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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  83,  Issue  X

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

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PHOTO  COURTESY  UUP

PHOTO  BY  JIMMY  CORRAO

SIGNED, SEALED, DELIVERED

A HIGHER EDUCATION

Union Presents Petitions For Part-­Timers

Students Organize Drug Discussion

STORY ON PAGE 7

STORY ON PAGE 3

CONSIDERING

CONSOLIDATION

‡Community Invited To Board Of Education Forum Wednesday ‡ Up To Two Local School Campuses Could Be Shared To Create Savings For District ‡ Parents Raise Concerns About Student Safety, Independence

SEE STORY ON PAGE 6

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡6HQDWH3UHSDUHV)RU(OHFWLRQV3J‡+RQRUV3URJUDP6HW7R([SDQG3J ‡*URXS7R'LVFXVV'LVWUDFWHG'ULYLQJ3J‡6HQDWRUV6HHN7R([WHQG6WXGHQW8QLRQ+RXUV3J


Julie  Mansmann EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Andrew  Wyrich   MANAGING  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF _________________

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

John  Brandi   NEWS  EDITOR

Rachel  Freeman   FEATURES  EDITOR

Zan  Strumfeld ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR

Cat  Tacopina   SPORTS  EDITOR _________________

Samantha  Schwartz   Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Josh  Kusaywa CARTOONIST _________________

Jaleesa  Baulkman   Kate  Blessing   Maria  Jayne   Katherine  Speller

FEATURES          PG.  3B A&E                        PG.  11B SPORTS                  PG.  13 About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle T

he  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI681<1HZ3DOW] Our  circulation  is  2,500.  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  sponsored  by  the  Student  As-­ sociation  and  partially  funded  by  the  student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  OracleLVORFDWHGLQWKH6WXGHQW8QLRQ5RRP'HDGOLQH for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in  The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\ e-­mail  at  oracle@newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HGE\WKHEXVL ness  manager.  Community  announcements  are  published  gratuitously,  but  are  subject  to  restriction  due   to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents  of  this  paper  cannot  be  reproduced   without  the  written  permission  of  the  editor-­in-­chief. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  published  weekly  throughout  the  fall  and  spring  semesters  on  Thursdays.   It  is  available  in  all  residence  halls  and  academic  buildings,  in  the  New  Paltz  community  and  online  at   oracle.newpaltz.edu.  For  more  information,  call  845-­257-­3030.  The  fax  line  is  845-­257-­3031. The  New  Paltz  OracleKROGVDVVLJQPHQWPHHWLQJVHYHU\6XQGD\DWSPLQ6WXGHQW8QLRQ Articles,  photographs  and  illustrations  are  assigned  to  the  pool  of  staff  and  contributors.

Volume  83 Issue  X Index

COPY  EDITORS

Pete  Viola Katie  Kocijanski ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITORS _________________

Sara  Federbush WEB  CHIEF

Patrick  Martz BUSINESS  MANAGER

Kathryn  Smith DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER    Suzy  Berkowitz,  Felice  Bernabo,  Sunya  Bhutta,  Nicole  Brinkley,  Andrew   Carden,  Jimmy  Corrao,  Beth  Curran,  Caterina  De  Gaetano,  Dean  Engle,   Nick  Fodera,  Elexis  Goldberg,  Maeve  Halliday,  Ryan  Patrick  Hanrahan,   Ross  Hamilton,  Ricardo  Hernandez,  Zach  Higgins,  Sarah  Hurd,  Mathew   John,  Brian  Kearney,  Angela  Matua,  Jessica  Mingoia,  Clarissa  Moses,   Carolyn  Quimby,  Jack  Sommer,  Pete  Spengeman,  David  Spiegel,  Emily   Sussell,  Chris  Thurston,  Pete  Thompson,  Olivia  Wells,  Annie  Yu

STAFF

University  Police  Blotter Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit   the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

NEWS THE  GUNK  

1B-­12B

THE  DEEP  END

9

EDITORIAL   COLUMNS

Two  F/Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  arrested  for  unlawful  possession  of   marijuana.   Incident:  Drugs Date:  11/28/11 Location:  Shango  Hall POâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  responded  to  Shango  Hall  for  an  odor  of   marijuana;;  call  unfounded.  

-­  CAT  TACOPINA  &  KATIE  KOCIJANSKI  

SPORTS  

12B

Incident:  Drugs Date:  11/29/11 Location:  LFH

10 11-­16

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SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

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Five  Day  Forecast Thursday,   December   1   Sunny   High:  47  Low:  29  

Friday,  December  2   Sunny   High:  49  Low:  26  

Saturday,   December   3   Partly  Cloudy   High:  44  Low:  31

Sunday,   December   4   Partly  Cloudy   High:  50  Low:  40  

Monday,   December   5   Few  Showers   High:  51  Low:  46  

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Students,  Faculty   Discuss  Drugs

Dr.  Zelbert  Moore,  a  Black  Studies  professor,  spoke  on  the  drug  war  and  the  collateral  damage  along  with  it  at  SSDPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Drug  Panel  on  Nov.  17.                                                                                                                                                                                          PHOTO  BY  JIMMY  CORRAO

By  Rachel  Freeman Features  Editor  |  Rachel.Freeman17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Students  gathered  in  Lecture  Center  100  on   Thursday,   Nov.   17   from   7:30   to   9:30   p.m.   to   hear  professors  of  various  disciplines  speak  on   different   drug-­related   topics   and   issues   for   the   ÂżUVWWLPHLQDSDQHOVW\OHGLVFXVVLRQ The   panel   was   organized   by   Students   for   Sensible   Drug   Policy   (SSDP)   member   Wendy   Cohen.   SSDP   is   an   international   organization   and   other   chapters   have   hosted   debates,   some-­ thing  Cohen  wanted  to  hold  a  variant  of. Âł:H ÂżJXUHG ZK\ QRW EULQJ GLVFXVVLRQ LQ-­ ward  into  our  community  and  just  start  the  dia-­ logue  between  different  professors  and  different   departments?â&#x20AC;?   Cohen   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   is   a   problem   on   campus   and   we   just   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   talk   about   it   KHUHVR,ÂżJXUHGZK\QRWVWDUWIURPZLWKLQEH-­ fore  getting  outside  people.â&#x20AC;? $WÂżUVW&RKHQVDLGVKHKDGDGLIÂżFXOWWLPH getting  professors  to  speak  on  the  subject  as  it  is   controversial   and   many   did   not   feel   they   were   experts  or  comfortable  enough  with  the  subject   matter.   SSDP   formed   a   list   of   about   20   to   25   possible  professors  to  join.  Although  many  did   not  want  to  participate  in  the  program,  they  were   able  to  direct  the  group  to  other  professors  who   might  be  more  helpful. The   main   reason   Cohen   created   the   event   was   to   inform   students   about   drug   use,   since   she  said  she  believes  many  students  take  drugs   without   realizing   what   they   are   doing   to   both   their  mind  and  body.  She  hoped  the  panel  would   bring  further  awareness  to  the  issue  while  foster-­ ing  a  dialogue. Although  SSDP  has  a  clear  stance  on  current   drug   policies,   Cohen   said   the   group   wanted   to  

put  their  perspective  aside  for  the  panel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   really   wanted   to   take   that   away   from   this  event  and  just  make  it  more  of  an  open  dis-­ cussion  so  that  people  can  talk  about  how  they   feel  about  it  without  feeling  pressured  to  say  one   thing  or  another,â&#x20AC;?  Cohen  said. The   speakers   included   Giordana   Grossi   (psychology),   Laura   Ebert   (Latin   American   Studies),  AJ   Williams-­Meyers   (Black   Studies),   Irwin  Sperber  (sociology),  Zelbert  Moore  (Latin   American  Studies/Black  Studies)  and  Kate  Mc-­ Coy   (educational   studies).   Each   professor   dis-­ cussed  a  different  topic  for  10  minutes  and  then   there  was  an  open  discussion  for  questions. Grossi   talked   about   how   drugs   affect   the   nervous  system,  mostly  through  their  â&#x20AC;&#x153;action  on   the  synapses.â&#x20AC;?  She  said  she  felt  students  might   not  know  enough  about  how  drugs  affect  brain   function  and  thought  it  was  important  informa-­ tion  to  deliver. Sperber  said  there  must  be  a  coherent  strate-­ gy  for  addressing  both  licit  and  illicit  substances   to   deter   students   from   experimentation.   How-­ ever,  his  main  topic  was  the  desire  for  decrimi-­ nalization  of  marijuana.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those   advocating   the   decriminalization   of   pot  and  other  popular  substances,  for  example,   pay  little  attention  to  the  public  health  risks,  the   environmental   impact   and   the   psychological   harm  rising  from  their  widespread  use,â&#x20AC;?  Sperber   said. He  concluded  his  portion  by  offering  the  so-­ lution  of  sanctions  on  the  use  of  any  drugs,  pre-­ ceded  by  a  thorough  educational  program  â&#x20AC;&#x153;on  a   community-­wide  basis.â&#x20AC;? Ebert,  a  professor  of  a  Latin  American  eco-­ nomic  development  course,  covered  the  concept  

of  supply  and  demand  in  the  drug  market  in  Lat-­ in  America.  He  talked  about  the  increasing  de-­ mand   in   developing   Latin  American   countries,   but   how   supply   is   more   complicated.   She   said   WKRVHDWWKHWRSHDUQKXJHSURÂżWVEXWWKHSRRU farmers  at  the  bottom  who  produce  drugs  such   as  cocaine  and  heroin  live  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;remote  and  under-­ developedâ&#x20AC;?  areas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   farmers   and   their   families   live   on   subsistence   in   unfertile   land   (although   condu-­ cive  for  growing  cocoa  leaves)  and  live  in  com-­ munities   with   little   state   oversight   in   terms   of   the  rule  of  law,â&#x20AC;?  Ebert  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Therefore  high  end   drug  gangs  and  thugs  can  easily  rule  over  poor   farmers  extracting  from  them  leaves  and  opium   poppies  at  low  cost.â&#x20AC;? The  drug  war  and  its  collateral  damage  was   Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   topic.   He   told   stories   about   innocent   people  hurt  as  a  result  of  drug  war  violence  and   also  went  into  the  incarceration  of  young  black   men  because  of  this.     Williams-­Meyers   focused   on   the   book,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  New  Jim  Crow,â&#x20AC;?  which  is  about  the  racial   biases  in  the  war  on  drugs  and  who  is  adversely   affected.   One   idea   mentioned   was   immaculate   perception,   which   is   that   all   out   perspectives   have  been  molded,  shaped  and  are  controlled  by   media  portrayals.  Williams-­Meyers  said  studies   reveal  that  even  if  people  think  they  are  not  rac-­ ists,  they  still  have  unconscious  racist  reactions   to  photos. McCoyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  presentation  was  titled,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Re-­think-­ ing   Drug   Education.â&#x20AC;?   She   said   scare   tactics   and   intimidation   often   lead   to   misinformation,   which  costs  credibility  and  how  reasons  for  drug   XVHDUHRIWHQÂłRYHUVLPSOLÂżHG´ She  continued  into  what  a  better  drug  educa-­

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

tion  would  entail.  She  feels  that  there  needs  to   be  a  better  understanding  of  why  people  choose   drugs.   Some   theories   include   human   drive   and   living  in  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;medicine  society.â&#x20AC;?   She  said  she  also  felt  that  more  accurate  in-­ formation   about   drugs   in   general   must   be   pro-­ vided. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  need  better  and  more  accurate  informa-­ tion   about   drugs   themselves   and   what   they   do   physiologically,   what   are   the   dangers,   how   do   people  use  them,  how  might  they  be  used  more   safely  if  people  do  decide  to  use  them,â&#x20AC;?  McCoy   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   we   start   thinking   about   all   the   things   that  are  drugs  and  how  we  moderate  our  use  of   those  things  it  can  translate  over  into  these  other   drugs  that  we  think  are  really  dangerous.â&#x20AC;? The   discussion   at   the   end   of   the   presenta-­ tions   involved   a   debate   between   McCoy   and   Moore  about  drug  testing  on  welfare  recipients,   something   McCoy   highly   opposed   and   Moore   favored.  Some  students  also  expressed  feelings   against  Sperberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  critique  of  the  magazine  High   Times. With   a   wide   range   of   lecturers   and   an   in-­ volved  discussion,  Cohen  hoped    students  would   leave  feeling  more  comfortable  with  the  subject   of  drugs  and  the  surrounding  issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   someone   walks   out   more   educated   on   drugs  than  when  they  walked  in,  then  I  feel  like   we  have  achieved  our  goal,â&#x20AC;?  Cohen  said. McCoyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drug  education  and  policy  class  is   KROGLQJDÂżQDOH[KLELWLRQZLWKPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ on  Dec.  19  from  12:30  to  2:30  p.m.  in  the  Hon-­ ors  Center  and  Cohen  plans  to  hold  a  follow  up   panel   in   the   spring   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;dig   deeperâ&#x20AC;?   into   the   is-­ sues  most  interesting  to  attendees.


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Senate  Prepares  To  Elect  New  Members

FIFTEEN  YEAR  MURDER  SPREE When   four   bodies   were   found   last   December   strewn   along   a   remote   barrier   beach   south   of   1HZ <RUNœV /RQJ ,VODQG SROLFH ¿JXUHG WKH\ were  dealing  with  a  serial  killer.  On  Wednesday,   the   Suffolk   County   police   commissioner   said   detectives  now  think  one  person  is  probably  re-­ sponsible  for  all  10  deaths  dating  back  to  1996. ANOTHER  VICTIM  SPEAKS Former   Penn   State   assistant   football   coach   Jerry   Sandusky   sexually   abused   a   boy  more  than  100  times  and  threatened   to  harm  his  family  to  keep  him  quiet,  ac-­ FRUGLQJWRDODZVXLW¿OHG:HGQHVGD\E\D new  accuser  who  is  not  part  of  the  crimi-­ nal  case. CAIN  TANGLED  IN  SCANDAL The  woman  who  says  she  had  a  long-­run-­ ning   extramarital   affair   with   Republican   presidential   candidate   Herman   Cain   is   a   single  mother  and  Atlanta-­area  business-­ ZRPDQZKRKDVIDFHGUHSHDWHG¿QDQFLDO trouble  and  once  lost  a  lawsuit  accusing   her  of  spreading  damaging  lies  about  an   ex-­business  partner. AN  APPLE  A  DAY... The  Food  and  Drug  Administration  is  consid-­ ering  tightening  restrictions  for  the  levels  of   arsenic  allowed  in  apple  juice  after  consumer   groups  pushed  the  agency  to  crack  down  on   the   contaminant.   Studies   show   that   apple   juice  has  generally  low  levels  of  arsenic,  and   the  government  says  it  is  safe  to  drink.   TIME  TO  TOKE  UP?   Washington  Gov.  Chris  Gregoire  and  Rhode   ,VODQG*RY/LQFROQ&KDIHH¿OHGDSHWLWLRQ with   the   U.S.   Drug   Enforcement   Admin-­ istration   asking   to   reclassify   marijuana   so   doctors  can  prescribe  it  and  pharmacists  can   ¿OO WKH SUHVFULSWLRQ DV D 6FKHGXOH  GUXJ allowing  it  to  be  used  for  medical  treatment. GRAHAM  HOSPITALIZED The   Rev.   Billy   Graham   was   admitted   to   a   hospital   Wednesday   near   his   home   in   western   North   Carolina   to   be   tested   for   pneumonia   after   suffering   from   con-­ gestion,   a   cough   and   a   slight   fever,   his   spokesman  said. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

 PHOTO  BY  JACK  SOMMER The  senate  discussed  a  bill  created  by  the  CRC  regarding  legislative  body  elections.    

By  Jaleesa  Baulkman   Copy  Editor  |  Jbaulkman75@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   52nd   student   senate   discussed   a   bill   created   by   the   Constitution   and   Rules   Committee   (CRC)   regarding   the   Student  Association   (SA)   election   pro-­ cess  Tuesday. Earlier  in  the  meeting,  SA  President   Terrell   Coakley   talked   about   the   plans   for  the  program  held  on  Nov.  30,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can   We   Talk   About   It?â&#x20AC;?   Coakley   said   he   wanted  the  program  to  have  an  intimate   setting,   so   if   more   than   300   students   show  up,  he  planned  on  splitting  the  au-­ dience  into  groups  of  30  people. Vice   President   of  Academic  Affairs   and   Governance   Ayanna   Thomas   also   announced  there  are    more  than  40  stu-­ dents   running   for   the   15   seats   on   the   student   senate.   She   said   voting   for   the   student   senate   begins   Dec.   7   and   ends   on  Dec.  9.     Students   can   vote   by   logging   in   to   their  my.newpaltz.edu  accounts.  Thomas   also   announced   that   the   library   survey   ZDVÂżQDOL]HGE\5D\PRQG6FKZDU]DV-­ sociate  vice  president  of  Student  Affairs,   and   it   will   be   distributed   via   e-­mail   to   students  to  determine  how  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going   to  modify  library  hours. During   his   report,   Senate   Chair  Al-­ berto  Aquino   said   there   were   also   hate   crimes   reported   at   the   University   of   Buffalo.   A   Muslim   student,   the   victim   of  the  repeated  hate  crimes  at  the  school,  

                   

found  two  swastikas  keyed  into  her  car   and  had  racially-­based  remarks  yelled  at   her.  Aquino   announced   that   the   SUNY   Student  Assembly  is  working  on  a  SU-­ NY-­wide  movement  about  diversity  and   the  powers  that  keep  racism  intact.   After   the   reports,   Sens.   Samantha   .RVVLQ DQG 0DUN 0DOL]LD WDONHG DERXW Article  14,  Section  3  of  the  SA  constitu-­ tion.     The  bill  stated  in  the  case  that  there   is  a  tie  between  two  senators  for  senate   seats   their   â&#x20AC;&#x153;names   shall   be   placed   on   uniform  index  cards  and  selected  at  ran-­ dom  by  the  Vice  President  of  Academic   Affairs  and  Governance  in  the  presence   RIWKHVHQDWHGXULQJWKHÂżUVWOHJLVODWLYH session  of  the  semester,â&#x20AC;?  the  person  se-­

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

lected  will  be  granted  the  seat.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  think  that  was  a  good   way  to  go  about  the  election,â&#x20AC;?  said  Mal-­ L]LDÂł,ÂżJXUHGWKDWLILWÂśVWKDWUDQGRPLW GRHVQÂśWQHFHVVDULO\IXOÂżOODQ\ERG\ZLWK DGHVLUHWRKDYHWKHPRVWTXDOLÂżHGDQG the  most  enthusiastic  student  on  senate.â&#x20AC;? 6HQ0DOL]LDFUHDWHGDELOOVWDWLQJLI two   or   more   people   are   tied   for   a   seat   on   the   senate,   the   candidates   will   have   to  appear  before  the  senate  and  present   to  them.  After  the  two  candidates  pres-­ ent  they  will  be  sent  out  of  the  room  and   the  legislative  body  will    vote  on  which   of   the   two   tied   candidates   will   get   the   senate  chair.   The   next   senate   meeting   will   take   place  Dec.  6  in  room  418.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

Task  Force  Takes  On  Distracted  Driving   By  Jaleesa  Baulkman    

oracle.newpaltz.edu

 5

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD  

Copy  Editor  |  Jbaulkman75@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After  hearing  cases  involving  car  accidents   caused  by  the  use  of  cellular  devices,  former  New   Paltz  Town  Judge  Judy  Reichler  founded  a  task   force   group   called   New   Paltz   Stop   Distracted   Driving  (NPSDD).    NPSDD  is  a  coalition  of  concerned  citizens   and  members  of  the  state,  county  and  local  law   enforcement  aiming  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;educate  as  many  people   as  possible  about  the  many  real  dangers  of  being   distracted  while  driving,â&#x20AC;?    she  said.   NPSDD   which   will   be   hosting   demonstra-­ tion  and  educational  events  throughout  the  year. Reichler   decided   to   create   this   group   after   hearing  one  of  case  in  particular  about  a  young   woman   arguing   on   the   phone   with   her   mother     while   she   was   driving   in   a   vehicle   with   two   of   her  friends.  She  crashed  her  car,  killing  one  of  her   friends  who  was  sitting  in  the  backseat.   Reichler  said  the  other  friend,  who  was  sit-­ ting  in  the  passenger  seat,  said  that  after  the  car   crash,  the  driver  -­  whose  cell  phone  was  still  in   her  hand  -­  tried  to  continue  a  discourse  with  her   mother.   Although   there   are   laws   restricting   cell-­ phone   use   and   texting     while   driving   in   New   York,  Reichler  believes  a  coalition  group  against   distracted   driving   is   still   necessary   since   these   laws  are  relatively  new  and  are  only  effective  for   people  who  know  about  them.     The  committee,  which  is  comprised  of  traf-­ ÂżFVDIHW\DJHQFLHVÂżUVWUHVSRQGHUVDQGWRZQDQG village   leaders,   began   meeting   in   September.  

SECOND  CHANCE   A  U.S.  businessman  who  spent  nearly  four   months  in  an  Aruban  jail  before  a  judge  or-­ dered  his  release  scored  another  legal  vic-­ tory  Wednesday  when  an  appeals  court  re-­ jected  a  prosecution  appeal  to  put  him  back   in  pretrial  detention.

Former  New  Paltz  Town  Judge  Judy  Reichler  founded  NPSDD.      PHOTO  BY  COURTNEY  MOORE  

They   plan   on   holding   demonstrations   and   edu-­ cational   programs     in   the   New   Paltz   to   educate   people   about   not   using   cellular   devices   while   driving. Chief  of  Police  Joseph  Snyder  said  â&#x20AC;&#x153;statis-­ tics  shows  [that]  the  number  of  accidents  [have]   increase  tremendously    due  to  cell  phone  use  and   texting.â&#x20AC;? According   to   The   New   York   Times,   studies   show  drivers  using  cellular  phones  are  four  times   more  likely  to  cause  a  crash  and  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  likeli-­ hood  that  they  will  crash  is  equal  to  that  of  some-­ one  with  a  .08  percent  blood  alcohol  level  -­  the   point   at   which   drivers   are   generally   considered   intoxicated.â&#x20AC;?

Reischler  said  that  research  have  come  to  re-­ alize  that  just  using  hand-­free  devices  while  driv-­ ing  is  also  dangerous  and  that  parents  need  to  act   as  role  models  for  their  teens.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  personally  want  to  target  parents  [as  well   as  teens],â&#x20AC;?  Reichler  said.   From  Nov.  23  to  Nov.  27,  the  NPSDD  col-­ laborated   with   the   town   police   in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Operation   Hang  Up,â&#x20AC;?  a  safety-­geared  sweep  that  focuses  on     texting  and  cellphone  use  while  driving.  Reichler   said   that   local   cops   and   New  York   State   Police   gave   out   more   than   70   tickets   to   drivers   who   were  texting  or  using  their  cellphone  while  driv-­ ing.  The  sweep  took  place  in  the  New  Paltz  and   Highland  area.    

Council  Concludes  Fall  Semester  With  Updates     By  Maria  Jayne     Copy  Editor  |  Maria.jayne17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

At   the   last   Council   of   Organizations   meeting  of  the  semester,  the    organization  of     racial  forums  was  discussed.   Many   events   were   held   so   students   could   have   a   safe   platform   to   discuss   their   feelings  on  racism  in  New  Paltz  and  the  cur-­ rent   student   climate.   Council   of   Organiza-­ tions  Chair  Shayna  Bentley  said  there  was  a   meeting   that   night   run   by   Student  Associa-­ tion  (SA)  Executive  Vice  President  Eve  Stern   in  Bouton  Hall  titled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;White  Privilege:  Does   it   Exist?â&#x20AC;?   She   also   made   announcements   about   SA   President  Terrell   Coakley   helping   organize  Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  forum,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can  We  Talk   About   It?â&#x20AC;?   in   the   Student   Union   Multipur-­ pose  Room  from  6  to  8  p.m.   Bentley  also  announced  that  the  survey   for   SA   Productions   is   currently   available  

WR EH ÂżOOHG RXW YLD VWXGHQWVÂś +DZNPDLO DF-­ counts.   The   survey   is   designed   to   poll   the   student  body  and  see  who  the  majority  would   like  to  see  perform  on  campus  in  the  spring.   Vice   President   of   Finance   Youssouf   Kouyo   announced   that   there   is   currently   no   money   left   in   the   General   Programming   budget  line  for  this  semester;Íž  however,  there   is   $10,000   left   for   the   Conferences   line.   So   any  organization  that  needs  funding  to  attend   conferences  should  contact  him.   Kouyo  also  said  he  was  looking  for  an-­ other   member   for   the   Budget   and   Finance   Committee  (BFC).  Toni-­Ann  Stevens,  mem-­ ber  of  African  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Association,  Carib-­ bean  Students  Organization,  All  People  Unit-­ ed   and   Residence   Life,   nominated   herself   and  was  unanimously  voted  into  the  position.   Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs  and   Governance  Ayanna  Thomas  announced  that     more   than   40   candidates   are   competing   for  

seats  on  next  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  senate.   This  brought  about  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet  the  Can-­ didatesâ&#x20AC;?   section   of   the   night.   Thomas   said   senate   elections   are   taking   place   on   Nov.   7   starting  at  noon  and  will  continue  until  Nov.   9  at  11:59  p.m.  on  my.newpaltz.edu. The   candidates   present   included:   An-­ WKRQ\ $GHJXQOH ÂżUVW\HDU SROLWLFDO VFLHQFH major;Íž  Kaychell  English,  third-­year  psychol-­ ogy  and  Black  studies  major;Íž  Kevin  Cavan-­ na,  third-­year  English  major;Íž  Lisette  Espinal,   ÂżUVW\HDUVRFLRORJ\DQG%ODFN6WXGLHVPDMRU Joskary   Diaz   second-­year   sociology   major;Íž   Lauren   Crawford,   second-­year   international   relations   major;Íž   Rose   Faber,   a   fourth-­year   student;Íž  Caitlin  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell,  second-­year  po-­ litical   science   major;Íž   Cora   Walker,   second-­ year   political   science   major;Íž   Nabiha   Kabir,   ÂżUVW\HDUELRORJ\PDMRUDQG.DVSHU*DUOLFNL ÂżUVW\HDULQWHUQDWLRQDOUHODWLRQVPDMRU

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

TERROR  IN  TURKEY   $ KHDYLO\ DUPHG PDQ RSHQHG ÂżUH DW RQH of   Istanbulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   main   tourist   attractions   on   Wednesday,   wounding   a   Turkish   soldier   and  a  security  guard  before  police  snipers   NLOOHGWKHDWWDFNHURIÂżFLDOVVDLG IRAN  ORDERED  TO  LEAVE   Britain  ordered  all  Iranian  diplomats  out  of   the  U.K.  within  48  hours  and  shuttered  its   ransacked  embassy  in  Tehran  on  Wednes-­ GD\LQDVLJQLÂżFDQWHVFDODWLRQRIWHQVLRQV between  Iran  and  the  West. COUNTING  BALLOTS    Tensions  ran  high  in  Guyanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  capital  on   :HGQHVGD\ DV HOHFWRUDO RIÂżFLDOV VORZO\ counted  paper  ballots  two  days  after  an  ap-­ parently  tight  national  election  in  the  South   American  country.

COPTER  CRASH  IN  NEW  ZEALAND A  pilot  and  conservation  worker  are  miss-­ ing   and   feared   dead   after   the   helicopter   WKH\ ZHUH Ă&#x20AC;\LQJ WR ÂżJKW D ÂżUH FUDVKHG into  the  ocean  off  New  Zealandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  far  north   coast.

MONEY  IN  CRISIS   The  central  banks  of  the  wealthiest  coun-­ tries,  trying  to  prevent  a  debt  crisis  in  Eu-­ rope   from   exploding   into   a   global   panic,   swept  in  Wednesday  to  shore  up  the  world   ¿QDQFLDO V\VWHP E\ PDNLQJ LW HDVLHU IRU banks  to  borrow  American  dollars.

Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


NEWS

 6 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Community  Converses  About  School  Resources By  John  Brandi   News  Editor  |  Jbrandi02@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Members  of  the  New  Paltz  Board  of  Education  and   the  community  came  together  on  Wednesday,  Nov.  30   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community   Conversation,â&#x20AC;?   a   forum   considering   options  for  school  consolidation  and  resource  realloca-­ tion.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   that   the   board   has   put   the   [consolidation   options]   on   the   table   as   something   that   needs   to   be   explored,   and   the   point   of   tonight   is   to   hear   from   the   community  about  what  they  think  about  consolidation,â&#x20AC;?   said   K.T.   Tobin   Flusser,   vice   president   of   the   board.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   a   board   member,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   here   to   just   sit   back   and   listen.  [To]  show  support,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  about  our  voices   tonight.â&#x20AC;?   The  input  given  to  board  members  will  aid  in  the  cre-­ ation  of  a  district-­wide  survey  used  for  â&#x20AC;&#x153;comprehensive   facilities  planning,â&#x20AC;?  according  to  information  presented   by  Superintendent  Maria  C.  Rice.  This  survey  will  be   created  in  January  2012  and  analyzed  a  month  later.   Three  options  were  considered,  labeled  A,  B  and  C.   Option   A   explored   funds   from   the   operating   budget.   The  repairs  needed  for  the  four  campus  buildings  -­  Le-­ nape,  Duzine,  the  middle  school  and  high  school  -­  will   FRPH LQ WKH IRUP RI  PLOOLRQ GLVSHUVHG RYHU ÂżYH years  in  increments  of  $3  million  each  year,  according   to  the  information  presented.   2SWLRQ$DOVRFDOOVIRUVLJQLÂżFDQWFXWVÂłWRWKHHGXFD-­ tional  programâ&#x20AC;?  to  offset  repair  costs,  reduction  in  year-­

ly  energy  usage,  no  state  aid  for  the  repairs  and  requires   â&#x20AC;&#x153;voter  approval  via  annual  operating  budget  vote.â&#x20AC;?  This   plan  intends  to  keep  all  four  campuses.   Option  B  is  based  on  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repair/Renovation  Bond(s),â&#x20AC;?   according  to  the  same  information.  This  option  calls  for   renovations  to  the  four  campuses  to  be  done  on  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;coor-­ dinated  schedule,â&#x20AC;?  with  vital  repairs  being  done  almost   immediately.     Other   provisions   to   this   option   include   state  aid,  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;high  risk  of  unpredicted  facility  needsâ&#x20AC;?  and   required  voter  approval  for  the  bonds  estimated  at  $12   to  $15  million.   Option   C   explores   consolidation   where   one   to   two   campuses   could   be   sold   or   shared   at   â&#x20AC;&#x153;historically   low   interest  ratesâ&#x20AC;?  and  this  â&#x20AC;&#x153;may  reduce  transportation  and   VWDIÂżQJ´DFFRUGLQJWRWKHLQIRUPDWLRQSUHVHQWHG7KLV option   includes   state   aid   and   lower   energy   consump-­ tion.   Participants   said   if   consolidation   went   forward,   there  is  a  concern  with  trying  to  balance  student  inde-­ pendence  with  safety.  A  member  of  the  discussion,  and   a  parent  of  a  middle  school  student,  was  concerned  that   if  the  middle  school  moved  to  the  high  school  campus,   then  there  was  a  chance  of  bullying  from  older  kids  to   younger  kids.   0HDQZKLOH 6WHYH *UHHQÂżHOG IRUPHU VFKRRO ERDUG member   and   participant   of   the   discussion,   mentioned   that   if   the   middle   school   moved,   this   could   present   a   problem  with  bussing.   %RDUGRIÂżFLDOVOHIWDQXQRIÂżFLDORSWLRQVSRWRSHQIRU community   suggestions,   while   Rice   reiterated   that   of-­

ÂżFLDOVZHUHRQO\FRQVLGHULQJÂłELJSLFWXUH´LVVXHVDWWKLV time.  She  declined  to  answer  questions  about  the  tax  cap   and  concerns  about  the  fate  of  the  middle  school  build-­ ing.  Rice  did  comment  about  the  educational  model.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  educational  program  needs  to  drive  our  facili-­ ties,  and  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  a  single  board  member  disagrees,â&#x20AC;?   she  said.   7KHÂłGHEULHÂżQJ´SRVWGLVFXVVLRQVSDUNHGQHZLGHDV for   the   board   to   consider.   The   discussion   broke   into   eight   tables,   each   providing   feedback.   One   table   sug-­ gested  reaching  out  to  the  senior  community  to  let  them   know  which  options  were  available.  Community  mem-­ bers   agreed   some   negative   propaganda   about   the   pro-­ posals  had  been  circulating.   Town  Supervisor-­elect  Susan  Zimet  was  involved  in   the  discussion  and  talked  about  the  consequences  of  the   community  not  a  reaching  a  decision  themselves.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  a  state  government  that  says  we  need  to  be   consolidating  -­  the  goal  is  to  force  consolidation,â&#x20AC;?  she   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make  us  a  model  community.â&#x20AC;?   Another   discussion   was   geared   toward   exploring   a   multitude   of   options   with   voter   approval.  The   input   gathered  at  this  forum  will  go  towards  creating  a  survey   to  be  handed  out  in  January.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  the  board  starts  making  those  decisions,  and   honing   it   down   after   they   get   the   data   from   your   sur-­ veys,   and   they   start   saying,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;OK,   these   are   the   things   that  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  investigate  and  look  at,  then  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   have  more  data  to  be  able  to  say  I  really  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  like  that   FRQÂżJXUDWLRQϫVDLG5LFH

Campus  Honors  Program  To  Expand  Areas  Of  Study By  John  Brandi   News  Editor  |  Jbrandi02@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

7KH +RQRUV 3URJUDP RIÂżFLDOV ZDQW to   expand   by   including   more   of   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;cross-­ sectionâ&#x20AC;?   of   students   from   various   academic   backgrounds,   according   to   Interim   Director   Dr.  Patricia  Sullivan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mostly  been  liberal  arts  and  sciences   majors,  and  75  percent  have  come  from  that   area,â&#x20AC;?  Sullivan  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;One  motivation  was  to   try  to  make  the  program  more  available  to  a   greater  range  of  students  and  to  think  about   what  we  can  do  to  make  that  happen.â&#x20AC;? One   of   the   changes   to   the   program   includes  â&#x20AC;&#x153;major  designated  honors  courses,â&#x20AC;?   which   are   already   in   process   and   will   be   facilitated   into   a   studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   area   of   study.   These  courses  will  be  reviewed  by  an  Honors   Advisory   Council   to   make   sure   it   was   pre-­ existing  in  the  curriculum  and  can  be  applied   to  the  program,  according  to  Sullivan. She   explained   other   changes   will   be   a   required   part   two   introductory   seminar   for   ÂżUVW\HDU VWXGHQWV DQG WKH WKHVLV ZLOO EH formalized  and  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  necessarily  have  to  be  

in  writing. Still,  the  Honors  Program  has  received   some  criticism  for  appearing  exclusive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   a   little   bit   of   an   extent   that   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   over   here,   that   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   apart   and   not   integrating,  but  with  reaching  out  to  majors,   and  a  greater  cross-­section  of  students,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going  to  change,â&#x20AC;?  Sullivan  said. She  hopes  that  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  happening  in  the   Honors   Program   can   translate   to   the   entire   campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some   things   we   do   in   honors   could   pilot  what  happens  in  a  course  and  that  could   ÂżOWHU RXW WR WKH VWXGHQWERG\ DV D ZKROH´ Sullivan  said. President   Donald   Christian   said   the   assessment   found   the   Honors   Program   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   successfully   integrating   with   all   departments.   He   said   Dr.   Sullivanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   advocacy   for   the   Honors   Program   shows   her  commitment  to  communicating  between   departments   and   furthering   the   integration   process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  has  been  a  sense  that  not  every   department   has   interfaced   well   with   the   Honors  Program,â&#x20AC;?  Christian  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The  Ad  

+RF &RPPLWWHH ZDV FKDUJHG@ WR ÂżJXUH RXW ways   to   develop   models   to   make   honors   programming  much  more  integrated  with  the   programming  for  various  majors.â&#x20AC;? The  Honors  Program  has  stayed  the  same   since  the  late  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s,  but  the  campus  community   hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,   Sullivan   said.   She   said   the   program   needed   to   adjust   to   meet   the   demands   of   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;substantially   changedâ&#x20AC;?   student   body   from   the  last  two  decades.  Sullivan  credited  New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   higher   admissions   standard   that   is   changing  the  face  of  the  program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  more  students  who  would  be   eligible   to   do   honor   work   now   because   the   admission  standard  here  is  so  high,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   Meanwhile,   Sullivan   said   that   the   admission   process   for   the   program   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;holistic.â&#x20AC;?   She   said   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   just   based   on   grades,   or   on   test   scores.   The   program   hopes   to   have   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;cross-­sectionâ&#x20AC;?   or   â&#x20AC;&#x153;rangeâ&#x20AC;?   of  students,  from  junior-­college  transfers,  to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;non-­traditional  students,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.     Since   the   assessment   was   completed,   and  the  new  guidelines  go  into  effect  for  fall   2012,  the  only  thing  left  is  getting  the  word   out  so  more  students  understand  the  Honors  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

Program.  Sullivan  said  she  has  done  â&#x20AC;&#x153;serious   recruitingâ&#x20AC;?  last  summer  at  the  orientations  to   ÂżQGVWXGHQWVWRDVVLVWLQWKLVJRDO She   also   said   the   website   for   the   program   will   be   improved   and   that   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   just  started  a  Facebook  page.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Making   sure   students   across   classes   know  each  other,  so  the  end  of  the  semester   there  will  be  a  gathering  to  get  the  students   to  know  each  other,â&#x20AC;?  Sullivan  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Also]   looking   at   a   peer   mentoring   program   and   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   establishing   a   student   advisory   board.   [Here   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m]   going   to   have   sub-­committees   within  the  advisory  board,  so  the  big  group   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  meet  that  frequently  but  they  will  have   tasks.â&#x20AC;? Some  of  the  tasks  include  managing  the   Facebook SDJH PDQDJLQJ ÂżOP VHULHV DQG alumni  relations. Christian  also  said  keeping  alumni  and   external   bodies   interested   in   the   Honors   Program  was  valuable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   am   also   talking   to   people   about   private  fund  raising  to  support  the  program,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   that   is   a   very   attractive   opportunity  for  philanthropy.â&#x20AC;?


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

 7

oracle.newpaltz.edu

UUP  Members  Petition  For  Part-­Timers By  Julie  Mansmann Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Jmansmann60@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

United   University   Professions   (UUP)   union   mem-­ bers  presented  President  Donald  Christian  with  a  peti-­ tion  demanding  higher  wages  and  better  working  con-­ ditions  for  part-­time  faculty  on  Tuesday.   Peter   Brown,   the   campus   UUP   chapter   president,   said  members  collected  over  2,000  signatures  for  their   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Petition   for   Educational   Quality,   Fairness   and   Equi-­ ty.â&#x20AC;?  Drafted  by  the  executive  committee  of  the  union,   the  petition  was  circulated  during  the  chapterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  obser-­ vance  of  national  Campus  Equity  Week  at  the  end  of   October.   Union   members   said   the   aim   of   Campus   Equity   Week,   an   event   that   began   more   than   a   10   years   ago   and  is  celebrated  every  other  year,  was  to  focus  on  the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;plightâ&#x20AC;?  of  part-­time  adjuncts  and  full-­time  contingent   faculty.  According   to   a   press   release,   more   than   two-­ thirds  of  all  American  teachers  in  higher  education  are   part-­timers.   Brown  said  that  although  the  300  SUNY  New  Paltz   adjuncts   and   contingent   faculty   teach   over   a   third   of   all  the  courses  at  the  college,  he  feels  they  are  seen  as   expendable.  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  the  collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  position  is  that  they  would  like   to  pay  the  adjuncts  as  little  as  absolutely  possible  and   make   them   as   invisible   as   possible,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   are  people  whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  dedicated  their  lives  to  the  pursuit   of  knowledge.  I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  outrageous  that  adjuncts  are  

teach  two  courses  per  semester,  with  contracts  cover-­ ing  one  semester  or  one  year. Brown  said  that  a  lack  of  job  security  is  just  as  unset-­ tling  as  low  adjunct  pay  to  union  members.  The  union   president   said   part-­timers   can   be   terminated   without   cause  at  the  college.   Christian  said  he  will  need  time  to  review  all  seven   points  of  the  petition  and  deliver  a  formal  answer  to  the   unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  demands  and  requests.   I   think   the   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   position   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   rather   wait   and   respond   after   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   gotten   a   chance  to  really  look  at  it,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   is  that  they  would  like  to  pay   UUP   members   will   be   gathering   for   a   a   part   time   the  adjuncts  as  little  as   labor  management  meeting  in  coming  weeks,  at  which   absolutely  possible  and  make   all  of  the  items  on  the  petition  will  be  addressed.  Mem-­ EHUV KDYH GHFLGHG WR ZDLW IRU FROOHJH RIÂżFLDOV WR UH them  as  invisible  as  possible spond  before  taking  any  other  action. While   Brown   said   he   hopes   the   president   will   be   receptive  to  their  efforts,  he  said  he  is  not  overly  op-­ ETER ROWN timistic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   meetings   in   the   past   when   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   asked   for   higher  wages  and  more  job  security,  the  response  has   paid  less  than  the  people  who  clean  the  rooms  at  night.â&#x20AC;?   always   been   negative,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   the   fact   that   A  UUP  press  release  states  an  adjunct  teaching  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   we   have   over   2,000   signatures   on   this   petition   speak   typical   load   of   four   courses   a   yearâ&#x20AC;?   earns   approxi-­ volumes   about   the   strong   support   we   have   from   the   mately  $12,000  annually.  It  also  said  adjuncts  typically   faculty,  students  and  the  college  community.â&#x20AC;?

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â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Multiple  Forums  Held  To  Discuss  Racial  Crimes

Y   OR EK  ST E LL T  W FU EX N

After  what  University  Police  described   DV ÂłUDFLDOO\ RIIHQVLYH´ VLJQV DQG JUDIÂżWL were  posted  around  campus,  students,  fac-­ ulty   and   administrators   organized   several   forums  to  discuss  the  incidents.   7KH ÂżUVW IRUXP FRVSRQVRUHG E\ WKH Student   Association   (SA)   and   the   Black   Student   Union,   was   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Colored   Only:â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Racism  at  SUNY  New  Paltz.â&#x20AC;?  Or-­ ganizers   said   they   were   happy   with   the   turnout  at  the  event  held  in  Student  Union   (SU)  100  on  Nov.  17.   Âł,W ZDV GHÂżQLWHO\ D VXFFHVV´ VDLG Ayanna  Thomas,  SA  vice  president  of  aca-­ demic  affairs  of  governance.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  good   to  see  people  come  together.â&#x20AC;?   Students  participated  in  planned  activ-­ ities  before  breaking  into  open  discussion.   SA   leaders   also   worked   with   Presi-­ dent   Donald   Christian   to   organize   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can   We   Talk   About   It?:   A   Discussion   about   Race  and  Racial  Equity  on  the  SUNY  New   Paltz  Campusâ&#x20AC;?  on  Nov.  30  in  the  SU  Mul-­ tipurpose  Room.  This  forum  allowed  par-­ ticipants  to  discuss   the  incidents  in  small   group  settings.   CAPTION  BY  JULIE  MANSMANN ALL  PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011


NEWS

 8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Students  Seek  To  Extend  Union  Hours By  Maria  Jayne   Copy  Editor  |  Maria.jayne17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Student  Association  (SA)  senators  are  working  on  ex-­ tending   the   hours   of   the   Student   Union   (SU)   and   installing   a   printer  in  the  building  for  campus  organizations  to  use.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extending  Student  Union  hours  was  of  principle  as  well   as   practicality,â&#x20AC;?   said   Manuel  Tejada,   the   senator   spearheading   this   change.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully   we   can   see   changes   happen   over   the   year  through  next  semester,  but  it  requires  steps  to  be  taken  at  a   manageable  pace.â&#x20AC;?   Before  the  legislation  about  the  intiative  written,  the  senate   is  developing  a  survey  that  will  poll  the  student  body  on  their   use  of  the  SU.  The  questions  in  the  survey  include  when  stu-­ dents  would  want  to  see  the  SU  open  and  what  time    would  be   appropriate  for  weekend  and  weekdays,  Tejada  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As  of  right  now,  putting  the  survey  out  there  can  happen   either  in  person,  or  online,  although  that  remains  to  be  worked   on,â&#x20AC;?  Tejada  said.  He  said  many  events,  conferences  and  club  meetings  are   limited  to  being  held  in  the  SU  and  feels  that  this  space  is  for  the   students  and  should  be  there  for  them  to  use  when  they  need  it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   SU   remains   the   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   building   and   by   having   it   open  until  12  a.m.  does  inhibit  students  from  having  a  safe  space   for  the  weekends  to  gather,  get  together,  and  build  community,â&#x20AC;?   said  Tejada.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;As  a  member  of  Student  Association  senate,  meet-­ ings   do   last   close   to   midnight   and   by   allowing   the   SU   hours   to  be  extended  will  provide  more  space  and  time  for  others  as   well.â&#x20AC;?    Tejada  said  extending  the  hours  of  the  SU  will  require  a  lot   RIÂżQDQFLDOUHFRXUVHVDQGWKHVHQDWHZLOOKDYHWRHYDOXDWHEXG getary  constraints  and  have  further  discussions  before  anything   can  be  implemented.  

Student  Association  representatives  hope  to  extend  the  hours  of  the  Student  Union.  

Michael  Patterson,  director  of  Student  Activities  and  Union   Services,  is  in  favor  of  revising  the  hours  of  operation  of  the  SU   such  as  making  it  open  and  close  later  on  the  weekend  or  during   the  week.   He  said  that  the  hours  have  been  the  same  since  he  started   working  here  three  and  a  half  years  ago.  However,  New  Paltz   GRHVQRWKDYHWKHÂżQDQFHVWRFRYHUH[WUDKRXUVDWWKLVWLPH â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   a   rough   estimate,   one   hour   more   each   day   for   the   course  of  a  school  year  it  runs  about  $14,000  to  $15,000,â&#x20AC;?  said   Patterson.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  estimate  includes  maintenance,  lights,  energy,   ZDWHUDQGVWDIÂżQJDQGWKDWÂśVMXVWIRURQHKRXU²LIZHVWD\HG

                             PHOTO  BY  COURTNEY  MOORE  

open  until  2  a.m.  it  would  cost  around  $30,000.â&#x20AC;?   3DWWHUVRQVDLGÂżQGLQJÂżQDQFLDOUHVRXUFHVIURPWKHLQVWLWX tion  for  additional  operations  may  be  a  challenging  due  to  the   recent  budget  cuts,  as  well  as  the  state  of  the  economy,  but  he   hopes  to  help  with  students  to  adjust  the  hours  and  budget  based   on  the  needs  shown  by  the  survey  results.  He  said  it  will  based   on   the   proposed   printer   survey   and   he   will   look   into   possible   alternatives.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  am  in  full  support  of  what  the  SA  is  looking  into  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   looking  to  support  what  they  need  and  what  they  care  about,â&#x20AC;?   said  Patterson.  

Accident  Causes  Power  Outage  On  Campus   By  Caterina  De  Gaetano Staff  Writer  |  N02546064@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

President  Donald  Christian  decided  to  remind  the  college  of   emergency  preparedness  policies  after  an  accident  on  Route  32   South  closed  the  road  and  caused  a  campus-­wide  power  outage   on  Monday,  Nov.  7,  leaving  parts  of  the  New  Paltz  community   without  power  into  Tuesday.   The  outage  was  caused  by  a  construction  truck  containing   a   backhoe,   -­  a  digging   machine  used   in  construction,  -­  which   hit   a   major   electrical   switch   around   6   p.m.,   said   John   Shupe,   assistant  vice  president  of  Facilities  Management.  No  injuries   were  reported.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  truckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  back-­hoe  hit  the  guide  wire  that  supported  a   utility  pole  across  the  street  from  Hopfer  House,â&#x20AC;?  Shupe  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  caused  the  pole  to  break  and  it  severed  the  power  line.â&#x20AC;?   As   a   result,   all   campus   buildings   lost   power   except   the   Athletic  and  Wellness  Center.  The  severity  of  the  incident  forced   DGPLQLVWUDWLYHRIÂżFLDOVWRFDQFHODOO0RQGD\HYHQLQJFODVVHV Central  Hudson  gave  faculty,  staff  and  students  an  estimated   time  of  six  to  eight  hours  until  power  was  restored.  Regardless,  

most  buildings  on  campus  have  emergency  back-­up  generators   was  with  Central  Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  power  lines  and  their  personnel  were   which  kept  lights  and  heat  running.  The  New  Paltz  maintenance   here  within  30  minutes  of  the  incident.â&#x20AC;?   VWDIIKDQGOHGWKHLVVXHHIÂżFLHQWO\DFFRUGLQJWR6KXSH Students   were   warned   about   the   current   situation   via   the   NP   Alert   system   which   is   an   emergency   service   provided   to   New  Paltz  students  residing  on  and  off  campus,  notifying  them   of  class  cancelations,  inclement  weather  and  safety  problems.   Christina  Mazzarella,  a  third-­year  student  living  off  campus   The   truckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   back-­hoe   hit   the   at  a  complex  across  the  street  from  the  college  on  Route  32,  lost   guide   wire   that   supported   a   power  in  her  apartment  that  night.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   freaked   because   I   saw   the   lights   turn   blue   and   things   utility   pole   across   the   street   began  to  buzz  in  the  apartment,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  then  proceeded  to   from   Hopfer   House.   This   call  my  friend  who  lives  on  campus,  hoping  he  had  power,  but   caused  the  pole  to  break  and  it   there  was  no  power  on  campus  either.â&#x20AC;? If  something  like  this  should  ever  happen  again,  generators   severed  the  power  line.   would  supply  power,  according  to  Shupe.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   back-­up   generators   run   on   natural   gas   supplied   OHN HUPE by  Central  Hudson.  They  should  run  for  as  long  as  it  takes  to   restore  power  to  the  campus,â&#x20AC;?  Shupe  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  had  employees  on  campus  at  the  time  power  went  out   Power  was  restored  to  all  buildings  but  the  Hopfer  House   so  there  was  no  delay  in  assessing  the  situation  and  beginning   by  8:30  p.m.  Christian  addressed  the  incident  in  his  November   the  process  of  restoring  back-­up  power,â&#x20AC;?  Shupe  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  issue   faculty  report.  

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Thursday,  December  1,  2011


The GUNK Thursday, December 1, 2011

American Marketing Association holds

Wine tasting Fundraiser Story on page 2B

PHOTO  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


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The  AMA  held  its  second  annual  wine  tasting  fundraiser.

   PHOTOS  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ

A Taste of Business in The Dorsky

AMA HOSTS THIRD ANNUAL WINE TASTING FUNDRAISER AND NETWORKING EVENT By  Rachel  Freeman Features  Editor    |  Rachel.freeman17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY   New   Paltz   students,   faculty,   staff   and   business   community   members   raised   their   glasses   in   the   Samuel   Dorsky   Museum  of  Art  and  learned  tips  and  tricks   of  wine  making  and  marketing,  as  well  as   networked  with  each  other. SUNY   New   Paltz’s   chapter   of   the   American   Marketing   Association   (AMA)   held   their   third   annual   Wine   Tasting   Gala   on  Tuesday,  Nov.  29  from  5  to  7  p.m.  as  an   “unusual  fundraiser.” “We   thought   this   would   have   a   lot   of   appeal   to   marketing   majors,   but   not   only   to   marketing   majors,”   AMA   Advisor   Ted   Clark   said.   “Students   like   wine,   so   they   could  learn  at  least  how  it’s  made  and  how   it’s   marketed.   So   that’s   where   the   educa-­ tional  component  came  in.” To   put   the   event   together,   the   AMA  

contacted   Whitecliff   Winery,   a   local   Gar-­ diner  business,  and  secured  the  museum  for   it’s  “great  atmosphere.” The  fundraiser  began  with  a  lecture  by   Dorsky   Director   Sara   Pasti   discussing   the   museum  and  present  exhibitions,  followed   by  the  wine  tasting  and  lesson  by  Whitecliff   owner  Yancey  Stanforth-­Migliore.  The  eve-­ ning  ended  with  a  networking  session  where   attendees  enjoyed  a  full  glass  of  wine. AMA  Vice   President   of   Programming   Derya   Eren   said   she   felt   the   wine   tasting   ZRXOGEHEHQH¿FLDOIRUVWXGHQWVLQWKHIX-­ ture. “From  a  student  point  of  view,  some  of   the   students   graduate   and   have   no   experi-­ ence  and  think,  ‘How  am  I  going  to  drink   this   wine?,’”   Eren   said.   “She   [Stanforth-­ Migliore]   teaches   you   how   to   enjoy   the   wine  better  and  rehearse  how  to  behave  in   that  situation.  You  need  to  experience  that,  

it  doesn’t  come  naturally.” Stanforth-­Migliore  spoke  about  wine  in   New  York  and  the  Hudson  Valley,  how  her   ZLQHU\ ¿WV LQ DQG WKH SURJUHVV WKH UHJLRQ has  made  in  “creating  quality  wine  and  get-­ ting  recognition  for  it.”  She  also  described   the  complexity  of  the  business  structure  and   how  it  is  made  up  of  different  elements  in-­ cluding  farming,  manufacturing  and  retail. “I’m  very  proud  of  what  we  do,  so  I’m   kind  of  evangelical  about  it.  I  think  every-­ body  would  enjoy  a  good  glass  of  wine  and   learning  a  little  bit  more  about  how  to  taste   it  and  what’s  produced  here,”  Stanforth-­Mi-­ gliore  said.  “I  also  think  Professor  Clark  is   on  to  something  having  a  presentation  like   this  one  to  the  marketing  students  because   it’s  business  that  offers  a  fun  application  of   marketing  skills  to  make  it  go.” Clark  said  that  while  marketing  infor-­ mation  was  a  primary  purpose  of  the  event,  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

it   also   gave   students   the   chance   to   meet   with  a  variety  faculty  in  a  small  group  and   at  the  same  time  appreciate  the  art  they  are   surrounded   by.   Having   met   students   who   never   visited   the   museum   or   don’t   even   know   where   it   is,   Clark   believes   students   sometimes   do   not   appreciate   the   exhibits   they  have  access  to. Overall,   Clark   hoped   to   organize   and   host  a  unique  program  that  would  intrigue   and  help  students  in  multiple  ways. “We  want  students  to  have  the  opportu-­ nity  to  network,  to  experience  a  wonderful   experience  and  learn  what  wine  is  all  about   and  to  learn  how  to  market  a  very  unusual   product,”  Clark  said.  “We  want  that  oppor-­ tunity  for  students  to  talk  to  faculty  and  for   faculty  to  talk  to  students  and  quit  frankly,   it’s   a   holiday   season   and   in   that   sense,   to   add  a  little  cheer.”


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Getting Into The Swing Of Things SUNY NEW PALTZ CLUB HOLDS SECOND ANNUAL SWING INVASION

By  Maria  Jayne Copy  Editor  |  Maria.jayne17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

With  a  local  big  band  and  eager  swing   dancers,  the  second  annual  Swing  Invasion   took   place   Nov.   18   in   the   Student   Union   Multipurpose  Room.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The   event]     brings   an   experience   from   the   past   of   classic   American   history   to  life  right  on  the  New  Paltz  campus,â&#x20AC;?  Al-­ vin  Arnold,  co-­founder  of  the  Swing  Dance   Club  said. Arnold,  a  fourth-­year  education  major,   and  Jill  Exman,  a  fourth-­year  environmen-­ tal  and  organizational  biology  major,  started   the  New  Paltz  Swing  Club  in  fall  2010  af-­ ter  transferring  from  Dutchess  Community   College.   They   said   they   wanted   to   bring   the  swing-­dancing  scene  over  to  New  Paltz   with  them.   Swing   Invasion   was   designed   to   em-­ power   the   local   swing   community   in   the   course  of  a  night  of  self-­expression  through   dancing  and  swing  music.   7KHÂżUVWKDOIKRXURI6ZLQJ,QYDVLRQ was  dedicated  to  a  practice  lesson  for  those   new  to  swing  dancing,  but  interested  in  the   style  and  the  remainder  of  the  night  was  so-­ cial  free-­style  dancing.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before   the   event   we   always   have   a   short   lesson   for   those   who   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   tried   swing   dancing   before   to   give   them   some  

WKLQJV WR XVH RQ WKH GDQFH Ă&#x20AC;RRU´ $UQROG said. Arnold   said   the   idea   for   Swing   Inva-­ sion  arose  from  his  desire  to  bring  a  swing   dance   event   to   the   New   Paltz   campus   and   to  expose  more  people  to  this  style  of  dance   and  music.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;So   far,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   held   one   big   event   each   semester   and   hope   to   continue   with   this  tradition,â&#x20AC;?  Swing  Club  President  Kelly   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor  said. At  each  event  held  by  the  Swing  Club,  a   local  big  band  is  invited  to  play  music  from   the  swing  era  for  attendees  to  dance  to.  This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  band  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Big  Blue  Big  Bandâ&#x20AC;?   (BBBB).   BBBB   is   an   independent   swing   band   from   Kingston,   N.Y.   They   are   an   18-­piece   ensemble   that   has   been   perform-­ ing  for  more  than  30  years  and  is  currently   accompanied  by  vocalist  Mark  Raisch.     Similar   to   the   event,   the   club   holds   weekly  meetings  that  encompass  the  enthu-­ siasm   of   dancers.   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor   said   the   club   is   comprised   of   devoted   members   that   are      PHOTO  BY  JIMMY  CORRAO truly   interested   in   learning   to   swing   dance   The  New  Paltz  Swing  Club  held  their  second  annual  Swing  Invasion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   usually   have   a   handful   of   dedi-­ and   appreciate   the   era,   but   no   experience   The  New  Paltz  Swing  Club  holds  meet-­ or  partner  is  necessary.  She  said  at  its  best,   cated  dancers  who  show  up  every  week,  as   ings  every  Friday  in  the  dance  studio  in  the   the  club  has  had  more  than  30  attendees  and   well  as  those  who  can  only  make  it  once  in   Elting  Gym  from  5:30  to  7  p.m.  Each  meet-­ there  are  usually  20  regular  members.  This   a  whileâ&#x20AC;?  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  event  is  open   ing  consists  of  a  swing  dance  lesson  at  the   varies  based  on  studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  schedules,  assign-­ to   everybody   and   we   will   have   everyone   beginning  and  ends  with  group  dancing. ments,   time   constrains   and   obligations   but   IURPÂżUVWWLPHGDQFHUVWRVHDVRQHGVZLQJ ers.â&#x20AC;? no  one  is  ever  turned  away.  

NO SHAVE NOVEMBEARD All month, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been tracking the progress of four SUNY New Paltz students in this fall tradition. Some participants shaved their novembeards prematurely. Others decided to trim their facial hair. But one student persevered. Congratulations, Dan Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Regan!

Betting On Safe Sex

RHSA HOLDS ANNUAL CONDOM CASINO By  Adriana  Strol Contributing  Writer  |  N01916085@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Hundreds   of   SUNY   New   Paltz   students   Ă&#x20AC;RRGHGWKH6WXGHQW8QLRQ0XOWLSXUSRVH5RRP on   Tuesday,   Nov.   29   for   Residence   Hall   Stu-­ dent   Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   (RHSA)   Condom   Casino   night.    A  night  of  music,  food  and  gambling  to   promote  safe  sex.   Condoms   were   used   as   chips   to   com-­ pete  in  favorite  casino  and  non-­casino  games,   such  as  blackjack,  roulette,  condom  pong  and   Apples  to  Apples,  which  were  among  the  most   heavily  populated  tables.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Condom   Casino   night   is   something   I   look  forward  to  every  year,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  lot  of  fun  so   I  volunteer,â&#x20AC;?  third-­year  organizational  commu-­ nications  Sarah  Sobel  said.   RHSA  President  Ranysha  Ware  wrote  the   rules  for  many  of  the  games  played  during  the   night   and   said   it   is   her   favorite   event   to   plan   for  RHSA.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   is   a   good   program,   students   want   to  

Thursday,  December  1  ,  2011

come   because   it   is   a   great   way   to   meet   new   people  and  it  is  educational  even  for  those  who   are  not  having  sex,â&#x20AC;?  Ware  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  never   used  any  of  the  condoms  I  have  received  from   Condom  Casino  night  but  I  still  go  and  students   should  feel  open  to  coming  too.â&#x20AC;? New  York  State  Condoms  supplied  RHSA   with   the   boxes   of   free   condoms.     This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   event  was  larger  than  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  with  an  esti-­ mated  700  attendees,  while    600  students  par-­ ticipated  last  year.   Oasis/Haven,  the  student  staffed  crisis  in-­ tervention  center  and  hotline,  tabled  at  Condom   Casino  night  and  helped  distribute  information   about   safe   sex.     Coordinator   Nicole   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gigiâ&#x20AC;?   Giordano  has  volunteered  at  previous  Condom   Casino  events  and  this  year  she  handed  out  in-­ formation   about   STIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,   birth   control   and   safe   sex  in  general. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  that  having  free  safe  sex  tools  for   students  is  important,â&#x20AC;?  Giordano  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  a   good  way  to  bring  students  out  and  keep  them   involved.â&#x20AC;?


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Shying Away From Conventional Clubs NEW ANTI-SOCIAL CLUB FORMS ON CAMPUS FOR STUDENTS TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS Copy  Editor  |  Maria.jayne17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Shy,  anti-­social,  socially  awkward,  iso-­ lated  or  not  very  outgoing  students  now  have   a   place   to   meet   up   and   make   new   friends   with  the  creation  of  the  Anti-­  Social  Club. “I   have   never   met   a   single   anti-­social   individual   who   didn’t   desire   at   any   level   to  interact  with  others,”  club  president  Eric   Rosenberg  said. Rosenberg,   a   second-­year   visual   arts   major,  formed  the  club  this  fall.  He  said  he   established   this   because   he   wanted   to   have   an   organization   for   others   who   he   felt   he   could  relate  to.   “During   freshman   year,   I   often   joked   about   the   idea   of   having   a   club   for   anti-­ social   people   and   it   was   well   received   so   I   decided   to   actually   create   it,”   Rosenberg   said.   “I   wanted   to   unite   the   community   of   those  whom  are  isolated  so  that  the  isolation   would  no  longer  be  on  their  own.” 5RVHQEHUJ GH¿QHV DQWLVRFLDO DV D EH havioral   disposition   where   an   individual   spends   the   majority   of   time   alone   as   a   re-­ sult  of  their  distaste  for  others.  However  he   said  there  are  thousands  of  different  ways  in   which  someone  who  is  anti-­social  can  be  de-­

scribed.   The   mission   of   the   club   is   to   have   a   place   for   bored   students   to   gather   and   chat   with  others  who  are  anti-­social  in  nature.  At   each  meeting  group  members  discuss  ideas   for  the  future  and  how  to  make  the  club  more   enjoyable  along  with  just  talking  and  joking   around.  They  have  had  eight  meetings  so  far   and  plan  to  continue  gaining  members  along   WKHZD\5RVHQEHUJVDLGWKHUHDUH¿YHFRQ sistent  members  that  attend  weekly  and  the   greatest  member  attendance  so  far  is  seven.   He   said   participation   is   not   as   great   as   he   would   like   and   explained   that   most   people   hear  about  the  club    and  see  it  as  a  joke  or   think  members  will  be  unfriendly,  but  these   assumptions  are  untrue. “We  may  not  have  many  members  but   not  a  single  person  who  has  showed  up  has   been   unfriendly,”   Rosenberg   said.   “Some   are  shy  and  others  are  open  minded  but  none   were  the  stereotypical  anti-­social.” Rosenberg   said   many   people   make   broad   assumptions   about   what   it   means   to   be   anti-­social,   therefore   they   are   unable   to   understand  the  concept  behind  the  club.  He   feels  that  others  may  not  see  themselves  as   anti-­social  and  feels  like  the  negative  conno-­ tations  surrounding  the  word  may  dissuade   them  from  joining  the  club.  

The  Anti-­Social  Club  was  created  this  semester.

“Not  everyone  who  is  anti-­social  hates   interacting   with   others,”   Rosenberg   said.   “They   may   be   simply   unskilled   at   it   and   are  often  discouraged  from  interacting  with   their  peers  due  to  social  rejection,  the  inabil-­

   PHOTO  ILLUSTRATION  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ

ity   to   relate   to   others   and   problems   main-­ taining  conversation.”     The   Anti-­Social   Club   meets   Wednes-­ days  from  7:30  to  8:30  p.m.  in  the  Student   Union  414.  

The Last awful Book I Read: ‘little women and me’ by lauren baratz logsted By  Nicole  Brinkley Staff  Writer  |  Nicole.brinkley76@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

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By  Maria  Jayne

“Little  Women”  fans,  pack  your  bags  and  run  for  the  hills.  You   can  go  singing  about  how  the  hills  are  alive  with  the  sound  of  music   if  you  want,  but  I’d  still  run.  Though,  Lauren  Baratz  Logsted’s  new   novel  “Little  Women  and  Me”  (Bloomsbury,  November  2011)  has   some   interesting   concepts,   overall   it’s   a   headache   of   a   story   that   can’t  get  past  the  protagonist’s  stupidity. Here’s  what  happens:  Emily,  who,  by  sheer  bad  luck  (and  also   the  timeliness  of  her  conception),  is  the  middle  child  of  her  family.   She  absolutely  dreads  her  life,  despite  the  fact  that  the  worst  thing   going  for  her  is  the  boy  she  likes  doesn’t  like  her  back.  When  her   English  professor  assigns  her  a  paper  about  what  she  would  change   about  her  favorite  novel,  she  gets  zapped  into  the  world  of  “Little   Women”  and  begins  wrecking  havoc  on  everything  she  touches. To  be  fair,  the  concept  is  enticing.  It’s  not  a  modern  take  on  the   novel,  and  the  way  Baratz-­Logsted  handles  it  makes  for  some  in-­ teresting  reading.  The  key  word  there  is  “some.”  The  fact  that  she’s   WUDQVSODQWHGLQWRWKH¿FWLRQDOIDPLO\DQGDOOWKHVLVWHUVLPPHGLDWHO\ adjust   to   her   presence   is   interesting   and   the   way   Baratz-­Logsted   uses  it  to  twist  the  ending  was  unexpected.

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

And  that’s  where  the  novelty  of  the  story  ends. You  know  that  one  friend  who  is  completely  boy  obsessed?   Yeah,  that  one.  The  one  that  thinks  about  boys  and  every  word  is   about  boys  and  it  seems  like  she  can’t  get  enough  of  anything  that’s   got  a  dangly  bit,  even  if  it  doesn’t  show  the  least  amount  of  inter-­ est  in  her?  The  one  that  you  only  kind  of  like  because  every  now   and  then  she  says  something  entertaining,  but  most  of  the  time  you   want  to  grab  the  biggest  book  you  own,  preferably  hardcover,  and   slam  it  into  her  skull? This   is   essentially   Emily’s   character.   It   doesn’t   matter   that   she’s  in  an  interesting  time  period  with  her  favorite  characters  of   all  time.  All  she  can  think  about  is  the  one  boy  she  left  behind  who   showed   no   interest   in   her   whatsoever   or   manipulating   the   story   so  the  only  male  character  her  age  will  want  to  get  into  her  pants   rather  than  Jo’s  or  Beth’s. So  to  “Little  Women”  fans  and  the  general  population  of  peo-­ ple  who  can’t  stand  characters  that  can  only  think  of  one  thing  -­  I’d   avoid  this  book.  Though  the  general  concept  is  cool  and  used  rather   well,  the  main  character  completely  wrecks  any  enjoyment  I  could   have  had.  


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Name:  Myeshia  Hasell                                                   Major: Journalism Age:  18                                                                                                       Hometown:  Harlem,  N.Y. 0\HVKLDFRPELQHVEROGĂ&#x20AC;RUDOSULQW leggings  with  casual  Converse  to  create   DIXQVLPSOHORRN+HUVSLNHGEUDFHOHW DGGVDQXQH[SHFWHGHGJH

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3PENDĂĽTHEĂĽHOLIDAYSĂĽINĂĽTHEĂĽ &INGERĂĽ,AKESĂĽ2EGION Graduate sooner with winter classes at FLCC. Get ahead on your four-year degree with classes at Finger Lakes Community College. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to get a few electives out of the way while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re home for winter break. Most FLCC Winter Session classes start December 27. Learn more! Visit www.flcc.edu/winter for details.

 Photo  by  Dean  Engle,  Dengle51@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu &DSWLRQE\5DFKHO)UHHPDQRachel.freeman17@hawkmail.edu

INTERESTED IN SEEING MORE OF â&#x20AC;&#x153;FRESH PALTZ?â&#x20AC;?

FRESHPALTZ.COM O  SEE  MORE   CHECK  OUT                                                                                    T OF  WHAT  NEW  PALTZ  IS  WEARING!  

at Hofstra, I got resourceful Joe Ryan â&#x20AC;&#x2122;05, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;08 M.A., Industrial-Organizational Psychology Ph.D., Applied Organizational Psychology A professor helped Joe Ryan secure an internship at Citi Private Bank while he was a graduate student in industrial/organizational psychology. That internship launched his career as a human resources executive and inspired him to earn a doctorate.

A graduate degree gives you a real advantage â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in a competitive marketplace and in your chosen career â&#x20AC;&#x201C; by providing you with the tools to advance in your field and shape your future. Hofstraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs in education, health and human services, business, communication, and the arts and sciences prepare our students for professional careers and are highly ranked in publications such as The Princeton Review and U.S. News & World Report, among others. Get ready to succeed.

Graduate Open House Tuesday, January 10 hofstra.edu/grad-day

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

5B


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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Expressions on Canvas

ARTIST JANE MCCAMBLEY EXPLORES INTERESTS AND INFLUENCES

Paintings  by  Jane  McCambley  from  left  to  right:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Self-­Portrait,â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Melissa.â&#x20AC;?   By  Carolyn  Quimby Staff  Writer  |  N01979729@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   Schenectady,   N.Y.   native   Jane   McCambley   said  she  is  fascinated  by  how  the  smallest  expressions,   such  as  the  cock  of  an  eyebrow  or  the  lift  of  a  lip,  can   transform  a  personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  face.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   greatest   inspiration   is   human   emotions,   ex-­ pressions  and  interactions,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  human  face   is  capable  of  carrying  so  much  expression.â&#x20AC;? Growing   up   with   a   heavily   artistic   background,   McCambley  began  drawing  at  a  young  age.  The  third-­ \HDU ÂżQH DUWV PDMRU VDLG KHU PRWKHU DQ HOHPHQWDU\ school  art  teacher,  encouraged  her  to  explore  a  creative   SURFHVVEXWGLGQRWVWHHU0F&DPEOH\WRZDUGDVSHFLÂżF medium.  She  decided  to  pursue  art  in  college  after  dis-­ covering  painting  in  high  school.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  until  later  in  my  life  that  I  understood   that  I  could  be  expressive  in  other  mediums,â&#x20AC;?  McCam-­ bley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  college,  I  started  experimenting  in  things  

                                                   3+2726&2857(6<2)-$1(0&&$0%/(<

like  ceramics  and  photography.â&#x20AC;? This  semester,  McCambley  said  she  started  paint-­ ing  in  a  way  she  never  tried  before.  She  is  working  with   liquid  washes,  which,  she  said,  is  watered-­down  paint.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  making  a  lot  of  cool  discoveries  about   what  happens  when  you  use  extremely  thinned  paint,â&#x20AC;?   said  McCambley.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  a  really  interesting  adven-­ ture  for  me.â&#x20AC;?   McCambley   said   she   uses   the   backgrounds,   or   washes,  to  help  her  transform  the  paintings  into  some-­ WKLQJPRUHWKDQMXVWVLPSOHSRUWUDLWV+HUSRUWUDLWVEH-­ gin   with   these   washes,   then   she   goes   over   them   with   â&#x20AC;&#x153;normal  paintâ&#x20AC;?  to  render  a  person  on  top.   0F&DPEOH\ VDLG KHU LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHV DUH FRQVWDQWO\ changing,  but  recently  she  has  been  inspired  by  paint-­ ings  by  Norman  Rockwell  and  Chuck  Close.  Through   her   own   art,   McCambley   said   she   wants   others   to   be   able  to  see  how  she  views  the  world  and  wants  to  shine   D VSRWOLJKW RQ WKH WKLQJV VKH ÂżQGV EHDXWLIXO GHVSLWH

Thursday,  Decemeber  1,  2011

how  odd  or  gross  they  may  seem. McCambley   said   she   is   amazed   at   how   children   perceive  themselves.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   tiniest   things   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   a   tutu,   a   crown,   a   pair   of   JRRJOHV²FDQJLYHFKLOGUHQDOOWKHFRQÂżGHQFHLQWKH world,â&#x20AC;?  she  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;and  an  arrogance  that  really  intrigues   me.â&#x20AC;? She  has  completed  a  few  drawings  and  paintings  of   her  sister  who  took  dance  lessons  for  17  years.   Âł6KHÂśVUHDOO\Ă&#x20AC;H[LEOHDQG>FDQ@FRQWRUWKHUERG\LQ UHDOO\VWUDQJHZD\VWKDW,RIWHQÂżQGEHDXWLIXO´VDLG0F-­ Cambley. McCambley   has   never   tried   to   force   a   political   message  on  her  work.  She  said  her  art  has  always  been   more  personal.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  the  way  I  view  the  world  has  to  do  with   ÂżQGLQJWKHEHDXW\LQWKHPDQ\HFFHQWULFLWLHVRIKXPDQ life,  and  I  hope  my  work  speaks  to  that,â&#x20AC;?  McCambley   said.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

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7B

Theatrical Fast Forward

ON-CAMPUS COLLECTIVE WRITES AND PERFORMS PRODUCTION IN ONE DAY

By  Suzy  Berkowitz Staff  Writer  |  N02007890@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Theatre  is  a  process,  but  some  students  are   attempting  to  speed  it  up.   The  24  Hour  Theatre  is  a  collaborative  stu-­ dent   effort   where   a   production   is   written   and   performed   in   a   day’s   time.   It   is   a   resurrected   tradition   that   involves   working   long   hours   to   create  and  put  together  a  show  from  scratch.   The  most  recent  24  Hour  Theatre  produc-­ tion   was   organized   by   third-­year   theatre   arts   major   Brendan   Quinn   and     performed   in   the   Black   Box   theatre   in   the   Smiley  Art   Building   on  Saturday,  Nov.  12. “We  met  Friday  night  at  8  p.m.  and  within   24  hours,  came  up  with  a  concept  and  discussed   various  ideas,”  Quinn  said.  “We  wrote  a  show,   rehearsed  it  and  performed  it  Saturday  night  at   8  p.m.”   Ten   students,   in   a   range   of   majors,   were   involved  in  the  production:  nine  actors  and  one   production  manager,  who  helped  with  the  over-­ all  creative  process. Those  involved  meet  24  hours  before  the   scheduled  performance  to  formulate  a  concept.     A  writer  works  on  the  script  through  the  night   and  the  next  morning  and  everyone  meets  up  to   read   the   script   through   and   start   blocking   and   rehearsing.   The   entire   day   is   dedicated   to   rehearsals   and  adding  costumes.  Finally,  at  8  p.m.,  the  col-­ laboration  is  performed.           This   year’s   show,   “Mistress   Quickly’s   Time  Travel   Café”   was   molded   into   a   parody   of   a   “Twilight   Zone”   episode.   The   show   in-­ FRUSRUDWHG UHDO DQG ¿FWLRQDO SHRSOH IURP GLI-­ ferent  time  periods  and  brought  them  together  

in  a  café  where  they  solved  the  mystery  of  the   murder  of  Genghis  Khan  before  they  were  al-­ lowed  to  venture  back  to  where  and  when  they   came  from.   Some   of   the   characters   included   JFK,   Cleopatra,  Jack  the  Ripper  and  Luna  Lovegood   from  the  “Harry  Potter”  series.   “It  was  a  mixture  of  several  genres:  com-­ edy,  psychodrama,  love  story,  and  just  general   strangeness…this   murder   mystery   leads   to   more  murder,  in  which  people  like  JFK  become   savage  killers  and  people  like  Jack  the  Ripper  

prove  to  be  innocent,”  said  Lydia  Nightingale,   a  fourth-­year  theatre  major  also  involved  in  the   performance.  “The  basic  instincts  of  humanity   have  been  revealed  to  show  that  no  one  can  be   trusted  and,  in  a  lot  of  instances,  the  most  un-­ likely  people  can  be  responsible  for  cruelty.”   Chrissie   Vuolo,   second-­year   psychology   and  theatre  double-­major  and  one  of    24  Hour   Theatre’s   sound   technicians   said   the   group   is   “a  great  experience  with  an  amazing  group  of   people.”   The  creative  process  and  camaraderie  that  

WHICH OF THESE MUSICIANS WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE?

MAIN  ACTS: Matt  and  Kim Regina  Spektor Big  Sean Wale Soullive  &  Lettuce The  Wailers Taking  Back  Sunday

SUPPORTING  ACTS: Jay  Electronica Super  Mash  Bros. Chris  Webby Kendrick  Lamar The  Pimps  of  Joytime

Check your hawkmail to vote for our spring concert! Thursday,  December  1,  2011

 PHOTO    COURTESY  OF  BRENDAN  QUINN accompanies   working   long   nights   on   a   tight   schedule,  makes  for  unforgettable  experiences   and  allows  students  to  focus  soley  on  one  proj-­ ect,  Quinn  said.   “[The   24   Hour   Theatre]   is   such   a   con-­ densed  project  that  you  can  really  forget  about   everything  else  for  twenty-­four  hours  and  just   work  on  a  theatre  piece,”  said  Quinn. 7KRXJKWKLVZDVWKH¿UVWVHPHVWHULQWKUHH years  24  Hour  Theatre  occurred,  students  were   pleased  by  the  experience,  and  it  is  scheduled  it   to  run  on  a  semesterly  basis  from  now  on.  


  8B

Arts & Entertainment

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Slamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Six: New Paltz Slam Team 2011-12 By  Katherine  Speller

Copy  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Photos  by  Jimmy  Corrao

The Prodigal

THE LEADER

Jackie Wolozin (Co-President): fourth-year, technical theatre major ,QKHUWHQXUHRQWKH1HZ3DOW]6ODP7HDPFRSUHVLGHQW-DFNLH:ROR]LQÂśVJRDOVKDYHVKLIWHG7KRXJKVKHÂżUVWMRLQHGZLWKWKH ambitious  intentions  of  becoming  a  great  poet  and  she  acknowledges  her  own  improvement,  her  focus  is  on  her  teammates. Âł:KLOH JRRG ZULWLQJ LV YHU\ LPSRUWDQW WR PH IRVWHULQJ WKH FRPPXQLW\ DQG EHLQJ DQ HIIHFWLYH OHDGHU LV MXVW DV LPSRUWDQW´   VDLG:ROR]LQÂł,IHHOWKDWZKDW,KDYHWRRIIHUWKHWHDPLVDGPLQLVWUDWLYHDVZHOODVSRHWLF´ +HUJURZWKDVDSRHWGHVSLWHQRIRUPDOVWXG\RIWKHFUDIWEHJDQZLWKKHURZQWU\RXWDVDÂżUVW\HDUVWXGHQW6KHVDLGVKHFRQ-­ VLGHUHGWKDW\HDUWREHDELWRIDOXFN\EUHDNFRQVLGHULQJWKHLQFUHGLEO\ÂżHUFHFRPSHWLWLRQEURXJKWRQLQWKHIROORZLQJ\HDUV6KHZDV given  the  opportunity  to  learn,  grow  and  truly  prepare  for  the  next  round  of  try-­outs. Though  it  serves  as  a  strong  motivator,  competition  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  everything  to  the  veteran  slammer. Âł&RPSHWLWLRQLVMXVWDPHFKDQLVPWRIRUFHSRHWVWRJURZDQGHYROYHDVDXWKRUV´VDLG:ROR]LQÂł,WPDNHVWKLQJVGLIÂżFXOWEHFDXVH if  there  is  too  much  competition,  it  becomes  about  winning  and  not  the  poetry,  but  because  you  are  competing,  everyone  is  working   WREHWKHEHVWWKH\FDQEH´ ,Q KHU RZQ SRHWU\ :ROR]LQ VDLG VKH VWULYHV IRU D PRUH UHDFWLRQDU\ VW\OH DV VKH ÂżQGV WKRVH SLHFHV FDUU\ VWURQJHU   emotional  connections.   Âł0\JRDOVWKLV\HDULQVODPDUHWRZULWHVRPHSRHPVWKDWUHDOO\VD\VRPHWKLQJVLJQLÂżFDQWRUH[SUHVVP\IHHOLQJVHIIHFWLYHO\ EXWDOVRWREHRUJDQL]HGDQGHIIHFWLYHLQWKHDGPLQLVWUDWLRQRIWKHWHDP´VKHVDLG

Ben Golden: third-year , Radio & TV production Major %HQ*ROGHQWRRND\HDURIIIURPFRPSHWLWLYHVODPSRHWU\DIWHUVSHQGLQJKLVÂżUVW\HDUDWFROOHJHRQWKH1HZ3DOW]6ODP7HDP He  said  he  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  if  he  would  return  to  the  team  until  the  end  of  his  second  year. During  his  time  away,  Golden  worked  on  his  craft.  He  made  a  name  for  himself  in  the  Albany  poetry  community  as  the  only   UHFXUULQJSRHWXQGHUSHUIRUPLQJDWORFDOVKRZVDQGÂżQGLQJKLVEHDULQJVDVDVHDVRQHGSHUIRUPHU7KRXJKKHVDLGKLVFRQÂżGHQFH grew,  he  still  worried  about  his  eventual  return  to  the  New  Paltz  scene. Âł$OORIWKLVOHGXSWRPHEHLQJDFRPSOHWHQHUYRXVZUHFNDWWKHÂżUVWSUHOLPLQDU\VODPEXWSODFLQJWKLUGRYHUDOOQRQHWKHOHVV´ Golden  said.   $VKLVHDUOLHVWSRHPVZHUHZULWWHQDVĂ&#x20AC;HVKHGRXWMRNHV*ROGHQOLNHVWRNHHSKXPRUSUHVHQWLQKLVZRUN+HVDLGKLVIDYRULWH SLHFHLVÂł3HUVXDVLYH(VVD\´DSRHPKHZURWHIRUD%ODFN(URWLFWKHPHGVODPLQ$OEDQ\EHFDXVHLWÂśVULIHZLWKWKHVRUWRIUDXQFK\DQG in-­your-­face  punch  lines  he  likes  to  deliver  as  he  discusses  his  infatuation  with  a  former  summer  school  professor.       â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  want  to  have  a  staple  of  memorable  funny  pieces  like  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Persuasive  Essayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  and  be  able  to  write  some  serious  poetry  with  some   UHDOZHLJKWWRLW´*ROGHQVDLGÂł1RWSDQGHULQJÂľ3OHDVHIHHOEDGIRUPHÂśSRHWU\EXWVRPHWKLQJDXWKRULWDWLYHO\VHULRXV´

The Rookie

Julianna Zuckerman: second-year, psychology major :KHQWKHÂżQDOÂżYHSRHWVY\LQJIRUVSRWVRQWKH1HZ3DOW]6ODP7HDPZHUHDQQRXQFHGWKH\KXGGOHGWRJHWKHUDQGZHUHWROG that  by  the  end  of  the  year  they  would  be  a  family.  Slam  team  newcomer  Julianna  Zuckerman  is  looking  forward  to  this  promised   camaraderie. Âł,KRSHZHZLOOEHDJURXSWKDWKHOSVDQGVXSSRUWVHDFKRWKHU´=XFNHUPDQVDLG Zuckerman  fostered  this  environment  even  before  she  was  named  a  member  of  the  team.  When  faced  with  pre-­slam  nerves,   Zuckerman  began  looking  to  Sabrina  Adikes,  a  fellow  team  member,  and  the  slam  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  coach,  Kate  Brady,  for  advice  on  her  poetry   and  the  best  ways  to  revise.   As  she  is  fairly  new  to  slam  poetry,  in  general,  Zuckerman  said  she  has  made  an  effort  to  surround  herself  with  the  craft  through   constantly  writing  and  her  internship  at  Nuyorican  Poetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  CafĂŠ. 7KRXJKVKHVDLGVKHGRHVQÂśWHQMR\WKHFRPSHWLWLYHQDWXUHRIVODP=XFNHUPDQGRHVKRSHWRJURZDVDSRHWLQWKHQH[W\HDUDQG FRQTXHUPRUHGLIÂżFXOWVXEMHFWPDWWHU Âł,WÂśVDOZD\VEHHQVWUDQJHWRPHWKDWSHRSOHÂśVDUWLVEHLQJMXGJHGEHFDXVHVODPLVSUHWW\IUHHIRUP´=XFNHUPDQVDLGÂł%XW, JXHVVLIWKHUHÂśVJRLQJWREHDWHDPWKHQWKHUHQHHGVWREHFRPSHWLWLRQXQIRUWXQDWHO\´

Thursday,  December  1,  2011


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

THE LEADER The Exorcist The Veteran

Christine Richin: second-year, undeclared student For  Christine  Richin,  writing  and  performing  poetry  is  therapeutic.  As  she  once  considered  herself  to  be  shy  and  without  a  voice,   she  said  releasing  her  most  pent-­up  emotions  and  confronting  her  innermost  demons  has  proved  to  be  not  only  a  cathartic,  but  an   enlightening  practice.   For  the  inexperienced    poet  who  had  only  performed  twice  in  front  of  a  sizeable  crowd,  being  named  one  of  the  top-­scoring  poets   at  the  Grand  Slam  on  Nov.  18  offers  a  host  of  opportunities.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  found  that  [poetry]  was  my  only  way  to  really  get  a  grip  on  things  that  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  kept  bottled  up  for  years,â&#x20AC;?  Richin  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   experience  has  made  me  grow  to  understand  myself  in  such  a  way  that  no  therapist  ever  could.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really  something  else.â&#x20AC;? Richin  said  that  she  searches  for  the  stories  and  memories  that  rouse  the  most  pain  or  enlightenment  to  provide  her  with  the   powerful  emotions  she  chooses  to  grapple  with.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  in  the  emotions,  not  just  the  words,  that  she  tries  to  connect  with  her  audience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  as  a  poet  to  be  able  to  expose  yourself  to  your  audience  and  even  more  importantly,  yourself,â&#x20AC;&#x153;  Richin  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   have  to  feel  it  for  the  audience  to  really  get  you.â&#x20AC;?

Sabrina Adikes: fourth-year, international business major )RUUHWXUQLQJPHPEHURIWKH1HZ3DOW]6ODP7HDP6DEULQD$GLNHVÂśDSSURDFKWRSRHWU\LVUHODWLYHO\RUJDQLF7KRXJKVKHKDV been  performing  her  poems  since  fall  of  2009,  she  said  she  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  entirely  sure  if  she  approaches  poetry  at  all.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inspiration  can  come  from  everything,  which  is  a  clichĂŠ  mostly  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  true,â&#x20AC;?  Adikes  said. Her  poems  are  often  composed  of  these  sporadic  inspirations.  Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  jot  down  lines  on  the  back  of  receipts  or  on  the  legal  pad   she  keeps  in  her  car  for  inspiration  on-­the-­go  and  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  send  herself  e-­mails  and  save  memos  and  one-­lined  Word  documents  on  her   computer.  Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  open  to  be  inspired  by  whatever  she  encounters  and  the  slam  competitions  themselves  serve  as  a  major  inspiration.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  competition  for  me  is  just  a  vessel  for  a  huge  bucket  of  amazing  ideas  and  brilliant  writing,â&#x20AC;?  Adikes  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  poems/ poets  are  what  matter,  not  the  points.â&#x20AC;? For  Adikes,  the  chance  to  write  and  share  a  poem  that  touches  her  audience  is  a  particularly  rewarding  experience.  Her  favorite   poem  to  perform  is  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big,â&#x20AC;?  and  she  said  that  it  had  made  the  largest  impression,  causing  friends  and  strangers  to  tell  her  how   they  were  moved  by  her  words. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  easy  to  feel  like  your  voice  and  your  experiences  get  lost  in  the  soup  when  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  performing  with  a  bunch  of  poets,â&#x20AC;?   Adikes  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;To  make  an  impact  is  the  best  possible  outcome,  for  me.â&#x20AC;?  

The CONQUERER THE LEADER

Karly Fesolowich: fourth-year, sociology major with Human Services Concentration Last  fall,  as  part  of  an  assignment  requiring  her  to  choose  and  attempt  to  change  a  negative  habit  by  the  end  of  the  semester,   .DUO\)HVRORZLFKFKRVHWRFRQTXHUKHUTXLHWZDOOĂ&#x20AC;RZHUWHQGHQFLHVE\FKDOOHQJLQJKHUVHOIWRWU\RXWIRUWKH1HZ3DOW]6ODP7HDP This  year,  she  reprises  her  role  in  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lineup. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  thing  about  slam  is  you  can  never  expect  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  happen  next,â&#x20AC;?  Fesolowich  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last  year,  I  had  no  idea  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be   gaining  a  family  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  happened.â&#x20AC;? At  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Grand  Slam,  when  she  was  left  with  no  choice  but  to  perform  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;coming  outâ&#x20AC;?  letter  to  her  parents  (with  her  mother   in  the  audience),  it  was  her  teammatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  support  that  carried  her  through.  To  Fesolowich,  the  slam  team  is  so  much  more  than  a  vehicle   for  competition;Íž  forging  deep  connections  between  the  poets,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  ultimate  support  system.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  think  about  it,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  necessary,  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  up  on  stage  to  talk  about  puppies  and  kittens,â&#x20AC;?  Fesolowich  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important   to  have  that  person  waiting  for  you  in  the  audience  that  you  know  would  love  you  no  matter  what.â&#x20AC;? With  the  new  year  of  slam,  Fesolowich  said  she  expects  new  challenges,  friends  and  stories.  Most  of  all,  she  expects  to  be     surprised.  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

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Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

TwiFight: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WHAT THE HELL DID I JUST WATCH?

It was...Good

By  Katherine  Speller

By  Julie  Mansmann

Copy  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Jmansmann60@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

,VDZWKHIRXUWKÂżOPLQWKHGXELRXVÂł7ZL lightâ&#x20AC;?   franchise,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Twilight   Saga:   Breaking   Dawn,â&#x20AC;?   this   week.   My   vampire   interest   ends   with  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buffy,â&#x20AC;?  so  maybe  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  the  wrong  sort  to  be   UHYLHZLQJWKLVÂżOP7RPHWKHUHÂśVUHDOO\QRWKLQJ sexy  about  blood-­suckers;Íž  you  might  as  well  try   making  a  Byronic  hero  out  of  a  leech.   7KHÂżOPRSHQVZLWKYDULRXVFKDUDFWHUVUH ceiving   a   wedding   invitation;Íž   the   wedding,   of   course,  is  that  of  brooding  vampire  Edward  Cul-­ len   (Robert   Pattinson)   and   the   hapless   heroine   Bella  Swan  (Kristin  Stewart).  Heartbroken  at  the   news,  shirtless  werewolf  beef-­cake  Jacob  Black   7D\ORU/DXWQHU UXQVRIILQWRWKHZRRGVLQDÂżW of  rage.  The  story  follows  the  wedding,  honey-­ PRRQDQGVXUSULVHSUHJQDQF\FUHDWLQJDÂżOPWKDW is  primarily  build-­up  and  little  else.  Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   getting  a  little  sequel-­happy  with  these  two-­part   ÂżQDOÂżOPVDQGLWÂśVWU\LQJP\SDWLHQFH I  understand  this  is  supposed  to  be  the  love   VWRU\ RI RXU WLPH DQG DV WKLV LV WKH ÂżUVW SDUW RI WKHÂżQDOLQVWDOOPHQWDOOWKHPHORGUDPDKDVEHHQ leading   up   to   the   big   moment   where   these   two   FKDUDFWHUVÂżQDOO\DFWRQWKHVH[XDOWHQVLRQZKLFK the  audience  has  invested  much  time,  energy  and   currency   in.   This   is   supposed   to   be   it:   the   big   bang,   if   you   will.   Instead,   the   main   characters   have   incredibly   awkward,   passion-­less   and   un-­ sexy  sex  (made  worse  by  Pattinson  and  Stewartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   abysmal  chemistry)  that  still  managed  to  not  be   DZNZDUGDQGXQVH[\HQRXJKIRUÂżUVWWLPHVH[ Then  they  play  chess  (no,  really).   They  say  nice  (albeit  melodramatic)  things  

about  being  together  forever,  but  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  clear   adult  love  (The  real  kind  of  relationship  love  that   takes   patience   and   compromise:   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;brushing   your   teeth   togetherâ&#x20AC;?   sort.),   instead   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   the  giddy  teenage  love  (that  is  much  closer  to  a   restraining  order-­worthy  obsession).  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  summed   up  best  when  Bella  hauls  herself  up  in  the  bath-­ room  to  have  a  moment  to  herself  and  panic.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a  very  human  thing  to  do,  to  panic  like  that.  But,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  painfully  irresponsible  to  paint  that  image  of   a  clueless  schoolgirl  as  the  sort  of  person  that  is   prepared   for   a   lifetime   (and   in   this   case   scary   supernatural)  commitment. While  valid  arguments  can  be  made  for  the   HQWHUWDLQPHQW YDOXH RI WKHVH ÂżOPV , ZDV MXVW creeped  out.  Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  something  wrong  with  the   weird   no-­chemistry   sex   that   tries   to   call   itself   loving,   and   the   scenes   showing   a   grown   man   falling  in  love  with  an  infant.  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  care  if  he   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  lusting  after  the  baby  in  its  current  form,   but   rather   its   adult   form.   I   say:   no.   He   looked   at  a   baby   and  developed  this  creepy,   not-­at-­all-­ romantic,  possessive  look.  You  can  layer  this  sort   of  obsession  with  sweet  words  and  the  trappings   of  love,  but  it  remains  unsettling. Is   this   what   girls   are   supposed   to   swoon   over?   Should   we   want   this?   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   so.   When   we   get   to   the   crux   of   the   matter,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   WKH VHULHV PDLQ Ă&#x20AC;DZ QRW WKH KRUUHQGRXV ZULW ing,  wooden  actors  or  awkwardly  religious  over-­ tones):  it  confutes  love  and  obsession,  portraying   both  in  a  way  that  is  wrong.  And  creepy.  Oh  so   very  creepy.

Ironically,  both  the  adoring  and  critical  mass-­ es   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   associate   any   edition   of   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilightâ&#x20AC;?   ERRN DQG ÂżOP VHULHV ZLWK WKH IXHO RI VRUWV WKDW drives   its   vampy   leads:   blood.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   romance,   and  all  of  the  politics  that  come  with  it,  that  have   people  swooning  and  snickering  every  time  Rob-­ ert  Pattinson  and  Kristen  Stewart  appear  on  screen   as  Edward  Cullen  and  Bella  Swan. :KR WKHQ FRXOG KDYH JXHVVHG WKDW RXU ÂżUVW glimpse  of  the  Cullensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  nuptials  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Twilight   Saga:  Breaking  Dawnâ&#x20AC;?  would  be  more  gory  than   gooey?   $FRORUOHVV%HOODÂżUVWKHDGVGRZQWKHZKLWH washed  aisle,  an  anything-­but-­blushing  bride  to  be   of  the  vampire  that  waits  at  the  other  end.  As  an   orchestral  number  takes  on  a  more  ominous  tone,   VRGRHV%HOODRQO\WRÂżQGWKDWKHUZHGGLQJJRZQ train  is  running  red  with  the  blood  her  loved  ones,   gutted  and  stacked  in  a  pile  at  the  foot  of  the  alter. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  talking  about  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilightâ&#x20AC;?  here  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   not   Hitchcock.   The   nightmare   ends   up   washing   into  wedding  scenes  that  pull  at  the  heart  strings   swelling  within  the  seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  romantic  fan  base.    But   before  Edward  delivers  his  speech  about  love  and   forever   and   rainbows,   director   Bill   Condon   im-­ plores  us  to  feel  something  other  than  sentimen-­ tality   (or   disgust).   He   makes   us   laugh,   bringing   fringe  characters  into  the  spotlight  for  comic  re-­ lief.   Condon   anchors   his   adaptation   to   points   where   Bella   meets   milestones:   marriage,   loss   of   virginity,   birth,   death   and   birth   again   (kind   of).   Portions   of   this   full   sequence   are   strangely   ar-­ ranged,  strung  together  by  nonsensical  plot  devel-­

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

opments  that  are  unavoidably  bound  by  awful  lit-­ erature.  But  at  every  notch  in  the  lifeline,  Stewart   and  Condon  do  their  best  to  deliver  all  of  the  right   HPRWLRQVZLWKDFHUWDLQĂ&#x20AC;DLU Young   virgins   are   nervous,   awkward   and   excited.  Author   Stephanie   Meyer   chooses   not   to   dwell   on   these   natural   reactions   to   avoid   down-­ playing  the  build  up  of  what  she  sees  as  a  sacred   act.  But  Condon  and  Stewart  bring  us  back  to  real-­ ity,  as  Bella  twitches  nervously. The   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking   Dawnâ&#x20AC;?   experience   is   also   grounding   thanks   to   reminders   of   how   violent   a   movie  about  vampires  could  and  should  be.  The   shockingly  red  ring  staining  Stewartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  teeth  when   Bella  needs  to  satiate  her  monster  babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  thirst  for   blood,   the   makeup   and   computer   effects   used   to   make   Stewart   look   all   kinds   of   gaunt,   close-­ups   of  her  seemingly  lifeless  eyesâ&#x20AC;Śit  was  all  cringe-­ worthy.  Quite  frankly,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  about  time  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilightâ&#x20AC;?   movie  made  audiences  react  in  this  way  to  some-­ thing  other  than  Taylor  Lautnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;acting.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking   Dawnâ&#x20AC;?   will   always   be   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twi-­ lightâ&#x20AC;?   movie.   That   means   there   are   going   to   be   supernatural  creatures.  That  means  Meyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Mor-­ mon  agenda  will  creep  in.  That  means  there  is  go-­ ing   to   be   pretty   bad   acting   by   gorgeous   people.   But   thanks   to   Condon,   there   will   be   blood,   too   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   laughter,   but   not   at   the   same   time.   The   directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  acts  of  artistic  liberty  and  his  fresh  fo-­ cus   on   emotions   underplayed   in   the   novel   bring   both  lightness  and  a  good  kind  of  heaviness  to  a   story  that  reeks  of  melodrama.    Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  refreshing,  so   it  wasâ&#x20AC;Śgood. PHOTOS  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

One Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Direction RAP DUO RELEASE SECOND MIXTAPE

By  Howard  Yew

Contributing  Writer  |  N02040237@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

As  the  hip-­hop  scene  in  New  Paltz  continues  to  grow,  so  does  lo-­ cal  rap  duo  One  Way.   $IWHUUHOHDVLQJWKHLUÂżUVWPL[WDSHChandelier  Dreams,  on  April   22,  fourth-­year  international  relations  major  Mike  â&#x20AC;?Kraunâ&#x20AC;?  Krau  and   fourth-­year   creative   writing   major   Nick   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nikkoâ&#x20AC;?   Taldi   are   ready   to   show   fans   their   progress   with     Late   Night   Drive,   to   be   released   on   Dec.  7.   While  the  concept  behind  Chandelier  Dreams  was  following  your   dreams,  the  concept  for  Late  Night  DriveLVPRUHUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWLYH7DOGLVDLG 7KH PL[WDSH ZLOO WDNH IDQV WKURXJK 2QH :D\ÂśV MRXUQH\ IURP ZKHUH they  started,  to  where  they  are  now,  taking  listeners  on  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;late  night   driveâ&#x20AC;?  of  their  own.   Âł,WÂśVDYHU\LQWHQVHMRXUQH\´VDLG.UDXÂł)URPDJJUHVVLYHVRQJV that  lead  you  to  go  on  this  late  night  drive,  to  the  middle  of  it,  which   slows  down  and  gets  a  bit  delusional  and  strange,  and  then  back  into   WKHUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWLYHVWDJH´ 8QOLNHWKHLUSUHYLRXVPL[WDSHZKLFKKDGPRUHLQGLYLGXDOWUDFNV than  collaboration  tracks,  Late  Night  Drive  will  feature  10  One  Way   tracks  and  three  solo  tracks  apiece  from  Nikko  and  Kraun,  giving  the   PL[WDSHDEURDGHUIRFXVE\LGHQWLI\LQJWKHGXRDQGWKHLUVRXQGWRJHWK er,  as  well  as  a  part. ,QWHUPVRIWKHVRXQGTXDOLW\RIWKHPL[WDSHHTXLSPHQWXSJUDGHV place   Late   Night   Drive   a   bar   above   Chandelier   Dreams,   said   Krau.   New   equipment   is   not   the   only   change   One   Way   made   during   their   creative  hiatus.     Referred  by  Taldi  and  Krau  as  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;renaissance  stage,â&#x20AC;?  or  the  re-­ birth  of  One  Way,  a  small  team  of  peers  and  friends  gathered  by  the  duo   to  help  make  their  sound  and  image  more  professional.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  decided  that  we  were  going  to  get  photographers  involved,   get  graphic  designers,  videographers  and  people  who  are  our  friends   DOVRWRKHOSXVWDNHWKDWQH[WVWHSDQGJHWSHRSOHWRORRNDWXVVHULRXVO\´ said  Taldi.   Both   emcees   said   they   hope   Late   Night   Drive ZLOO KHOS H[SDQG WKHLUH[SRVXUHEH\RQG1HZ3DOW]DQGJDLQQHZIDQV:LWKKXQGUHGVRI QHZPL[WDSHVFRPLQJRXWRQOLQHQHDUO\HYHU\GD\7DOGLDQG.UDXDJUHH that  getting  attention  and  convincing  people  to  simply  listen  is  enough   of  a  challenge.   Despite  the  odds,  the  duo  and  their  team  remain  optimistic  that   WKHLUQHZPL[WDSHZLOOEHDEOHWRDSSHDOWRDODUJHDXGLHQFH â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  so  many  different  songs  for  so  many  different  people,â&#x20AC;?  

 

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MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: GREG GONDEK

YEAR: Third MAJOR: English HOMETOWN: Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y.

WHEN  AND  WHY  DID  YOU  START  WRITING  SONGS? It  just  happened.  When  I  was  in  middle   school  I  started  playing  guitar.  My  dad   showed  me  chords.  Music  is  such  a  huge   part  of  my  life;͞  it  was  just  inevitable  for   me  to  write. WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? The  Beatles.  Andrew  Bird.  Beck.  Radio-­ head.  Elliott  Smith. WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? Other  Lives.  George  Harrison.  Andrew   Bird.  

 

                                             3+272&2857(6<2)0,.((367(,1

said  Krau.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  going  through  anything  in  their  lives,  I  think,  can   relate  to  some  of  the  songs  that  we  have  on  Late  Night  Drive.â&#x20AC;? Lyrically,  both  Taldi  and  Krau  agree  that  no  matter  what  kind  of   VRQJWKH\GRO\ULFVDUHWKHÂżUVWSULRULW\0LNH(SVWHLQIRXUWK\HDUKLV WRU\PDMRUDQG2QH:D\PDQDJHUH[SODLQHGWKDWXQOLNHPDQ\UDSSHUV ZKR DUH SRSXODU QRZDGD\V WKH O\ULFV LQ7DOGL DQG .UDXÂśV VRQJV DUH always  grounded  in  truth.   Âł1RWKLQJLVHYHUVDLGMXVWWRVRXQGFRRO´VDLG(SVWHLQ 7KHGXRH[SODLQHGWKDW2QH:D\SXVKHVKLSKRSIDQVWREHUHDO istic  with  the  music  they  listen  to.  Taldi  hopes  that  their  fans  can  see   WKHWUXWKLQWKHLUPXVLFDQGFRQQHFWWRWKHHPRWLRQVDQGH[SHULHQFHV conveyed  in  their  songs.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  a  couple  of  songs  that  are  real,  like  this  happened,  and   \RXFDQWHOOLWKDSSHQHGWKURXJKKRZZHVD\LWDQG,WKLQNLWÂśVPRUH forceful  on  Late  Night  Drive  than  it  was  on  Chandelier  Dreams,â&#x20AC;?  said   Taldi.   2QH :D\ÂśV ÂżUVW PL[WDSH DQG RWKHU VRQJV DUH DYDLODEOH RQ Facebook  at  www.facebook.com/onewayers.

Spend the night forgetting about finals.

JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE at  Club  Helsinki  Hudson )ULGD\'HFHPEHUSP Visit  helsinkihudson.com  for  more  information. Thursday,  December  1,  2011

WHAT  WAS  A  PERFORMANCE  YOU  WERE  YOU  INSPIRED  BY? Andrew  Bird.  Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  amazing.  The  key  about  him   is  he  went  to  school  for  violin.  Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  one  with  his   violin  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  he  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make  a  mistake  on  it  because   he  knows  it  so  well.  He  just  makes  a  one-­man   band  beautiful. WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  going  to  keep  writing  and  hopefully   record;Íž  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  banking  on  a  career  in  music,   but  obviously  I  would  love  one. ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? Keep  perfecting.  Keep  practicing.  Play  the   music  that  you  really  like.  Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just  concen-­ trate  on  what  people  would  like.

CHECK  OUT   GREG  GONDEK PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE   WITH  ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Zan  Stumfeld  at  sstrumfeld34@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  


THE  DEEP  END

12B oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END ANITA TROMBETTA Major: BFA Painting and B.S. Spanish Year: Fifth Inspirations: Traveling, food, music, language “My paintings reference food and the body to evoke desires such as hunger and lust. I work abstractly, allowing my materials to be just as corporal as what is represented. My inspiration comes from day to day, physical and emotional experiences. I am most interested in everyday life, with its limitations and possibilities. Painting and representation allow me to explore these boundaries and infinite possibilities. Come to my BFA thesis show on Dec. 2 at The Dorsky.”

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  ANITA  TROMBETTA.  CAPTION  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


 9 oracle.newpaltz.edu

EDITORIAL

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

CARTOON  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ  

WE  ARE   THE  

NIGHTHAWKS Members   of   Student  Association   (SA)   are   currently   in   the   process   of   extending   the   hours   of  operation  of  the  Student  Union  hours  in  an  ef-­ fort  to  give  students  and  organization  more  space   and  options  to  meet  and  connect.  We  at  The  New   Paltz  Oracle  commend  SAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  efforts  to  extend  the   hours  in  the  Student  Union  (SU).   :KHQ WKH $WULXP ZDV ÂżUVW RSHQHG WR WKH FDPSXV FRPPXQLW\ FROOHJH RIÂżFLDOV VWUHVVHG that  it  would  be  a  place  for  students  to  convene   and   spend   their   downtime.   However,   students   are  only  given  15  hours  a  day  during  the  week   and   even   more   limited   time   over   the   course   of   the  weekend.   2IÂżFLDOVSURPLVHGXVDSODFHWRPHHWZLWK our  peers,  providing  us  with  a  space  in  the  center   of  campus.  The  SU  has  proven  itself  to  be  a  safe,   relaxing  environment  which  is  vital  for  all  of  us.   Computers,   air   hockey   tables   and   pool   tables   were  put  there  for  our  use.  With  the  SU  not  be-­ ing  open  during  times  when  students  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  busy,   they  get  put  to  waste.   Students  lead  busy  lives  with  classes,  clubs,   DWKOHWLFVDQGLQWHUHVWVRXWVLGHRIWKHFRQÂżQHVRI

SUNY   New   Paltz.   School,   work,   and   practices   all   generally   operate   or   happen   during   the   day   time,   for   various   reasons.   This   gives   the   wide   array  of  student  organizations  that  we  still  want   WR¿QGWLPHWREHDSDUWRIDOLPLWHGZLQGRZWR convene  -­  keeping  the  SU  open  at  different  times   could  widen  it.   With  a  limited  amount  of  hours  in  the  SU,   some   student   organizations   and   groups   have   been   forced   to   meet   off   campus.   To   us,   this   is   ridiculous  considering  how  much  space  is  avail-­ able  in  the  SU.  The  actvity  fee  that  all  students   pay  at  the  beginning  of  the  year  is  so  that  clubs   can   meet   and   without   hassle.   Some   of   this   fee   VKRXOG EH SXW WRZDUGV VWXGHQWV NHHSLQJ RI¿FH hours   open,   as   it   would   help   make   scheduling   meeting  times  and  events  less  stressful.    With  more  hours  open,  organizations  will   not  have  to  rush  to  reserve  the  same  space  in  the   same  rooms  at  the  same  times.  These  organiza-­ tions   will   be   able   to   schedule   meetings   easier,   creating   less   stress   for   building   organizers   and   everyone  involved.   Student   groups   and   organizers   in   general  

would  also  have  more  time  to  plan  events  in  the   building.  We  have  seen  them  do  so  successfully   in  the  past.  Last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  walk  out/teach-­in  drew  a   large  crowd  of  people  eager  to  learn  about  seri-­ ous  budgetary  issues,  and  part  of  this  success  is   due  to  the  availability  of  the  SUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Multipurpose   Room  (MPR).  We  would  like  to  see  more  events   like   these,   and   having   more   hours   of   operation   would  create  greater  opportunities.   For  students,  the  SU  is  our  common  ground   where   we   can   also   meet   with   friends   to   catch   up.  With   cold   weather   and   numerous   construc-­ tion  projects  around  campus,  we  as  students  are   limited  to  only  so  many  places  to  meet  on  cam-­ pus.  The  SUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  convenience  is  vital  and  students   should  use  it  to  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  full  advantage.  More  hours   would  give  students  a  better  opportunity.   0DQ\ VWXGHQWV ÂżQG IUHH WLPH GXULQJ WKH evenings,   past   the   hours   of   operation   for   the   SU.  The  Atrium,  in  particular,  has  proven  itself   a   popular   area   for   students   to   study   and   relax.   Why  should  these  hours  be  limited  during  a  time   where  students  need  it  the  most?  Increasing  SU   hours  during  the  evenings  will  provide  a  better  

chance   for   students   to   utilize   what   the   SU   has   to  offer.   :HXQGHUVWDQGWKH¿QDQFLDOFRQVWUDLQWVUH-­ ODWLQJWRVWDI¿QJWKHEXLOGLQJIRUVDIHW\UHDVRQV DUH VHULRXV :H DSSUHFLDWH FROOHJH RI¿FLDOV DUH concerned   about   our   well-­being   during   the   late   hours  of  the  night.  However  it  is  clear  that  ex-­ tending   the   hours   of   the   SU   is   something   we   need  to  happen.  Therefore  hiring  some  sort  night   staff,  however  large  it  is,  should  be  a  priority  of   RI¿FLDOV We  as  a  student  body  need  to  see  the  hours   of  the  SU  expand.  The  SU  truly  belongs  to  us,   and  it  should  be  available  to  us  when  we  need  it.   Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the   majority  of  the  editorial  board.  Col-­ umns,  op-­eds  and  letters,  excluding   editorials,  are  solely  those  of  the  writ-­ ers  and  do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,  its  staff   members,  the  campus  and  university  or   the  Town  or  Village  of  New ��Paltz.

LETTER Dear  Editor,   Considering  recent  events  on  campus,  it  might  be  ap-­ SURSULDWHWRKHDUIURP6RMRXUQHU7UXWKZKROLYHGKHUÂżUVW thirty-­two  years  not  far  from  here  in  Ulster  County,  walked   away  to  freedom,  became  a  famous  orator,  and  in  2009   was  honored  with  a  bronze  bust  in  the  U.  S.  Capitol.     Truth  could  also  be  very  critical  when  she  spoke   to  a  white  audience.  In  an  1854  speech  she  said  â&#x20AC;&#x153;White   people  owed  the  colored  race  a  big  debt,  and  if  they  paid   it  all  back,  they  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  anything  left  for  seed.â&#x20AC;?  Or   in  Rochester,  New  York,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;God  will  take  care  of  the  poor  

trampled  slave,  but  where  will  the  slaveholder  be  when   eternity  begins?â&#x20AC;?  To  a  Sabbath  School  Convention  in   Battle  Creek,  Michigan,  on  June  3,  1863,  with  over  500   children  and  their  teachers,  she  asked  the  following: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Children.  Who  made  your  skin  white?  Was  it  not   God?  Who  made  mine  black?  Was  it  not  the  same  God?   Does  it  not  cast  a  reproach  on  our  Maker  to  despise  a  part   of  his  children  because  he  has  been  pleased  to  give  them   a  black  skin?  Indeed  children  it  does;Íž  and  your  teachers   ought  to  tell  you  so,  and  root  up,  if  possible,  the  great  sin   of  prejudice  against  color  from  your  minds.  While  Sabbath  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

school  teachers  know  of  this  great  sin,  and  not  only  do  not   teach  their  pupils  that  it  is  a  sin,  but  too  often  indulge  in   it  themselves,  can  they  expect  God  to  bless  them  or  their   children?â&#x20AC;? Sojourner  Truth  stated  her  hope  for  future  when  she   said  â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  time  will  come  when  it  will  be  no  disgrace  to   be  black  but  rather  it  will  be  an  honor.â&#x20AC;?    I  hope  that  every   student  on  this  campus  will  want  to  learn  more  about  this   woman  for  whom  our  library  is  named. -­  Corinne  Nyquist,  Librarian/Professor,  Sojourner      Truth  Library


10oracle.newpaltz.edu

OPINION

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS CAT  TACOPINA   Sports  Editor  

CTacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

As  a  journalism  major,  internships  are  vi-­ tal  to  my  college  experience.  I  can’t  graduate   without  one  and  getting  a  job  is  near  impos-­ sible  if  you  haven’t  had  one.  As  a  big  women’s   soccer  fan,  I  decided  early  on  that  I  was  go-­ ing  to  try  and  get  an  internship  with  Women’s   Professional  Soccer. That  might  have  to  change. Currently,   the   WPS   faces   termination   and  may  have  to  cancel  their  2012  season,  de-­ spite  the  hype  and  soccer-­mania  caused  by  the   Women’s  World   Cup   this   past   summer.   U.S.   Soccer   has   stated   that   they   will   not   sanction   WKHOHDJXHLQLIWKH\FDQQRW¿QGDQRWKHU owner  for  a  sixth  WPS  team  by  Dec.  5.  This   would   leave   some   of  America’s   best   players   with  few  options. I  could  talk  about  how  being  a  beat  writer   for  a  WPS  team  such  as  the  Boston  Breakers   or  the  Western  New  York  Flash  is  my  dream   job  and  how  the  league  shutting  down  would   crush   that,   but   there   are   a   lot   of   issues   with   this  that  mean  a  lot  more.  I  can’t  even  begin   to  explain    how  detrimental  closing  the  league  

KATIE  KOCIJANSKI   Asst.  Copy  Editor  

KKocijanski14@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

It   never   ceases   to   amaze   me   how   IDVW WLPH KDV JRQH E\ VLQFH , ¿UVW started   college.   So   much   has   changed,   the   18-­year-­old   me   would   never   have   thought  I  would  end  up  at  SUNY  New   Paltz,  happier  than  I  have  been.   Almost  four  years  ago  now,  I  grad-­ uated   from   Monticello   High   School.   I   WKRXJKW , KDG HYHU\WKLQJ ¿JXUHG RXW I   had   decided   to   go   to   SUNY   Albany   to   pursue   an   accounting   degree.   Com-­ ing   from   a   small   town,   I   thought   what   I  needed  was  the  city  life.  Albany  was   only   two   hours   from   home   and   I   had   family   in   the   area,   it   seemed   perfect.   All  of  this  ran  through  my  mind  before   I  went  off  to  school  in  August. I   quickly   learned   Albany   was   not   for   me.   The   campus   was   too   big   and   overwhelming.  I  found  the  atmosphere   was  not  what  I  thought  it  would  be.  The   class  sizes  were  too  big.  There  were  500   students   in   my   nutrition   class   and   250  

would  be  for  female  athletes,  current  and  fu-­ ture. All  of  us  witnessed  the  heroics  pulled  off   by  the  likes  of  Abby  Wambach  and  Hope  Solo   this   summer.   We   saw   a   country   that   doesn’t   appreciate  soccer  like  American  football,  rally   behind  21  women  who  instilled  hope  and  pas-­ sion   in   the   hearts   of   the   people.  We   saw   the   best  soccer  team  this  country  has  offered  since   the  Women’s  World  Cup  team  in  1999.   That   team   would   not   have   been   what   it   was  without  a  venue  like  the  WPS.  The  WPS   gives   a   chance   for   not   just   U.S.   players,   but   international  players  like  Marta  and  Christine   Sinclair  somewhere  to  keep  doing  what  they   love.  They  get  to  grow  and  keep  in  shape  with   the  league.  However,  the  players  who  have  al-­ ready  made  a  name  for  themselves  are  not  the   only  ones  who  need  this  league. The   WPS   is   vital   for   younger   players.   Some   of   these   women   will   not   see   an   inter-­ national   tournament   for   a   while,   but   they   still   need   a   place   where   they   can   continue   WR JURZ LQ WKHLU VNLOO DQG FRQ¿GHQFH<RXQJ players  like  Lauren  Cheney  and  Tobin  Heath   have   made   their   way   into   International   play   and   proven   their   worth.   However,   not   hav-­ ing   a   league   while   they   wait   for   events   like   the  World  Cup  and  the  Olympics,  is  detrimen-­ tal  to  them  developing  into  the  World’s  best.  

If   the   United   States   wants   to   continue   being   a   powerhouse   on   the   international   level,   the   WPS  must  remain.   If  we  let  the  WPS  go,  we  prove  we’re  a   country  that  does  not  value  men’s  and  wom-­ en’s  sports  equally.  I  don’t  mean  to  put  anyone   down,  but  history  shows  that  the  U.S.  Women   have  had  more  success  and  have  done  better   than  the  U.S.  Men.  The  MLS  running  smooth-­ ly   shows   that   there   is   American   interest   in   soccer.  What  would  the  loss  of  our  Women’s   soccer   league   say   about  American   society   at   large?   That   no   matter   the   skill   level,   men’s   sports  will  always  have  more  value  than  wom-­ en’s   sports.   Perhaps   this   isn’t   the   case,   but   there  are  many  people  who  will  see  it  that  way. But  that  in  mind,  here  comes  the  sappy,   sentimental  bit. If  anyone  has  paid  attention  to  the  Twit-­ ter  pages  of  players  in  the  league  such  as  Ca-­ nadian   Goalkeeper   Karina   LeBlanc,   you   can   see  just  how  much  the  players  love  this  game.   Beyond   Twitter,   watching   the   players   play   during  the  World  Cup  was  enough  to  convince   anyone  how  their  love  for  this  game  knows  no   bounds.     I’m  someone  who  watched  the  1999  U.S.   team  as  a  7-­year-­old  and  I  know  what  it’s  like   to   be   young   and   inspired   by   a   team.   Part   of  

me  will  always  want  to  be  Mia  Hamm,  while   another   part   of   me   is   always   going   to   yell   “Pearce”  instead  of  “Rampone.”  I  know  how   the   young   girls   who   watched   the   2011   team   feel,  and  they  need  a  league  like  this  in  their   lives.  The  WPS  is  more  than  a  Women’s  Soc-­ cer  League;;  it’s  a  place  for  dreams  to  be  rec-­ ognized. These  players  deserve  to  play  and  numer-­ ous   people   have   provided   ways   to   remedy   WPS  problems.  Someone  needs  to  step  up  and   realize  they  can  be  a  hero  to  so  many  people   by  investing.   I   mean,   not   that   it   counts   for   anything,   but  I’m  just  warning  everyone  now  that  if  the   WPS  ultimately  does  get  shut  down,  the  entire   staff  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  will  be  subject   to  my  depression  and  nonstop  playing  of  Joni   Mitchell’s  Blue  album.  Be  warned.

in  my  microeconomics  class!  You  were   merly   a   number   to   the   professors   -­   at-­ tendance  for  the  class  was  taken  through   a  remote  control.  I  was  miserable.  I  was   terribly   homesick   and   missed   my   fam-­ ily.  All  of  my  friends  were  enjoying  col-­ OHJHDQGDGMXVWLQJ¿QH,IHOWVRDORQH These  feelings  of  increased  anxiety   and  sadness  had  been  building  up  inside   of  me  for  a  long  time.  I  called  my  par-­ ents  the  day  after  they  dropped  me  back   off  after  October  break  to  tell  them  that   I  was  leaving  Albany  and  running  away.   I  was  not  in  the  right  state  of  mind  when   I  said  those  things  and  was  willing  to  do   just  about  anything  to  leave.  I’ve  never   seen  my  parents  as  angry  and  upset  with   me   as   they   were   that   day,   not   know-­ ing  what  was  to  come.  I  packed  up  my   things  and  left  my  dorm.   Shortly   after   that,   I   was   diagnosed   with   depression   and   severe   anxiety   by   a  mental  health  professional.  It  all  made   sense  now;;  I  needed  help  and  was  going   to  get  it.  Throughout  this  entire  process,   my   parents   and   sister   were   amazing.   They  supported  me  in  the  best  way  and   were  very  understanding.  What  I  need-­

ed  the  most  was  them,  my  family.  Dur-­ ing   those   three   months   I   was   home,   I   went  on  medication  for  my  anxiety  and   depression  and  went  back  into  therapy.     My  parents  and  sister  put  up  with  a  lot   during  that  time,  and  I  owe  them  every-­ thing.   They   were   my   support   system   and   still   are   to   this   day.   No   words   can   describe  how  grateful  I  am  to  them  for   everything  they  did  and  continue  to  do   for  me.   The  following  January,  I  enrolled  at   a  local  community  college  and  returned   to  an  old  job  I  had  had  in  high  school.   I  got  my  life  back  and  continued  treat-­ ment  for  my  depression  and  learned  how   to  manage  it.  I  met  my  best  friend,  who   quickly  became  an  important  part  of  my   life,  and  continues  to  be  to  this  day.  By   December   2010,   I   had   graduated   and   was   accepted   to   New   Paltz.   When   I   came   this   past   January,   I   quickly   real-­ ized  I  had  found  the  place  I  needed  to  be   all  along.  My  roommates  were  wonder-­ ful   and   I   was   able   to   transfer   with   my   best  friend  from  my  community  college.   I   was   able   to   reunite   with   a   friend   from   high   school   as   well.   She   was   a  

student   at   the   School   of   Business   with   me  and  happened  to  be  a  statistics  tutor.   Reconnecting  with  her  was  such  a  great   thing  for  me  -­  she  continues  to  give  me   support  when  I  need  it  the  most  to  this   day.   In  the  end,  I  found  where  I  needed   to   be.   The   choices   I’ve   made   and   ob-­ stacles  I  have  encountered  led  me  to  the   place  of  happiness  I  am  at  today.  Albany   was  not  the  place  for  me,  but  it  made  me   WKHSHUVRQ,DPWRGD\)RUWKH¿UVWWLPH in  a  long  time,  I’ve  realized  I  am  right   where  I  need  to  be—here  in  New  Paltz.  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

Cat  is  a  19-­year-­old  journalism  student     with  a  minor  in  German  Studies.  Aside   from  her  love  of  all  things  sports,  she  en-­ joys  wings  and  Quentin  Tarantino  movies.   She  wants  everyone  to  know  that  she,  not   Sharyce  Willand,  is  the  Swan  Queen.  She  is   also  the  Robin  to  Andrew  Wyrich’s  Batman.  

Katie  is  a  21-­year-­old  senior  marketing   student.  She  is  an  aspiring  journalist   and  writer  on  the  side.  Aside  from  her   love  of  writing,  she  enjoys  coffee  and   movies.  Someday,  she  will  travel  the   world  and  plans  to  see  Australia,  Spain,   Ireland  and  Greece.  Katie  loves  but-­ WHUÀLHVDQGSHQJXLQV6KHLVDWUXHJLUO\ girl  at  heart,  who  loves  fashion  and  the   colors  blue,  silver  and  purple.  


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7KH1HZ3DOW]0HQœV%DVNHWEDOO7HDPLVORRNLQJWRLPSURYHIURPODVW\HDUZLWKQHZFRDFKHVDQGDQHZDWWLWXGH3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1 By  Brian  Coleman &RQWULEXWLQJ:ULWHU_N01802454@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  (2-­2)  team  opened   up    2011-­12  campaign  in  Scranton,  Pa.  with  a  win  over     Centenary   College.   The   Hawks   bested   their   opponent   ZLWKDÂżQDOVFRUHRIEHKLQGSRLQWVIURPWKLUG \HDUIRUZDUG0DWW'HYLQH 7KHRSHQHUPDUNHGWKHEHJLQQLQJRIWKHÂł0LNH5H MQLDN HUD´ LQ 1HZ 3DOW] 5HMQLDN HQWHUV KLV ÂżUVW VHDVRQ DVKHDGFRDFKRIWKH+DZNVIROORZLQJDIRXU\HDUVWLQW at  Amherst   College   where   he   served   as   assistant   coach.   5HMQLDN ZDV KLUHG LQ -XO\ DQG VDLG KH FKRVH 1HZ 3DOW] EHFDXVHRIWKHSRWHQWLDOKHVDZLQWKHSURJUDP Âł:KDW LQWULJXHG PH PRVW DERXW 1HZ 3DOW] ZDV LWV DELOLW\WREHDJUHDWPHQÂśVEDVNHWEDOOSURJUDP´VDLG5HM QLDNÂł,ZDQWHGWREXLOGDZLQQLQJWUDGLWLRQWKDWKDV\HWWR be  attained  by  the  menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  basketball  program.  This  athletic   SURJUDPKDVEURNHQQHZJURXQGWKLVIDOODQG,ÂśPJODGWR EHDSDUWRILW´ 5HMQLDN LV MRLQHG E\ DQRWKHU QHZFRPHU LQ DVVLVWDQW FRDFK5\DQ:RHUQHUZKRVHUYHGDVDQDVVLVWDQWFRDFKIRU the  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  basketball  team  at  Cornell  last  season.   Âł,DPKRQRUHGWRMRLQVXFKDQDFFRPSOLVKHGOHDGHULQ &RDFK5HMQLDNDVZHHVWDEOLVKDQHZEUDQGRI1HZ3DOW] +DZNVEDVNHWEDOO´VDLG:RHUQHUÂł,ORRNIRUZDUGWREH ing  able  to  develop  these  high-­quality  student-­athletes  at   a  great  place  like  New  Paltz.â&#x20AC;? 7KHDUULYDORIQHZFRDFKHVIRVWHUVWKHDUULYDORIDQHZ

DWWLWXGHIRUWKH+DZNV,Q5HMQLDNÂśVIRXU\HDUVDW$PKHUVW &ROOHJH WKH VFKRRO ORVW RQO\  JDPHV DQG UHDFKHG WKH 1&$$WRXUQDPHQWWKUHHWLPHV7KDWFXOWXUHRIZLQQLQJLV something  he  hopes  to  bring  to  a  New  Paltz  program  that   KDVQÂśWÂżQLVKHGDERYHLQRYHUDGHFDGH Âł+H KDV LPSOHPHQWHG D ZLQQLQJ DWWLWXGH KHUH DQG FRPLQJ IURP D ZLQQLQJ SURJUDP DW $PKHUVW KH XQGHU VWDQGVKRZWREHVXFFHVVIXODWWKLVOHYHO´VDLGIRXUWK\HDU JXDUG+DUULV:LFKDUGÂł&RDFKLVYHU\GLVFLSOLQHGDQGKH pays  attention  to  every  detailâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;He  has  a  tremendous  work   ethic.â&#x20AC;? The   Hawks   entered   this   season   with   the   SUNYAC   WLWOHRQWKHLUPLQGV$IWHUEHLQJRXVWHGE\681<3ODWWV EXUJKLQWKHTXDUWHUÂżQDOVRIWKH681<$&WRXUQDPHQWODVW year,  the  Hawks  carry  a  chip  on  their  shoulder.  They  said   their  goal  is  simpleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to  win  the  SUNYAC  championship. Âł0\H[SHFWDWLRQVDUHYHU\KLJKIRUWKLVVHDVRQ´VDLG :LFKDUGÂł:HH[SHFWWRZLQHDFKDQGHYHU\WLPHZHVWHS RQWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRU7KHJRDORIZLQQLQJWKH681<$&VLVYHU\ DWWDLQDEOHZLWKWKHFRDFKLQJVWDIIDQGWKHSOD\HUVWKDWZH have.â&#x20AC;? :LFKDUGZKROHGWKHWHDPLQVFRULQJODVW\HDUZLWK SRLQWVSHUJDPHMRLQV'HYLQHDQGIRXUWK\HDUJXDUG -HUPDLQ:DOODFHDVWKHFDSWDLQVDQGOHDGHUVRIWKHWHDP Âł+DUULV:LFKDUG0DWW'HYLQHDQG-HUPDLQ:DOODFH KDYHGRQHDQLFHMREOHDGLQJP\WHDPERWKRQDQGRIIWKH FRXUW´VDLG5HMQLDNÂł,SXWDORWRQWKHLUSODWHDQGWKH\ KDYHEHHQYHU\SURDFWLYHZLWKVHWWLQJWKHH[DPSOHIRUP\

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WHDP7KH\HDFKEULQJDGLIIHUHQWW\SHRIHQHUJ\´ The  key  to  the  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  success  this  season  will  rest   RQWKHOHDGHUVKLSRIWKHLUYHWHUDQVDVZHOODVWKHLUDELOLW\ WRGHIHQGVRPHWKLQJZKLFKWKH\KDYHQRWEHHQDEOHWRGR WKXVIDU6LQFHWKHRSHQLQJZLQWKH+DZNVKDYHGURSSHG WZRVWUDLJKWJLYLQJXSDQDYHUDJHRISRLQWVSHUJDPH Âł,GRQRWZRUU\DERXWRXUWHDPRIIHQVLYHO\,VHHRXU JUHDWHVW QHHG LV WR EHFRPH D PRUH GHIHQVLYHO\GULYHQ WHDP´ VDLG 5HMQLDN Âł&RDFK :RHUQHU DQG P\VHOI ZLOO NHHS EUHDNLQJ WKLQJV GRZQ DQG NHHS ÂżQGLQJ QHZ DQG XQLTXHZD\VWRWHDFKRXUWHDPWKHIXQGDPHQWDOVWKDWJR into  a  winning  team.â&#x20AC;? 5HMQLDN KDV DOUHDG\ VWDUWHG WR FKDQJH WKH DWWLWXGH within   the   program   and   said   it   starts   with   practice   and   preparation.   Âł(YHQWKRXJKRXUURVWHULVVPDOOHUWKDQPRVW,KDYH DORWRIFRQÂżGHQFHLQP\VHOIDQGP\WHDPPDWHVWRSOD\ DWDYHU\KLJKOHYHO´VDLG:LFKDUGÂł:HKDYHSXWLQDWUH PHQGRXVDPRXQWRIZRUNLQWKHSUHVHDVRQDQGLQSUDFWLFH WRWKHSRLQWZKHUHZHIHHOOLNHZHDUHKLJKO\FRQGLWLRQHG DQGH[WUHPHO\SUHSDUHGIRUDELJWLPHUXQ´ The  Hawks  continue  to  take  this  season  one  game  at   DWLPHDQGIDFHDWRXJKQRQFRQIHUHQFHVFKHGXOHZKLFK 5HMQLDNVD\VLVH[DFWO\ZKDWWKLVWHDPZDQWV Âł,WKLQNKDYLQJJRRGTXDOLW\QRQFRQIHUHQFHRSSR QHQWVLVWKHRQO\ZD\WRJR´VDLG5HMQLDNÂł,WÂśVJRLQJWR EHWKHEDURPHWHURIZKDWZHQHHGWRZRUNRQDQGZLOO SUHSDUHXVIRUWKLVWRXJKOHDJXH´


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Wischoff  Runs  Down  National  Dreams By  Katie  Kocijanski

for  a  shot  at  the  top  35  at  Nationals  in  order  to  earn  All-­ American  credentials. Head  Coach  Mike  Trunkes  is  thrilled  for  Wischoffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Third-­year  captain  of  SUNY  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Cross  Country   team  Nichole  Wischoff  recently  took  14  out  of  256  runners  at   success.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  worked  incredibly  hard  to  achieve  what  she  has   the  NCAA  Div.  III  regional.   this  season  and  her  trip  to  Nationals  is  just  the  icing  on  the   After  receiving  US  Track  and  Field  and  Cross  Country   Coaches  Association  All-­region  honors,  Wischoff  said  she  is   cake,â&#x20AC;?  Trunkes  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;With  her  performance  at  regionals  she   positioned  herself  as  one  of  the  top  cross  country  runners  in   very  proud  of  her  success.   one  of  the  most  competitive  regions  in  the  country.â&#x20AC;?     â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wow,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  is  just  about  all  that  I  can  say  to  sum  up  the   Both  Wischoff  and  Trunkes  believe  the  team  ran  up  to   season  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  had  with  my  team  and  my  coaches,â&#x20AC;?  Wischoff   their  potential  and  worked  incredibly  hard  this  season.   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;With  the  help  of  my  incredible  coaches,  I  have  gone   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  moved  up  one  spot  in  the  region,  and  though  that   above  and  beyond  even  what  I  expected  of  myself.  I  found   feat  seems  miniscule,  the  progress  each  and  every  one  of   RXW6XQGD\WKDW,TXDOLÂżHGIRUQDWLRQDOVDQGKDYHQÂśWEHHQ them  has  made  since  last  year  and  our  incoming  freshman   able  to  allow  that  to  soak  in.â&#x20AC;?   Wischoff  has  been  a  star  athlete  for  the  team  this  season,   has  been  huge,â&#x20AC;?  Wischoff  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  girls  are  stronger  than   placing  highest  out  of  all  New  Paltz  runners  at  the  SUNYAC   ever  and  there  is  no  doubt  in  my  mind  that  slowly  but  surely,   we  will  have  more  than  just  one  woman  going  to  nationals   7RXUQDPHQWLQ1RYHPEHUÂżQLVKLQJHLJKWKRXWRI next  year.â&#x20AC;?   Despite  the  accolades  and  accomplishments,  Wischoff   7UXQNHVVDLGWKHWHDPKDVWKHFRQÂżGHQFHDQGGULYHWR was  still  surprised  and  in  disbelief  when  she  received  word   take  them  where  they  want  to  go.  This  season,  many  athletes   of  her  trip  to  Nationals.   Wischoffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dreams  became  a  reality  on  Nov.  19  with  her   made  their  personal  best  times.  The  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  top  seven  runners   berth  into  the  NCAA  Div.  III  championships.  With  a  time  of   are  returning  next  fall  and  Trunkes  said  he  hopes  they  will  be   one  year  stronger  when  they  return  in  the  fall.   22:19.36,  Wischoff  placed  103  out  of  277  runners  in  the  6K   The  team  will  continue  training  each  day  and  jump  into   UDFHÂżQLVKLQJLQWKHWRSKDOIRIFRPSHWLWRUVDQGEHVWLQJKHU some  indoor  races  in  the  winter  to  prepare  for  outdoor  track   own  school  record  for  the  fourth  time  this  season.   LQWKHVSULQJZLWKWKHWUDFNDQGÂżHOGFOXE To  prepare  for  the  upcoming  season,  Wischoff  said  she   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fourteen  was  a  dream  to  me  until  Saturday,â&#x20AC;?  Wischoff   woke  up  every  morning  over  the  summer  and  this  semester   to  go  for  a  run  alone  with  only  a  dream  in  mind.  She  said  she     VDLGÂł,ÂśYHPDGHLWDUHDOLW\,ÂśYHJRWP\H\HVRQÂżUVWSODFH next    year.â&#x20AC;? dreamed  of  her  and  her  coach  sitting  on  a  plane  to  Oshkosh  

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  ED  DILLER  PHOTOGRAPHY

Assistant  Copy  Editor  |  Kkocijanski14@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Nichole  Wischoff  came  in  103  at  the  NCAA    Div.  III  championships.

Club  Frisbee  Team  Proves  Their  Worth By  Suzann  Caputo Contributing  Writer  |  Scaputo24@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

7R WKH DWKOHWHV UDYDJLQJ WKH ÂżHOGV chasing   down   discs   and   blocking   offen-­ sive   moves,   their   sport   is   more   than   a   mere  outdoor  romp;Íž  it  is  Ultimate. The   New   Paltz   Ultimate   Frisbee   team,  Gunx,  is  in  its  sixth  year  at  SUNY   New  Paltz.  It  has  been  increasing  in  popu-­ larity   because   of   its   tight   bonds,   overall   good  spirits  and  love  for  the  game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frisbee   is   a   game   you   play   with   a   friend   or   with   your   dog,   but   Ultimate   is   a   real   sport,â&#x20AC;?   said   fourth-­year   Ultimate   team  Captain  Tom  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley.   Ultimate,   otherwise   known   as   Ul-­ timate   Frisbee,   started   in   the   late   1960s.   7KH ÂżUVW ÂżYHUHJLRQ 1DWLRQDO 8OWLPDWH Championship  was  held  in  May  1979.   Ultimate   is   different   than   traditional   Frisbee.  The  game  is  played  with  two  sev-­ en-­player  teams.  The  object  of  the  game  is   to  score  points  by  passing  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;discâ&#x20AC;?  to  a   teammate  in  the  opposing  end  zone,  simi-­ lar   to   football.   Players   may   not   run   with  

the   disc   and   may   only   move   one   foot   or   pivot  while  holding  it. The   Gunx   will   begin   to   compete   again   in   the   spring,   where   they   compete   in  a  variety  of  tournaments.  Still,  the  team   practices  year-­long  to  keep  their  skills  in-­ tact. The  teams  practice  four  times  a  week,   with  the  menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  and  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  teams  prac-­ ticing  together  on  Tuesdays  and  Fridays,   and   range   anywhere   from   two   and   half   KRXUVWRÂżYHKRXUV2Âś0DOOH\VDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   depends   on   when   the   sun   goes   down,â&#x20AC;?  said  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley.   The  team  practices  inside  during  the   winter  and  have  conditioning  where  they   lift  weights  and  work  out,  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley  said.   He  said  gym  practices  cause  more  injuries   for  the  team,  which  is  why  they  prefer  to   practice  outdoors. Fall  is  the  Gunxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  biggest  recruitment   WLPHDVÂżUVW\HDUVWXGHQWVFRPHWRVFKRRO looking   for   ways   to   get   involved.   The   WHDPÂżQGVLWHDV\WRJDLQUHFUXLWVEHFDXVH of   their   sense   of   community,   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley    

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  a  good  way  to  meet  people,  and   have   no-­pressure   fun,â&#x20AC;?   said   fourth-­year   player  Emily  Cottone. Many   people   who   participate   in   Ul-­ WLPDWH VDLG WKH\ ÂżQG LW GLIÂżFXOW WR VWRS playing.   Cottone   had   never   played   Ulti-­ mate  until  fall  2010,  when  she  transferred   to   SUNY   New   Paltz   and   decided   to   join   the   team.   Even   though   she   has   been   in-­ jured   and   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   play,   she   still   attends   all   the  tournaments  and  is  very  close  with  the   team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  like  one  big  family,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  even  have  our  own  Thanksgiving.â&#x20AC;? At   the   center   of   Ultimate   is   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   called   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;spirit   of   the   game,â&#x20AC;?   which   is   what   sets   them   apart   from   other   sports.   Ultimate   is   self-­run.   There   are   no   refer-­ ees,  so  the  calls  are  up  to  the  teams  par-­ ticipating.  If  a  foul  is  called  on  a  player,   he   or   she   can   either   accept   it   or   contest   it.   If   they   choose   to   contest   they   can   get   a  re-­do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimate   is   made   on   the   backs   of  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

people  who  love  the  game  and  just  want   to  have  a  good  time,â&#x20AC;?  said  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley. The   games   range   from   competitive   to   relaxed,   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley   said.   Right   across   the  river  is  Gunxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  greatest  rivalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Marist   College.   Throughout   the   years   the   two   teams   have  been  competitive.  At  the  Bard  Tour-­ nament   in   October,   the   Gunx   were   3-­1   with  a  two  point  loss  to  Marist.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  we  know  we  can  win  it  gets   really  competitive,â&#x20AC;?  said  Cottone. When  Gunx  began  in  2007,  the  team   began  with  15  players.  The  club  now  has   more   than   40   members.   The   team   has   been  a    club  sport  for  two  years  now  and   the  Student  Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  support  has  al-­ lowed  them  to  participate  in  farther  tour-­ naments,  said  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley. The  team  does  not  hold  try-­outs  and   everyone  is  welcome,  though  this  does  not   guarantee  playing  time,  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hard   work   and   practice   determines   how  much  someone  is  going  to  play,â&#x20AC;?  said   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley.


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Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer Ends  Storybook Season

The  New  Paltz  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  Team  were  knocked  out  of  the  NCAA  Div.  III  Tournament  by  No.  1  Messiah  College.                                                                                                      PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN By  Cat  Tacopina Sports  Editor  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  book  has  closed  on  the  SUNY   New  Paltz  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  Teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  fall   2011  season. The  Lady  Hawks  completed  their  run   in  the  NCAA  Div.  III  Tournament  after   a  1-­0  loss  to  No.  1  Messiah  College.  A   week  before  the  loss  to  the  No.  1  seed,  the   Hawks  defeated  No.  11  Lynchburg  college   after  tying  0-­0  in  regulation  and  advanc-­ ing  on  penalty  kicks.  The  team  then  went   on  to  beat  Rowan  University  with  a  2-­1   overtime  victory. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  amazing,â&#x20AC;?  Head  Coach  Col-­ leen  Bruley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  after  the  Fredo-­ QLDJDPHWKHFRQÂżGHQFHNHSWEXLOGLQJDQG building  and  every  time  they  stepped  on   WKHÂżHOGWKH\NQHZWKH\ZHUHJRLQJWRGR the  best  that  we  can.â&#x20AC;? The  team  earned  their  spot  in  the   tournament  after  defeating  SUNYAC  No.   VHHG681<&RUWODQGZLWKDÂżQDOVFRUH of  1-­0.  After  getting  an  opportunity  to  rest   for  a  couple  of  days,  the  team  was  back  

to  work  once  they  received  word  their   ÂżUVWRSSRQHQWZRXOGEH/\QFKEXUJZKR compiled  a  record  of  19-­2-­1  before  facing   the  Hawks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To  get  ready  for  this  tournament  we   continued  to  work  hard  in  practice  every   day  and  we  studied  the  other  team  we   were  playing  by  watching  videos,  so  we   understood  how  they  played,â&#x20AC;?  third-­year   forward  Shelby  Kondelka  said.   Fourth-­year  Captain  Shannon  Cobb   said  keeping  up  team  chemistry  during   practice  was  an  important  factor  in  the   success  of  the  team  during  the  tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  most  important  things  for  us  was   to  stay  active  and  consistent  with  getting   touches  on  the  ball  and  to  have  fun,â&#x20AC;?  Cobb   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  were  really  proud  of  our  success   throughout  the  season  and  we  knew  that   remembering  the  joy  of  actually  being   together  and  playing  the  game  was  the   important  thing  for  us  at  that  point.â&#x20AC;? Players  said  the  atmosphere  of  an   NCAA  game  and  the  underdog  mentality   they  had  through  the  tournament  helped  to   make  them  successful  against  opponents  

who  were  statistically  better  throughout   the  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  hit  me  that  we  were  in   WKH1&$$VXQWLOZHVWHSSHGRQWKHÂżHOG to  play  in  Lynchburg,â&#x20AC;?  Kondelka  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  were  the  underdogs  going  into  every   game  we  played,  so  we  knew  that  we  had   nothing  to  lose.  The  atmosphere  is  unlike   any  game  I  have  ever  played  in.  You  know   that  this  is  the  biggest  game  you  have  ever   played  in  and  it  was  an  amazing  feeling  to   play  in  something  that  big.â&#x20AC;? While  not  expecting  to  win  against   Lynchburg,  Bruley  said  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  defense   kept  them  competitive  and  made  her  be-­ lieve  they  had  a  chance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  back  four  and  our  goalkeeper  re-­ ally  stepped  their  game  up  in  that  game,â&#x20AC;?   Bruley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;As  the  minutes  ticked  by   and  we  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  giving  up  goals,  they   JDLQHGPRUHFRQÂżGHQFHDQGZHUHGHWHU mined  not  to  give  up  a  goal  in  that  game.   Once  we  got  to  penalty  kicks  we  knew   that  we  had  a  good  chance  of  winning  that   game.â&#x20AC;? With  the  0-­0  tie  with  Lynchburg,  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

third-­year  Goalkeeper  Stephanie  Vega   recorded  her  13  shutout  of  the  season.   Vegaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  performance  not  only  impressed   Bruley,  but  rival  fans  commended  her   performance  as  well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  (Vega)  had  a  great  year  all  year,   but  she  made  some  incredible  saves  at   Lynchburg  and  put  herself  on  the  map  in   Div.  III  soccer,â&#x20AC;?  Bruley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  we   were  at  Messiah,  someone  from  Messiah   said  that  she  was  the  best  Div.  III  goal-­ keeper  they  had  ever  seen.â&#x20AC;? Cobb  said  team  chemistry  was  key  for   the  Lady  Hawks  this  season  and  that  she   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  more  impressed  by  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seeing  us  progress  throughout  the   year  was  amazing,â&#x20AC;?  Cobb  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was   surprised  by  us  every  time  we  set  foot  on   WKHÂżHOG-XVWZKHQ,WKRXJKW,FRXOGQRW possibly  be  happier  with  or  more  proud  of   our  team  and  our  accomplishments  I  was   surprised.  The  progression  throughout  the   year  was  so  amazing  that  the  NCAA  tour-­ nament  was  the  icing  on  the  cake.â&#x20AC;?


SPORTS

14oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

New  Paltz  Women  Swim  Ahead 2VZHJR1HZ3DOW]GHIHDWHG9DVVDU&ROOHJH â&#x20AC;&#x153;From   an   athletic   standpoint,   I   think   this   team   KDV WKH SRWHQWLDO WR KDYH RQH RI RXU EHVW VHDVRQV LQ In  a  dual  meet  against  SUNY  Oswego  on  Nov.  12,   SURJUDP KLVWRU\´ :KLWEHFN VDLG Âł:H KDYH D JUHDW womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   swimming   set   the   tone   for   their   upcoming   FRPELQDWLRQRIERWKWRSHQGWDOHQWDQGGHSWKDQGWKH VHDVRQ 5HFHLYLQJ ÂżUVW SODFH UHFRJQLWLRQ LQ  RI  HYHQWVWKH+DZNVVHQWDPHVVDJHWKDWWKHLUÂżUVWPHHW DW ,WKDFD &ROOHJH ZDV D Ă&#x20AC;XNH DV WKH RQO\ ORVV VR IDU this  season.   :KLOHVHFRQG\HDU&KHOVHD$OORFFRZRQERWKWKH  DQG  IUHHVW\OH UDFHV DQG IRXUWK\HDU &KULV WLQH5LHWKZRQWKHIUHHVW\OHDQGEDFNVWURNH QLQH RWKHU DWKOHWHV HDUQHG JROG 7KLUG\HDU .DWLQD /RZQWKLUG\HDU<XND6X]XNDWKLUG\HDU&DUO\0DU VKDOO VHFRQG\HDU9LFWRULD 6FDOLVH ÂżUVW\HDU .DWKHU LQH%X\HVDQGIRXUWK\HDU&DSWDLQ7D\ORU+HQVKDZDOO held  top  performances. SCOTT  WHITBECK Âł7KLVZDVRXUEHVWSHUIRUPDQFHRIWKHIDOOEHFDXVH we  did  the  little  things  right,â&#x20AC;?  said  Head  Coach  Scott   :KLWEHFNÂł:HZHUHUDFLQJVPDUWÂżQLVKLQJRXUUDFHV well   and   were   maintaining   a   good   team   atmosphere   women   on   the   team   are   dedicated   and   determined   to   succeed.â&#x20AC;?   throughout  the  meet.â&#x20AC;?   7KHJLUOVÂżQLVKHGVHFRQGODVW\HDUDWWKH681<$& :KLWEHFNÂśV JRDO DV D FRDFK LV WR ZRUN ZLWK WKH &KDPSLRQVKLSVDQGKRSHWRJHWEDFNWKHUHDJDLQWKLV WHDPWRPD[LPL]HWKHLUFDSDELOLW\WRUHDFKWKHLUSRWHQ WLDODWKOHWLFDOO\DQGDFDGHPLFDOO\6RIDUKHKDVEHHQ \HDU Âł0\SHUVRQDOJRDOLVWRJRWR1&$$DQGJLYHP\ JHWWLQJUHVXOWV$ZHHNDIWHUWKHSHUIRUPDQFHDJDLQVW

By  Kate  Blessing

&RS\(GLWRU_KBlessing34@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

I   think   this   team   has   the   potential   to   have   one   of   our  best  seasons  in   program  history.

WHDPWKHSRVLWLYHDWPRVSKHUHDQGVSLULW´VDLG6X]XND +HQVKDZVKDUHVWKHSOD\HUVÂśDQGFRDFKHVHQWKXVL DVP6KHEHOLHYHVWKDWWKHWHDPFDQUHDFK681<$&V DQG ZLQ WKH FKDPSLRQVKLS WKLV \HDU VXUSDVVLQJ ODVW \HDUÂśVSHUIRUPDQFH Âł:HDUHORRNLQJWREHDW681<$&ULYDOV&RUWODQG DQG*HQHVHRDQG,WKLQNWKDWLWÂśVSRVVLEOHIRURXUWHDP WKLV\HDU´+HQVKDZVDLGÂł:HKDYHDJUHDWDWWLWXGHLQ DQGRXWRIWKHSRRODQGHYHU\RQHLVUHDOO\SV\FKHGWR swim  fast  and  work  hard.â&#x20AC;? While  all  the  girls  are  working  hard  and  winning   high  honors,  Rieth  has  proven  herself  a  powerhouse  so   IDU5LHWKKDVZRQHYHU\UDFHVKHFRPSHWHGLQLQIRXU RIÂżYHPHHWV 7KHEDUKDVEHHQVHWKLJKDQGLWLVXSWRWKH+DZNV WR PDLQWDLQ WKHLU PRPHQWXP :KLWEHFN SODQV WR HQ courage   and   push   the   athletes   throughout   the   season   VRWKHWLPHEHIRUH681<$&VZLOOEHDVVXFFHVVIXODV the  last  month.   Âł,WVJUHDWWREHRIIWRDVWDUWZHDUHSURJUHVV ing  as  a  team  each  week  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  looking  forward  to   VHHLQJKRZZHGR´:KLWEHFNVDLG 7KH+DZNVIDFHRIILQWKH(&$&:LQWHU&KDPSL RQVKLSWKLVZHHNHQGEHJLQQLQJ)ULGD\'HF

ATTENTION  STUDENTS!!! SPRING  2012  SEMESTER   SOUTHSIDE  TERRACE  APARTMENTS OFFERS  SEMESTER  LEASES 6WXGLRRQH WZREHGURRPDSDUWPHQWV Heat  &  Hot  water  included $OODSDUWPHQWVDUHIXUQLVKHG &OXEKRXVHEDVNHWEDOOFRXUWVPDQ\H[WUDV Walking  distance  to  the  college  &  town                     SOUTHSIDE  TERRACE  APARTMENTS 4  SOUTHSIDE  AVENUE NEW  PALTZ,  NY  12561 7KXUVGD\'HFHPEHU


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Waiting  to  Seal  the  Deal   andrew.wyrich63@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   hot   stove   has   been   simmering   for   the   Mets   so   far   this   offseason,   as   we   have   watched   this   off-­seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Free   Agent   class   slowly  be  picked  apart  by  hungry  teams  look-­ ing  for  an  early  present  under  the  tree.  How-­ ever,   the   Mets   have   been   quiet   and   seem   to   be  waiting  for  the  leftovers  in  the  back  of  the   fridge  they  can  snag  for  a  discounted  price.   The   likes   of   Jonathan   Papelbon   have   signed   mega-­contracts   and   the   new-­lookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   0LDPL0DUOLQVKDYHEHHQĂ&#x20AC;LUWLQJZLWKHYHU\ big-­ticket   free   agent   on   the   market.   Mean-­ while,   the   Mets   have   been   quiet   picking   up   players   like  Adam   Loewen   and   other   unin-­ spiring  names.   So  what  gives?  When  will  the  Mets  wake   up  and  start  signing  players?   The   short   answer   is   probably   not   too   soon.  The  Mets  and  General  Manager  Sandy   Alderson   are   currently   in   a   holding   pattern   as  the  team  decides  how  to  proceed  with  the   OLPLWHG ÂżQDQFLDO UHVRXUFHV FXUUHQWO\ DYDLO

HYTHM & LUESHIRTS ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

  So  how  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bout  them  Rangers? In   the   last   six   days,   we   saw   the   boys  in  blue  take  down  the  Washington   Capitals,  the  Philadelphia  Flyers  and  the   Pittsburgh  Penguins.  These  are  some  of   the   best   teams   the   league   has   to   offer,   and   the   Rangers   came   out   on   top   each   time,   compiling   12   total   goals   against   their  opponents. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to  personally  thank  the  Rang-­ ers   for   providing   me   with   a   very,   very   good  holiday.  Also  for  producing  the  re-­ sults   needed   to   make   sure   my   brothers   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   tear   the   house   down   while   I   was   home  from  school. In   all   seriousness,   the   Rangers   showed   the   NHL   and   its   fans   a   lot   this   week.   The   Rangers   have   been   so   im-­ pressive   in   these   past   three   games   that   Rangers  columnist  Andrew  Gross  asked   Tortorella   if   the   Rangers   could   be   con-­ sidered  an  â&#x20AC;&#x153;elite  team.â&#x20AC;? While   Tortorella   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   answer,   the  

able  to  them.   If   the   Mets   are   serious   about   retaining   Jose  Reyes,  which  certainly  seems  to  be  the   case,   it   means   the   team   is   preparing   to   al-­ locate   around   $20   million   per   season   to   the   shortstop,  which  obviously  will  take  up  a  sig-­ QLÂżFDQWFKXQNRIWKHDOUHDG\OLPLWHGDPRXQW of  money  the  team  is  able  to  spend  this  off-­ season.   Rumors   suggest   the   Mets   are   looking   into   laying   groundwork   for   a   deal   to   obtain   a  closer  at  next  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Winter  Meetings.  Re-­ cently,   the   team   has   been   connected   to   Oc-­ tavio   Dotel,   Matt   Capps,   Francisco   Cordero   and  Frank  Francisco  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  all  of  whom  have  for-­ mer  closing  experience.   The  generally  accepted  belief  is  that  Al-­ derson  is  hoping  to  snag  two  players  and  have   them   compete   for   the   closers   role,   with   the   less  impressive  one  taking  over  the  8th  inning   set-­up  duties.   In  a  post  for  MLB.com,  Anthony  DiCo-­ mo  said  the  Mets  are  â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong  playersâ&#x20AC;?  for  Do-­ tel,   who   pitched   for   the   St.   Louis   Cardinals   last  season,  posting  a  3.50  ERA  in  54  innings  

while   striking   out   62   batters.   The   38-­year-­ oldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   past   closing   experience   and   veteran   presence   makes   perfect   sense   for   the   Mets,   not  to  mention  that  his  age  allows  the  Mets  to   make  a  short  term  commitment  to  him  as  the   team  transitions  towards  the  future.   Another  pitcher  the  Mets  have  been  con-­ nected  to  is  Cordero,  who  would  likely  serve   as  the  Mets  primary  closer  if  he  signs  with  the   team.  Rumors  suggest  Cordero  is  looking  for   a  two-­year  $16  million  deal  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  which  is  about   the  maximum  the  Mets  are  willing  to  spend   on  a  closer.  Cordero  pitched  for  the  Reds  last   season  and  saved  37  games  with  a  2.45  ERA   in  68  appearances.   Cordero,   like   Dotel,   is   up-­there   in   age,   KRZHYHUKHÂżWVWKH0HWVÂśGHVLUHIRUDSOD\HU who  would  sign  a  short  term  contract  and  act   as  a  stepping  stone  towards  their  future  plans.   Both   offer   the   team   experienced   late-­ inning   relievers   who   could   stabilize   a   Mets   bullpen   that   was   in   shambles   in   the   second   half  of  last  season.   While   the   Mets   continue   to   search   for   bullpen  relief,  there  are  rumors  swirling  that  

the   team   might   become   active   in   the   trade   market.   Angel   Pagan,   whose   poor   2011   season   KDVOHIWDEDGWDVWHLQWKHIURQWRIÂżFHÂśVPRXWK is   one   player   the   Mets   will   explore   trading   WKLV RIIVHDVRQ ZLWK WKH KRSHV RI ÂżQGLQJ D team  who  will  latch  onto  the  playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  poten-­ WLDO,IWKHWHDPÂżQGVDGHDOWKDWWKH\WKLQN would  make  sense,  it  could  be  an  option.   One  fantasy-­land  trade  that  makes  sense   could  be  made  with  the  Chicago  White  Sox.   ESPNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Buster  Olney  said  on  Twitter  that  the   Sox  have  been  trying  to  dump  reliever  Matt   Thornton  and  his  $12  million  contract  since   July,  and  have  interest  in  trading  Jake  Peavyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   $17   million   contract   as   well.   Some   fans   be-­ lieve  the  Mets  would  be  wise  to  try  and  trade   Jason  Bay  and  a  prospect  for  the  two  pitchers.   &UD]\"'HÂżQLWHO\3RVVLEOH"3HUKDSV While  things  might  seem  bleak,  the  Mets   are   obviously   looking   toward   the   future.   While  it  might  be  a  quiet  offseason,  take  sol-­ ace  in  the  fact  we  wont  be  handing  out  long   term  contracts  to  players  like  Oliver  Perez.  

Rangers  Getting  Rowdy   clear   answer   is   no.   But   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   for   now. For  the  Rangers  to  be  an  elite  team,   they  need  to  play  every  team  in  the  NHL   like  they  would  against  the  leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best. My  older  brother  and  I  will  usually   argue   about   how   the   Rangers   will   do   during  stretches  in  their  schedule  that  are   particularly   rough.   He   tends   to   expect   the  worst  and  usually  predicts  the  Rang-­ ers  will  go  0-­3  or  1-­3  (in  this  past  case).  I   usually  say  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  go  2-­3  or  3-­3.   I  say  this  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  said  be-­ fore  and  it  will  be  said  again:  The  New   York   Rangers   play   up   to   the   best   and   play  down  to  the  worst. The   Rangers   already   beat   the   Van-­ couver  Canucks  this  season  and  beating   the   Pens,   Caps   and   Flyers   shows   what   the  Blueshirts  are  capable  of.  All  of  the   pieces  are  there  for  them  to  be  among  the   best,  but  I  sometimes  wonder  if  that  reg-­ isters  with  them. While  taking  down  competitors  like   Vancouver,   they   end   up   losing   games   against  teams  like  the    Florida  Panthers  

and   the   Islanders.   The   Rangers   go   into   those   games   expecting   to   win   and   they   turn  out  lazy,  lackluster  performances.   The  Rangers  have  to  realize  that  no   matter  what  their  skill  level  is,  they  need   to  play  the  Islanders  the  same  way  they   would  play  the  Penguins.   The  Rangers  are  a  team  that  consis-­ WHQWO\QHHGVDÂżUHOLWXQGHUWKHLUEXWWVLQ order  to  perform  well.  Tortorella  is  great   at   that,   but   the   Rangers   need   to   always   have  their  ears  open  when  Torts  is  talk-­ ing.  If  they  do  this,  they  will  be  the  elite   team  us  Rangers  fans  have  been  waiting   patiently  for. In   other   Rangers   news,   we   got   in-­ sight   into   the   HBO   24/7   special   com-­ ing   in   a   few   short   weeks.   We   all   know   how   much   Broadway   and   Broadstreet   hate  one  another,  but  really,  that  preview   was  something  else.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  amazing  to  see   how  much  the  two  teams  hate  each  other.   We   had   Jody   Shelley   calling   Brandon   Dubinsky   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   little   weasel,â&#x20AC;?   and   Martin   Biron  saying  everyone  hates  each  other.     In   the   words   of   our   News   Editor  

Thursday,  December  1,  2011

John  Brandi,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  gonna  get  dirty.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   expecting   some   really   horrible   things  to  be  said  out  on  the  ice  and  dur-­ ing  the  show.  The  Flyers  are  a  disgusting   group  of  players  in  general,  and  they  al-­ ways  seem  to  bring  out  the  worst  in  other   teams  as  well.  The  Rangers  are  no  excep-­ tion,  and  with  players  like  Chris  Pronger   and  Marian  Gaborik  out  on  the  ice  with   one  another,  all  bets  are  off  and  anything   goes. Last   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   24/7   showed   two   NHL   teams   who   disliked   each   other   because   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   constantly   compared   to   one   an-­ other.   However,   this   24/7   features   a   ri-­ valry   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   around   for   decades.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   history   of   hatred   and   if   that   12-­minute  preview  showed  us  anything,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  that  the  Winter  Classic  is  going  to  be   a  bloodbath  of  epic  proportions.   I   mean,   you   know   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   get   ugly   when   even   Glen   Sather   trash-­talks   the   other   team   in   their   own   hometown.   Never   thought   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   say   this,   but   four   for   you  Glen  Sather.  Four  for  you,  indeed.


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The New Paltz Oracle, Volume 83, Issue 10