for territory. In that back seat, the most part, they’re long I received my first kiss on a gone. dare. Fast forward to 2008, my In those days, kissing was 13-year-old son is sitting in about all we knew to do. Of front of me with a letter from course the rumor mill and his middle school that he bathroom walls provided says I must sign. As I begin sketchy — at best — ideas reading, my eyes automatiabout the birds and the bees. cally focus on the word “sexIn our malinformed little ual” and once again, I feel minds, it just sounded too that rapid heartbeat warning gross. Plus, we had better me that I am about to tread

new territory. Territory I’ve been hoping to evade for most of my child’s growing years; but the time has finally come. And in a community with very little else for young teens to do other than prove or disprove bathroom wall theory, not a minute too soon, in my opinion. The Stuart Pepper Middle School will be presenting a course entitled “Choosing the Best Path” (www.choosingthebest.org) for the seventh graders, which focuses on sexual abstinence. During the weeklong class students discuss sex, the risks of STD, HIV and AIDS, teen pregnancy, safe sex, setting boundaries and so on. The letter provides data from an independent study of the program showing that after 12 months, there was a 47 percent reduction in the initiation of teen sex among those students who received the program, compared to a group who did not.

I check “YES my child can attend class for Choosing the Best Path,” sign it, and hand it back to him. I am grateful that the school system is doing everything they can to ensure my child is armed with the knowledge to make a better choice. I applaud their proactive stance of preventative maintenance via education. However, I personally don’t believe that all of the teens having sex in Meade County are necessarily uneducated in the ways of abstinence or the dangers of promiscuity. I think they are unsupervised and bored. According to Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance in 2003, four percent of female high school students and eight percent of male high school students in Kentucky reported having sexual intercourse before age 13. That same year, 54 percent of female high school students and 50 percent of male high school students in Kentucky,

the wind, when there’s nothing better to do. I think this community should seriously commit to providing more safe and positive alternatives for our young people. A teen activity center, community center or community playhouse would be a good place to start. Promoting the establishment of local businesses, who offer affordable kid and teen-friendly activities, comes with an even greater benefit to our children — the expansion of their job market. Many of the teens I spoke with simply wanted to work. I’d take a job over an unwanted pregnancy any day. I guess the bottom line is — we have to make a concerted community effort to help our children choose the best path, because unless we begin to lay the foundation — and soon — the best we can offer is a muddy trail straight into the statistic pool.

To Reach Us

The News Standard

News Laura Saylor, editor - editor@thenewsstandard.com Jorena Faulkner, staff writer - jorena@thenewsstandard.com Felicia Thompson, youth writer - thompson@thenewsstandard.com Chelsey Garris, youth writer - chelsey@thenewsstandard.com Sean Lowe, youth writer - lowe@thenewsstandard.com

1065 Old Ekron Road Brandenburg, Kentucky 40108 Phone 270-422-4542 • Fax 270-422-4575

Advertising

Sue Shacklette Cummings Publisher

Charlotte C. Fackler

Laura Saylor

General Manager

Editor

The ultimate goal of The News Standard’s Viewpoints page is to encourage frank and lively discussion on topics of interest to Meade County. Editorials are the opinion of newspaper management. Columns represent the view of the writer and do not necessarily represent the view of the management. The News Standard welcomes and encourages letters to the editor. All letters must be no more

reported having had sexual intercourse. It concerns me that this community doesn’t have much more for teenagers to do other than experiment down at the “Boat Dock.” These kids need supervision. They need positive alternatives to necking down at Otter Creek or underage drinking at the lake. Our collective motto should be “less pamphlet, more parent and community responsibility.” In talking to several local teens about the issue, the resounding consensus is that there’s nothing to do around here. They feel forgotten and misplaced. Many cannot wait to “grow up” and “get out of town.” Some admit to having sex. Is it because they’re uniformed about the issues of teen pregnancy, or the rising danger of STDs? No. They’re fully aware that they are growing up in a different era. But caution is thrown to

than 500 words and must include a signature, town of residence and phone number for confirmation. Letters may be edited for grammar, space and clarity. Letters may be handwritten, typed or e-mailed. Letters on redundant topics will not be published. Letters will appear as space permits. Letters are due by 5 p.m. Tuesday before publication. Letters may be faxed, mailed or sent by e-mail to editor@thenewsstandard.com.

ads@thenewsstandard.com Angelika Gilley, Clorisa Fiveash or Tennille Trent, sales Cheri Pendleton or Shelby Snider, graphic designers

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Page A4

Rose Lee Smith 1950-2008

Mrs. Rose Lee Smith, 58, Guston, Ky., died Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008, at her residence. Mrs. Smith was the farm manager for Ray’s Racing Farm in Guston, Ky. for eight years and a member of the Laborers Union in Louisville. She was preceded in death by her parents, Delbert and Florence Gray Schroll, a brother, Johnny Schroll and a sister, Jeannie Heilig. Mrs. Smith is survived by her husband, Jimmie L. Smith of Guston, Ky.; two sons, Clint Cook of Louisville and George Cook, Jr. of Peru, Ind.; a step-daughter, Lauren Smith of Flaherty, Ky.; a brother, Billy Schroll of Louisville; two sisters, Barbara Smith of Jeffersonville, Ind., and Pat Wells of Cocoa, Fla.; and three grandsons, Shane and Justin Cook of Peru, Ind. and Mackenzie Hendrick, USMC, Iraq. Funeral Services were held Sunday, March 2 from the chapel of the Hager Funeral Home with Rev. Peggy Holthaus officiating. Expressions of sympathy may take the form of contributions to Hospice of Central Kentucky. Online condolences may be left at www.hagerfuneralhome.com.

Doris J. Cowles 1922-2008

Doris J. Cowles, 86, of Vine Grove, Ky., died Tuesday, March 4, 2008 at her home. She is survived by five children, James L. Cowles, Jr. of Statesville, NC, Diane L. Schwab of Florence, Ky., Kim D. Cowles of Las Vegas, Dennis R. Cowles of Rineyville, Ky. and Sandra M. Davey of Vine Grove; numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. The visitation and service will be private with Rev. Dennis L. Cousens officiating. Burial will be at North Hardin Memorial Gardens in Radcliff, Ky. Expressions of Sympathy may take the form of contributions to Hosparus, P. O. Box 2149, Elizabethtown, KY 42702. The guest register may be signed at www.nebfh.com. Nelson-Edelen-Bennett Funeral Home in Vine Grove is in charge of arrangements.

William Everett “Luke” Dunagin 1915-2008

William Everett “Luke” Dunagin, 93, of Radcliff, Ky., died Saturday, March 1, 2008, after a brief illness, at Hardin Memorial Hospital in Elizabethtown, Ky. Luke was a member of the Kerbella Shrine Temple and twice past president of the West Knox Shrine Club. He also belonged to the Elks Club and the Eagles Club. He was an avid golfer and helped organize the Annual West Knox Shrine Golf Tournament. In the 1950’s, while living in Auburn, Wash., he was instrumental in youth sports programs. He was preceded in death by his mother, Minnie Pearl Pinkston Dunagin Adams; and his father, Frank Leslie Dunagin. He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Gail R. Dunagin; two daughters, Dianne Dunagin and her life partner Patricia Ackerman of Skykomish, Wash. and Delores “Dodie” Maier and her husband Harry Maier of Radcliff, Ky.; three grandchildren, Sean Maier and his wife Jacci Maier of Grafton W. Va., Shannon Maier of Rowlesburg, W. Va. and Colleen Maier Mann and her husband Thomas Mann of Chattanooga, Tenn.; six great-grandchildren, Caroline Renee Maier, Meredith Raye Maier, Harrison Everett Monroe Maier, Jonathan Edward Keith Maier, Abigail Deane Mann and Evalynn Pearl Mann. Any memorials may be sent to the Lexington Shriners Hospital, 1900 Richmond Road., Lexington, KY 40502 The guest register may be signed at www.nebfh.com. Nelson-Edelen-Bennett Funeral Home is in charge of local arrangements.

OBITUARIES

Friday, March 7, 2008

Stefonson L. “Stevie” Crum

Coffey & Chism Funeral Home

1987-2008

Mr. Stefonson Lewood “Stevie” Crum, 21, of Mauckport, Ind., died Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008 in Brandenburg from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. He was employed by McDonald’s in Brandenburg. He is survived by his mother and step-father, Maria and Tony Fowler of Mauckport, Ind.; his father, Dave Lennis; a son, Seth Crum; two sisters, Chenelle (Tony Hatfield) Crum of Irvington, Ky. and Katie Furnish of Mauckport, Ind.; two brothers, David and Nathan Lennis; six step-brothers and step-sisters, Brandon, Brent, Justin, Jacob, Faith and Florence Fowler; his grandparents, Dorris and Steve Shipley of Daleville, Ind.; Barbara Corkell of Henderson, Nev. and Bob (Gloria) Crum of Clarksville, Ind.; his great-grandparents, Marie and Larry Trump of Charlestown, Ind.; a niece, Chassidy Rengers; two nephews, Dustin and Austin Rengers; an aunt, Katrina Corkell; and many friends who will forever keep him in their hearts. Visitation was held at Hager Funeral Home in Brandenburg from 2 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 29. Cremation was chosen. Expressions of sympathy may take the form of contributions to the Stefonson Crum Memorial Fund. Online condolences may be left at www.hagerfuneralhome.com.

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Lena Alberta (Hardin) Robinett, 80, died Thursday, Feb. 28, 2008 at Nazareth Home. She is survived by a brother, Stan Hardin of Carthage, Tenn.; two sons, Ronald Whitley of Brandenburg and David Whitley of Louisville; two daughters, Diana Clark and Valerie Lacroix, both of Louisville; nine grandchildren; and 16 great-grandchildren. The funeral was held Monday, March 3, and burial was at Green’s Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery. Houghlin Funeral Home in Bloomfield, Ky. was in charge of arrangements.

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Gladys Birch Murray 1921-2008

Gladys Birch Murray, 87, of Radcliff, Ky., died Thursday, Feb. 28, 2008 at Kensington Manor in Elizabethtown, Ky. She was a member of Mill Creek Baptist Church where she taught Sunday School and worked in the nursery. She was a Cub Scout leader and volunteered at nursing homes for many years. Many times she visited people in their homes or at the hospital. Mrs. Murray enjoyed playing the piano, the organ and reading her Bible. She is survived by her husband, William Murray; three sons, John Murray of Tampa; James Murray of Sandy, Utah and David Murray of Radcliff, Ky.; and four grandchildren, Shannon Murray, Caitlin Murray, James Murray and John Murray. The funeral service was held on Tuesday, March 4, 2008 at Nelson-Edelen-Bennett Funeral Home in Radcliff with Dr. Jim Shaw officiating. Burial followed in the North Hardin Memorial Gardens in Radcliff. The guest register may be signed at www.nebfh.com.

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Raymond C. Brown 1915-2008

Raymond C. Brown, 93, of Vine Grove, Ky., died Sunday, March 2, 2008 at Hardin Memorial Hospital, Elizabethtown, Ky. He was a member and Deacon Emeritus of Valley View Baptist Church in Vine Grove and an officer in the Kentucky Soil Conservation Service. He was preceded in death by his wife, Marian Frances Brown. He is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, Dr. M. Kay and Martha Brown of Elizabethtown, Ky.; a daughter and son-in-law, Rosemary and Don Bennett of North Port, Fla.; three grandchildren, Laura S. Bennett, Dr. Chad Brown and Cameron Brown; and two great-grandchildren, Ethan Brown and Catherine Brown. The funeral service was held on Wednesday, March 5 at Valley View Baptist Church in Vine Grove with Rev. Ron Burgess and Rev. K. Christian Burton officiating. Burial was in the Vine Grove Cemetery. Expressions of Sympathy may take the form of contributions to Valley View Baptist Church, 501 Valley View Dr., Vine Grove KY 40175. The guest register may be signed at www.nebfh.com.

Marjorie Carole Pyle 1942-2008

Marjorie Carole Pyle, 66, of Corydon, Ind., died Saturday, March 1, 2008 at Norton’s Pavilion, Hospice of Louisville. She was born Aug. 12, 1941, the daughter of the late Calvin and Eula Pollock Johnston. She was retired from Whayne Supply Company in Louisville and had worked at O’Bannon Publishing Company in Corydon, Ind. She was a member of Lincoln Hill Christian Church in Corydon. She is survived by her husband R.E. “Brad” Pyle; cousins Joyce Angell of Neoga, Ill., and Joseph Pollock of Lexington; a stepson, Martyn Pyle of Neoga, Ill.; several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. were held on Tuesday, March 4, from the Lincoln Hills Christian Church in Corydon, Ind. with Pastor Webster Oglesby officiating. Committal followed in Louisville Memorial Gardens West. Expressions of sympathy may be made to Lincoln Hills Christian Church Building Fund. Online condolences may be made at bjsfunerals.com

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BUSINESS

Page A6

Friday, March 7, 2008

Unique variety at The Finde It Shoppe By Jorena D. Faulkner jorena@thenewsstandard.com Consigning, collecting or searching for something you just can’t seem to find anywhere else in town? If so, then The Finde It Shoppe is just the store for you. “I have a little bit of everything in here,” owner Rocklin Heath said. “I have jewelry, I have Elvis … skeletons. I sell home and garden; I make my own floral arrangements. We’ve got TVs, entertainment centers, guitars. I’ve got Black Diamond (guitar) strings coming in Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday. I’m going to be carrying musical equipment.” The Finde It Shoppe, located in Broadway Plaza at 520 East Broadway in Brandenburg, opened its doors on Friday, Feb. 29 to over 100 customers Heath said. The shop was set to open on Valentine’s Day, but the date was pushed forward due to the recent weather. “When the tornado came through it put me a week behind working up here,” Heath said. “I wanted to be open by Valentine’s Day and that put me behind because we had so much at home we had to get done. Then we had the winter storm … and then we had the ice.” After cleaning up debris from the storms, she then decided to move forward with a March 1 opening date, but alternatively settled on Feb. 29 because of leap year. “I asked myself how many times — in my lifetime — would I have to open up on a leap year,” Heath said. “How

THE NEWS STANDARD/JORENA FAULKNER

If you’ve lost it, you can find it again at ‘The Finde It Shoppe’, located on Broadway in Brandenburg across the street from St. John’s Church. special is that!” Heath has always been a collector of anything and everything, opening her first shop in Harned, Ky., using items she’d brought from home. She also has a generous streak, and has often donated her stock to families who have lost belongings due to fire or other unforeseen events. “If anyone got burned out, if I had it in the store, it was donated,” Heath said. “I do collect — year round — for Shop With a Cop and Angel Tree. I’m very big on donations. I just believe God has blessed me and I need to turn that around. I just feel so fortunate to be able to do this.” The store motto ‘If we don’t have it, we’ll try to find it for you’ showcases the variety of

services The Finde It Shoppe has to offer. “If you’re looking for something, you tell me and I’ll put it on the list,” Heath said. Just since her opening on Friday, she’s had several satisfied customers. They came in with items they were searching for and Heath went out and found it for them. “I double as a personal shopper — if you need something I’m going to go out and find it,” she said. “I love doing it. It’s in my blood.” Heath believes her affordable pricing will set her apart from other consignment shops in the area, along with her 24/7-client availability pledge and her layaway program. “I have a 30-day layaway plan,” she said. “You pay

half down, and pick up the item and pay the remaining balance in 30 days. And I’m making myself available to my clients 24 hours a day, seven days a week — I am here for them whenever they need me.” Heath doesn’t consign clothing or find items for her store at yard sales — she orders a majority of her stock. She takes consignments on a 50-50 commission, 60-40 if she has to clean it. The Finde It Shoppe will host an open house and ribbon cutting ceremony on Tuesday, March 11 at noon. Heath will be giving away a life-sized doll in a drawing, and offering lunch to attendees. “I’m going to have barbecue and sandwiches,” Heath said. “I’m going to have homemade desserts. I love to bake.” The Finde It Shoppe at 520 East Broadway is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sunday and Monday by appointment only. For more information on The Finde It Shoppe come by the shop, contact owner Rocklin Heath at 270-422-5201/5150, or e-mail rocklin50@yahoo.com.

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SALE #2: ABSOLUTE AUCTION COMMERCIAL LOT SALE #2: RE/MAX Group Auctioneers will offer at absolute auction this commercial lot consisting of 0.86 +/- acres.

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DIRECTIONS: From Elizabethtown, KY, travel U.S. Hwy 31 W N. and turn left onto 1638. Turn slight right onto KY 448. Turn left onto KY 1051 (Bypass Road). Property on left. Signs posted.

AUCTIONEERS NOTE: RE/MAX Group Auctioneers have been commissioned to sell this Retail Sales/Office Building and vacant lot rain or shine at public auction on Saturday, March 22nd at 10 am. Come prepared to bid and buy. TERMS REAL ESTATE: A 10% buyer’s premium will be added to the final bid price to determine the total sales price. 15% of the total purchase price down on Auction day. Sale #1 - Buyer will be required to pay $10,000.00 of the 15% down in the form of a cashiers check. Sale #2 - Buyer will be required to pay $5,000.00 of the 15% down in the form of a cashiers check. The balance being due with the deed within 30 days or less. The 2008 Real Estate Taxes will be Prorated between the buyer and seller to date of closing. SALE #1: Retail Sales/Office building will be landlord possession with deed within 30 days or less from day of auction. SALE #2: Vacant land possession with deed within 30 days or less of auction. For more information call Will Thompson, Auction Coordinator at 270-769-1655 or 1-800-624-1782 or e-mail at willthompson@auctiongroups.com

J.E. Bramblett, CAI, Auctioneer/Broker www.AuctionGroups.com

1-800-624-0782

RE/MAX®

Earl F. Wright Financial Advisor

Saturday, March 22 , 10 am

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RadioShack .............................. RSH ............... 17.14 Best Buy Co Inc .........................BBY ............... 42.60 Dell Inc ................................... DELL ............... 19.67 Microsoft CP........................... MSFT ............... 27.59 Wells Fargo & Co .................... WFC ............... 28.83 Vulcan Materials ..................... VMC ............... 71.11 Proctor & Gamble ...................... PG ............... 66.05 Johnson & Johnson ..................... JNJ ............... 62.64 Wal-Mart Stores ...................... WMT ............... 49.87 United Parcel B..........................UPS ............... 71.05 Fedex Corp ............................... FDX ............... 90.31 Dow Jones Industrial Average ................... 12,213.80

nd

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Deere & Co. ................................DE ............... 86.69 Caterpillar Inc............................CAT ............... 71.74 Ford Motor Co. .............................. F ................. 6.13 General Motors ......................... GM ............... 23.07 Harley-Davidson .....................HOG ............... 36.59 CSX Corp...................................CSX ............... 49.44 General Electric Co. ....................GE ............... 33.52 Peabody Energy ........................ BTU ............... 55.03 Marathon Oil...........................MRO ............... 52.86 Chevron ................................... CVX ............... 86.73 Arch Chemicals ..........................ARJ ............... 34.73 Brown Forman B....................... BF B ............... 64.53 Lowes Companies ...................LOW ............... 24.07 Home Depot Inc.........................HD ............... 26.87 McDonalds Corp .....................MCD ............... 53.63 Papa Johns .............................. PZZA ............... 25.46 Yum! Brands Inc ...................... YUM ............... 35.02 Coca-Cola Co ............................. KO ............... 59.37 Pepsico Inc ................................ PEP ............... 70.04

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STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Quotes effective as of close of market Tuesday, March 4, 2008

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reduce other government benefits they currently receive or that it will cause a tax problem. The fastest way for those seeking the tax rebate is to use direct deposit. This is true regardless of whether you must file a tax return based on income or were exempt. The only way to receive the tax rebate in 2008 is to file a 2007 tax return. In Meade County, free tax help is available for low- and moderate-income, as well as elderly taxpayers through AARP at the Meade County Public Library. A tax-aide will be on site on Fridays from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. until April 15th. For more information, contact 945-1304. If you have already filed a 2007 tax return reporting at least $3,000 in qualifying income, you do not need to do anything else to receive the stimulus payment. The first checks should go out in early May. For more information contact the Meade County Extension Service at 422-4958.

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In order for seniors to receive the rebate, you must file a federal income tax return even if you did not have to in past years. Low-income consumers — along with those who receive Social Security and veterans’ benefits, but did not need to file federal tax returns in previous years — should do so this year to receive at least $300 as an individual or $600 as a couple. The IRS has a special version of Form 1040A that you can fill out to qualify for a rebate (stimulus payment). If you are sending a regular 1040A for the express purpose of receiving the tax rebate, write the words “Stimulus Payment” across the top of the form you file. Those who have access to the internet should go to the front page of the IRS. gov Web site and click on the rebate questions link in the middle of the page. Many retired and disabled individuals do not pay taxes

on their Social Security payments and do not have to file an income tax return since they do not have a lot of other income. However, the federal economic stimulus law passed in February includes a special provision allowing Social Security recipients to count those benefits toward the qualifying income requirement of $3,000 and thereby qualify for a $300 rebate as an individual or $600 as a couple. SSI payments do not qualify. Low income workers who have earned income above $3,000 and typically would not have to file a 2007 tax return must file in order to receive the rebate. The same is true of Social Security recipients and certain railroad retirees. The IRS indicates that people with no filing requirement who file a tax return to qualify for the economic stimulus payment will not receive a tax bill. People in this situation will not owe money because of the stimulus payment. People who have not previously had to file do not have to fear that receiving the rebate will

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By Jennifer Bridge CEA for Family and Consumer Sciences

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Seniors, low-income workers could qualify for tax rebates

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e-mail contains the name and supposed signature of the Director of the IRS’s Exempt Organizations business division. This e-mail is a phony. The IRS does not send unsolicited e-mail about tax account matters to individual, business, tax-exempt or other taxpayers. Filing a tax return is the only way to apply for a tax refund; there is no separate application form.” For more information on scams, please contact the Meade County Cooperative Extension Service at 270-4224958. Ask for the Kentucky Cooperative Extension publication, “Let the Consumer Beware!: A Guide to Fraud and Rip-Offs” (FAMRHF.116A).

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The Internal Revenue Service cautioned taxpayers to be on the lookout for scams involving rebate checks. According to the IRS, “At least one scheme using the word ‘rebate’ as part of the lure has been identified. “In that scam, consumers receive a phone call from someone identifying himself as an IRS employee. The caller tells the targeted victim that he is eligible for a sizable rebate for filing his taxes early. “The caller then states that he needs the target’s bank account information for the direct deposit of the rebate. If the

target refuses, he is told that he cannot receive the rebate.” The IRS also says to be on the alert for bogus e-mail that “falsely claims to come from the IRS, tells the recipient that he or she is eligible for a tax refund for a specific amount, and instructs the recipient to click on a link in the e-mail to access a refund claim form. The form asks the recipient to enter personal information that the scamsters can then use to access the e-mail recipient’s bank or credit card account. “In a new wrinkle, the current version of the refund scam includes two paragraphs that appear to be directed toward tax-exempt organizations that distribute funds to other organizations or individuals. The

RE/MAX®

By Jennifer Bridge CEA for Family and Consumer Sciences

(down the street from Brandenburg City Hall)


AGRICULTURE

Friday, March 7, 2008

Page A7

Allis-Chalmers orange and John Deere green deck the fairgrounds

Strong, steady, reliable, sound and secure…

By Laura Saylor saylor@thenewsstandard.com Tractors of all shapes and sizes were on display at the Meade County fairgrounds community building last weekend, and hundreds of people stopped by to browse through aisles and aisles of toys, parts and trinkets. The 14th annual Meade County Farm Toy Show and Sale welcomed more than 700 visitors and dozens of vendors to the community building. Held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, the toy show offered everything from models and plastic toys to train tracks and antique collectibles. The event was sponsored by the Lincoln Trail Antique Power of the Past, Inc. “We have vendors come from all over,” said Edd Pike, the club’s president. “Some from Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana and one from Ohio. Everything they have just has to be farm-related.” A $2 admission was charged as a way to raise money for the Lincoln Trail Antique Power of the Past, Inc. The

Crop Insurance Volatile markets can often devastate farming operations more severely than a natural disaster. Farm Credit Services of Mid-America believes that every market downturn should have an upside. That’s why Farm Credit Services offers a range of crop insurance services with both yield and income protection features. THE NEWS STANDARD/LAURA SAYLOR

Cindy Stonecipher and her son, Ryan, admire some of the models at a display by Burnett Farm Toys. Christopher Burnett, left, said the business focuses on scale models. non-profit organization donates 50 percent of proceeds to local charitable events such as Crusade for Children and the Angel Tree program. Other donations go to the Meade County Community Action Center. People of all ages crowded into the building during the two-day event. Children tinkered with board games, dolls and electronic tractors while their parents and grandpar-

ents reminisced about old model tractors that were on display, some of them refurbished to the shiny, bright paint of their heyday. A snack bar, door prizes and elaborate displays of miniature farm scenes were also part of the toy show. “We might have missed about two years, but we’ve been here several years before and since then,” said vendor Christopher Burnett. “There’s

always a big turn out here.” The Lincoln Trail Antique Power of the Past, Inc. will sponsor its 16th Annual Antique Machinery Show and Threshing Days at Otter Creek Park July 4-6. The three-day celebration features steam and gas engines, antique tractors, draft horses and mules, threshing, blacksmithing, races, games and several other events and activities.

Habitat and food plot management Andy Mills CEA for Ag/Natural Resources Over the past several years, there have been numerous products to hit the shelves that claim they are “Gods Gift to Wildlife.” With all these products and the magazine and TV propaganda that “proves” they work, it is impossible to make educated decisions on food plot products. Dr. Tom Barnes, University of Kentucky Extension Wildlife Specialist, will be on hand at the Meade County Extension Office on Monday, March 10, at 6:00 pm.

Dr. Barnes will be discussing habitat management and the pros and cons to food plots, as well as, different kinds of food plots. He will be discussing the decision making that should go into food plot planning. Most people think that food is all good, when in fact, it could do more harm. In cases of disease outbreaks, a small food plot with a large concentration of animals just helps spread the problem. Also, food may be a draw but total habitat is more desirable. Also, we will be going over guidelines to suc-

cessful food plot establishment. Several of the food plot products on the shelves are good, but without proper preparation before planting and management after emergence they are a waste of money. If you are a land owner and a wildlife enthusiast, I think you will enjoy this meeting. For more information or questions, contact the Meade County Extension Office at 422-4958. Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people re-

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Riders of all ages competed in pole bending and barrel racing events held Saturday at 4C’s Arena in Ekron, Ky. Martha Campbell, owner of the arena, and Brandy Pile helped organize the American Quarter Horse Association and National Pole Bending Association shows. Youth, novice and amateur riders, as well as experienced junior and senior class riders, competed first during barrel racing, then the arena was cleared and the pole bending competition was held.

Receipts: 681 head Slaughter cows: Breaker Boner Lean Slaughter Bulls: Y.G. 1 2

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Kentuckiana Livestock Market - Owensboro, KY Market Report per CWT for Monday, March 3, 2008 % Lean 75-80 80-85 85-90

Weight 1005-1750 860-1480 955-1140

Price 48.00-55.00 45.00-50.00 35.50-42.00

Weights 1385-2325 1230-1970

Carcass Boning % 78-79 76-77

Price 60.00-64.00 53.00-60.00

Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1-2 Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range 200-300 256 112-118.00 300-400 374 123.00-126.50 400-500 418 114.00-123.25 500-600 516 104.00-110.00 600-700 630 87.50-101.00 700-800 730 88.00 800-900 882 81.00 1200-1300 1242 77.00 Feeder Steers Medium and Large 2 200-300 268 90.00-106.00 300-400 358 117.00-120.00 400-500 453 100.00-112.00 500-600 585 98.00 600-700 685 85.00 800-900 860 72.50 Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1-2 200-300 266 103.00-109.00 300-400 366 101.00-109.00 400-500 429 91.00-100.75 500-600 535 86.00-91.00 600-700 640 78.00-82.50 700-800 748 76.00-78.50 900-1000 955 66.00 Feeder Heifers Small and Medium 1 300-400 315 86.00 400-500 417 78.00-86.00 500-600 595 73.00 600-700 685 71.00 Feeder Bulls Medium and Large 1-2 300-400 365 113.00-119.00 400-500 444 105.00-116.50 500-600 545 92.50-106.00 600-700 645 91.50-94.50 700-800 720 82.00-82.50 800-900 805 81.50

Avg Price 115.29 124.17 118.21 105.60 91.23 88.00 81.00 77.00 100.18 117.45 106.92 98.00 85.00 72.50 104.85 102.98 96.26 88.18 81.29 77.65 66.00

86.00 83.26 73.00 71.00 115.31 111.97 98.54 93.02 82.25 81.50

High Dressing 55.50-59.50 53.00-55.50 No report.

Stock Cows Medium and Large 1-2: Heifers 2-8 months bred: 460.00-960.00 per head Cows 4 years old 3-8 months bred: 936.00-1200.00 per head Stock Cows and Calves: Cows 4-9 years old with100-475 lb. calves at side: 700.00-1285.00 per pair Baby Calves: Beef breed: 175.00-260.00 per head

Owensboro Grains Owensboro Market Report per bushel for Wednesday March 5, 2008 Soybeans Corn

14.71 5.45

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Page A8

Marriages Lisa Mae Devall, 25, of Vine Grove to Joshua Dewayne Lingerfelt, 22, of Rineyville.

Property Transfers James M. Dupin, Linda Dupin, Joyce Gordon, Meade County Kentucky, 84 Lumber Company, Meade County Fiscal Court, Don’s Lumber, Kenneth Smallwood, B & R Supply Company, Inc., Charles Barmore and Joyce Barmore to Jeff Nott, Lot 4, 12, 17, 19, 20, 26, and 27 of Doe Haven Subdivision. Mary Ann Wright and Norman R. Wright to John Weick and Trea Weick, 8.026 acre tract on Bald Knob Cementary Road, 3.664 acre tract on Bald Knob Cementary, deed tax $23.50. Peggy Stice and National City Mortgage to National City Bank, Lot 23 and 24 of Wesley Guy Farm. Estate of James A. Doll, Sr. to Jeffrey Knott and Joyce Knott, Lot 10 and 11 in Warren Place, deed tax $25. William M. Smith and Catherine Smith to Jon W. Pirtle, Jr., married, Property in Meade County, deed tax $200. Peggy S. Daniel to Dennis R. Daniel, Parcel 25, 5 acres and Parcel 26, 6.561 acres. Ernest Paul Schultz and Judy K. Schultz to RRHB LLC, Lot 7 consisting of 0.953 acres, Lot 8, 0.954, Lot 9 and 10 of Knobs subdivivsion 2.084 acres, deed tax $252. Malinda Board to Raymond T. Satterley Jr., and Dawn Satterley, Lot 9 of Otterview Estates Subdivision, deed tax $12. James E. Russell to Karen Trent and James Trent, property in Meade County. Steven M. Taylor, Casey J. Taylor, Bank One, National Association, The Cit Group Sales Financing, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Bank One, National Association, its successors and assigns to Federal National Mortgage Association, 1605 Fackler Road Webster, Ky., Debbie Pike to Judith Allison Jupin and Gregory Scott Jupin,, and Barrett Anthony Pike and Stacy Renee Pike, and Alicia Gayle Pike to Nancy Gail Pike, 5.436 acres Sirocco Road. OB Properties LLC to Jason Lee and Brandy Lee, Lot 4 and 5 and 70 of The Station Subdivision, deed tax $71.50. Ronald Felts and Sherri Felts, David R. Felts, Jacqueline Felts and Marcia Ellis and Dale Ellis and Robert Felts to William R. Smiley and Virginia E Smiely, Parcel 15.669 acres of Joyce Felts Farm, deed tax $30.50.

Building Permits

02/27/08 Jeff Nott, Park Place 5/8, Vine Grove, Ky.-single family dwelling-$155. 02/27/08 Mark Kimmons, 379 Pine Point Road, Brandenburg, Ky.-deck 02/29/08 Steve Dezelich, 20 Jerry Hardesty Road, Ekron, Ky.-pool 02/29/08 Walter Dreffs, 1990 New Highland Church Road, Brandenburg, Ky.-deck

Retail Food Establishment Report 02/26/08 - Muldraugh Elementary-100% 02/26/08 - Pizza Hut-90% Follow-up-95%. Dented cans-corrected immediately; build-up on can opener; build-up on hand sinks; ceiling in poor repair by oven. 02/26/08 - Schnitzel Barn - 100% 02/26/08 - Little Dave’s Four Corners, Food Service-97%, Retail-98%, leak in bottom of deli case; no hair restraints; wood floor in food prep and retail areas. 02/28/08 - Basham’s Food Mart, Food Service-96%, Retail-99%, hair restraints not worn in food prep area; cutting board at prep cooler in poor repair; several freezers in need of defrosting. 02/28/08 - Bluegrass Convenient, Food Service-91%, Retail-93%, no hair restraints worn in food prep area; no test strips for sanitizer; build-up inside microwave; no thermometer in ice cream freezer; hand sink in poor repair in restroom; no covered trash container in restroom; no lid on dumpster; floors in poor repair in some areas; walls in poor repair in some areas. 02/28/08 - Dairy Queen Grill & Chill-89% Immediate followup-94%, One gallon cocoa fudge and one gallon butterscotch topping both voluntarily destroyed; cutting boards in food prep area in poor repair; single serve coke lids on floor of storage building; dumpster lids open; floors in and around equipment need frequent cleaning. 02/28/08 - Otter Creek Tavern-93%, handle missing on up-

right freezer; interior of walk-in bare wood; double doors on walkin not closing properly; employee lacks hair restraint; ceiling tile in poor repair in food prep area; dumpster lids open; ice scoop improperly stored; cutting boards in poor repair not easily cleanable surface. 02/28/08 - Jailhouse Pizza-87% Immediate Follow-up-92%, some bottles not properly labeled; cutting board in poor repair; bare wood shelving; dented cans foundcorrected immediately; food items stored on floor in storage area; no test strips to check sanitizer; build up on can opener and inside microwave. 02/29/08 - Hillcrest Country Club-94%, no hair restraints; shelving containing clean utensils observed build-up; single serve cups in box stored on floor of storage room; dumpster with lid missing; floors in and around food equipment unclean; floor covering around ice machine in poor repair.

Brandenburg Police 02/23/08 4:22 p.m. Gary Halbert of Brandenburg was traveling on Kentucky 1692 in a 1998 Chevy S-10 when his brakes went out. He was attempting to pass Lydia Bennett of Payneville, who was driving a 1999 Dodge, when another vehicle was coming the other way so he cut back hitting the left front side of Ms. Bennett vehicle. Both vehicle’s received minor damage. Report BPD080818 was filed by Officer Singleton.

Meade County Sheriff Department

02/15/08 2:03 p.m. Four miles east of Brandenburg, Michael Hardcastle of Brandenburg, was traveling eastbound on Kentucky 1638 in a 2002 Chevy pick-up. The passenger in his vehicle, Christina Glisson of Irvington, stated that Mr. Hardcastle lost control, went off the edge of the road and back on onto the road into the westbound lane where the pick-up hit a 1996 Kenworth, driven by Robert Watkins of Laconia, In. Evidence at the scene indicated that Mr. Hardcastle vehicle went off the westbound side, striking a guard rail before coming to rest. Evon Givans of Brandenburg, was traveling east on Kentucky 1638 in a 2007 Pontiac Grand Prix, as the vehicles were coming to rest and she stopped. Michael Faro of Brandenburg, was also traveling east on Kentucky 1638 in a 1989 Chevy pick-up. Mr. Faro stated that he was coming up behind Ms. Givans when he lost control due to diesel fuel on the roadway from Mr. Watkins truck. Mr. Faro’s pick-up struck Ms. Givans’s vehicle before he could get stopped. Mr. Hardcatle’s vehicle was towed from the scene with severe damage. Mr. Watkins’s vehicle was towed from the scene with moderate damage. Ms. Givans’s and Mr. Faro’s vehicle both received moderate damage. Operator’s of the vehicles involved stated that they saw two subjects get out of Mr. Hardcastle’s vehicle and flee into the woods. Both subjects were apprehended and criminal charges have been taken. Report 08-0045 was filed by Officer Robinson. 02/19/08 12:26 p.m. Two miles east of Brandenburg, Mary Robertson of Brandenburg, was traveling east on Kentucky 448 attempting to make a left turn onto Kentucky 1638 in a 1995 Plymouth Voyager. As Ms. Robertson turned, she turned into the path of Jeffery Robinson of Irvington, who was traveling west on Kentucky 448 in a 1994 Peterbuilt, owned by Jerry Hardesty of Guston. Ms. Robertson struck Mr. Robinson in the side causing Ms. Roberston’s vehicle to rotate counter clockwise and striking a 1994 Ford pick-up driven by James Cundiff of Brandenburg, who was eastbound on Kentucky 448 waiting to turn. Mr. Robinson’s truck went off the westbound side of the roadway before coming to a stop. Ms. Robinson’s vehicle was towed from the scene with severe damage. Mr. Robinson’s vehicle was towed from the scene with moderate damage. Mr. Cundiff’s vehicle received minor damage. Report 08-0060 was filed by Officer Robinson. 02/25/08 7:50 a.m. Three miles south of Brandenburg, Eli Youart of Payneville, stated that he must have pulled up too far in the intersection of Kentucky 144 and Kentucky 79 in his 1995 Jeep Wrangler. Charles Paisely of Cordyon, In., was traveling southbound on Kentucky 79 in his 1999 Mazda Miata and struck Mr. Youart. Mr. Youart’s vehicle received minor damage. Mr. Paisely’s vehicle was towed from the scene with severe damage. Report 08-0052 was filed by Officer Robinson. 02/26/08 2:00 p.m. One mile west of Garrett, Ran-

COURT

dall Carnell of Brandenburg, was traveling east of Kentucky 144 in a 2001 International owned by Meade County Solid Waste. Mary Burroughs of Vine Grove, was also traveling east on Kentucky 144 in her 2005 Buick Lacrosse. Mr. Carnell and Ms. Burroughs were distracted when an elderly subject walked into the roadway without looking at traffic. Ms. Burroughs stopped to avoid the subject but Mr. Carnell was unable to stop before striking Ms. Burroughs. Mr.Carnell’s vehicle received minor damage. Ms. Burroughs’s vehicle received moderate damage. Report 08-0053 was filed by Officer McCubbin. 02/26/08 2:15 p.m. Cynthia Greer of Brandenburg, was traveling west on Kentucky 1239 in a 1993 Jeep Cherokee, when she ran off the right shoulder and over corrected and went across the road and overturned into a pond. The vehicle was towed from the scene with minor to moderate damage. Report 08-0054 was filed by Officer McCubbin. 02/26/08 3:30 p.m. Lillie Garland of Shepherdsville, was making a left turn onto Liberty road in a 1982 Ford pick-up. Carroll Bewley of Payneville was traveling east on Liberty road in a 1994 Ford Aerostar. Neither operator could see each other due to a blind curve. Ms. Garland failed to yield the right of way by pulling out in front of Ms. Bewley. Both vehicle’s received minor to moderate damage. Report 08-0055 was filed by Officer McCubbin. 02/26/08 9:13 p.m. Six miles west of Flaherty, Cassidy Durham of Big Springs was traveling eastbound on Kentucky 333, when her 2001 Chrysler slid off the right side of the road, struck an earth embankment, and overturned. The roadway was extremely slick and icy. The vehicle was towed from the scene with severe damage. Report 08-0056 was filed by Officer Wright. 02/26/08 10:57 p.m. Two miles south of Flaherty, Lacy Quail of Muldraugh, was traveling north on Viers lane in a 2000 Ford. Tammy Polston of Vine Grove, was traveling south on Viers lane in a 1997 Dodge. Ms. Quail slid in front of Ms. Polston. The roadway was extremely slick and icy. Both vehicle received minor to moderate damage. Report 08-0057 was filed by Officer Wright. 02/28/08 3:24 p.m. Nancy Mitcham of Brandenburg, had entered the Meade County High School parking lot in a 2005 Cadillac, and was waiting for the traffic to clear before proceeding forward. Adam Johnson of Flaherty, was backing from a parking space in a 1994 Chevy Camaro. Mr. Johnson did not see Ms. Mitcham and struck the front fender of her vehicle. Mr. Johnson’s vehicle received very minor damage. Ms. Mitcham’s vehicle received minor damage. Report 08-0059 was filed by Officer Cummings. 02/28/08 7:16 p.m. One mile north of Midway, Theresa Allen of Rhodelia, was traveling north on Kentucky 1239, in a 2002 Ford pick-up when a cow ran out in the road. Ms. Allen tried to miss the cow but could not avoid hitting it. The cow belonged to Charlie Jenkins of Brandenburg. Ms. Allen vehicle was towed from the scene with moderate damage. Report 08-0061 was filed by Officer Stinebruner. 02/29/08 7:29 p.m. Hester Stephenson of Payneville, was traveling west on Kentucky 228, Wolfcreek Road in his 1998 Ford Crown Victoria, when a deer ran out in front of his vehicle. Ms. Stephenson’s vehicle received minor to moderate damage. Report 08-0062 was file by Officer Stinebruner.

District Court

02/27/08 Joseph Jarboe, 21, careless driving; operating motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol/drugspled not guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. Scotty Manson Collins, 32, receiving stolen property over $300; theft by unlawful taking/dispfrom auto<$300; criminal mischief 3rd degree-pled not guilty preliminary hearing 03/05/08. Brian Keith Taulbee, 23, receiving stolen property over $300; criminal mischief 2nd degree-pled not guilty preliminary hearing 03/05/08. Kevin David Hurt, 33, possession of marijuana; use/possess drug paraphernalia 2nd or > offense-pled not guilty preliminary hearing 03/05/08. Marshall J. Sherrill, 60, improper registration plate; failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security; operating on suspended/revoked license; 3 counts of receiving stolen property over $300; convicted felon in possession of a firearm-pled not guilty preliminary and pretrial conference 03/12/08.

Friday, March 7, 2008 Dennis Martin Hill, Jr., 28, fleeing or evading police 1st degree; fleeing or evading police 2nd degree; wanton endangerment 1st degree-police officer; reckless driving; failure to notify address change to department of transportation; resisting arrest; receiving stolen property over $300-pled not guilty preliminary hearing 03/05/08. Allan Wayne Hill, 29, possession of burglary tools; receiving stolen property-pled not guilty preliminary hearing 03/05/08. Diane Keys Sipes, 44, obstructed vision and/or windshield; possession of marijuana; use/possess drug paraphernalia 2nd or > offense-pled not guilty preliminary hearing 03/05/08. Michael A. Watson, Jr., 29, fugitive from another state-warrant required-continued 05/21/08. William Chad Brown, 18, criminal trespass 2nd degree; reckless driving-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. Randall E. Greenwell, 49, possession of marijuana; use/possess drug paraphernalia 1st offensepled not guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. Shawn M. Hayes, 18, use/possess drug paraphernalia 1st offense; possession of marijuanapled not guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. Jason Elliot Howard, 33, falsely reporting an incident-pled guilty 12 months probated 2 years, no public offenses, possess no alcohol, ill-drugs/drug paraphernalia, waive rights to search and seizures, fine $200 plus costs. April M. Tellez, 25, theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. Heather L. Thomas, 20, possession of marijuana; use/possess drug paraphernalia 1st offensepled not guilty pretrial conference 03/05/08. Jordon L. Roberts, 18, criminal mischief 3rd degree; criminal trespassing 3rd degree-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/05/08. Christina L. Glission, 21, disorderly conduct 1st degree-pled guilty, 30 days probated 2 years, no public offenses, fine $500 plus costs. Rhonda J. Allen, 51, theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled guilty probated 2 years after serving 1 hour, no public offenses, write no checks. Albert Allen, 50, theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled guilty probated 2 years after serving 1 hour, no public offenses, write no checks. Matthew William Jackson, 28, theft by deception including cold checks under $300-continued 03/12/08. Tyson L. Heath, 50, possession of marijuana-pled guilty, 6 months probated 2 years after serving 10 days (1 day credit), no public offenses, possess no alcohol, illdrugs/drug paraphernalia, waive rights to searches and seizures; use/possess drug paraphernalia 1st offense-marijuana-pled guilty, 6 months probated 2 years after serving 10 days consecutively (1 day credit), no public offenses, possess no alcohol, ill-drugs/drug paraphernalia, waive rights to searches and seizures, and stay out of Meade County for 2 years after release from jail. Eva Marie Clark, 37, 5 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled guilty, 10 days probated 2 years after serving 1 hour consecutively, no public offense, write no checks. Kina R. Lucas, 42, 21 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. Erroll B. Bettles, 50, 6 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled guilty, 10 days probated 2 years after serving 1 hour consecutively, no public offense, write no checks. Angela Kay Martin, 28, possess controlled substance 3rd degree 1st offense; controlled substance prescription not in original containerpled not guilty pretrial conference 03/05/08. Ruth Ann Straney, 41, possession of marijuana; controlled substance not in original container; possess controlled substance 3rd degree 1st offense-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/05/08. Carroll S. Garvey, Jr., 28, possession of marijuana-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/05/08. Bridget D. Roth, 20, theft by deception including cold checks under $300-failure to appear. Katresa Whitehurst, 25, 6 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled not guilty pretrial conference 04/02/08. Melissa Darlene Knott, 31, no/ expired registration plates; no/ expired Kentucky registration receipt-dismissed on proof. Cody Staples, 18, disregarding stop sign; failure to wear seat belt-refer to county attorney traffic safety program. Lisa Marie Brown, 31, speeding 17 mph over limit-assign to state

traffic school; failure to produce insurance card-amend to failure to of owner to maintain required insurance-pled guilty, 90 days probated 2 years, no public offenses, not to operate motor vehicle without valid license and insurance. Ernest Wayne Popham, 26, failure to notify address change to department of transportation-dismissed on proof; failure to produce insurance card-amend to failure to of owner to maintain required insurance-pled guilty, 90 days probated 2 years, no public offenses, not to operate motor vehicle without valid license and insurance. Melissa C. Baysinger, 30, speeding 26 mph over-amend to 15 mph over-fine $30 plus costs. Angelic Brooks, 35, failure to wear seat belts-pled guilty fine $25; failure to notify address change to department of transportation-dismissed on proof. Brandon Mark Jaggers, 25, speeding 15 mph over limit; improper equipment; failure to produce insurance card-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/05/08. Carl Jun Logsdon, 49, disregarding stop sign-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/05/08; failure to produce insurance card-dismissed on proof. James H. Yates, 30, speeding 19 mph over limit; failure of nonowner operator to maintain required insurance-pled not guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. James Robert Stiverson, 32, operating on suspended/revoked license; failure to produce insurance card; improper registration; no/ expired registration plates; failure to register transfer of motor vehicle-pled guilty pretrial conference 03/12/08. Michael F. Faro, 41, operating on suspended/revoked operators license-pled not guilt pretrial conference 03/05/08. Lori Cater, 32, 5 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-continued 03/05/08. Lorie A. Cater, 32, 4 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-continued 03/05/08. Drew A. Beckefeld, 22, receiving stolen property over $300-pled not guilty preliminary hearing 03/05/08. Allen T. Kinder, 31, 26 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-continued 03/12/08. Kimberly Ann Noble, 39, possess open alcohol beverage container in a motor vehicle-pled guilty fine $35. Thomas Hogan, 23, falsely reporting an incident; 2 counts of menacing; terroristic threatening 3rd degree-dismissed with prejudice. Linda Kay Wilson, 44, 7 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-continued 03/26/08. Michelle Denise Miller, 26, speeding 22 mph over limit; operating on suspended/revoked operators license-continued 04/30/08. Carolyn Stone Bottoms, 45, flagrant non support-amend to criminal support-pled guilty, 12 months probated 2 years, no public offense, pay child support as court ordered. Mason L. Meade, 21, criminal mischief 2nd degree-continued 03/12/08. Phillip W. Hudson, 23, possession of marijuana; use/possess drug paraphernalia 1st offensecontinued 03/26/08. Rommel J. Breffe, 41, theft by deception including cold checks under $300-failure to appear. Vicki Jo Colvin, 38, 10 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-pled guilty, 10 days probated 2 years after serving 1 day consecutively, no public offenses, write no checks. Joseph J. Cox, 45, 3 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-continued 03/05/08. Andrew L. Fernandez, 19, speeding 26 mph over/greateramend to 25 mph over-pled guilty, fine $60 plus cost; careless drivingpled guilty, fine $25. Tracy Gros, 19, speeding 26 mph over/greater-amend to 25 mph over-pled guilty, fine $60 plus cost; careless driving- pled guilty, fine $25. Christopher W. Colligan, 18, operating motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol/drugs; operating on suspended/revoked operators license-continued 03/12/08. Esther Docherty, 81, theft by unlawful taking/disp shoplifting under $300-continued 03/26/08. Stacie Jo Smiley, 36, 2 counts of theft by deception including cold checks under $300-continued 03/12/08. Lagena Beth Bottoms, 36, theft by unlawful taking gasoline 1st offense-pled guilty, 12 months probated 2 years after serving 3 days (2 hours credited), no public offenses, pay restitution to Dodge Store, possess no alcohol, illdrugs/drug paraphernalia; theft by unlawful taking gasoline 2nd offense-dismissed.


Raising teens requires a delicate balance of freedom and order QUESTION: If power is so important to teenagers then it must play a key role in family dynamics. How does it work itself out at home? DR. DOBSON: You’ve asked a very perceptive question. It is a wise parent who knows intuitively how to transfer power, or independence, to the next generation. That task requires a balancing act between two equally dangerous extremes. They dare not set their teenagers free before they are mature enough to handle the autonomy -- even though they are screaming for it. Adolescents still need parental leadership and parents are obligated to provide it — that’s the law of the land. One of the characteristics of those who acquire power too early is a prevailing attitude of disrespect for authority. It extends to teachers, ministers, policemen, judges and even to God Himself. Such an individual has never yielded to parental leadership at home. Why should he or she submit himself to anyone else? For a rebellious teenager it is only a short step from there to drug abuse, sexual experimentation, running away, and so on. The early acquisition of power has claimed countless young

victims by this very process. Mothers who make that On the other hand, there is mistake are some of the most an equally dangerous mistake frustrated people on the face to be avoided at the of the earth. On the latter end of adoles- Focus on other hand, we must cence. We must not retain parental the family not wait too long to set power too long. Conour young adults free. trol will be torn from Self-determination is our grasp if we refuse a basic human right to to surrender it volunwhich every adult is tarily. The granting entitled. To withhold of self-determination that liberty too long is should be matched to incite wars of revostride for stride with lution. the arrival of matuJames My good friend, Jay rity, culminating with Dobson complete release durKesler, observed that Mother England made ing early adulthood. that specific mistake with her Sounds easy, doesn’t it? We children in the American col- all know better. I consider this onies. They grew to become orderly transfer of power to rebellious “teenagers” who be one of the most delicate demanded their freedom. Still and difficult responsibilities she refused to release them in the entire realm of parentand unnecessary bloodshed hood. ensued. Fortunately, England QUESTION: Can boys and learned a valuable lesson from girls be taught to treat each that painful experience. Some other with respect? That seems 171 years later, she granted a like a tough assignment. peaceful and orderly transfer DR. DOBSON: They cerof power to another tempes- tainly can! Young people are tuous offspring named India. naturally more sensitive and Revolution was averted. At empathetic than adults. Their the risk of being redundant, viciousness is a learned relet me summarize our goal sponse, resulting from the as parents: first, we must not highly competitive and hostile transfer power too early, even world in which they live — a if our children take us daily to world we have allowed to dethe battlefield. velop. They are destructive to

the weak and lowly because we adults haven’t bothered to teach them to feel for one another. One of the values children cherish most is justice. They are uneasy in a world of injustice and abuse. Therefore, when we teach children respect for others by insisting on civility in our classrooms, we’re laying a foundation for human kindness in the world of adulthood to come. It is a fundamental attitude that should be taught in every classroom and every home. QUESTION: What do you think of the phrase “Children should be seen and not heard?” DR. DOBSON: That statement reveals a profound ignorance of children and their needs. I can’t imagine how any loving adult could raise a vulnerable little boy or girl by that philosophy. Children are like clocks, they must be allowed to run! Dr. Dobson is founder and chairman of the board of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995(www.family.org). Questions and answers are excerpted from “Solid Answers” and “Bringing Up Boys,” both published by Tyndale House.

Make time to tend your own garden “Some seeds were eaten by birds, some withered under the sun, some were choked by weeds, but some grew into a huge harvest.” —Mark 4: 1-9 One of the things about being in ministry as long as I have is that you are always running into people you have baptized or united in marriage several years back. Often you are amazed at how far they have come. Sometimes, however, you are shocked by how far some beautiful young couples have let themselves go! Sometimes, it’s all you can do to hold back a gasp. The same can be said about the ordained. The years have not been kind to them. They are like sprouted seedlings scalded by the sun or growing plants crowded by weeds. They squandered their potential. It hurts too much to watch. What got them into trouble

in the first place, I believe, is their belief that things like graduations, weddings and ordinations mark the end of school, the end of dating and the end of seminary instead of a beginning — a beginning of a lifetime of fighting one’s lazy streak and one’s temptation to rest on one’s laurels. Jesus makes a very important point in the gospel cited above: Planted seeds, no matter how good they are, must be tended — watered, protected, encouraged with fertilizer and sometimes, even pruned. Otherwise, their potential for reaching their goals will be wasted, stunted or overpowered. These words can also be applied to those of you who are graduating, getting married or ordained. Some of you will take what you were taught, religiously and academically, and it will be wasted like seeds sprinkled on concrete. It will go nowhere. The invest-

ment in you will be wasted. much depends on you, the Some of you will take what ground that receives them. you were taught and leave Today’s “most likely to sucbe all excited about ceed” could be the what you can become, biggest failures in life, but you will give into Encouraging while today’s “least Words your lazy side and do likely to succeed” nothing with what could actually be the was invested in you. biggest successes. A Some of you will lot depends on your take what you were attitude and willingtaught and make a ness to water, protect, great start, only to get encourage and prune distracted and sidewhat has been planttracked, losing sight ed in you. Ronald of your goals until it is Anybody can plant too late to get back on a garden, but what Knott track. happens after you Some of you will plant it determines shock and surprise your- whether you will have deliselves and others, by taking cious vegetables to eat in the what you were taught and future. Just so, what happens parlay it into in a future rich after a good beginning deterin spiritual and personal de- mines whether you will have velopment, even worldly ac- a satisfying life in the years to complishment. come. “Good seeds” have been planted in you, but no matter how good these seeds are,

‘The day the Lord has made’ Psalm 118: 24 says, “This is the day the Lord has made; We will rejoice and be glad in it” ( NKJV). We have an uplifting song set to this verse and it can lift you up on high when you sing it. Scripture is always prompting us to embrace today. “Now is the day of salvation“( 2 Corinthians 6: 2 ); “Today, if you hear his voice, do not harden your hearts“ ( Hebrews 3: 15 ). God knows we can only live in the present, and He encourages us to make good use of that day. This is our gift from God. We can waste it with regrets over our past or worries about our future. We can

squander it trying to outrun Rejoice in the opportuniyesterday’s miseries and ties God brings to you tofailures. We can ignore it, day. lost in our wishful God has a future thinking. for you, but you have Divine It’s up to us to deto live in today to Guidance get there. Step out in cide what to do with it. God would have faith when God asks us make the most of you to trust Him. this day. What are This is the day that you seeking for tothe Lord has made. morrow? More opRejoice and be glad! portunities? Better Grace Baptist relationships? PerChurch invites you sonal growth? to be their guests Dan Embrace today. Newton this Sunday mornLearn the lessons ing at their 11:00 the Lord requires of a.m. service. A radio you today. Be faithministry will begin ful with the things God en- this Sunday at 9:30 a.m. trusts you with today. Let Reverend Dan Newton is God’s presence sustain you the pastor of Grace Baptist through this day’s trails. Church.

Father Knott, a Meade County native, is a priest from the Archdiocese of Louisville BIBLE TRIVIA by Wilson Casey 1. Is the book of Deuteronomy in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. Along with his sons, who was the first person in the Bible to be cremated? Samuel, Solomon, Shadrach, Saul 3. Especially from Biblical times, what did “to sup with” mean? Journey, Pray, Dine, Wash 4. Who bet 30 men that they could not solve his riddle? Moses, Samson, Daniel, Paul 5. In Revelation 3:19, Jesus tells us to be zealous and ... ? Repent, Share, Love, Witness

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Hold Father’s hand I lived the first 18 years “There is a big differof my life in West Virginia, ence,” said the little girl. “If where swinging bridges I hold your hand and somewere common. They were thing happens I may let go kind of rickety old of your hand. But if bridges across a river Pastor’s you hold my hand that was suspended and something hapby wire cables, and Spotlight pens, I know for sure they would “swing” you will never let go and rock as you of my hand.” walked across them. The Father smiled, A story is told reached down and about a little girl and firmly held onto the her father crossing hand of his child. one of those bridges. Sometimes our The little girl and her grip on things is not Randy father were walking that strong. SomeJohnson across a swinging times we loose our bridge when he said grip, we slip, we fail to the little girl, “Sweetheart, and fall. hold my hand so you don’t You can be sure that God’s fall into the river.” grip on us is much stronger The little girl said, “No, than our grip on Him. You father, you hold my hand.” may sometimes let go of “What’s the difference?” God, but he will never let go he asked, a little puzzled. of you.

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THE NEWS STANDARD Riverport Authority overviews Senate appropriations request Page A10

Friday, March 7, 2008

By Jorena D. Faulkner jorena@thenewsstandard.com During a Meade County Riverport Authority board meeting held Tuesday at the county courthouse, Flint Group consulting representative Deanna Sandefur — standing in for Mike Flint — updated the board on the status of House Bill 491 for Riverport Development. According to the Kentuckians for Better Transportation update House Bill 491, Riverport Development — sponsored by Rep. Frank Rasche and others — would

Abe From page A1 game.’ At that time, Kentucky is fourth in the nation in population; it’s a big state in numbers and it’s a rich agricultural state with all these horses. Plus, the Ohio River had no bridges across it, so that (would have been a) natural defense line had Kentucky gone with the Confederacy. He knew the importance of the state, and he worked very hard to make sure Kentucky remained in the Union, and it did. So in that sense, he had an impact on Kentucky even though Kentucky didn’t necessarily understand it at the time.” Klotter says it took a long time for Kentuckians to recognize the impact Lincoln had, and continues to have, on the state. “I think after Lincoln’s death, Kentuckians still — for a period of time — didn’t look terribly favorably on him because he had been involved in the freeing of the slaves and that was something Kentuck-

Tax From page A1 premiums with a $5 minimum. State employees, federal employees, people with individual insurance and people with HMOs are all exempt from the tax, meaning approximately 90 percent of Muldraugh’s population would be exempt from paying the health insurance tax. “I can’t do that,” Lee said during Friday’s meeting. “I can’t pass a tax that’s only going to affect 10 percent of the people. It’s not fair. You either tax everyone or no one. It’s just not right.” Mayor Danny Tate was unsure how much revenue the tax would generate, and said it was hard to speculate what amount of money city hall would receive from the tax. Councilman Curtis Kelley said the only way to know if the tax generates money is to try it for one year and amend it, if needed, after that.

establish a Water Transportation Advisory Board to advise executive and legislative branches of government, establish riverport marketing assistance programs, and provide $4 million annually for Kentucky riverport improvements. The bill also provides for a marketing program funded at $400,000. Sandefur also overviewed the Meade County Riverport 2009 Appropriations Request proposal by Senators Mitch McConnell and Jim Bunning. The appropriations request asks for $1 million for construction of a cargo dock at ians, as a whole, did not support. They still tended to see him in that light. But for a time, I think that the basic goodness, the basic greatness of the man became evident, even to them. By the late 19th century, people like Henry Watterson of the Courier-Journal, who at that time had the biggest circulation of any paper in the south, started speaking favorably of Lincoln and I think Kentuckians, more and more, started basically saying ‘this is our man — our Lincoln.’ The more time passed, the more those memories of the Civil War faded, and the more that he became viewed as one of the greatest presidents of the United States.” Although much has been written about Lincoln’s close connections with other Kentucky areas — such as Elizabethtown and Hodgenville — very little has been written about his connection with Meade County. Lincoln’s father, Thomas Herring Lincoln, was actually a carpenter and stone mason in the area and helped to construct the addition to the mill on Doe Run Creek — named Stevenson’s Mill — now known as Doe Run Inn.

Councilman Ron Heschke displayed pictures he had taken of two pounds of marijuana and semi-automatic rifles that were confiscated by the police department from people in Muldraugh. “These are the things that are going on in the streets of our city,” he said. “Unless we have enough police officers and an adequate police department … this stuff could overrun the city. I don’t want it.” After the photographs were displayed, a roll call vote was made to have the first reading of Ordinance No. 277 taxing health and life insurance premiums. Lee — in the absence of Carlberg — was the only person to vote no. During the most recent special meeting held Tuesday at city hall, Carlberg and Lee again immediately initiated a motion to table the second reading of the ordinance and to tax only life insurance. Kelly and Heschke dissented, wishing to continue with the second reading. Haynes was absent from the meeting, leaving Basham to be the deciding factor. After much delibera-

the Meade County Riverport as part of a multi-phase development project to increase economic development within the port and for surrounding counties. Citing potential job market expansion and tax income revenue as perks of the development, the request highlights a six-county commitment of funding by county agriculture development boards totaling $22,500 and a Kentucky Community Economic grant in the amount of $206,000. Additionally, a Rural Business Grant from the United States Department of Agriculture was secured for

$95,000 to assist with the final engineering and design, and the FHWA earmarked $1 million in the fiscal year 2003 Omnibus Appropriations Bill (P.L. 108-7) for an access road for the Riverport according to the request. Although the request was submitted by the deadline date, Sandefur doesn’t expect appropriation of the funds under the current administration. “I think we may wait until the next president to try again,” Sandefur said. Sandefur also recommended that a request be drafted

THE NEWS STANDARD/JORENA FAULKNER

Records show payments made to Thomas Lincoln for work he did on the mill at Doe Run Inn, pictured above. Thomas Herring Lincoln was born in Rockingham County, Virginia in 1778 and moved to Kentucky with his family in the 1780s. Six years later, Indians murdered his father, Abraham Lincoln Sr., as he worked the land. Young Thomas witnessed the killing, and the memory haunted him throughout the remainder of his life. As a result of his father’s death, his mother moved the family to Washington Coun-

tion, Basham agreed to continue with the second reading, meaning the motion to table the second reading failed 3-2. “This is the worst tax I’ve ever seen,” Lee said. “I can’t support something like this.” Tate said all taxes were wrong and he didn’t think the occupational tax in Muldraugh was fair, but taxes have to be paid. “I owe this town a police department and protection,” Tate said. The 8.5 percent tax on health and life insurance premiums will take effect in July, though city hall won’t see money generated from the tax until the end of October..

ty, Kentucky where Thomas lived until he was 18. In 1802, Thomas moved to Hardin County where he purchased land and married his wife, Nancy Hanks. Two years later, the Lincoln’s purchased a farm in Nolin Creek, Kentucky near Hodgen’s Mill — about 15 minutes southeast of Elizabethtown — the homestead where future president Abraham Lincoln was born. According to “Two Centuries in Elizabethtown and

and sent to counties who committed funding to the development project, seeking reservation of funds until the project is ready to proceed. The funding received from each county’s Agriculture Development Board is earmarked for the purchase of equipment. Kentucky Transportation Cabinet representative Gary Valentine reported that the archaeological study of the Riverport area is currently underway according to Meade County Riverport Authority Board Chairman Joe Wright.

“The archeological (study) should be done by our April meeting,” Wright said. “But the trees still need to be dealt with.” Wright said that County Industrial Development Authority Chairman David Pace had agreed to address the issue of the trees at the February meeting. “I’ll give David Pace a call,” Wright said. “This needs to be done in a week to 10 days so that we can move forward.” The board concluded that the Authority should be close to advertising for bids by the April 2008 meeting.

Hardin Co.” by Daniel E. McClure Jr., “Little York” was the first county seat of Meade County and was located on Doe Run Creek, which is about midway between Brandenburg and Fort Knox. Around 1780, construction on Stevenson’s Mill began at Doe Run Creek and continued through 1790 when the original building was completed. In 1800, construction of an addition to the mill began. The Abraham Lincoln in Kentucky Site Survey states the addition — made of limestone — was two-and-onehalf stories tall and included a walk out basement. During that time, it has been verified that Thomas Lincoln was working as a stonemason and living in Elizabethtown. Historical ledgers and journals from Bleakley & Montgomery general merchandising in Elizabethtown from July 30, 1804 to June 3, 1808 show Thomas Lincoln as a customer. His purchases confirm that he worked steadily as a carpenter in the area. An old record book and documents — believed to be somewhere in Breckinridge County — show a payment made to Thomas Lincoln for

work on the Stevenson’s Mill addition, which was completed in 1821. “My father-in-law, who has passed on, was the one who had that document — a photocopy of it,” Ken Whitman said. “And we have not been able (to find it). They say (the photocopy) is in our attic.” Whitman and his wife, Cherie, are the current managers of Doe Run Inn. The Inn has been in Cherie’s family for six generations. Over the years, Stevenson’s Mill changed hands many times and served as many purposes. From a mill to a family resort known as “Sulfur Wells Hotel” — which boasted healing waters — the local historical landmark has persevered, finally settling as The Doe Run Inn around 1958. Today, Doe Run Inn offers an on-site restaurant, rooms for overnight stays, and provides banquet and catering services. For more information on Doe Run Inn visit www.doeruninn.com. More information on The Kentucky Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and statewide events can be found at www.kylincoln.org.

Ballpark From page A1 fields in the shape they’re in. Pieces of metal and wiring are scattered throughout the park, all of which will be meticulously cleaned up before any children are allowed to play on the fields. Craycroft and Fiscal Court members have been trying to speed along the bidding process to hire contractors in order to get the park back in shape for

baseball season. The major projects that need completed are a new practice building, lighting, fencing and dugouts. Local companies were contacted first in regards to the various projects, though because of such a tight deadline businesses that could complete the projects most expeditiously were heavily considered.

Meade County Treasurer Shirley Fackler said the county’s insurance company will cover approximately $450,000 - $500,000 worth of expenses to repair the park. Craycroft roughly estimated the repair and clean-up projects to be $425,000 to $450,00 thus far. He felt the restoration projects look to be covered under insurance. “We should come in where the insurance should pay it,” Craycroft said. Tate agreed, saying from his estimates the county should be in the clear.

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Sports

Laura Saylor, Editor (270) 422-4542 sports@thenewsstandard.com

STANDINGS Basketball District Overall Boys: W L W L Meade Co. 7 1 20 8 Breck Co. 5 3 12 14 Hancock Co. 3 4 8 18 Fred. Fraize 0 7 0 24 Girls: Meade Co. Breck Co. Hancock Co. Fred. Fraize

8 4 3 0

0 16 15 3 11 13 5 10 16 7 0 18

ON DECK March 24 Greenwave/ Lady Wave Tennis @LaRue County 5 p.m. Greenwave Baseball @Grayson County 6 p.m.

Friday, MARCH 7, 2008

Benock staking claim behind the arc at MSU By Chelsey Garris chelsey@thenewsstandard.com Meade County has become quite familiar with the name “Benock” over the last several years. Though the 2007 Meade County High School graduate is no longer a Greenwave, Riley Benock has moved on to bigger and better things at Mississippi State University. Benock was a major contributor to the Greenwave basketball team,

defining himself as an ace threepoint shooter during his high school career. As a freshman at MSU, he’s staying on top of his game and is gaining the confidence it takes to be a major contributor to the Bulldogs as well. Benock was a three-year starter for Meade County and he racked up some impressive numbers over the years. He averaged 12.6 points, 5.6 rebounds, 4.6 assists and 2.6 steals per game. Cumulatively, he man-

aged 1,159 points, 517 rebounds, 427 assists, 236 steals, 113 blocks and 177 three-pointers. Benock was selected as the 20062007 3rd Region Player of the Year and was also selected as Elizabethtown’s All-Area Player of the Year. Over the summer Benock represented his home state in the Indianapolis Star Indiana/Kentucky All-Star series. Not only was Benock an outstanding basketball player, he was

Meade County teams claim district championships before leaving playoffs

March 27 Greenwave/ Lady Wave Tennis North Hardin 4:30 p.m. Greenwave baseball Holy Cross 5:30 p.m.

also a star student ranking sixth in his graduating class of 335 students with a perfect 4.0 grade point average. He’s still maintaining his good student reputation while playing at MSU. “Riley is the most coachable player I think we’ve had,” said Jerry Garris, Benock’s high school coach. “I can remember when he was a freshman and we were playing Breck County

See BENOCK, B2

Waves take districts, fall to Star power

BASKETBALL RESULTS

By Sean P. Lowe lowe@thenewsstandard.com

Muhlenberg North 53, Meade 33 Muhlenberg North: Steele 6-14 0-2 14, Gaston 5-9 0-0 12, Reynolds 3-4 6-9 12, Springer 3-7 5-7 11, Everly 1-4 0-0 2, Gabbard 1-1 0-0 2, Campbell 0-3 0-0 0, Griffin 0-1 0-0 0, Underwood 0-2 0-2 0.

against Breckinridge County, the atmosphere in the Meade County gym was anxious. But fans showed confidence when their boys took to the court. Though Meade didn’t come out on top against the Suns, they did play one heck of a ball game. The MCHS auditorium surged when senior Nick

After clinching the District 11 throne for the third time in a row last Thursday, the Lady Waves hosted a big foe Monday night — Muhlenberg North. With a big threepointer to start the game and another seven points right off the bat, the Lady Stars were off to a powerful start, leaving the Lady Waves Josh scoreless and down Hurt by 10. Meade County’s first two points came from the free throw line from senior forward Kayla Fackler halfway through the first quarter. The Lady Waves stayed aggressive on the ball and were able to pull within seven points before the end of the buzzer. “We were down 10-0 to start against a team that’s good and experienced and we could have folded our tents,” said coach Josh Hurt. “But we came back before the half and cut the score to six.” After several unanswered points by Muhlenberg, the Lady Waves faced an uphill battle before the half, but again, Meade County’s scrappy play took precedence and resulted in points on the board. Before heading into the locker room, the Lady Waves hiked the score to within six, 26-20. “We were so pumped, so emotionally charged,” Hurt said. “Our kids had really gotten excited for this game and we talked it up all week. We talked about how if your going to play a team like Muhlenberg North its better to get them the first game and they bought into that, but I think the first two or three minutes we were over-hyped and needed to calm down a little bit, and when we did it was very competitive.” The third quarter was eight minutes of highs and lows for Meade County. The Lady Waves narrowed the Lady Stars’ lead to three, but Muhlenberg spread the difference to 15 by the start of the fourth quarter. Meade County’s season all came down to the final eight minutes of

See DYNASTY, B3

See POWER, B3

Meade: Oliver 7-15 3-3 17, B. Powers 1-5 3-6 5, Fackler 1-3 3-4 5, S. Powers 0-5 3-4 3, Ledford 1-1 0-0 3, Wathen 0-1 0-0 0, Montgomery 0-1 0-0 0, Pike 0-1 0-0 0, Wilson 0-2 0-0 0. Muhlenberg North 14 12 12 15—53 Meade 7 13 3 10—33 Three point goals— Muhlenberg North 4-16 (Steele 2-5, Gaston 2-5 Springer 0-4, Campbell 0-1, Griggin 0-1), Meade 1-8 (Oliver 0-4, Ledford 1-1, Wathen 0-1, Pike 0-1, Wilson 0-1). Assists—Muhlenburg North 12 (Steele 6, Gaston 1, Reynolds 1, Everly 1, Griffin 1, #12 1, Sallee 1), Meade 9 (Fackler 1, S. Powers 1, Wathen 3, Montgomery 3, Long 1). Rebounds—Muhlenburg North 22 (Steele 6, Gaston 1, Reynolds 1, Springer 1, Everly 5, Underwood 8), Meade 32 (Oliver 2, B. Powers 7, Fackler 9, S. Powers 9, Montgomery 2, Stinnett 1, Pike 2). Total fouls—Muhlenburg North 15, Meade 21. Technical fouls—none. Muhlenberg South 53, Meade 50 Muhlenberg South: Diedrich 4-14 4-4 13, Hawkins 3-5 0-0 7, Civils 5-13 3-6 13, Wolfe 1-5 0-1 2, Jenkins 9-16 0-0 18, Smith 0-1 0-0 0. Meade: Mann 0-1 0-0 0, Hubbard 0-3 0-0 0, Williams 3-8 0-0 6, Ives 3-9 0-0 6, Stinnett 11-25, 6-7 28, Roe 3-6 0-0 6, Wells 2-3 0-0 2, Whelan 0-3 0-0 0. Muhlenburg South 11 10 13 19—53 Meade 18 14 7 11—50 Three point goals— Muhlenberg South 2-10 (Diedrich 1-5, Hawkins 1-2, Civils 0-3), Meade 0-11 (Hubbard 0-3, Williams 0-2, Ives 0-4, Sinnett 0-2). Assists—Muhlenburg South 5 (Shanks 1, Hawkins 2, Civils 1, Jenkins 1), Meade 11 (Mann 3, Hubbard 1, Williams 2, Ives 3, Stinnett 2). Rebounds—Muhlenburg South 36 (Diedrich 1, Hawkins 4, Civils 7, Wolfe 4, Jenkins 11, Smith 3), Meade 32 (Williams 3, Ives 5, Stinnett 10, Roe 6, Wells 3, Whelan 1). Total fouls—Muhlenburg South 8, Meade 15. Technical fouls—none.

THE NEWS STANDARD/CHARLOTTE FACKLER

Senior Eric Whalen goes up for an uncontested lay-up during the Greenwave’s Feb. 29. home game.

Districts dynasty By Sean P. Lowe lowe@thenewsstandard.com

The Greenwave battled Breckinridge County for the District 11 championship last Friday, then played host to Muhlenberg South during the first round of the Region 3 playoffs. With the hard-nosed ball the Greenwave played

Edwards gets slapped while winning DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Well, NASCAR Sprint Cup Series learned how to go from NASCAR’s penthouse to its outhouse in about three days. On Sunday the Columbia, Mo., native was on cloud nine after winning his second race in seven days and this time at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. “We do this to win,” Edwards said. “That’s the thing. Winning these races is the greatest part of this whole thing for me.

Winning a championship would be the ultimate, so what we’re trying to do is win the championship this year. That’s our number one goal. The greatest part about winning these races is we get the 10 points per race that will help us out, if we make The Chase. So that’s really good, but, really, truly, it’s just the feeling of winning. That’s an amazing feeling.” Apparently, NASCAR was listening when Edwards made that last state-

ment. After the race Edwards’ No. 99 Roush Fenway Racing Ford was found to be illegal and failed post-race inspection. Edwards won the race, but in NASCAR’s eyes those who prepared his car cheated in doing so. Therefore, NASCAR came down hard on Edwards, car owner Jack Roush, crew chief Bob Osborne and Roush Fenway Racing itself. NASCAR penalized Ed-

wards 100 championship and/or equipment used do points and Roush 100 own- not conform to NASCAR ers points, while rules); and 20-2.1J also coming down (any device or duct hard on the team work that permits and Edwards crew air to pass from one chief after his No. area of the interior 99 Ford failed postof the car to anothrace inspection last er, or to the outside Sunday at Las Veof the car, will not gas. be permitted. This Edwards’ car includes, but is not was in violation of limited to, the inBuddy Sections 12-4-A (acside of the car to Shacklette tions detrimental the trunk area, or to stock car racing); 12-4-Q See SLAPPED, B2 (car, car parts, components

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Page B2

Benock From page B1

and we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a guard. Riley wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worked in a lot, but we had to use him. I asked him what we could run with him in there (the game) and he said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I can run whatever you want.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; That showed me that he paid a lot of attention and he was going to do a lot for us.â&#x20AC;? Benock said playing for such a reputable team in high school helped prepare him for college ball. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Playing for Coach Garris and listening to what he had to say gave me somewhat of a leg up on other freshman in terms of knowing what to do and how to do it,â&#x20AC;? he said. Averaging about nine minutes a game for MSU,

Benock is gaining valuable floor time during his first year playing as a Bulldog. He said every minute he spends on the court against the stiff competition, contributes to him become a better and better basketball player. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unbelievable how things can change in a year,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sometimes catch myself thinking about where I was this time last year, playing teams like Cloverport and Breck County, and now I find myself playing Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas. Not taking anything away from those two teams, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re no SEC opponent.â&#x20AC;? Mississippi State has an overall record of 19-8 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and an SEC western division-leading record of 10-3 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so far this season, and Benock contributed to some of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bigger victories against teams like

THE NEWS STANDARD

Kentucky, Louisiana State University and South Carolina. As of Feb. 23, Benock leads the team with a .424 three-point percentage, knocking down 14 of 33 thus far. He has a .405 field goal percentage and a .625 percentage from the freethrow line. Though Riley loves his hometown, he has adapted well to his Mississippi surroundings and is happy, grateful and proud to be a Bulldog. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve loved every minute of my time here and I love all of my teammates and coaches,â&#x20AC;? he said. MSU coach, Rick Stansbury, is also a fellow Meade County High School graduate, and Benock is ecstatic about sharing the same small town roots with his new head coach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great coach and a wonderful guy that really cares about his players and I think he would be willing

Two pitchers aim, at last, for greatness By Mark Vasto A Sporting View Two pitchers are taking to the mound this spring, both men separated by nearly a decade in age, both men searching for another chance at major league greatness. One of the men, Hideo Nomo, 39, has done many great things. Nomo has pitched two no-hitters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one in each league â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and was a strikeout king one season. His splitfingered fastball and unique â&#x20AC;&#x153;tornadoâ&#x20AC;? windup were sensations when he was at the top of his game. He has pitched seven seasons where he worked 190 innings or more. That said, in 11 seasons, the most games heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever managed to win was 16. And his good years, where his ERA hovered in the 3.00 range, are spikes among some pretty awful seasons. In his last two seasons, the oft-injured Nomo racked up ERAs of 8.25 and 7.24 respectively. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been out of the game since 2005. Now heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trying to pitch his way onto the Kansas City Royals. Mark Prior is 27 years old. He has pitched for five seasons with the Chicago Cubs. One season was such a standout that had the entire Second City buzzing. The year was 2003, and Prior posted 18 wins against six losses, pitched 211 innings, gave up only 15 home runs in the friendly confines of Wrigley Field while striking out 245 batters for and ERA of 2.43. He pitched the Cubs to within a few innings of the World Series before Steve Bartman decided to play the Billy goat for

the Cubbies. Basically, Prior had superstar written all over him. Over the next three years he won only 18 games. By 2007, he was optioned to Triple-A Iowa and was considered a majorleague bust. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get invited to the Futures Game or something,â&#x20AC;? he said, sarcastically, of his demotion. For Prior, the future is now. Signed to an incentive laden, $1 million, one-year contract with the San Diego Padres, Prior and his surgically-repaired right shoulder will attempt to make it back to the big leagues. With legends like Greg Maddux and Trevor Hoffman in the clubhouse, and reporting no pain in his first few throwing sessions this spring, Prior looks like he could be a steal for Bud Blackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Padres. With Nomo, who knows? For sure, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sentimental favorite: Nomo is the Jackie Robinson of Japanese baseball. That said, it looks bleak for his chances: after sitting out 2007 to recover from elbow surgery, Nomo made seven starts for Caracas in the Venezuelan Winter League and gave up 10 runs and 18 hits in 13 2/3 innings. Royals GM Dayton Moore probably summed up the gamble on both pitchers at the time of Nomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signing: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You never discount somebody who has had so much success in the major leagues and still has the desire to do it. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count those types of athletes out.â&#x20AC;? The countdown starts now. Mark Vasto is a veteran sportswriter and publisher of The Parkville (Mo.) Luminary.

NASCAR writer and Meade Countian Buddy Shacklette... only in The News Standard!

Friday, March 7, 2008

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

2007 MCHS graduate Riley Benock is continuing to make a name for himself. The three-point ace is now in the middle of his freshman year at MSU. to do anything for any of us,â&#x20AC;? he said. Benockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents, Tom and Karen Benock, visit their son and go to as many games as they can when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not watching their other son, Jordan Benock, play basketball at Campbellsville University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made several

games and I think they have one or two more trips in mind, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not easy to get away,â&#x20AC;? Benock said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough for them to balance out coming to my games and going to Jordanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s down at Campbellsville, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to see them when they get the chance to come.â&#x20AC;?

The former Meade County superstar has carried his talent to a different team, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reveling in every moment of his college basketball experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dream come true and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m taking in everything I can and enjoying every minute of my time here,â&#x20AC;? he said.

Slapping

der of the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to just maintain focus,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roush said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as good as it would appear to be for having won the last two races and we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as bad as it looked like we were when we couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win a race for part of last year.â&#x20AC;? Prior to the penalty Edwards was leading the points race by 21 over Kyle Busch, but NASCARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s penalty dropped him from first to eighth in the standings. Edwards has led 150 of 517 laps over the last two races and this weekend he heads to a place where heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s won in Atlanta. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Atlanta is going to be a little bit different than California and Vegas,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obviously itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a different race track, but the pavement is a little

different. The bumps there, the things that make it so much fun making Atlanta are going to be difficult for all of us to get a hold of. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know when we were there at the test we were not very fast last time we were there, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a little bit faster. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really looking forward to Bristol. We had a great race there last time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That place is really neat now that you can run three-wide there, so thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a lot of fun. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a little bit nervous about how fast weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be at Atlanta. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone is aware right now in this sport that anyone could go there and be dominant. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just no telling. I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be all right, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just an unknown right now.â&#x20AC;?

From page B1

the floors, firewalls, crush panels and wheel wells passing air into or out of the car) of the 2008 NASCAR rule book. Edwards won the race, his second in a row, but if he makes The Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup, the team will not receive the 10 bonus points for the UAW-Dodge 400 victory used for determining the Chase seeding order. Also, Osborne was fined $100,000, suspended from the next six NASCAR Sprint Cup Series events until April 30 and placed on probation the remain-

HARRY HOW/GETTY IMAGES FOR NASCAR

Race winner Carl Edwards edged Dale Earnhardt Jr. for the win on Sunday at las Vegas in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race.

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Friday, March 7, 2008

Power From page B1 the game. “I think Muhlenberg did a lot of things that were good,” Hurt said. “They made some shots, but they’re not going to go a whole game without missing shots. “I thought we guarded them as well as you could possibly guard them, but defensively they made some stops and made some plays, and they went zone and we kind of got stagnate against the zone. We didn’t attack the gaps like we needed to.” At the end of the night — and of the season — Meade fell to Muhlenberg 53-33. Though the Lady Waves wrapped up their season this week, the year ended on a high note after the team won the District 11 championship for the third year in

a row. Meade County took a significant 61-29 win over Hancock County to earn the title in front of its home crowd. The Lady Waves will say goodbye to five seniors, who have been playing and leading Meade to many wins over the last four years. “We’re excited about next year,” Hurt said. “We loose five really good players. Mindy, has obviously been our leading scorer for three years. She is going to be hard to replace. Kayla Fackler has been starting for three years and is going to be hard to replace. Kim has been starting on and off for three years, and people don’t realize how good of a year Kim has had, and people may never know, because she doesn’t score a lot, but man she handles the ball so well and she has got us into spots that we needed to get into. Her alone with Caroline, Mallory and Moe, they did a really good job

THE NEWS STANDARD

for us this year.” “Melinda Hurt is the heart and soul of this thing. Just her intensity, her effort, her desire her attitude, and then you get a kid like Kelsie Ledford, who is such a team person, so positive, so upbeat. Were going to miss all five of them.” Though the team is losing five key players, Hurt is positive that next year will be just as successful. “I think that if we work hard and build on what these seniors had done we can be even better at next year than this year, hopefully,” he said. Hancock 29, Meade 61 Hancock: Jones 3-4 3-5 9, Wroe 2-5 3-7 7, Sanders 2-3 1-3 6, M. Johnson 0-4 3-4 3, Husk 0-2 2-4 2, Jackson 0-1 1-2 1, Long 0-1 1-2 1, White 0-1 0-0 0. Meade: Oliver 8-12 1-2 19, B. Powers 3-6 2-6 8, Fackler 2-6 3-4 7, Evans 3-8 1-1 7, Wathen 2-4 0-0 5, Stinnett

Page B3

1-1 3-3 5, S. Powers 2-5 0-0 4, Montgomery 1-2 1-2 4, Adams 0-0 2-2 2, Ledford 0-1 0-0 0, Hurt 0-2 0-0 0, Wilson 0-4 0-0 0. Hancock 4 11 8 6—29 Meade 23 19 6 13—61 Three point goals—Hancock 1-3 (Sanders 1-1, M. Johnson 0-1, Jackson 0-1), Meade 4-11 (Oliver 2-5, Wathen 1-1, Montgomery 1-2, Ledford 0-1, Hurt 0-2). Assists—Hancock 3 ( Jones 1, Wroe 1, M. Johnson 1), Meade 17 (Oliver 4, Evans 1, Wathen 3, Montgomery 2, Wilson 5, Hurt 2). Rebounds—Hancock 18 (Jones 3, Wroe 6, Sanders 2, M. Johnson 2, Husk 3, White 2), Meade 28 (Oliver 6, B. Powers 3, Fackler 2, Evans 5, Wathen 3, Stinnett 2, S. Powers 3, Montgomery 1, Wilson 1, Smith 2). Total Fouls—Hancock 11, Meade unknown. Technical fouls—none.

THE NEWS STANDARD/SEAN P. LOWE

Senior Mindy Oliver pushes the ball past a Muhlenburg North defender during Monday night’s game.

brought the score to 39-34. “We got our shots there at the end of the third quarter, start of the fourth,” said coach From page B1 Jerry Garris. “We started getting a little bit shorter, and started playing not to loose Stinnett put two points in af- ... instead of going ahead and ter only 20 seconds ticked off playing to win. “But I think a big part of the clock. It was apparent the Greenwave had something to that was not having Casey prove taking an early eight- Hubbard in the ball game and that’s one player I think we point lead. South Muhlenberg remained could not afford to have out at scoreless halfway through the that time,” he said. Senior point guard Hubfirst quarter, and Meade conbard didn’t play because of an tinued to flex its muscles, takinjury, and his ball handling ing a 10-point lead. In the final seconds of the and agility could have powfirst quarter, the Suns gained ered the ‘Wave to a win. “We’ve played without Nick possession of the ball and some before, we’ve played drained a three-point shot at without Chris Roe before, and the buzzer to pull the game we’ve played without Rob bewithin seven points, 18-11. Both teams rallied at the end fore, but we have never had to of the first half, and the Suns play without Casey, and we found themselves setting to an saw why we need him in there and what it amounts to,” Gar11-point deficiet. Meade and Muhlenburg ris said. “He gives so much came out battling in the second from a leadership standpoint half, keeping the game close. and keeps everybody where The Suns outscored Meade they need to go … and when by six points in the third and he was out for those nine minutes that was a big part of the

Dynasty

Senior Chris Roe puts the moves on a Muhlenburg South defender during the boys region 3 home game Tuesday night. The Greenwave played a close game with the Suns, but lost by three points to conclude their season.

THE NEWS STANDARD/ SEAN P. LOWE

ball game.” The Suns were relentless during the final eight minutes of the game, putting up shots and pulling down rebounds. Two back-to-back blocks by Greenwave junior Johnathon Ives stifled the Suns’ offense, though both teams stayed neck and neck during the final minutes of play. Meade had a shortlived four-point lead that quickly withered to two points, and then one. The Suns stole the lead with seconds left on the clock, and after missed three-point attempts by both teams and some confusion about the time, Meade was given one last opportunity to tie the game. The crowd held their breath as Stinnett shot for three from behind the half court mark. The ball bounced off the rim and the buzzer sounded. Though it was an emotional loss for players, coaches and fans to endure, the Greenwave — like the Lady Wave — can officially deam their threeyear reign as district champions a dynasty.

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Page B4

Friday, March 7, 2008

New device helps blind archers take aim Submitted by the KY Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources Sydney and Austin Clark were already unlikely archers. The visually impaired sister and brother shot bows and arrows in their Frankfort elementary and high school archery programs alongside sighted classmates. They hit the target despite being unable to see more than a few feet away. But they always needed a teacher to help them aim. Now, an apparatus designed to allow blind and visually impaired archers to aim and shoot on their own has ratcheted their abilities up a notch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The great thing about this device is it allows them to shoot independently,â&#x20AC;? said Jennie Richardson, Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coordinator for

the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP). â&#x20AC;&#x153;It basically levels the playing field.â&#x20AC;? The Clarks recently tried out this new device â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a welded metal frame with various adjustment knobs and hinges â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at Second Street Elementary School in Frankfort. The device is simple. Shooters stand with their heels against the bottom of the frame, which allows them to set their stance correctly. Then they hold their bow out and touch their knuckles to a metal beam which serves as an anchor point â&#x20AC;&#x201D; touching the beam tells them they are in line with the target. They pull back their bow, then move their knuckles away from the beam and let the arrow go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It gives them the ability

to become an independent archer, so theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not relying on anyone,â&#x20AC;? said teacher Lisa Frye, who has helped the students aim their arrows since the kids began shooting four years ago. Before the device was made, Frye stood behind the kids, looking down their arrows and directing them both in archery class and in NASP competition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be standing on the line all by themselves,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were aided in a sense before. But now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re independent.â&#x20AC;? Richardsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coach, Curtis Beverley, designed the apparatus with help from Richardson and Georgia archery coach Rob Smith. Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources Maintenance Section Supervisor John Akers built

a wood frame to match the design. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I put the wood frame together so it swiveled, hinged and drew out where they needed,â&#x20AC;? said Akers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This allowed the shooters to hold their bows at the correct height, or elevation, and to adjust their side-toside aiming, or windage.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a two-dimensional anchor point,â&#x20AC;? said Akers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It gives them their elevation and their windage.â&#x20AC;? Beverley brought the wood frame for the Clarks to try out one day after school. The kids didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to expect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sydney thought she was just going to get some professional instruction, but Curtis brought the wood prototype that Akers made,â&#x20AC;? said Frye. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were so excited. They went home and

told their mother and father that they shot all by themselves.â&#x20AC;? Finally, Frankfort High School volunteer archery coaches Chris Lee and Sterling Frye spent many hours cutting and welding the final metal version. Sydney and Austin Clark are busy learning to use the completed device, as they prepare for upcoming NASP tournaments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With kids with disabilities, there are very few activities they can do where they have the ability to compete at the top level,â&#x20AC;? said Richardson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the archery field, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like everyone else.â&#x20AC;? Sydney and Austin Clark are not the only shooters overcoming physical barriers. The NASP program is full of inspiring stories of

children shooting bows and arrows despite being bound to wheelchairs, having hearing or visual impairments, autism or even missing hands or arms. Despite these physical challenges, the students discover that archery is a sport for everyone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As an educator, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work for money. You work for that feeling of accomplishment,â&#x20AC;? said Frye. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best feeling in the world. I told Sydney, one of these days when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re shooting in the Olympics, you make sure Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m one of your coaches.â&#x20AC;? Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state NASP tournament is March 18 at downtown Louisvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kentucky International Convention Center. The national tournament is May 10 at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville.

Volunteers opt for a little work to improve big park By Sean P. Lowe lowe@thenewsstandard.com Fresh air and clean trails are what people expect to see and experience when they go to a park. Otter Creek Park is no exception. Otter Creek Park is located off highway 1638 and is open to the public year round. Because of this, garbage tends to accumulate on all of its four trails spanning more than 23 miles throughout the park. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Otter Creek Park is having its trail cleanup day Saturday, March 8. The clean up is open to the public but is limited to 15 participants with pre-

registration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do this so we can supervise those who are helping.â&#x20AC;? said naturalist Bryn Lewis. The clean up starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. This is a great way to help out Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment as well as help to keep its parks clean and safe for years of fun and adventures to come. Otter Creek has been open since 1937, after 3,000 acres were selected in Meade County for residents in Louisville and surrounding areas to enjoy. The park has been well maintained and working to provide a safe and clean outdoors experience for all who visit.

Lick the wild, learn to survive at park programs Submitted by the Kentucky Department of Parks UNION, Ky. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever wondered if you could hold your own with survival reality-show contestants, Big Bone Lick State Park has planned a program this summer thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just right for you. The northern Kentucky park is sponsoring Lick the Wild, a series of eight classes on real-life wilderness living and survival skills that will be held every first full weekend starting Saturday and Sunday June 7-8. Park Naturalist/Anthropologist Todd Young will teach the eight courses designed to develop vital skills like how to find safe drinking water and how to build a shelter from the elements. Participants can attend just one or the whole series

of courses, which will take place in the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nature center. Each session costs $10 per person. Group discounts are available for all programs. No prior knowledge is necessary. All sessions start at 12 p.m. and are held the first full weekend of each month beginning in June and continuing through September. All programs are for ages 15 and above. However, children under 18 must have a legal guardian signed up and in attendance. The classes include, Finding Water in the Wild, held June 7; Finding and Gathering Food, held June 8; Shelter from the Elements, held July 5; Fire-starting, held July 6; Primitive Cooking, held Aug. 2; Cordage: Making rope from plant material, held Aug. 3; Tracking

Volunteers work to clear a trail at Otter Creek Park. The trails will be cleaned tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

There are many planned and organized activities for visitors such as enjoying the nature center, disk golf course and different public buildings â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or they can explore on their own. In order to prepare for the busy camping season, Otter Creek Park is having a campground clean up day on March 15 that is also open to the public. No pre-registration is needed to participate, but the park does ask to have participants name and contact information before helping. You can register online at www.ottercreekpark.org or by calling 502-574-4583.

and woods-lore, held Sept. 6 and Primitive Weaponry for Hunting and Defense, held Sept. 7. For more information please contact Todd Young at todd.young@ky.gov or call (859) 384-3522. Big Bone Lick State Park is located at 3380 Beaver Road in Union, Ky. Union is in southern Boone County about 10 miles south of Covington on Highway 42. The park is known for its â&#x20AC;&#x153;outdoor museumâ&#x20AC;? of prehistoric animals and its herd of buffalo. Other attractions include fishing in a 7.5 acre lake, swimming in the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pool, and hiking in the wooded areas and grassy plains where mastodon, primitive bison and sloth once roamed. The park also features a campground and two picnic shelters.

SUBMITTED PHOTO BY OTTER CREEK PARK

FOR

E GREAT PLACIN NER!! D LUNCH OR

Tinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Horseshoe 105 Broadway, Brandenburg 270-422-3383

Now accepting all major Credit Cards!

Subs â&#x20AC;˘ Sandwiches â&#x20AC;˘ Pizza â&#x20AC;˘ Fish Burgers â&#x20AC;˘ Chicken â&#x20AC;˘ Appetizers

Children Welcome...

OPENING NEW STORE! â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

Indoor Archery Range Largest Selection of Hunting &

â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

Gun â&#x20AC;˘ Bow â&#x20AC;˘ Paint Ball Gun â&#x20AC;˘ Fishing Reel Repair & Maintenance Handcrafted Fishing Lures while you wait!

BRANDENBURG HUNTINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; & FISHINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

105 Commerce Dr, Brandenburg â&#x20AC;˘ 422-2221

Battletown Community Park Lawson Park Rd. Battletown, Ky 40104

.PXJOH#JETr4FBTPO

Battletown Community Park will accept bids for the mowing season from April 2008 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 2008.

The expectations of the winning bid will be as follow: 1. Picking up all trash and debris and to empty all trash cans each time the park is mowed.  Mowing all of the grass every 10 days or as needed or on special request of the board before a function at the park. 3. Trimming all areas that can not be reached with the mowers. Such as but not limited to around all poles and fences under all playground equipment, under all bleachers, around the entire ball field and dumpsters along tree line etc, each time the grass is mowed. 4. Your bid should include the whole mowing season not month by month. 5. You must attend the regular scheduled meeting each month to be paid. You will not have to stay for the whole meeting but you must attend to be paid. Therefore, if there is a problem we can resolve it then. #JEEFBEMJOFJT.BSDIUI"MMCJETNVTUCFJOPVSQPTTFTTJPOCZOFYUNPOUIMZNFFUJOH.BSDI If there are any questions that you may have about the expectations of the winning bid or the mowing in general, please call one of the numbers listed below...

#PCCJF%JBMTr $JOEJ1FSDFr 3FOFBPS.JLF1BZOFr Please mark the envelope you send as lawn bid... All bids will remain sealed until next meeting. Winning bid will be notified. Please send all bids to:

#BĨMFUPXO1BSL 10#PY Battletown Ky 40104


OUTDOORS

Page B4

Friday, March 7, 2008

New device helps blind archers take aim Submitted by the KY Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources Sydney and Austin Clark were already unlikely archers. The visually impaired sister and brother shot bows and arrows in their Frankfort elementary and high school archery programs alongside sighted classmates. They hit the target despite being unable to see more than a few feet away. But they always needed a teacher to help them aim. Now, an apparatus designed to allow blind and visually impaired archers to aim and shoot on their own has ratcheted their abilities up a notch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The great thing about this device is it allows them to shoot independently,â&#x20AC;? said Jennie Richardson, Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coordinator for

the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP). â&#x20AC;&#x153;It basically levels the playing field.â&#x20AC;? The Clarks recently tried out this new device â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a welded metal frame with various adjustment knobs and hinges â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at Second Street Elementary School in Frankfort. The device is simple. Shooters stand with their heels against the bottom of the frame, which allows them to set their stance correctly. Then they hold their bow out and touch their knuckles to a metal beam which serves as an anchor point â&#x20AC;&#x201D; touching the beam tells them they are in line with the target. They pull back their bow, then move their knuckles away from the beam and let the arrow go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It gives them the ability

to become an independent archer, so theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not relying on anyone,â&#x20AC;? said teacher Lisa Frye, who has helped the students aim their arrows since the kids began shooting four years ago. Before the device was made, Frye stood behind the kids, looking down their arrows and directing them both in archery class and in NASP competition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be standing on the line all by themselves,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were aided in a sense before. But now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re independent.â&#x20AC;? Richardsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coach, Curtis Beverley, designed the apparatus with help from Richardson and Georgia archery coach Rob Smith. Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources Maintenance Section Supervisor John Akers built

a wood frame to match the design. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I put the wood frame together so it swiveled, hinged and drew out where they needed,â&#x20AC;? said Akers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This allowed the shooters to hold their bows at the correct height, or elevation, and to adjust their side-toside aiming, or windage.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a two-dimensional anchor point,â&#x20AC;? said Akers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It gives them their elevation and their windage.â&#x20AC;? Beverley brought the wood frame for the Clarks to try out one day after school. The kids didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to expect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sydney thought she was just going to get some professional instruction, but Curtis brought the wood prototype that Akers made,â&#x20AC;? said Frye. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were so excited. They went home and

told their mother and father that they shot all by themselves.â&#x20AC;? Finally, Frankfort High School volunteer archery coaches Chris Lee and Sterling Frye spent many hours cutting and welding the final metal version. Sydney and Austin Clark are busy learning to use the completed device, as they prepare for upcoming NASP tournaments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With kids with disabilities, there are very few activities they can do where they have the ability to compete at the top level,â&#x20AC;? said Richardson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the archery field, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like everyone else.â&#x20AC;? Sydney and Austin Clark are not the only shooters overcoming physical barriers. The NASP program is full of inspiring stories of

children shooting bows and arrows despite being bound to wheelchairs, having hearing or visual impairments, autism or even missing hands or arms. Despite these physical challenges, the students discover that archery is a sport for everyone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As an educator, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work for money. You work for that feeling of accomplishment,â&#x20AC;? said Frye. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best feeling in the world. I told Sydney, one of these days when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re shooting in the Olympics, you make sure Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m one of your coaches.â&#x20AC;? Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state NASP tournament is March 18 at downtown Louisvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kentucky International Convention Center. The national tournament is May 10 at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville.

Volunteers opt for a little work to improve big park By Sean P. Lowe lowe@thenewsstandard.com Fresh air and clean trails are what people expect to see and experience when they go to a park. Otter Creek Park is no exception. Otter Creek Park is located off highway 1638 and is open to the public year round. Because of this, garbage tends to accumulate on all of its four trails spanning more than 23 miles throughout the park. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Otter Creek Park is having its trail cleanup day Saturday, March 8. The clean up is open to the public but is limited to 15 participants with pre-

registration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do this so we can supervise those who are helping.â&#x20AC;? said naturalist Bryn Lewis. The clean up starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. This is a great way to help out Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment as well as help to keep its parks clean and safe for years of fun and adventures to come. Otter Creek has been open since 1937, after 3,000 acres were selected in Meade County for residents in Louisville and surrounding areas to enjoy. The park has been well maintained and working to provide a safe and clean outdoors experience for all who visit.

Lick the wild, learn to survive at park programs Submitted by the Kentucky Department of Parks UNION, Ky. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever wondered if you could hold your own with survival reality-show contestants, Big Bone Lick State Park has planned a program this summer thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just right for you. The northern Kentucky park is sponsoring Lick the Wild, a series of eight classes on real-life wilderness living and survival skills that will be held every first full weekend starting Saturday and Sunday June 7-8. Park Naturalist/Anthropologist Todd Young will teach the eight courses designed to develop vital skills like how to find safe drinking water and how to build a shelter from the elements. Participants can attend just one or the whole series

of courses, which will take place in the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nature center. Each session costs $10 per person. Group discounts are available for all programs. No prior knowledge is necessary. All sessions start at 12 p.m. and are held the first full weekend of each month beginning in June and continuing through September. All programs are for ages 15 and above. However, children under 18 must have a legal guardian signed up and in attendance. The classes include, Finding Water in the Wild, held June 7; Finding and Gathering Food, held June 8; Shelter from the Elements, held July 5; Fire-starting, held July 6; Primitive Cooking, held Aug. 2; Cordage: Making rope from plant material, held Aug. 3; Tracking

Volunteers work to clear a trail at Otter Creek Park. The trails will be cleaned tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

There are many planned and organized activities for visitors such as enjoying the nature center, disk golf course and different public buildings â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or they can explore on their own. In order to prepare for the busy camping season, Otter Creek Park is having a campground clean up day on March 15 that is also open to the public. No pre-registration is needed to participate, but the park does ask to have participants name and contact information before helping. You can register online at www.ottercreekpark.org or by calling 502-574-4583.

and woods-lore, held Sept. 6 and Primitive Weaponry for Hunting and Defense, held Sept. 7. For more information please contact Todd Young at todd.young@ky.gov or call (859) 384-3522. Big Bone Lick State Park is located at 3380 Beaver Road in Union, Ky. Union is in southern Boone County about 10 miles south of Covington on Highway 42. The park is known for its â&#x20AC;&#x153;outdoor museumâ&#x20AC;? of prehistoric animals and its herd of buffalo. Other attractions include fishing in a 7.5 acre lake, swimming in the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pool, and hiking in the wooded areas and grassy plains where mastodon, primitive bison and sloth once roamed. The park also features a campground and two picnic shelters.

SUBMITTED PHOTO BY OTTER CREEK PARK

FOR

E GREAT PLACIN NER!! D LUNCH OR

Tinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Horseshoe 105 Broadway, Brandenburg 270-422-3383

Now accepting all major Credit Cards!

Subs â&#x20AC;˘ Sandwiches â&#x20AC;˘ Pizza â&#x20AC;˘ Fish Burgers â&#x20AC;˘ Chicken â&#x20AC;˘ Appetizers

Children Welcome...

OPENING NEW STORE! â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

Indoor Archery Range Largest Selection of Hunting &

â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

Gun â&#x20AC;˘ Bow â&#x20AC;˘ Paint Ball Gun â&#x20AC;˘ Fishing Reel Repair & Maintenance Handcrafted Fishing Lures while you wait!

BRANDENBURG HUNTINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; & FISHINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

105 Commerce Dr, Brandenburg â&#x20AC;˘ 422-2221

Battletown Community Park Lawson Park Rd. Battletown, Ky 40104

.PXJOH#JETr4FBTPO

Battletown Community Park will accept bids for the mowing season from April 2008 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 2008.

The expectations of the winning bid will be as follow: 1. Picking up all trash and debris and to empty all trash cans each time the park is mowed.  Mowing all of the grass every 10 days or as needed or on special request of the board before a function at the park. 3. Trimming all areas that can not be reached with the mowers. Such as but not limited to around all poles and fences under all playground equipment, under all bleachers, around the entire ball field and dumpsters along tree line etc, each time the grass is mowed. 4. Your bid should include the whole mowing season not month by month. 5. You must attend the regular scheduled meeting each month to be paid. You will not have to stay for the whole meeting but you must attend to be paid. Therefore, if there is a problem we can resolve it then. #JEEFBEMJOFJT.BSDIUI"MMCJETNVTUCFJOPVSQPTTFTTJPOCZOFYUNPOUIMZNFFUJOH.BSDI If there are any questions that you may have about the expectations of the winning bid or the mowing in general, please call one of the numbers listed below...

#PCCJF%JBMTr $JOEJ1FSDFr 3FOFBPS.JLF1BZOFr Please mark the envelope you send as lawn bid... All bids will remain sealed until next meeting. Winning bid will be notified. Please send all bids to:

#BĨMFUPXO1BSL 10#PY Battletown Ky 40104


Friday, March 7, 2008

VIEWING

Page B5

Tune into WMMG 93.5 FM Your Hometown Radio Station! Monday through Saturday at 10:00am and Monday through Friday at 6:00pm for

TRADIO Kentuckiana’s #1 Buy, Sell and Trade Call-in Show!

422-3961 • 547-4464 • 877-2961


MARKETPLACE

Friday, March 7, 2008

KENTUCKY LAND CO. 525 N. Dixie Radcliff, Ky 40160

270-828-2222 www.kentucky-land.com

422-2600

Ed’s Lawn ServiceTop quality work lowest rates guaranteed. Call 812-738-6515.

Absolutely NO cost to you!! All brand new power wheelchairs, hospital beds and scooters. Immediate delivery. Call toll free 1-888-998-4111 to qualify.

Notice of Intent to Sale-1993 Jeep Cherokee to pay towing and storage fees. Call 270-828-5242 or 270-312-3045, Scalf’s Auto Repair & Towing.

For Sale-Full Blooded German shepherd puppies, mom and dad, is on sight to see, $200. Call 945-4207.

4 + or - acre house – 3 BR, 1 BA, county water, well, 30x50 metal building, located in Garrett. 10 minutes from Fort Knox, possible owner financing, $125,500. Call 270-547-8279. 36 acres Breck Co. near Webster, all woods with timber, nice home site, also good hunting. $2,500 an acre. 87.142 acres in Breck Co., near Webster, pasture, woods, perfect hunting, ok for horses or cattle, nice home site, must see to appreciate! 7 acres beautiful creek front property near Cloverport, Breck Co. O.K. for home or cabin, access to Ohio River and boat ramp. Perfect get away. 12 acre mini-farm, county water, electric and paved road, perfect for horses, located in Breckiridge County. 1-6 acres in Meade County near Fort Knox. Ok for single or doublewides homes. County water and electric available, owner financing. 5 acres and 7.7 acres near Irvington Beautiful home site, ok for horses or cattle, must see to appreciate!

HUNTERS PARADISE!!! * 88 acres in Fordsville, $1,400 an acre, may divide. * 38 acres in McQuady. * 367 acres in Lewis County near Morehead.

CALL MARION WHELAN 270.668.4035 www.mwlandforsale.com

Wooded building lots, located near Otter Creek Park, in Forest Ridge Estates, county water, streets will be paved, “restricted to Houses”. $24,900 Financing available for everyone! 270-828-2222. Building Lots in Milstead Estates, located near Flaherty in Hwy 144, city water available, streets will be paved “restricted to houses.” $29,900. Financing available for everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222. Home in Vine grove, 3 bedroom, 1 ½ baths, city water and sewers, completely remodeled with new kitchen, new bathrooms, new drywall, new laminated hardwood floors and carpets, located in Vine Grove on Shelton Street. $74,900. Financing available for everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222. 6.4 acres, on Hwy. 228, 6 miles from Brandenburg, city water available, lays nice for a home. $34,900 Financing available for everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222. 5 acres set-up for Double-Wide Home, with city water, septic, electric, located between Otter Creek Park and Doe Valley off Hwy. 1638 and Hwy. 933 in the Woods. $39,900 Financing available for everyone! www. kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222. 1 to 6 acre lake front lots on Rough River Lake, city water, long lake frontage, in a new development. Starting @ 22,900 Financing available for everyone! www. Kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222. 2 acres with 16’x 80’ Mobile Home, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, city water, new laminate hardwood flooring and new carpet in bedrooms, fresh paint very clean and nice, located off Hwy.79 near Irvington. $49,900 Financing Available for everyone! www. Kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222 4 bedroom double wide home on 1.7 acres has over 2000 Sq.ft of living space, 2 baths, new hardwood laminated floors, new carpet and new paint. Located off U.S. Hwy. 60 and ShotHunt Road $84,900 Financing Available for Everyone! www. Kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222 Mobile Home and 1 acre of land, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths city water, new carpet and flooring, nice and clean. Located off old Ekron Road near Brandenburg. $49,900 Financing Available for Everyone! www. Kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222. Double Wide Home and Garage on 1 acre of land, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, city water, beautiful home on permanent block foundation on paved road, very clean and nice. Located in the Woods Estates off Hwy. 933 and Hwy 1638. $84,000 Financing Available for Everyone! www. Kentucky-land.com, 270-828-2222.

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We offer owner financing on most all our properties with no prequalifications!

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*Please visit our website at www.mhdrealty.com*

RESTRICTED BUILDING LOTS 4 ACRE LOTS, Just off Hwy 144 Flaherty, Blacktop frontage & Co Water, $37,500. 1-2 ACRE LOTS, On Hwy 144 & Approx. 2 Miles from US 60, 20 minutes from E-town. Priced at $29,900. FORREST RIDGE, 1-2 ACRE WOODED LOTS, RESTRICTED TO SITE BUILT HOMES, Off Hwy 1638, Close to Otter Creek Park, $24,900.

ACREAGE 5 ACRE LOTS, Off Hwy 823 Meade County, Nice lots with nice amount of trees, $21,900 each. MOBLIE HOME LOT, 2 ACRES. Old Ekron Road, city water, perk tested, $19,900. LAKE FRONT LOTS, Homes Tucker Road, Breckinridge Co, starting at $22,900.

LOTS W/ HOMES OR READY FOR YOUR HOME 3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 BATH MODULAR HOME, VINE GROVE, Completely remodeled, new laminate flooring, carpet, paint, windows, priced to sell $69,900. Possible owner financing. 2 ACRES, 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME, new carpet, paint, city water, Irvington, $49,900. 5 ACRES, SMALL POND, SET UP FOR MOBILE, Deep well, electric, septic, driveway, concrete pad, Meade County $42,900. 1 ACRE, 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME, new floor covering and paint, 3 miles from Brandenburg, $49,900.

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CHERRY BLOSSOM GOLF/COUNTRY CLUB, Georgetown. Voted #1 public access golf course by Golf Week Magazine. Join us for your next round or outing. Call 502-570-9849.

CDL TRAINING Preapproval for financing, employment applications and enrollment in as little as 60 Minutes. Choose from over 20 Carriers. Excellent Benefits– Health, Dental & 401K. www.tatcdl.com 1-866-244-3644 TRUCK AMERICA TRAINING.

Page B7

Be wise, advertise! in coupon Miguel’s Mexican Bring to receive… Restaurant Dine-In or Carry-Out

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Driver- Home weekends! Co. Drivers up to .42cpm. O/O .90 cpm + FSC. 1 year T/T experience, Good MVR, Stable work history req. Epes Transport (888)849-1011 www. epestransport.com. Drivers: ASAP! SignOn Bonus 35-42 cpm. Earn over $1000 weekly. Excellent benefits. Need CDL-A and 3 mos recent OTR 800-535-8669.

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634 River Ridge Plaza • Brandenburg (270)422-3353

What’s Your Favorite Thing?® •Homemade Pies •Breakfast Bar •Fruit, Soup and Salad Bar •Hot Fudge Cake •Hand Breaded Onion Rings

Drivers- CDL-A. The grass is greener at PTL. Students WelcomeExcellent training program. Co. Drivers earn up to 46 cpm. Owner Operators earn 1.21 cpm. 22 yrs of age, 12 mos OTR. No forced Northeast! Co. Drivers call: 800-848-0405. O.Operators call: 877-774-3533 www.ptlinc.com. Drivers - Great Home Time & Pay! Company or Lease Purchase. Health, Vision & Dental. Direct Deposit. CDL-A & 3 Mos. Experience Req’d. 800-441-4271 ext. KY-100. Flatbed DriversCompetitive Pay & Bonuses. Consistent Home Time, Great benefits. Accepting recent grads. 23 YO, 1yr. OTR, CDL-A. Smithway Motor Xpress. 888-619-7607, www.smxc. com.

•Valentines Coupons - 8 Kids meals for $1 •Lent Favorites -Frisch’s Famous Fish Sandwich -White Fish and Chips -Salmon Dinner •Drive thru and carry out Northeast corner of I-64 and Hwy. 135 Exit 105, Corydon

738-1970

Call Tennille Today!

The News Standard 422-4542

Bumps and Bruises should be your only concern…

Got a Menu Special Let the hungry viewers know about it. Place your specials here in the Wine & Dine section. Log onto

www.familywatchdog.us to find registered sex offenders in your area.

Gun Show! March 8-9. Sat. 9-5 & Sun. 9-4. Lexington. Heritage Hall. (430 W. Vine St.) Buy- Sell- Trade. Info: (563)927-8176.

Torti • Female 1 Year Old

Shelty Mix • Tan & Black 1/2 Years Old • Male

Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcohalt House, 2254 Fairgrounds Road, meets Sunday through Thursday, 8 p.m.; Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. Call 422-1050. Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous Meetings held at the Acceptance Place 1370 Hwy. 79 in Irvington, Ky. Alcoholics Anonymous meetings held every Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Wednesday nights at 8 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meeting held Monday nights at 8 p.m. For more info, call 270-547-0347 or 270-547-0445.

1 Year Old Female

Kittens 2 Female

4 Month Old • Zoey Female • Shepherd Mix

Male • Black Collie Mix • 1 Year Old

3 Year Old Female

Calico • Female 1 Year Old

Female • Yellow Lab Am I Lost?

1 Year Old Female

Al-Anon meets every Sunday and Tuesday, 8 p.m.., Alcohalt House. For more information, call 497-4885. The OPEN DOOR ALTEEN group meets Thursday at 8 p.m. at The Alcohalt House. For more information, call 497-4885. Report a crime, new tip line 270-422-HOPE (4673), the tip line is totally anonymous, and your identity cannot be revealed.

Real Estate Development

We buy and sell land

270-547-4222 Thinking about selling your farm give us a call we pay cash, quick closing Approx 21 acres near Lodiburg, Breck Co mostly open lays good, lots of road frontage $44,900. 28 Acres Breck Co good survey open and wooded, lots of road frontage, only $1,000 DN 71.5 acres has mobile home, nice barn, pond open and wooded, lots of county road frontage $149,900. 8 + acres at dead end road open and trees lays good, great building site only $500 DN. 18.2 acres near Webster mostly open great view ok for house or mobile home $37,500. 39.5 acres Breck Co Webster area mostly open great building sites or small farm only $2,100 per acre.

DESTIN, FORT WALTON BEACH, SOUTH WALTON, PANAMA CITY & PORT ST JOE, FLORIDA. Best selection of beach cottages, homes & condos. On-line Reservations. www.SouthernResorts. com 800.737.2322.

#1 Truck Driving School. Training for Swift, Werner & Others. Dedicated/ Regional/ Local. Approx. $50,000-$70,000 yearly. Home weekly! 1-800-883-0171 Open 7 days a week. Attn Drivers: HOME WEEKENDS! GET PAID 40¢ PER MILE, Tarp Pay & 6% Bonus! CDL-A & 1 yr flatbed exp. req’d. W.V.T. 800-246-6305 www.wvtonline.com . DriversImmediate openings for Regional & OTR drivers! CDL-A w/ tanker req’d. Premium pay & benefits. Call 877-484-3061 or visit us at www.oakleytransport. com.

Please send check and payment to: The News Standard 1065 Old Ekron Road • Brandenburg, KY 40108 SUBSCRIBER’S NAME & ADDRESS ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Payment Type:______________ Amt._____________


FUN & GAMES

Page B8 ACROSS 1 Not at all 6 Unruly hairdo 9 Frivolous one of song 12 Phantom's domain 13 Parisian pal 14 Spy novel org. 15 Eye doctor's subjects 16 Huge sandwich eponym 18 Marvel 20 Ship's framework 21 Faraway craft 23 "Hazel" cartoonist Key 24 High nest 25 Aerobatic maneuver 27 Aristocratic 29 Caterina de' 31 Former Houston team 35 Detroit dud 37 Pivot 38 Racing shell 41 Greek consonants 43 Kitten's remark 44 As well 45 Give 47 Kansas city 49 Concerning 52 Droop 53 Newton filler 54 Bullwinkle is one 55 Noshed 56 Pub brew 57 Go by bike DOWN 1 2 3

Soc. Sec. designations Choose 16th-century

Friday, March 7, 2008

Strange but True By Samantha Weaver •It was German-born theoretical physicist (and sometime philosopher) Albert Einstein who made the following sage observation: "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the universe." •You may be surprised to learn that studies show your brain is more active while you're asleep than it is while you're watching television. Then again, maybe that's not so surprising. •The country of South Africa has a total of 11 official languages. •Advertising is everywhere — you can't turn around without seeing dozens of pitches for some kind of product or service competing for your attention. Perhaps it's fitting, then, that the English word "advertise" comes from the Latin word "advertere," which means "to turn toward" or "to pay attention."

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 17

author John Hydrox competitor Failed to be Eked out a living Sharif or Epps Glutton Clean the pots and pans Garlic mayonnaise Punch-bowl accessory Transportation, slangily

19 21 22 24 26 28 30 32 33 34 36 38

Jeans material Einstein's birthplace Adversary Actress Larter It's higher when the head is removed Paycheck extra Animation frame - Park, Illinois Regret Stitch Tense Burrito enhancer

39 40 42 45 46 48 50 51

•In the TV show "Charlie's Angels," it was a requirement that each of the stars have eight different outfits for each episode.

Sports-shoe attachment Grammarian's concern Philatelist's prize Seethe Reed instrument Son-gun link "Born in the -" Part of AT&T

•There are those who feel we should adopt the metric system of measurement, claiming that our current system is outdated and archaic. To go truly archaic, though, we could start measuring things in flags, baronies, falls, roods, townships and hides. Yes, those are actual terms of measurement. They equal, respectively, 25 square feet, 4,000 acres, 342 square feet, a quarter of an acre, 36 square miles and 10 acres. •The magnolia — that icon of genteel Southern life — is actually an entire family of plants, encompassing more than 200 species. •The golf tee was patented in 1899, but it wasn't put into official use until 1922. •Thought for the Day: "The only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory." —Paul Fix

Horoscopes

HOCUS-FOCUS

By Henry Boltinoff

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your soft-hearted self is drawn to a tempting offer. But your hard-headed half isn't so sure. Best advice: Do it only after every detail is checked out to your liking. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your inventive mind should help you find a way to get around an apparently impassable barrier and make yourself heard. Your efforts get you noticed by the right people. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You're enjoying this creative period. But by midweek, you'll need to emphasize your more pragmatic talents as you consider a risky but potentially lucrative move. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) An unexpected rejection could turn into something positive if you pocket your pride and ask for advice on how you can make changes that will make the difference. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your Lion's heart gives you the courage to push for answers to a job-related situation. Stay with it. You'll soon find more believers coming out the ranks of the doubters. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Your curiosity pays off this week as you push past the gossip to find the facts. What you ultimately discover could lead you to make some changes in your plans. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A new sense of enthusiasm helps get you out of on-the-job doldrums and back into a productive phase. Family matters also benefit from your more positive attitude. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A bit of nostalgia is fine. But don't stay back in the past too long or you might miss seeing the signpost up ahead pointing the way to a new opportunity. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) If you feel you need to take more time to study a situation before making a decision, do so. Don't let anyone push you into acting until you're ready.

Last Week’s Solutions

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) As the Great Advice Giver, the Goat really shines this week as family and friends seek your wisdom. Someone especially close to you might make a surprising request. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Spiritual concerns dominate part of the week before more worldly matters demand your attention. An old promise resurfaces with some surprises attached. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) You're in a highly productive period and are eager to finish all the projects you've taken on. But don't let yourself get swamped. Take a breather now and again. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a gift for learning new things quickly and applying your knowledge to best advantage where needed.


YOUTH

Friday, March 7, 2008

2008 Meade County Spelling Bee and the winner is...

PHOTOS BY CHARLOTTE FACKLER /THE NEWS STANDARD

Students from all over the county, grades 4 through 8, participated in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spelling bee and were excited to sample the new auditorium at Meade County High. LEFT: Margaret Huffines proudly receives the 1st place trophy from Mr. Adams for the second year in a row. Margaret is the daughter of Jerry and Tracy Huffines of Flaherty; Paula and Don Fowler of Brandenburg. On March 4, Meade County High School hosted the 2008 Meade County Spelling Bee in the new auditorium. The first place winner, Margaret Huffines â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a fifth-grade student at David T. Wilson Elementary School â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was also winner of the 2007 county and regional spelling bees and will advance to the regional competition.

Second place winner was Meaghan Dunn, a seventh-grade student at Stuart Pepper Middle School. Third place winner, Robin Farrell, is a fourth-grade student also attending David T. Wilson. The school trophy will be on display at David T. Wilson.

Battletown Ms. Lora Bell, Sponsor Brianna Arnold Emma Bell Arialle Daley Gracie Fackler Jessica Mattingly Marty Mattingly Wyatt Perce Austin Schneider Blake Thomas Slater Adams (alt.) Dakota Hoskins (alt.) Angel Kieslich (alt.)

Payneville Ms. Cheryl Vanover, Sponsor Madilyn Barr Ashley Bloomer Cierra Hopkins Michael Krimm Ashley Padgett Dusty Shemwell Julie Stivers Cody Tate Austin Wootten Hailey Blevins (alt.) Blake Deal (alt.) Jasmyn Knott (alt.)

Ekron Ms. Megan Hubbard, Sponsor Janessa Gonsalves Rilana Gonsalves Corey Hubbard James McNeil Katie Phelps Kayla Schmid Bo Schultz Tanner Sipes Justin Skeans Brandee Addison (alt.) Ariel Combs (alt.) Kayla English (alt.)

David T. Wilson Ms. Georgia Whelan, Sponsor Katelyn Allen Annie DeVries Ethan Fackler Robin Farrell Alex Haynes Margaret Huffines Tyler Jackson Hannah King Holli Otis Makayla Pearce (alt.) Briana Rice (alt.)

Flaherty Ms. Amy Hamilton, Ms. Emy Lorigan, and Ms. Anita Seymour, Sponsors Morgan Cruz Jarrod Foushee Chelsea Lancaster Ashley Nikolao Toni Pohlman Kaylea Pryor Joseph Psyck Micaela Ray Kati Jo Schuh Raley Johnson (alt.) Savannah Woodson (alt.) Muldraugh Ms. Mary Straney, Sponsor Brany Hart Kasdin Jones Kaitlyn Schierbaum Logan Short Stuart Pepper Middle Ms. Tammy Alcorn, Sponsor Alexis Cox Mahala Curl Meaghan Dunn Sarah Hollis Nathan Prince Hoss Westbay Hannah Gempler (alt.)

MCHS graduate puts the spotlight on Brandenburg

THE NEWS STANDARD/ CHESLEY GARRIS

Actors Juliam Vaca and Steven Berryessa (red and black) and Jourdan Lees and Kenny Foster (green and white) play a match of foosball during filming in the MCHS gym. By Chelsey Garris chelsey@thenewsstandard.com Dozens of local youth participated in the filming of a local documentary by being extras during scenes shot at the Meade County High School gymnasium. Mary Slinger, a 2007 MCHS graduate, is the assistant director of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Diaries of a Professional Foosball Teamâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a film project she is working on for her film production class at Watkins College of Art and Design. Friend and classmate Caroline Ingrassia is

the director of the film. Other scenes in the documentary were also filmed in the county, including Little Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Down on the River, the Brandenburg United Methodist Church and other residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homes. The film project is expected to be completed by the end of April and will be premiered in May at the Belcourt Theater in Nashville, Tenn. A two-minute-long trailer of the film can be viewed online at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=BW2iRmGextI.

LIFE

HOME

INSURANCE AUTO

Page B9

Death is a part of life

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death is a part of life.â&#x20AC;? grief, do it in a safe, healthy Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure who first person way. was to utter those words, Going on a drinking binge but I do know that or getting high is not every day many a good way to deal Felicia people die in all Thompson with loss. Trying to parts of the world. spend more time with Countless people friends and family is are affected by a good idea, because death all the time; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very likely that the they cope with the people around you are loss of their mothhurting as well. Your ers, fathers, sibpresence with them lings, children, best may benefit them as friends, co-workers much as it does you. and other loved Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also OK to be ones. alone sometimes. For some Losing a loved one is people, it may be easier to never an easy ordeal. Of all deal with things alone, raththe millions of words that er than with help from outcomprise the English lan- side sources. guage and the endless comJust last week a friend of binations of sentences and mine passed away after he phrases, there are absolutely was involved in a car crash. none that will instantly heal I know that being around your pain after someone people definitely softened close to you dies. the blow for my friends and People have to find their myself. own way of dealing with Ignoring or denying the that kind of loss. Everyone issue probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help goes through his or her anything. By repressing pain own grieving period when and emotions and not giva loved one passes away. ing yourself enough time to However you handle your grieve, you could ultimately

hurt more when those feelings eventually boil to the surface later in your life. Many people seek the help from therapists and counselors. Seeking counseling or talking to a counselor at school might really help you. Speaking with someone who isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t directly related to the situation can be beneficial because they can listen to you without interjecting their own personal feelings about the situation. If you would like to talk with a professional you can visit one of the counselors at your school. Death really is a part of life, and though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never easily accepted, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that everyone will have to face at some point in their life. By dealing with death in a healthy manner that involves letting yourself be sad and surrounding yourself with others, the chances are youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll become a stronger individual in the grand scheme of things.

Kentucky Women in Agriculture offering college scholarship Staff Report In keeping with the mission to empower women in agriculture through education, involvement and action, the Kentucky Women in Agriculture, Inc. organization is offering a scholarship for women who are entering their junior year in college through graduate school. Scholarship applicants must be seeking a degree related to agriculture. For more information and scholarship criteria, visit www. kywomeninag.com or call 1-877-266-8823. Application

deadline is April 1, 2008. Central Kentucky Community Action educational awards The Central Kentucky Community Action will again offer educational awards for graduating seniors and GED recipients in the eight-county area. These educational awards will be given in the form of scholarships to assist with tuition while attending a four-year college, a two-year college or a technical school. Anyone applying for these scholarships must first

meet the federal low-income guidelines. Preference will be given to graduating seniors going into the fields of social services, business, agriculture or education, in that order. Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; grade point averages will also be taken into consideration. Scholarship packets are available at local high schools, vocational schools and at the Meade County Community Action Office. Call 270-422-2545 for more information.

COUPONS!

$1 OFF VIDEO OR $5 OFF 20 VISITS OR 30 DAY GAME RENTAL UNLIMITED PKG. Not Valid on Mondays

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CHORUS ACTIVE PARENTS (CAPS) is sponsoring the following events at the

NEW AUDITORIUM AT THE MEADE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL. â&#x20AC;˘ ALL EVENTS AT 7:00 PM â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WITH EXCEPTION OF WAVE REVUE â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 270-422-2646 â&#x20AC;˘ MADRIGALS SOLO VOICE RECITAL MARCH 4

CHOIR STUDENT PIANO RECITAL APRIL 8

SPMS SPRING CONCERT MONDAY, MARCH 10

FACULTY RECITAL APRIL 24

MCHS SPRING CONCERT TUESDAY, MARCH 11

ANNUAL WAVE REVUE 3 SHOW TIMES THIS YEAR FRI & SAT, MAY 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10

The Finde It Shoppe â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll try to find it for you!â&#x20AC;?

GRA ND OPENING Tuesday, March 11 at noon $POTJHONFOUTr(JÄ&#x203A;Tr#BSHBJOT Come in for coffee & look around. Hours of Operation:

Tuesday - Friday 10 am to 6 pm Saturday 10 am to 4 pm Sunday & Monday by Appointment Only

520 E. Broadway, Brandenburg r

Brandenburg 422-3979 â&#x20AC;˘ Flaherty 828-4600

kfbmeadeinsurance.com Greg Beavin Jeanna Turner John Beavin

HEALTH Greg_Beavin@Kyfbins.com

Jeanna_Turner@Kyfbins.com

John_Beavin@Kyfbins.com


2008.03.07 The News Standard  

See BALLPARK, A10 ASK ABOUT THE INDUSTRY’S BEST INSTALLATION SYSTEM AND OUR LOWEST PRICE GUARANTEE! See DISASTER, A2 Business, A6 See ABE, A...

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