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H tted with co-o se.” on eek into o • “Open ly by Governor o n: bushels or al Kitchen Com mmunity in st and have been d rp o u e Let’s p THE NEWS p ils b the t s a W r to co un es of l new ediate ident e for th ents fo going • “Comm them in every me communiti r imm age county is gun to organiz e 7,500 garm bandages, readers Nationa ue, Says Pres or politics,’ the in so blish at Ceda e ad g n b ta s, e “P a s m io g • g e lie .” es ie n at L lle rt ity ns pp vi er to a n e a co ers’ wear.” stitutio ers h rable gical su a Peac mandate of p ndate of huma er are in op te Teach n hono the farm at 13 state in , including “sur ticles of knitted p the a already .” orm tions in the u Iowa Sta ho can show a es r ar fort e d at ul ng the m is Dead: F had e he ef “All Na not obeying th m sf yi t w ot ar In e o a es b • w n us sh cc o w e itio su are are velt tes , the and vario ss for th rtificates th of the soldiers years tu … ‘We continued, ‘we “Roose of United Sta eader, per acre Red Cro efs, tray cloths r pharmacy ce ate house. 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Rice of F ler of a re cause employe are on strike. ement suppose g the m ge 17. d with n up, seiz u containin ranger dashed had been stuffe ntinues on pa • “Be bers n agre • Mary Grace Alsh editor were co se ort plum our day, with a ed.” a st a ys p ry r, n itc d o d se to n o e ve su S rn a d a ct e e y. Th SD, d Gu e D 2 for a nine h treaty is sign re ele . purebre to an alle r of th alls we eview Iowa F ness manage of Iowa $7.1 until the peace , 25 head of of $168 a head Iowa acre in ountyR a si e ct ananC and bu , the University revious effe southwest Iow n average pric ty, won the 1918 906 boys s.Buch w e a p un r ye ch In N o co fo e • hi n ke h “At in w sold Iowa Haw om @T ellman, rship or ar book. essfully at Ames book.c junior ye either the edito t of the succ arion E. Bell of W ip in a contest t: Face n s sh w us a • “M on pi llo Fo time ha ess manageme men.” am club ch s.com o n the busi n entrusted to w e total corn untynew h e ananco book be off to Iowa! 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PAGE 6 February 14, 2019

The News & The Guide

n d e ding a l W P ner

Get the most out of bridal shows and wedding events Bridal shows can be a great way for couples to meet and familiarize themselves with local wedding professionals, all the while introducing themselves to the terminology of wedding planning. Though they're a great source of information, contacts and samples, bridal shows also can be a bit overwhelming. Learning how to maximize time spent at shows can help couples plan their weddings as efficiently as possible. · Attend more than one. Often there are bridal shows scheduled in different venues over the course of a few months. Because it can be overwhelming to take everything in at any single event, plan to attend more than one. · Scout out vendors. Check local newspapers and websites for lists of exhibitors and vendors. Use the show as a chance to compare offerings. · Come prepared. Chances are each vendor is going to ask couples for information so that they can follow up with a phone call or email with more detailed offerings and estimates. Couples attending the show can expediate the process by coming equipped with labels that

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feature their names, contact information and wedding date. They can then stick the labels on sign-in sheets or use them like business cards. · Dress comfortably. Bridal expos involve a lot of walking and roaming around. Wear comfortable clothing and shoes. Consider a backpack or hands-free bag so you are not weighed down when collecting the swag and other handouts throughout the day. · Ask questions. When face-to-face with vendors, rely on their expertise but don't hesitate to ask questions concerning themes, colors, recommendations for honeymoon locations, invitation paper suggestions, and much more. · Stay for the fashion show. Many shows will offer a runway experience to present the latest gown and tuxedo offerings. This can be an entertaining way for couples to formulate their wedding styles. Wedding shows introduce couples to vendors and set them on the path to making decisions regarding the planning of their weddings.

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The News & The Guide

February 14, 2019 PAGE 7

Wedding Planner

Alternatives to engagement rings

Engagement rings are often sizable investments with the average engagement ring costing around $5,800. Jewelry styles are personal, and grooms-to-be should carefully research their loved one’s preferences in terms of precious metals, colors and gemstones. Even though tradition holds that a diamond gemstone is classic for engagement rings, they are not the only options. In fact, before World War II, just 10 percent of proposals involved diamond engagement rings. That number jumped to 80 percent by 1990. Now, many couples lean toward other offerings not only for the uniqueness they provide, but also for the potential cost savings. · Amethyst: Purple shades have long been associated with royalty, making an amethyst fitting for such an occasion as special as an engagement. Because amethysts, which are less expensive than diamonds, are a seven on the Mohs scale for gemstone hardness, they can be very durable. · Knot rings: These rings do not have a center stone. Rather, they're designed to be a tied knot or infinity symbol. These rings can be particularly sentimental as they represent true, unbroken love. · Opal: Gemstones, like flowers, have been assigned certain meanings. Tying the engagement ring to one of them can infuse more symbolism into the relationship. Opal, for example, represents love, passion, creativity, spontaneity, and inspiration. Those traits seem tailor-made for surprise proposals. · Sapphire: While sapphire stones often are blue, they can also be yellow, green, pink, and white. Sapphires are the third hardest mineral. A white sapphire can be the perfect diamond replacement. · Garnet or ruby: Red is the definitive color of love. A Valentine's Day proposal can be made even more special by presenting an engagement ring with a red gemstone. · Moissanite: The jewelry source Brilliant Earth says moissanite is a gemstone first discovered in 1893 by Henri Moissan in a meteorite that fell to earth. It is remarkably similar to a diamond in appearance and strength. Moissanite also has heightened brilliance, with a refractive index higher than that of a diamond. Couples have many beautiful alternatives to diamonds that they can explore when shopping for engagement rings.

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PAGE 8 February 14, 2019

Wedding Planner

The News & The Guide

Did you know?

All about “Tying the knot”

Should a person hear that a couple "tied the knot," it's immediately known that they got married. But just when and where does the term "tying the knot" come from? The phrase "tying the knot" is steeped in tradition, though the origins of the phrase remain open for debate. One origin story states that tying the knot can be traced back to the Roman empire, when brides wore girdles that were tied in knots, and the groom had to eventually untie those knots to consummate the marriage. Tying the knot also may be traced to the custom of handfasting. The marriage contract was established between a bride and a groom by joining their hands together and tying them. Although accounts vary as to whether the hands were tied only during the ceremony or later, this is believed to be an ancient Renaissance or Celtic tradition. Others speculate that the phrase traces its origins to Hindu weddings in which brides and grooms tied a necklace of flowers as part of wedding tradition. Yet another theory suggests that the phrase can be traced back to the knotted ropes that supported beds prior to the use of metal springs. Therefore, in order to make a marriage bed, couples first needed to tie the knot. Knots also represent a difficult-to-break bond, which is why they have long been associated with marriage. In one unity tradition, couples may braid or knot together three strands, with one representing the bride, one symbolizing the groom and the third representing God as they join together in faith. Similarly, the phrase "getting hitched" is associated with knottying as well. The saying implies that two people are being tied together just like a horse is tied, or hitched, to a wagon.

Did you know…

The modern bridal shower may trace its origins the 1890s. "The Old Farmer's Almanac" says the first bridal shower hostess filled a paper parasol with small presents and turned it over the head of the bride-to-be. Soon the concept caught on, and many other women began "showering" future brides in such a manner. Naturally, as presents became larger and heavier, the tradition of literally showering the bride with gifts was modified - but the name has stuck. Bridal showers are designed to equip couples with many of the necessities to start their new life together. This custom is believed to have evolved from an old dowry system, in which a bride was expected to bring valuables to the marriage. The dowry was originally intended as compensation for the burden of supporting a wife placed on the groom. Some parents of the bride were not rich enough to afford an ample dowry, so friends and family members would offer small gifts to help offset this financial responsibility.

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The first dance sets the tone

A first dance song at the wedding reception often sets the tone for the event and can exemplify just how newlyweds feel about each other. Couples may agonize over which song to choose, but there are many different resources available that can help couples narrow down their options. Popular streaming music services have now compiled a list of the most popular wedding songs, based on global respondents. A top pick was "Perfect," by Ed Sheeran, a song that many might suspect was composed with wedding dances in mind. Sheeran's "Thinking Out Loud," Etta James' "At Last," John Legend's "All of Me," and Elvis Presley's "Can't Help Falling in Love" are also popular.

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The News & The Guide

Wedding dress fitting guide

Wedding Planner

February 14, 2019 PAGE 9

Fittings are a part of wedding planning, and here's how brides-tobe can navigate the process of finding and being fitted for a dress. · Try on sample gowns. The first step is to make your rounds to various gown shops and try on the samples they have available. Most sample sizes will not be the size you wear every day, so expect them to be ill-fitting. Do not be discouraged. Once a gown is chosen, the dress shop will take your measurements and order the gown according to the manufacturer's sizing guide. Again, this can be shocking, since the size will likely be larger than what you wear in street clothes. Some shops will also order a little larger to allow for adequate tailoring. · Schedule the first fitting. The first fitting should be anywhere from eight to 12 weeks before the wedding date, according to experts. This is the time it takes to complete most standard alterations. Complex customizations can take even longer. Brides should also budget a minimum of $500 for alterations, which may or may not be included in the price of the dress. · Bring shoes and undergarments. Remember to bring along the exact shoes and undergarments you will wear with your gown. A change in shoes or bra/corset can result in the alterations fitting poorly the next time. Bring these items along to all subsequent fittings. · Speak up. Martha Stewart Weddings suggests speaking up at fittings if anything is uncomfortable or needs tweaking. Seamstresses are masters at their crafts, but only if they understand the desires of the bride. · Check the details. The second fitting is designed to check that all issues from the first fitting have been addressed, the gown is comfortable and you can move freely. At the last fitting, ask the maid of honor to come along so that she understands how to bustle or help you handle complicated straps or closures.Open communication with a seamstress and bridal shop can ensure brides-to-be get a dress that fits like a glove.

Don’t risk a bad hair day for your wedding!

A wedding is a tough time to experience a bad hair day. Clothing styles, time of day and weather all can dictate a wedding hairstyle, but ultimately one of the most important factors in a wedding hairstyle is finding a stylist who understands you and can exercise your vision. A patient, understanding stylist who is open to viewing different photographs and drawing inspiration from various places, as well as running through a few trial styles, can help brides (and grooms) look their best. In fact, trials are a must to ensure that a chosen style will work with your hair texture. If you plan to get your hair colored, professionals recommend doing so about three weeks in advance of the big day so it looks natural and any potential snafus can be remedied beforehand. Your stylist may suggest a light trim prior to the wedding so that the ends are fresh and healthy. And since you're putting your faith in a qualified stylist, trust their expertise and vision. Keep an open mind to their suggestions. You may fall in love with one of the options you hadn't considered.

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Business & Service Directory

PAGE 10 February 14, 2019

ADVERTISING THE NEWS &

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www.thenews-guide.com 319.361.8390

AUCTIONEERING EMMETT DONNELLY Auctioneering & Appraisal Service Certified Appraiser & Full-Service Marketing

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AUTO SERVICE IOWA TRANSMISSION REBUILDERS Independence 319-334-2040

The News & The Guide

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

HOSCH CARPET CLEANING & SALES Independence 319-334-6181

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION BUCHANAN MASONRY & CONCRETE INC.

FOOD

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Gas, wood, pellet, electric fireplaces. Install, including chimney, & service.

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The News & The Guide

Wedding Planner

February 14, 2019 PAGE 11

How newlyweds can successfully blend finances It is best for couples to discuss finances before they tie the knot. Establishing a financial plan will shed light on how much you can afford to spend on your wedding. Newlyweds should make a list of financial matters that concern them, and these concerns can spark discussions about finances. To avoid conflict, consider these ways to merge newlywed finances. * Be forthcoming with information. It may be embarrassing to have a low credit score or substantial amount of debt. But it's still best to share this information sooner rather than later. Openness with regard to finances allows couples to work collectively to improve their financial standing. * Begin slowly. After so many years of financial self-sufficiency, some newlyweds find it difficult to blend finances. Couples with vastly different salaries may struggle to determine equitable contributions to joint accounts, so it can pay to take things slowly. For example, open a joint account shortly after tying the knot, using the account to pay for home and living expenses. Keep separate accounts for discretionary purchases. * Create a savings plan. Budgets that worked before you got married likely won't be realistic now that you have tied the knot. Expenses and/or income may have increased, so examine your finances to get an honest assessment of your finances. Once a clear of how much money is coming in and going out picture is presented, you and your spouse can begin to map out your short- and long-term financial plans. * Establish a family CFO. Many couples opt to split responsibilities equally, while others realize one person is better suited to managing money. Whatever your decision, it should be mutual. Financial conflicts are one of the biggest contributors to marital dissatisfaction. If one person is the primary account manager, the other spouse should have open access to bank accounts, credit cards and passwords. Recognize that responsibilities are not static. Changes can be made if things are not working out. * Kids change everything. Plans may need to be revised as children enter the equation. Separate accounts may have worked in the past, but usually it makes more financial sense, especially come tax time, to completely merge accounts when children are in the picture. It may also be time to think about life insurance and disability insurance. Couples also must update investment paperwork and retirement accounts to include new beneficiaries. Both husband and wife should each write a will once children are born. This may require another assessment of assets and some additional financial Perfect for any occasion! decisions. Communication is the most • Indoor seating for up to important thing when newly married couples begin to 240, Outdoor Area & merge their finances. Awnings for tables

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PAGE 12 February 14, 2019

The News & The Guide

Wedding Planner

Factors that can affect the length of an engagement Each year, millions of couples around the world tie the knot. But before couples walk down the aisle, the proposal to get married must take place. Many couples mutually agree to get engaged, while the experience may be a surprise for others who have thought about it, but may not have been sure when one partner or another would "pop the question." Upon getting engaged, couples may ponder how long their engagement should last. There is no perfect answer, and engagement length typically depends on personal preference and the needs of the couple. In fact, according to a study by The Knot, the average length of an engagement is about 14 months. A number of factors affect the length of a couple's engagement, and couples should not feel as if they need to hurry down the aisle. For example, couples who will be financing their own weddings may need a longer engagement than those whose parents will be chipping in. Others may prefer a shorter engagement if they are financially stable and prepared to tie the knot. Couples in their late 30s may feel the tug of a biological clock and want to ensure there is ample time to get married and have children. Some couples may have little choice in the matter, as the length of their engagements may be dictated by the availability of their favorite venues. Military deployment, work commitments, medical issues, or travel responsibilities also may affect the length of an engagement. Some couples may feel that an especially lengthy engagement diminishes their excitement about getting married. That "new engagement shine" can wear off as family and friends wait months or years for the wedding to take place. Couples generally are advised to stick with what feels right to them regarding the length of their engagements. Just like all aspects of the wedding, couples can weigh the opinions of others but follow through with what works best for them.

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Wedding registry tips

Wedding registries are invaluable resources that provide engaged couples' loved ones with gift suggestions. In spite of that value, couples may find it daunting and even a little uncomfortable to build their registries. Couples likely won't want to ask for too much or for gifts that are too expensive, but a poorly built registry can be a major inconvenience for guests. The following tips can help couples build adequate registries that benefit them without

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Wedding Planner asking too much of their guests. · Register with more than one store. It's important to register with more than one store. Doing so makes things as convenient as possible for guests and increases the chances they will be able to shop at stores they're familiar with. Unless your guest list is predominantly local, try to register with at least one national chain so guests who live in different regions can shop for gifts in-person if they prefer to do so. · Make a large list. Some couples are hesitant to make large wedding registries, feeling that doing so gives the impression that they're asking for too much. But large registries simply give guests more options to choose from. Many industry insiders advise registering for two to three gifts per guest. That might seem like a lot, but guests will appreciate having all of those options. · Don't hesitate to include expensive items on your registry. Couples also may be hesitant to include especially expensive items on their wedding registries. However, the couples' parents and other close relatives may be honored to purchase more expensive items, so couples should not feel embarrassed to include them on their lists. It's also important to note that many retailers, after couples' wedding days have come and gone, discount registry items that weren't purchased. So even if no one purchases the more expensive items, including them on a registry may significantly reduce their cost for couples who want to buy such items themselves after tying the knot. · Vary the prices of items on the list. In addition to including more expensive items on the registry, make sure to include moderately priced and inexpensive items. This gives guests more options and ensures guests who might be spending a lot to travel to and from the wedding can still purchase gifts without digging too much deeper into their pockets. · Periodically update the registries. Periodically update your registries to remove items you have already received

and to add items if many of the less expensive ones have already been purchased. This also makes things more convenient for guests. Building a wedding registry is a unique task that couples can embrace as their wedding day draws near.

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Kress named IPPA 2018 Master Pork Producer Submitted by the Iowa Pork Producers Association

At the 2019 Iowa Pork Congress, the Iowa Pork Producers Association introduced the 2018 class of Master Pork Producers and Master Pork Partners, which included lo-

Kress named IPPA 2018 Master Pork Producer Submitted by the Iowa Pork Producers Association

At the 2019 Iowa Pork Congress, the Iowa Pork Producers Association introduced the 2018 class of Master Pork Producers and Master Pork Partners, which included lo-

cal producers Ryan Kress of Winthrop and Gene Tinker of Manchester. A Master Pork Producer award denotes an individual’s or family’s excellence in pork production, as measured by their pork production statistics, their commitment to We Care® principles, and their contribution to their community. There are six We Care principles that outline a pig farmer’s responsibilities to uphold high standards for animal care, food production, the environment, people, and community involvement. IPPA’s 77th class of Master Pork Producers includes nine pig farmers: • Ryan Kress, Winthrop, Buchanan County Story continues on page 4. Pictured, from left: Chris Rademacher, DVM and associate director of the Iowa Pork Industry Center, Ryan and Dawn Kress, and IPPA President Trent Thiele.

Peek into the Past

Let’s peek into the past to see what was important to readers of THE NEWS one hundred years ago.

National news

value of the soil crops for the state for 1918 are $862,215,117, an increase over 1917 of $40,000,000, and nearly 200,000,000 greater than 1916. … Corn as usual heads the list with a total value of $438,712,710. The total crop this year was 356,677,000 bushels or 34.4 per acre worth 1.23 per bushel.” • “Communal Kitchen Coming in Iowa: Food Administration expects to establish them in every community in state. … Such kitchens already are in operation in some communities and have been very successful.” • “Four years tuition at the Iowa State Teachers’ college at Cedar Falls will be given to all soldiers who can show an honorable discharge from the army.” • A 25-acre farm near Webster City sold for $1,000 per acre, the highest price ever paid in that section for farm land. • “Iowa farmers don’t like the daylight saving regulation which was in effect during the summer. A vote was taken through an Iowa farm paper recently, and out of 2,020 farmers only one man was in favor of it. The other 2,019 were loud in their demands for a return to the old order of things.” • “Because employers refused them $7 for an eight hour day, Davenport plumbers are on strike. They have been receiving $7.12 for a nine hour day, with an agreement supposed to be in effect until the peace treaty is signed.” • In southwest Iowa, 25 head of purebred Guernseys were successfully sold for an average price of $168 a head. • “Marion E. Bell of Wellman, Iowa county, won the 1918 Iowa acre corn club championship in a contest at Ames in which 906 boys

as $35 for a WHOLE YEAR!

And now get two for the price of one! Iowa news

• Iowa hog survey, carried out by children in rural schools, shows Polk County has 55,318 of the 3,322,199 hogs listed in the state. • Mary E. Rice of Flandreau SD, and Grace Alshuler of Iowa Falls were elected editor and business manager of the Hawkeye, the University of Iowa junior year book. “At no previous time has either the editorship or the business management of the book been entrusted to women.” • “Hats off to Iowa! The total

Last week eastern Iowa was plunged into a deep freeze, with an all-time record low air temperature of -30 degrees set in Cedar Rapids – some local temperatures were even colder – in the early morning of Jan. 31. Adding in the wind chill, some areas felt colder than -50 degrees. Although dangerously cold, the weather did lead to some spectacular “sun dogs” (pictured). Story continues on page 20.

Supervisors hear bridge replacement plans

Pictured, from left: Chris Rademacher, DVM and associate director of the Iowa Pork Industry Center, Ryan and Dawn Kress, and IPPA President Trent Thiele.

Peek into the Past

Let’s peek into the past to see what was important to readers of THE NEWS one hundred years ago.

National news

At their Jan. 28 meeting, Buchanan County Supervisors Don Shonka, Clayton Ohrt, and Gary Gissel heard from County Engineer Brian Keierleber who presented plans for a bridge replacement on Daniel Avenue. After discussion, the board approved the plans for a bridge over Spring Creek, from 250th St. South 0.5 miles in Sec. 21, Twp. 88, Rng. 10 and set the letting date for March 4, with a start date of August 2019. Story continues on page 20.

“All Nations in a Peace League, Says President Wilson: … ‘We are not obeying the mandate of parties or politics,’ the president continued, ‘we are obeying the mandate of humanity.” “Roosevelt is Dead: Former President of United States had Great Career as Political Leader, Reformer, Soldier, Author and Big Game Hunter.”

Iowa news

• Iowa hog survey, carried out by children in rural schools, shows Polk County has 55,318 of the 3,322,199 hogs listed in the state. • Mary E. Rice of Flandreau SD, and Grace Alshuler of Iowa Falls were elected editor and business manager of the Hawkeye, the University of Iowa junior year book. “At no previous time has either the editorship or the business management of the book been entrusted to women.” • “Hats off to Iowa! The total

value of the soil crops for the state for 1918 are $862,215,117, an increase over 1917 of $40,000,000, and nearly 200,000,000 greater than 1916. … Corn as usual heads the list with a total value of $438,712,710. The total crop this year was 356,677,000 bushels or 34.4 per acre worth 1.23 per bushel.” • “Communal Kitchen Coming in Iowa: Food Administration expects to establish them in every community in state. … Such kitchens already are in operation in some communities and have been very successful.” • “Four years tuition at the Iowa State Teachers’ college at Cedar Falls will be given to all soldiers who can show an honorable discharge from the army.” • A 25-acre farm near Webster City sold for $1,000 per acre, the highest price ever paid in that section for farm land. • “Iowa farmers don’t like the daylight saving regulation which was in effect during the summer. A vote was taken through an Iowa farm paper recently, and out of 2,020 farmers only one man was in favor of it. The other 2,019 were loud in their demands for a return to the old order of things.” • “Because employers refused them $7 for an eight hour day, Davenport plumbers are on strike. They have been receiving $7.12 for a nine hour day, with an agreement supposed to be in effect until the peace treaty is signed.” • In southwest Iowa, 25 head of purebred Guernseys were successfully sold for an average price of $168 a head. • “Marion E. Bell of Wellman, Iowa county, won the 1918 Iowa acre corn club championship in a contest at Ames in which 906 boys

Dangerous cold hits area

Last week eastern Iowa was plunged into a deep freeze, with an all-time record low air temperature of -30 degrees set in Cedar Rapids – some local temperatures were even colder – in the early morning of Jan. 31. Adding in the wind chill, some areas felt colder than -50 degrees. Although dangerously cold, the weather did lead to some spectacular “sun dogs” (pictured). Story continues on page 20.

Est. Buchanan County Review 1892

Supervisors hear bridge replacement plans Kress named IPPA 2018 Master Pork Producer SubmittedSupervisors by the Iowa Pork Producers Association At their Jan. 28 meeting, Buchanan County At the 2019 Iowa Pork Congress, the Iowa Pork ProducDon Shonka, Clayton Ohrt, and Gary Gissel heard fromthe 2018 class of Master Pork ers Association introduced and Master Pork Partners, which included loCounty Engineer Brian Keierleber whoProducers presented plans for a bridge replacement on Daniel Avenue. After discussion, the board approved the plans for a bridge over Spring Creek, from 250th St. South 0.5 miles in Sec. 21, Twp. 88, Rng. 10 and set the letting date for March 4, with a start date of August 2019. Story continues on page 20.

cal producers Ryan Kress of Winthrop and Gene Tinker of Manchester. A Master Pork Producer award denotes an individual’s or family’s excellence in pork production, as measured by their pork production statistics, their commitment to We Care® principles, and their contribution to their community. There are six We Care principles that outline a pig farmer’s responsibilities to uphold high standards for animal care, food production, the environment, people, and community involvement. IPPA’s 77th class of Master Pork Producers includes nine pig farmers: • Ryan Kress, Winthrop, Buchanan County Story continues on page 4. Pictured, from left: Chris Rademacher, DVM and associate director of the Iowa Pork Industry Center, Ryan and Dawn Kress, and IPPA President Trent Thiele.

Dangerous cold hits area

Last week eastern Iowa was plunged into a deep freeze, with an all-time record low air temperature of -30 degrees set in Cedar Rapids – some local temperatures were even colder – in the early morning of Jan. 31. Adding in the wind chill, some areas felt colder than -50 degrees. Although dangerously cold, the weather did lead to some spectacular “sun dogs” (pictured). Story continues on page 20.

Supervisors hear bridge replacement plans

At their Jan. 28 meeting, Buchanan County Supervisors Don Shonka, Clayton Ohrt, and Gary Gissel heard from County Engineer Brian Keierleber who presented plans for a bridge replacement on Daniel Avenue. After discussion, the board approved the plans for a bridge over Spring Creek, from 250th St. South 0.5 miles in Sec. 21, Twp. 88, Rng. 10 and set the letting date for March 4, with a start date of August 2019. Story continues on page 20.

and girls entered and with 156 completely finished, with a total yield of 119.1 bushels of dry, 16% moisture, shelled corn. ... He began early in the spring, when he covered the ground well with barnyard manure. He plowed the ground May 1, about six inches deep.” Let’s peek into the past to see what was important to value of the soil crops for the state for 1918 are $862,215,117, and girls entered and with 156 completely finished, with a total yield • “Ice dealers at Waterloo are worrying over thereaders fact ofthat cutting THEno NEWS one hundred years ago. an increase over 1917 of $40,000,000, and nearly 200,000,000 of 119.1 bushels of dry, 16% moisture, shelled corn. ... He began greater than 1916. … Corn as usual heads the list with a total early in the spring, when he covered the ground well with barnyard has yet been done.” National news value of $438,712,710. The total crop this year was 356,677,000 manure. He plowed the ground May 1, about six inches deep.” “All Nationspneumonia in a Peace League, Says President Wilson: • Webster City started giving free vaccinations against • “Ice dealers at Waterloo are worrying over the fact that no cutting bushels or 34.4 per acre worth 1.23 per bushel.” … ‘We are not obeying the mandate of parties or politics,’ the • “Communal Kitchen Coming in Iowa: Food Administration expects has yet been done.” and Spanish influenza. president continued, ‘we are obeying the mandate of humanity.” to establish them in every community in state. … Such kitchens • Webster City started giving free vaccinations against pneumonia “Roosevelt is Dead: Former • “Open war on illicit importation of liquor on trains will be launchedPresident already are in operation in some communities and have been very and Spanish influenza. of United States had • “Open war on illicit importation of liquor on trains will be launched successful.” Great Career as Political Leader, immediately by Governor W.L. Harding’s vice committee.” • “Four years tuition at the Iowa State Teachers’ college at Cedar immediately by Governor W.L. Harding’s vice committee.” Reformer, Soldier, Author and Falls will be given to all soldiers who can show an honorable • “Page county is going to be dotted with co-operative stores, • “Page county is going to be dotted with co-operative stores,Big Game Hunter.” discharge from the army.” the farmers having begun to organize for that purpose.” the farmers having begun to organize for that purpose.” • A 25-acre farm near Webster City sold for $1,000 per acre, the • Inmates at 13 state institutions made 7,500 garments for the Iowa news Red Cross for the war effort, including “surgical supplies, bandages, • Inmates at 13 state institutions made 7,500 garments for the• Iowa hog survey, carried out by highest price ever paid in that section for farm land. children in rural schools, shows • “Iowa farmers don’t like the daylight saving regulation which handkerchiefs, tray cloths and various other articles of knitted wear.” Red Cross for the war effort, including “surgical supplies, bandages,Polk County has 55,318 of the was in effect during the summer. A vote was taken through an • “Women candidates for pharmacy certificates showed up the hogs listed in the state. Iowa farm paper recently, and out of 2,020 farmers only one man men at the recent examination held at the state house. Both of the handkerchiefs, tray cloths and various other articles of knitted wear.”3,322,199 • Mary E. Rice of Flandreau was in favor of it. The other 2,019 were loud in their demands for women who took the examination secured certificates while but • “Women candidates for pharmacy certificates showed up theSD, and Grace Alshuler of a return to the old order of things.” four of the 12 men passed the examination successfully.” Falls were elected editor • “Because employers refused them $7 for an eight hour day, • “Blackmailers who attempted to get $10,000 from J.W. men at the recent examination held at the state house. Both of theIowa and business manager of the Davenport plumbers are on strike. They have been receiving Bettendorf, Davenport millionaire, met with failure. Supplied with women who took the examination secured certificates while butHawkeye, the University of Iowa $7.12 for a nine hour day, with an agreement supposed to be in the address by the telegraph company, Pinkerton men surrounded a house to which a messenger boy was to bring a suitcase junior year book. “At no previous effect until the peace treaty is signed.” four of the 12 men passed the examination successfully.” time has either the editorship or • In southwest Iowa, 25 head of purebred Guernseys were containing the money demanded, but as he was knocking at the door, a stranger dashed up, seized the suitcase and disappeared • “Blackmailers who attempted to get $10,000 from J.W.the business management of the successfully sold for an average price of $168 a head. • “Marion E. Bell of Wellman, Iowa county, won the 1918 Iowa acre into an alley. The suitcase had been stuffed with newspapers.” book been entrusted to women.” Bettendorf, Davenport millionaire, met with failure. Supplied with• “Hats off to Iowa! The total corn club championship in a contest at Ames in which 906 boys Story continues on page 17. the address by the telegraph company, Pinkerton men surrounded Copyright 2019 www.thebuchanancountynews.com Follow us at: Facebook.com @TheNews.BuchananCountyReview a house to which a messenger boy was to bring a suitcase containing the money demanded, but as he was knocking at the door, a stranger dashed up, seized the suitcase and disappeared into an alley. The suitcase had been stuffed with newspapers.” Story continues on page 17.

Peek into the Past

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“All Nations in a Peace League, Says President Wilson: … ‘We are not obeying the mandate of parties or politics,’ the president continued, ‘we are obeying the mandate of humanity.” “Roosevelt is Dead: Former President of United States had Great Career as Political Leader, Reformer, Soldier, Author and Big Game Hunter.”

Dangerous cold hits area

cal producers Ryan Kress of Winthrop and Gene Tinker of Manchester. A Master Pork Producer award denotes an individual’s or family’s excellence in pork production, as measured by their pork production statistics, their commitment to We Care® principles, and their contribution to their community. There are six We Care principles that outline a pig farmer’s responsibilities to uphold high standards for animal care, food production, the environment, people, and community involvement. IPPA’s 77th class of Master Pork Producers includes nine pig farmers: • Ryan Kress, Winthrop, Buchanan County Story continues on page 4.

and girls entered and with 156 completely finished, with a total yield of 119.1 bushels of dry, 16% moisture, shelled corn. ... He began early in the spring, when he covered the ground well with barnyard manure. He plowed the ground May 1, about six inches deep.” • “Ice dealers at Waterloo are worrying over the fact that no cutting has yet been done.” • Webster City started giving free vaccinations against pneumonia and Spanish influenza. • “Open war on illicit importation of liquor on trains will be launched immediately by Governor W.L. Harding’s vice committee.” • “Page county is going to be dotted with co-operative stores, the farmers having begun to organize for that purpose.” • Inmates at 13 state institutions made 7,500 garments for the Red Cross for the war effort, including “surgical supplies, bandages, handkerchiefs, tray cloths and various other articles of knitted wear.” • “Women candidates for pharmacy certificates showed up the men at the recent examination held at the state house. Both of the women who took the examination secured certificates while but four of the 12 men passed the examination successfully.” • “Blackmailers who attempted to get $10,000 from J.W. Bettendorf, Davenport millionaire, met with failure. Supplied with the address by the telegraph company, Pinkerton men surrounded a house to which a messenger boy was to bring a suitcase containing the money demanded, but as he was knocking at the door, a stranger dashed up, seized the suitcase and disappeared into an alley. The suitcase had been stuffed with newspapers.” Story continues on page 17.

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The News & The Guide

February 14, 2019 PAGE 15

Public Notice

Public Notice

Buchanan Co. Board of Supervisors, February 4, 2019 The Buchanan County Board of Supervisors met in regular session at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, February 4, 2019 with Don Shonka, Chairman in the Chair and Clayton Ohrt present. Gary Gissel absent. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited. Motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to approve the minutes of the January 28th meeting as presented. All in favor, motion carried. Motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to approve the claims filed with the County Auditor for payment in the amount of $72,793.66. All in favor, motion carried. Motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to place on file manure management plan updates from Tyler Paris & Dexter Paris in Sec. 34 of Buffalo Twp.; Michael Robinson in Sec. 21 of Madison Twp.; Kenneth Wilgenbusch, facility KW Pork Finishing in Sec. 13 of Middlefield Twp. All in favor, motion carried. The Board met with Sam Hudson, Director North Iowa Juvenile Detention for an introduction and to discuss services that are offered. No official action was taken by the Board. County Engineer, Brian Keierleber presented information on the Hwy. D-22 paved shoulders from Frost Ave. east 3.03 miles to Golf Course Blvd. The project cost is $585,252.39 and HSIP and TSIP funding will be $665,600. After discussion, motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to approve the contract between Buchanan County and Flynn Company, Inc., Dubuque, project #HSIP-SWAP-C010(105)--FJ-10 and authorize the Chairman to sign. All in favor, motion carried. Engineer, Keierleber presented bridge replacement contracts for a bridge on Hwy. D-16, Isaac Ave .1 west. The project cost is $414,493.39. After discussion, motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to approve the contract between Buchanan County and Jim Schroeder Construction, Inc., Bellevue, project #BRS-SWAP-C010(107)--FF-10 and authorize the Chairman to sign. All in favor, motion carried. Motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to recess at 9:47 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. All in favor, motion carried. Don Shonka, Chairman ATTEST: Vanessa Tisl, Auditor’s Administrative Assistant Motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to reconvene at 10:37 a.m. All in favor, motion carried. The Board received the initial proposals for the AFSCME Council 61 courthouse union and AFSCME Local No. 1722 secondary road union. Union negotiations continued with proposed settlements to be voted on by the union members. Motion by Ohrt second by Shonka to adjourn at 10:42 a.m. All in favor, motion carried. Don Shonka, Chairman ATTEST: Karen Stephenson, Deputy Auditor

Public Notice

City of Independence - January 28, 2019 The Independence City Council met in regular session in the council chambers at 6:31 p.m., on Monday, January 28, 2019. Mayor Davis called the meeting to order with Council Members Vaughn, Kurtz, Hill, Scharff, and O’Loughlin in attendance. Hanna participated via telephone. Hayward was absent. Scharff/O’Loughlin to approve the agenda as presented for the regular meeting held January 28, 2019. Ayes: All. Scharff/Kurtz to accept and approve the consent agenda that approves the following: 1) The minutes of the January 14, 2019 Regular Meeting. 2) Budgeted Monthly Transfers for the month of December. Ayes: All. Hill/Kurtz to approve the following bills for payment. Ayes: All. ACCESS SYSTEMS Contract-ALL 1,447.21 ACCUCUT Supply-L 267.50 ADVANCE AUTO PARTS Maintenance-PD 5.99 AECOM Service-ST 4,682.27 AFLAC Benefit 382.68 ALLEN OCCUPATIONAL Service-PD 92.00 ALLIED 100 LLC Supply-F 507.00 AMAZON Supply-L 1,198.10 AVFUEL CORPORATION Service-A 40.00 BCHC FAMILY PRACTICE Service-PD 30.00 BEATTY, ROBERT L. Service-ST 100.00 BLAKER, LAURA Reimbursement-L 60.00 BOLTON & MENK, INC. Services-A 870.00 BRODART CO Supply-L 1,306.22 BROWN SUPPLY CO Supply-W 1,786.45 BRYAN HEAVY EQUIP Maintenance-PR 319.49 BUCHAN CO EXTENSION Training-W 35.00 BUCHAN CO LANDFILL Fees-CH 17,898.00 BUCHAN CO RECORDER Service-PR 22.00 BUCHAN CO SENIOR CITIZEN Donation-CH 3,500.00 BUCHAN CO TOURISM Dues-CH 125.00 BUCHAN CO WILDLIFE Dues-PD 650.00 BULS, JANET L Instructor-PR 39.40 CARD SERVICES-LIBRARY Miscellaneous-L 666.38 CARD SERVICES Operating-B,F,PD,ST 1,000.82 CAVENDISH SQUARE Supply-L 190.50 CENGAGE LEARNING Book-L 99.41 CENTER POINT LRG PRINT Supply-L 221.10 CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT Supply-PD 221.13 CITY LAUNDERING CO INC Maintenance-A,PD,PR,W 422.23 COLLECTION SERVICES CNTR Recovery 290.00 COLONIAL LIFE & ACCIDENT Benefit 422.10 CONSOLIDATED ENERGY CO Service-All 5,599.66 CORKERY, GARY Reimbursement-ST 150.00 CRAWFORD ENGINEERING Service-PR,ST 20,597.93 CRYOTECH DEICING TECH Supply-A 2,192.08 CULLIGAN TOTAL WATER Supply-A 23.43 CY & CHARLEY’S Service-PD,ST,W 507.82 DATA TECH Supply-CH 223.95 DEMCO Supply-L 116.06 DON’S TRUCK Maintenance-ST 50.64 EAST-CENTRAL IA R.E.C. Utility-A,PR,ST,W 3,006.54 EBSCO Dues-L 896.58 FAHR BEVERAGE INC Supply-PR 221.65 FAIRCHILD COMM Dues-A 135.00 FARMERS STATE BANK Service-W 31,305.00 FASTENAL CO Supply-PR 146.92 FELD FIRE Maintenance-F 1,657.75 FOX ENGINEERING Service-W 10,112.00 FULL SERVICE SHOP Maintenance-ST 546.22 FUSION FORWARD Service-CH 700.00 GEERTSEMA, SEAN Service-PR 165.00 GRAINGER INC Supply-CH,W 271.00 GREENLEY LUMBER CO Supply-PR 33.02 GROUP SERVICES INC Insurance-All 14,867.16 H.P.I., INC. Service-W 13,581.51 HACH CO Supply-W 337.09

PUBLIC NOTICE OF STORM WATER DISCHARGE The City of Winthrop plans to submit a Notice of Intent to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to be covered under the NPDES General Permit No. 2 “Storm Water Discharge Associated with Industrial Activity for Construction Activities”. The storm water discharge will be from construction of additional treatment structures and improvements to existing infrastructure at the City’s wastewater treatment plant. Soil disturbing activities include construction of crushed stone parking and access lanes, topsoil stripping, site grading, utility construction, dewatering (if necessary), fill placement, building construction, wastewater treatment tank construction, parking lot and access lane construction, and topsoil hauling and spreading. The project site is located in the NE Quarter of Section 02, Township 88N, Range 08W in Winthrop, Buchanan County, Iowa. Discharge will travel overland to drainage channels to an unnamed creek to the Wapsipinicon River. Comments may be submitted to the Storm Water Discharge Coordinator, IOWA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES, Environmental Protection Division, Henry A. Wallace Building, 502 E 9th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0034. The public may review the Notice of Intent from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at the above address after it has been received by the department.

HALLS, CASSANDRA HARDWARE HANK HAWKEYE FIRE & SAFETY HEARTLAND AG GROUP HOMAN, NICK HOUK & ASSOCIATES HUPP ELECTRIC I.S.C.I.A. IA DEPT OF PUB SAFETY IA DEPT OF REV IA DNR IA LIBRARY ASSOC IA PRISON INDUSTRIES IA SPORTS SUPPLY CO IACP IEH-BIOVIR LAB INDE COMM SCHOOL INDE L&P INDE PLUMBING HEATING INDE ROTARY CLUB IRS INTERSTATE ALL BATTERY IPERS JENSEN, JARED JOHN DEERE FINANCIAL K & W COATINGS LLC KEYSTONE LAB INC KNAPP’S SERVICE LAMPHIER, KALEB LEVI ARCHITECTURE LIZARRAGA, JAMES M&T BANK MAIN, TIMOTHY MANHATTANLIFE MCCORMICK, ETHAN MCDONALD, CONNIE MIDAMERICAN ENERGY MILLER, JAXON MOCIC MYERS-COX CO NAPA AUTO PARTS NORTH CENTRAL LAB OCCIDENTAL LIFE O’CONNELL, KRISTI OELWEIN PUBLISHING CO OFFICE TOWNE INC P & N CORPORATION PALMER, CARTER PAYROLL CHECKS PENWORTHY CO PEPSI-COLA PERFECT GAME PERMA-BOUND PETERSON, KEVIN PORTZEN CNSTRC, INC PRINT EXPRESS PURCHASE POWER R & E REAL ESTATE RACOM CORP RADIO COMM CO RECORDED BOOKS RJS WELDING LLC RYAN EXTERM INC RYDELL AUTO GROUP S & K COLLECTIBLES SHERRETS, TODD SIDLES, JAKE SIGNS & MORE

Service-CH Supply-L Supply-F Supply-L Service-PR Maintenance-W Maintenance-W Training-PD Dues-PD Sales Tax Dues-A Training-L Supply-ST Equipment-PR Dues-PD Analysis-W Fee-PR Service-All Service-PR Dues-CH Tax Supply-F Benefit Service-PR Supply-PR,ST,W Service-W Analysis-W Supply-ST Service-PR Service-CH Service-PR Benefit Instructor-PR Benefit Service-PR Service-PD Utility-CH,PR,ST,W Service-PR Dues-PD Concession-PR Supply-PR,ST Analysis-W Benefit Instructor-PR Publication-CH,W Supply-B,F,ST,W Service-A Service-L Total Checks Supply-L Concessions-PR Supply-PR Supply-L Reimbursement-ST Service-PR Supply-PR Postage-CH,PR,W Rent-PD Maintenance-PD Service-F Audio Book-L Service-CH Maintenance-CH Maintenance-PD,ST Shipping-W Reimbursement-B Service-PR Service-B,CH,PR

1,500.00 22.99 363.40 25.00 22.00 1,161.90 827.01 150.00 300.00 8,856.00 130.00 40.00 322.98 5,016.00 190.00 1,240.00 1.00 39,277.99 1,061.29 262.00 24,643.48 22.80 29,392.85 220.00 764.74 24,090.00 3,083.10 32.25 22.00 1,200.00 1,348.00 1,756.04 247.50 48.32 165.00 25.00 7,066.61 253.00 150.00 189.39 238.68 22.46 50.00 15.00 336.69 399.72 245.64 40.00 71,723.57 118.61 436.25 494.85 46.27 129.99 10,000.00 3,470.00 233.99 2,315.00 374.00 268.25 296.97 950.00 44.00 221.60 91.76 99.95 22.00 233.59

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SPAHN & ROSE LUMBER Supply-PR,ST 1,763.08 STOREY KENWORTHY Supply-CH 681.11 SUPERIOR CLEANING Maintenance-L 2,184.88 SWISHER & COHRT Services-CH 773.50 T & W GRINDING Services-ST 6,500.00 TASC Benefit 976.34 TEAMSTERS Dues-PD 415.00 TESTAMERICA LAB Analysis-W 7,344.23 THOMA, TIFFANY Instructor-PR 720.00 THOMPSON SHOES Supply-PD 275.00 TRANS-IA EQUIP CO Maintenance-ST 251.02 TREASURER-ST OF IA Tax 8,390.00 TRUE VALUE Supply-L 246.54 UNITED RENTALS Supply-PR 36.34 UNUM Benefit 772.52 US CELLULAR Phone-PD,PR,ST 313.35 USA BLUE BOOK Supply-W 260.98 VAN METER Maintenance-W 29.37 VERIZON WIRELESS Phone-PR 52.29 WALMART COMM Supply-CH,PR 249.80 WASTE MNGMNT Garbage-A,CH,PR,W 38,582.37 WELLMARK Benefit 45,175.16 WESCO Supply-W 4,817.50 1,909.26 WHKS Service-ST WILDTHUNDER Donation-CH 500.00 WINTHROP NEWS Publication-CH,W 305.72 WPPI ENERGY LED Project-ST 959.91 ZOOBEAN Service-L 929.50 CLAIMS TOTAL- $520,165.24, GENERAL FUND- $236,299.51, LIBRARY FUND$24,932.33, HOTEL-MOTEL TAX FUND- $4,325.00, STREETS DEPT - ROAD USE TAX FUND- $37,986.09, EMPLOYEE BENEFITS FUND- $1,807.86, CAP PROJ - STREET IMPROVEMENT FUND- $19,060.27, CAP PROJ - BRIDGES FUND- $1,909.26, CAP PROJ - CITY BUILDINGS FUND- $1,200.00, CAP PROJ - VISIONING PROJECT FUND$6,242.93, CAP PROJ - AIRPORT FUND- $870.00, CAP PROJ - AQUATIC CENTER FUND- $10,000.00, CAP OUTLAY SAVINGS/LOST FUND- $1,949.03, WATER FUND$52,504.18, SEWER UTILITY FUND- $74,906.62, SEWER SINKING REVENUE BOND FUND- $31,305.00, SELF INSURANCE FUND- $14,601.66, SELF INSURANCE - ENTERPRISE FUND- $265.50 REVENUE TOTAL-$527,528.36, GENERAL FUND-$131,963.45, LIBRARY-$1,354.66, EMPLOYEE BENEFITS-$795.48, DEBT SPECIAL ASSESSMENT-$189.44, CAPITAL PROJECT VISIONING-$75,309.18, CAPITAL PROJECT AQUATIC CENTER-$1,250.00, CAPITAL OUTLAY SAVINGS/LOST-$29,771.39, WATER FUND-$79,081.88, SEWER UTILITY FUND-$192,945.72, SELF INSURANCE-$14,601.66, SELF INSURANCE ENTERPRISE-$265.50 Hill/Kurtz with a motion to set the date of Public Hearing for February 11, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. in City Hall Council Chambers for two amendments to the Zoning Ordinance, second by Council Member Kurtz. Ayes: All. Kurtz/Scharff with a motion to approve a Resolution Appointing Karen Connell to serve as a member on the Independence Airport Board filling the vacancy created by D. Whealy. Ayes: Kurtz, Hill, Scharff, O’Loughlin, Hanna, and Vaughn. Absent: Hayward. Res No. 2019-08. O’Loughlin/Vaughn with a motion to approve the amended Airport Manager Job Description for hire. Ayes: Hill, Scharff, O’Loughlin, Hanna, Vaughn, and Kurtz. Absent: Hayward. Kurtz/Hill with a motion to approve a Memorandum of Understanding with INRCOG to assist in the writing of a Wellmark Grant. Ayes: Hill, Scharff, O’Loughlin, Hanna, Vaughn, and Kurtz. Absent: Hayward. Hill/O’Loughlin to approve a Letter of Intent for the purchase for the former Medical Associates Building. Ayes: Scharff, O’Loughlin, Kurtz, and Hill. Nays: Hanna and Vaughn. Absent: Hayward. City Clerk stated that she received a written request from Al Roder that the Evaluation be given in closed session. Council Member Kurtz with a motion to enter into closed session per Iowa Code 21.5 (1), I; to evaluate the professional competency of an individual whose appointment, hiring, performance, or discharge is being considered when necessary to prevent needless and irreparable injury to that individual’s reputation and that individual requests a closed session, second by Council Member Scharff. The roll being called the following Council Members voted: Ayes: O’Loughlin, Hanna, Vaughn, Kurtz, Hill and Scharff. Absent: Hayward. Closed session was entered into at 7:14 p.m. Scharff/Hill with a motion to resume regular session at 8:25 p.m. Ayes: Hanna, Vaughn, Kurtz, Hill, Scharff, and O’Loughlin. Absent: Hayward. The following comments were heard from Council and Staff. Scharff/Vaughn to adjourn. Ayes: All. Meeting adjourned at 8:32 p.m.


PAGE 16 February 14, 2019

The News & The Guide

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INRCOG, CDBG ADMINISTRATION 772.78 SUBDIVISION UPDATE FEE 100.00 JACOBS TREE REMOVAL, TREE TRIMMING 550.00 MCELROYS, I CE MELT/SNOW REMOVAL 20.69 MUELLER SYSTEMS, WATER METERS 1,392.00 KEYSTONE, SEWER TESTING 308.00 R.E.C., STREET LIGHTS 99.25 STATE HYGIENIC LAB, WATER TESTING 13.00 THE NEWS, PUBLISHING 265.71 TNT, POWER SERVICE ADDITIVE (SNOW REMOVAL) 70.00 UNITY POINT CLINIC,A NNUAL DUES DRUG TESTING 40.00 U.S. POST OFFICE, WATER BILL POSTAGE 132.05 $1 STAMPS (25) 25.00 UTILITY EQUIPMENT CO, 2 TRU-READ REMOTE WATER METERS 186.52 WASTE MANAGEMENT, GARBAGE/RECYCLING, CITY HALL DUMPSTER 5,115.43 WEX BANK, FUEL 50.50 FUEL/SNOW REMOVAL 267.82 WINTHROP BUILDING SUPPLY, ELECTRIC TAPE, VOLT TESTER 14.97 *******LIBRARY***** AMAZON, BOOKS, SUPPLIES 75.65 BAKER & TAYLOR, BOOKS, DVDS 594.98 BROADREACH BOOKS, BOOKS 665.80 CITIZENS ST BANK, STOP PAYMENT FEES-EMPLOYEES LOST CHKS 80.25 DEMCO, SUPPLIES 439.04 FOLLETT, SUPPLIES, 1 MONTH HOSTING CONTRACT 176.60 MCELROYS, SUPPIES 9.98 OFFICE TOWNE, COPY MACHINE CONTRACT, SUPPLIES 66.98 TIME, SUBSCRIPTION 263.56 USPS, $1, $2, STAMPS ILL 80.00 WALMART, PROGRAMMING SUPPLIES 25.70 *******FIRE DEPARTMENT******* BAYMONT INN, FIRE SCHOOL LODGING-ESTIMATED 234.10 MENARDS, FIRE DEPT SUPPLIES 273.75 WEX BANK, FUEL 61.44 =========== TOTAL BILLS TO BE PAID 35,184.36 TOTAL BILLS BY ACCOUNT: GENERAL 20,252.90 LOCAL OPTION TAX 0.00 ROAD USE TAX 1,519.51 UTILITY 13,411.95 SEWER CDBG 0.00 SEWER UPGRADE 0.00 ============= 35,184.36 ***ACCUMULATED COMP TIME**** 1/25/19 CURTIS 132.5 HOURS COMP JAN. RECEIPTS WATER/SEWER/LANDFILL 31,400.64 STATE OF IOWA/CDBG 0.00 LOCAL OPTION SALES TAX 5,891.59 BUCHANAN CO. PROPERTY TAX 1,711.89 ROAD USE TAX 9,274.10 BYRON,MFIELD,FREMONT 4,360.00 MISCELLANEOUS & INTEREST 570.34 TOTAL -----------------53,208.56

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE WINTHROP CITY COUNCIL February 06, 2019 The Winthrop City Council met in regular session on Wednesday, February 06, 2019 at 7:00 P.M. Mayor Gerald Dennie presiding. Council Members present: Melissa Hesner, Mark Kress, Ann Myers, and Collin Whitney. Council Member Lee White was absent. Individuals present: Gary McElroy, Sean Baragary, Deb Holt-Library Representative, Deputy Matt Cook, Fehr-Graham’s Lucas Elsbrand, PWD Shawn Curtis, City Clerk Mary Ryan and Government Students. M/S/C Myers, Hesner to approve the Consent Agenda: prior meeting minutes (January 09, 2019), current bills and monthly financial report. All ayes. Public hearing opened at 7:03 p.m. on plans, specifications and cost estimates on sewer upgrade project. No oral or written comments received. M/S/C Kress, Hesner to close public hearing. All ayes. Public hearing closed at 7:04 p.m. Bids opened from Staab Construction $2,543,000/Alt Bid $9,750, Portzen Construction $2,344,364.49/Alt Bid $11,050, WRH, Inc. $2,672,667/Alt Bid $25,000, Woodruff Construction $2,479,593.30/Alt Bid $6,290 and Boomerang $2,497,313.80/Alt Bid $9,675. M/S/C Hesner, Myers to tentatively approve awarding contract to Portzen Construction, $2,344,364.49 (low bid), pending engineer’s final approval. All ayes. M/S/C Myers, Kress to approve Resolution 19-01, establishing Bank Depository Limits for City of Winthrop. All ayes. Public hearing opened at 7:18 p.m. on budget (7/1/19-6/30/20). No oral or written comments received. M/S/C Hesner, Myers to close public hearing. All ayes. Public hearing closed at 7:19 p.m. M/S/C Kress, Hesner to approve resolution 19-02 approving the fiscal year budget ending June 30, 2020. All ayes. M/S/C Myers, Hesner to approve Resolution 19-03, setting salaries and wages for employees and elected officials, fiscal year 7/1/19-6/30/18. All ayes. M/S/C Kress, Myers to approve Resolution 19-04, approving grant application for Black Hawk County Gaming Association, for new Fire Truck, by Winthrop Fire Department. All ayes. Sponsored Project reviewed. Discussion on other possible projects, review of survey results (2 contingency responses). M/S/C Kress, Hesner to proceed with Monroe Street being the sponsored project for designated interest deferment grant funds and only completing items that qualify for the grant funded project as listed in the original application. All ayes. Discussion held by Council on seeking additional bids for waste service for residential customers. Currently at this time the City will remain under contract with Waste Management; with options to re-evaluate in the future. Sean Baragary spoke on building permit requirements. He was urged to consult IDNR and engineering firms in reference to requirements for construction on contaminated soils. He will meet with Curtis and Dennie to finalize permit requirement plans. 2019 Committee/Appointments presented by Mayor Dennie. M/S/C Hesner, Kress to adjourn. All ayes. Meeting adjourned at 7:52 p.m. SUBDIVISON CODEBOOK UPDATE WORK SESSIONS WILL BE SCHEDULED FOR 6:00 P.M. PRIOR TO REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETINGS. ANYONE IS WELCOME TO ATTEND. BILLS TO BE APPROVED FEBRUARY 6, 2019 COMPANY, PURPOSE AMOUNT PAYROLL 10,778.19 PAYROLL TAXES 2,961.62 I.P.E.R.S. 1,573.51 ALLIANT, GAS & ELECTRIC 5,293.73 DATA TECHNOLOGIES, PAYROLL SOFTWARE INSTALLATION 1,193.72 EAST BUCHANAN TELEPHONE, PHONE/FAX/INTERNET 207.12 HYDRITE CHEMICAL, WATER PLANT CHEMICALS 654.92 IMFOA, YEARLY DUES 50.00

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February 14, 2019 PAGE 17

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Hurt at Work Each year thousands of Iowans are hurt at work, but many fail to learn the Injured Workers Bill of Rights which includes: 1. Payment of Mileage at $.545 per mile. 2. Money for Permanent Disability 3. 2nd Medical Opinion in Admitted Claims. . . . A New Book reveals your other rights, 5 Things to Know Before Signing Forms or Hiring an Attorney and much more. The book is being offered to you at no cost because since 1997, Iowa Work Injury Attorney Corey Walker has seen the consequences of client’s costly mistakes. If you or a loved one have been hurt at work and do not have an attorney claim your copy (while supplies last) Call Now (800)-707-2552, ext. 311 (24 Hour Recording) or go to www.IowaWorkInjury.com. Our Guarantee- If you do not learn at least one thing from our book call us and we will donate $1,000 to your charity of choice.


Page 18 February 14, 2019            

Fresh homemade chili and beef stew loaded with vegetables. _ Free Will DONATION _ 5PM - 7PM At the Fire Station

TUESDAY , FEB 19

INDEPENDENCE FIRE DEPARTMENT

_ Orders to Go Available Delivery Available.

ANNUAL SOUP SUPPER

As always, fresh delicious homemade chili and beef stew will be served piping hot. Meal includes milk, coffee, water, bread, and a choice of Fabulous Dessert! All proceed will be used to purchase or replace equipment. Come hungry - leave full. Come show support for a group of dedicated firefighters.

319.334.3404

The News & The Guide

Advertise in FISH FRY THE NEWS and 4:30 - 8 PM - February 22 THE GUIDE! St. Patrick Parish Center - Winthrop St. Patrick Social Concerns Committee Your ad in is sponsoring a benefit fish fry for Dennis (Seymour) Hoefer on Friday, Feb. 22 from BOTH 4:30-8 PM at St. Patrick Parish Center, Winthrop. There will be a free-will donation. newspapers one low rate NEW Factory Built Homes and On-Line 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath too! set on your foundation - $59,980. Reach MORE readers in Mon.-Sat. 8-8, Sun. 10-6 • Hazleton, IA 1-800-632-5985 Buchanan County than Find THE any other NEWS at: newspaper! Winthrop: THE NEWS Office McElroy’s Foods, Speede Shop Call Independence: Fareway, 319.935.3027 S&K Collectibles, Hartig Drug, Music Station, Casey’s. Wal-Mart 319.327.1810 Manchester: Widner Drug

HORKHEIMER HOMES

today!

Big Care for Kids of all Ages

Sarah DeVore, ARNP

David Fahey, DO, ABFM

Rick McCormick, DO

Duane Jasper, MD, AAFP

Kurt House, DO, AAFP

William Schmitt, DO, ABFM

Bridget Baker, ARNP

Your Health is our Primary Care • Well Child Exams • Sports & Back-to-School Physicals

(319) 334-2541 View our complete list of services at BCHealth.org

• Treatment of Acute & Chronic Illnesses • Same-day Acute Appointment Availability

• • • • •

Special Early Morning Appointments: Mon-Fri, 8AM – 9AM For Established Patients 0-18 For Acute Illnesses and Injuries Online Scheduling Beginning at 7PM at BCHealth.org Early Appointments Limited – Call for Additional Times


The News & The Guide               

Living Well with Buchanan County Health Center The importance of muscle recovery Muscle recovery is an important factor to consider when working out or performing any strenuous activities. Failing to allow for muscle recovery significantly increases the possibility for injury. When the body is put through a strenuous workout, the muscles are exposed to lactic acid build up. Lactic acid is released into the muscles when normal energy reserves are used up but the muscle still requires more. Small amounts of lactic acid operate as a temporary energy source, thus helping you avoid fatigue during a workout. However, lactic acid is also responsible for causing muscles to become stiff, sore and achy. When lactic acid causes soreness, the worst thing a person can do is to do nothing. The best method to speed up recovery from lactic acid build up in the muscles is to break it down by stretching or rolling out the muscles. Taking an extra few minutes to stretch will result in quicker recovery periods and decrease the potential for injury that could hinder a person’s ability to achieve his or her health goals. Another method to help decrease lactic acid build up is to make sure that you stay hydrated during and after a strenuous workout. Buchanan County Health Center, 319 – 332 – 0850.

Get ALL your community news! Subscribe to THE NEWS today.

  February 14, 2019 Page 19

A newspaper at it’s best is a community having a conversation with itself. -- Mark Twain

” Iowa’s Good Samaritan Law Protects You Don’t Run Call 911! if you witness a drug overdose

generally, YOU CANNOT BE ARRESTED, CHARGED OR PROSECUTED FOR: Possession of a controlled, dangerous substance Possession or use of drug paraphernalia, and Calling 911 WILL NOT affect your parole or probation status

Details on page 14...

Iowa’s law does not protect against arrest for open warrants and crimes not listed above. For additional details regarding Iowa’s Good Samaritan Law, see Iowa Code Section 124.418.

IDPH

Iowa Department of Public Health

September 2018

Stop in! Always Great Selection. Great prices too!

For more information visit

YourLifeIowa.org Thanks to Maryland Department of Health

https://www.eastbuchanan.com

Valentine’s Specials

$100 OFF ALL Stella Wines Try our FitVine wines

Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Cabernet All sugar free, lower carbs, less calories than regular wine.

Guy’s... for that last minute gift for your Valentine, we have a special sparkling wine, decorated with candy, and a surprise. HOURS: Mon-Wed 9-6 • Thurs-Sat 9-7

Escape to the "Good 'Ole Days" of bobbiesocks and poodle skirts In our 1950s Ice Cream Parlor. Widner’s is a MUST STOP when in Manchester.

Ice Cream Treats * Sandwiches * Salads and Snacks

Widner Ice Cream Parlor

111 South Franklin St., Manchester

563-927-4463

Check out our NEW website Follow us on Facebook!


Page 20 February 14, 2019

  

       

The News & The Guide

PRESIDENT’S DAY

WEEKEND SALE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 • 9 AM-6 PM SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 • 11 AM - 5 PM MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18 • 8:30 AM-5 PM

STOREWIDE SALE

Our Entire Furniture Stock Sale Priced

S NOTICE: The Store will be Closed at 3pm on Thursday, February 14th and 3 DAYS Y A D 3 ONLY! ! Closed on Friday, February 15th to prepare for this HUGE SALE! ONLYQuinton

DINING ROOM TABLE 6 CHAIRS

&

Almond/Pecan Finish

$ Was

$1999

1484

TWO-TONE BROWN 80”

SOFA

COIL SPRINGS CUSHIONS

$ Was $699

397

40

ONLY 1 IN-STOCK

BIG 5 DR.

CHEST FOUR FINISHES

192

$

Was $269

10

DROP LID DESK

32” WIDE - LIGHT OAK FINISH

344

$

SMALL TABLE & 2 CHAIRS

Formica Top - Country Oak Chairs 1

$ Was

ONLY!

$499

SECRETARY

Was $599

Very Popular

80

371

52

VAUGHAN-BASSETT

7 PC. WASH GREY FINISH

BEDROOM SUITE Queen Poster Bed $

Was $2149

1487

Beautiful

JUSTICE SOFA W/PILLOWS VERY NICE COVER

Was $1899

1047

$

SO MANY ITEMS DID NOT MAKE THE AD! Please Stop In & SEE ALL THE SPECIALS!

TWIN BEDDING CRAZY MIKE

FULL SIZE

CATSKILL PLUSH TOP

MATTRESS MATTRESS & BOX SET & BOX SET $

Was $269

168

74

27740

$

Was $469

QUEEN SIZE CATSKILL PLUSH TOP

FULL SIZE TYLER

MATTRESS MATTRESS & BOX SET & BOX SET

297

$

Was $539

20

36893

$

Was $539

40” Wide Deep

FULL SIZE Best Home Furniture 4 DR. STORAGE MATTRESS POWER SOFA DOUBLE BOOKCASE WITH CHEST & BOX SET RECLINER OTTOMAN SLATE TILE ACCENTS DARK CHERRY DRESSER HARLOW Rustic Oak Style Nice Grey Fabric ONLY 4 IN STOCK

2 PC. AUTUMN OAK

4’ HIGH X 33” WIDE

W/MIRROR • 2 LEFT Was $399

$

258

41

Was $519

283

$

40

$

Was $118

71

10

Was $799

$

496

35

1 ONLY!

873

$

Was $1549

45

GREAT DARK BROWN FABRIC W/ROLLERS

Was $449

29367

$

1 ONLY!

U-HAUL PRICES • DELIVERY AVAILABLE • BRING YOUR VAN, PICKUP OR TRAILER CLOSEOUT CLOSEOUT CLOSEOUT! END TABLE TABLE W/ Black Metal & Glass GREAT SELECTION BED HEADBOARDS PICTURES CLEARANCE LAMPS T.V. STAND TWIN • FULL • QUEEN SHEETS MANY STYLES WILL SOLID OAK 44” Wide PRINTS VARIOUS SIZE BE CLOSED OUT OAK • PINE • METAL & COLORS MIRRORS HURRY FOR BEST SELECTION Shop Early For $ 60 $ 65 $ HIGH LEG

817

Beige/Taupe Fabric

POWER

SOFA RECLINER PUSH ARM RECLINER WALL HUGGER Very Nice! RECLINER STARTING AT Sits Great! Very Nice Soft Beige Fabric Was $999

$

30

THREE BIG DAYS!

Was $599

386

$

50

Was $759

$

452

70

Was $249

ALL SPECIAL PRICED

GREAT SELECTION LEATHER LA-Z-BOY OF

ROCKER LAMPS RECLINERS

STARTING AT

25

ONLY 2!

626

$

$

Was $899

5 PC.

LA-Z-BOY

Multiple Chromcraft

133

LA-Z-BOY 2 PC.

ROCKER HIGH TOP TABLE SOFA/LOVE STOOLS RECLINER & 436”BAR CHAIR SETS - 2 Tone Finish COMBO FULL LEATHER 5pc/ castered roller chairs Rustic Style CLOSE-OUT Tilt/Swivel

ON SALE

SALE DATES: Sat., Feb. 16th • 9 am - 6 pm Sun., Feb. 17th • 11 am - 5 pm Mon., Feb. 18th • 8:30 am - 5 pm

CLOSED: At 3pm Thursday, February 14th Closed: Friday, February 15th

Was $529

287

$

Was $1499

1131

$

50

189777

$

Was $3149

32

Was $59.95

HIGH BACK

RECLINING LOVESEAT

IN A GLAZED MICRO FIBER GREY - BLACK Was $1189

86740

$

MANY CLOSEOUT LA-Z-BOY

ROCKER RECLINERS Hurry In For Best Selection

335358

LA-Z-BOY

146

Was $329

201 N. Franklin Manchester • 563 927-2202

Locally Owned & Operated Furniture Store.

NO EARLY BIRDS!

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Best Deals & Styles

Profile for THE NEWS | Buchanan County Review

The Guide Proof 2-14-2019  

The Guide Proof 2-14-2019