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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

Pg 3

Crispell  First  in  Line  for  Remodeling By  Maxim  Alter A&E  Editor  |  Malter42@newpaltz.edu

Crispell  Hall  will  be  shutting  its  doors   for  upgrades  this  winter,  forcing  some  resi-­ dents  to  seek  new  housing. According   to   Director   of   Facilities   Design   and   Construction   John   McEnrue,   a   $12.5   million   renovation   for   Crispell   Hall   ZLOOEHJLQRQ'HF,WZLOOEHWKHÂżUVWRI four  Hasbrouck  residence  halls  scheduled  to   undergo  construction. Changes   to   the   hall   will   include   im-­ proving  the  suite  layout,  replacing  the  heat-­ ing   and   plumbing   system   and   rewiring   the   building  electrically,  McEnrue  said.  Dormi-­ tory  Authority  of  the  State  of  New  York  and   Architecture   Plus,   the   consultants   hired   to   design  the  projects,  will  also  make  updates   to   telecommunication   lines   to   utilize   wire-­ less  technology. McEnrue   said   the   construction   should   not   hassle   housing   plans   for   Crispell   resi-­ dents   who   are   currently   in   the   process   of   choosing  new  dorms,  however. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most   of   the   students   living   in   Crisp-­ ell   Hall   this   semester   are   either   graduating   in  December,  planning  to  move  off  campus   in  the  spring  or  transferring,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   few  occupants  that  do  plan  to  live  on  cam-­ pus  next  spring  will  be  moving  to  other  resi-­ dence  halls.â&#x20AC;? According   to   Director   of   Residence   Life  Corinna  Carracci,  all  students  living  in   Crispell   were   informed   before   the   start   of   the  semester  they  would  be  required  to  relo-­ cate  into  other  buildings. Carracci  said  students  should  not  face  a   shortage  of  housing  options  and  will  be  able   to  transition  to  new  dorms  with  ease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   usually   have   about   200-­220   stu-­ dents   who   do   not   come   back   in   the   spring   semester   for   various   reasons,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   Âł7KLVLVRXUÂżUVW\HDUH[SHULHQFLQJWKLVW\SH RI UHQRYDWLRQ , DP FRQÂżGHQW WKDW ZH ZLOO learn  from  it  and  adjust  as  needed  to  accom-­ modate  students  and  their  needs.â&#x20AC;? Students  living  together  in  Crispell  may   choose   from   open   triples   and   doubles   in   other   halls,   Carracci   said,   but   there   are   no   guarantees   roommates   will   remain   living   together. According   to   John   Shupe,   assistant   vice   president   for   Facilities   Management,   upgrades   to   Crispell   and   other   Hasbrouck   complex   dorms   are   a   necessity   for   SUNY  

PHOTO  BY  LAURA  LUENGAS

Crispell  Hall,  which  was  built  in  the  1960s,  will  begin  to  be  renovated  in  December  and  will  be  completed  in  August  of  next  year. New   Paltz   because   of   major   water   leaks,   bad  plumbing,  electrical  capacity  issues,  ex-­ posed  asbestos  in  the  ceiling  and  poor  ven-­ tilation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  is  a  really  important  and  aggres-­ sive  project  from  a  scheduling  prospective,â&#x20AC;?   Shupe   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   building   will   look   com-­ pletely   different   when   completed   includ-­ ing  a  new  façade,  metal  peaked  roof,  larger   bathrooms   and   better   services   for   the   stu-­ dents  living  and  visiting  the  building.â&#x20AC;? Because   Crispell   was   completed   in   1967,  McEnrue  said,  the  buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  utilities   have  needed  constant  repair,  making  an  up-­ grade  vital. McEnrue   said   other   additions   planned   for  Crispell  include  a  new  sprinkler  system   throughout   the   hall,   new   facility   upgrades   better   suited   for   residents   with   disabilities,   QHZĂ&#x20AC;RRULQJUHÂżQLVKHGZDOOVDQGFHLOLQJVD redesigned  pitched  roof  and  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;refreshingly   newâ&#x20AC;?  student  lounge  and  lobby. According   to   Jennifer   Jerussi,   a   resi-­ dent  assistant  (RA)  of  Crispell,  even  though   the   building   will   be   closing   for   the   spring,   her   RA   duties   and   compensation   will   not   change. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Myself  as  well  as  the  rest  of  my  staff   have   been   placed   in   RA   openings   around  

campus,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  will  be  in  Bouton  next   semester,  but  I  will  be  returning  to  Crispell   in  the  fall.â&#x20AC;? Jerussi  said  she  was  made  aware  of  the   incoming   construction   when   she   was   hired   in   the   fall,   and   has   been   planning   for   the   move  ever  since.   She  said  she  is  excited  for  the  new  reno-­ vations  and  was  not  upset  to  learn  she  would   have  to  work  in  a  new  hall  for  a  semester.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  it  is  great  that  [the  administra-­ tion]   is   trying   to   update   the   campus,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  the  remodel  of  Crispell  is  ex-­ citing   and   it   will   be   awesome   to   get   to   go   back  next  fall  and  live  in  a  brand  new  build-­ ing.â&#x20AC;? Crispell   RA   Christine   Retta   said   hear-­ ing   about   the   planned   construction   left   her   feeling  worried  about  her  future. After   becoming   aware   of   the   renova-­ tions   through   bulletins   on   the   SUNY   New   Paltz  website  before  she  became  an  RA,  she   VDLGLWZDVFUXFLDOWRÂżQGRXWZKDWKHURS-­ tions  were. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   extremely   upset   when   I   heard   about  the  construction,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  lived   in  Crispell  for  the  past  two  years  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the   only  home  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  known  in  New  Paltz,  so  the   idea  of  moving  out  kind  of  depressed  me.â&#x20AC;?

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

Retta  said  she  is  now  no  longer  appre-­ hensive   about   leaving   Crispell   and   looks   forward   to   working   with   a   new   group   of   people  when  she  transfers  to  another  build-­ ing.  She  will  still  keep  her  job  as  an  RA  and   ZLOOFRQWLQXHWRHDUQWKHSRVLWLRQÂśVEHQHÂżWV According   to   Shupe,   work   on   Crispell   will  end  by  August  2011  and  the  next  reno-­ vations  are  planned  for  Deyo  Hall  in  2013.   He  said  the  three  remaining  Hasbrouck  halls   are  scheduled  to  follow  each  year  after  that. In  order  to  better  accommodate  students   who   want   to   live   on   campus,   Shupe   said   the   construction   of   a   new   residence   hall   is   scheduled  for  2012. Shupe   said   break   periods   are   planned   between   each   construction   because   resi-­ dence  hall  projects  receive  no  state  support   and  contractors  will  be  working  two  shifts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  operation,  maintenance  and  reno-­ vation   costs   are   fully   funded   by   student   housing   fees,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   would   like   to   renovate   quicker,   but   that   would   increase   student  housing  fees  too  much.â&#x20AC;? For  those  wanting  to  learn  more  about   the  construction  and  remodeling  of  Crispell   and  other  Hasbrouck  halls,  an  hour-­long  pre-­ sentation  is  scheduled  for  Monday,  Dec.  6  at   12:15  p.m.  in  the  Lecture  Center.


Pg 4

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

News Briefs National   House  Democrats  have  re-­elected   1DQF\3HORVLDVWKHLUOHDGHULQWKHQH[W Congress.   The  closed-­door  vote  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  150  for  Pe-­ losi  and  43  for  Heath  Shuler  of  North   Carolina  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  lets  the  California  con-­ gresswoman  shift  from  House  speaker   to  minority  leader  in  January,  despite   concerns  by  some  Democrats  that  the   party  needs  new  leadership  after  suffer-­ ing  huge  midterm  election  losses. ***** Prosecutors  say  a  rural  Wisconsin  man   blasted  his  TV  with  a  shotgun  after   ZDWFKLQJ%ULVWRO3DOLQÂśVÂł'DQFLQJZLWK the  Starsâ&#x20AC;?  routine,  sparking  an  all-­night   standoff  with  a  SWAT  team. According  to  court  documents,   67-­year-­old  Steven  Cowan  of  the  town   of  Vermont  in  Dane  County  became   enraged  while  watching  Palin  dance  on   Monday  evening.  He  felt  Palin  was  not   a  good  dancer. ***** %LOO1\HKRVWRIWKH(PP\ZLQQLQJ VWHOHYLVLRQVKRZÂł%LOO1\HWKH Science  Guy,â&#x20AC;?  collapsed  during  a  Cali-­ fornia  speech,  then  got  up  and  contin-­ ued  his  presentation. The  Los  Angeles  Times  said  the   54-­year-­old  Nye  apparently  fainted   on  stage  Tuesday  evening  in  front  of   hundreds  of  people  gathered  at  the   University  of  Southern  California. 3DUDPHGLFVDQGFDPSXVVDIHW\RIÂżFHUV responded,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  unclear  if  Nye  was   treated.   International  Briefs  on  Page  5

3+272%</$85$/8(1*$6

Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs  and  Governance  Caitlin  Ryan  asked �� for  input  from  the  student  senate  for  a  draft  of  new  SEIs.

Senate  Rejects  Appeal,  Discusses  SEIs By  Pamela  Vivanco Copy  Editor  |  Pvivanco57@newpaltz.edu

The  50th  student  senate  denied  an  ap-­ peal,  discussed  potential  Conferences  fund-­ ing   line   bylaw   amendments   and   discussed   changes   it   would   like   to   see   implemented   into  Student  Evaluation  of  Instruction  (SEI)   forms  at  its  Nov.  16  general  meeting. The   legislative   body   rejected   a   $108   appeal   made   by   Amnesty   International   President   Samantha   Kossin.   Last   week,   a   political  science  professor  and  Amnesty  In-­ ternational  advisor  spent  $108  on  pizza  for   attendees   of   a   movie   screening   hosted   by   the  club,  Kossin  said. Kossin   said   she   informed   the   advisor   that  in  order  to  be  reimbursed  by  SA,  cer-­ WDLQSDSHUZRUNPXVWEH¿OOHGRXWVL[GD\V EHIRUH DQ HYHQW$ IHZ VHQDWRUV H[SUHVVHG that  despite  the  information  given  by  Kos-­ sin,  the  professor  proceeded  to  buy  the  piz-­ za  and  the  appeal  was  denied. After  the  appeal,  Vice  President  of  Aca-­ demic  Affairs  and  Governance  Caitlin  Ryan   asked   the   legislative   body   for   suggestions   on  questions  it  would  like  to  see  on  an  SEI   draft  made  by  Academic  Affairs.  According   WR5\DQ$FDGHPLF$IIDLUVZLOOYRWHRQD¿-­

nal  draft  of  SEIs  and  present  it  to  the  SUNY   New  Paltz  faculty.  Among  many  other  sug-­ JHVWLRQV VHQDWRUV SURSRVHG WKDW WKH ÂżQDO SEI   draft   include   a   question   on   a   profes-­ sorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  attendance,  a  question  on  whether  or   not  a  courseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  syllabus  informs  the  student   of   how   they   will   be   graded   throughout   a   course   and   whether   or   not   professors   use   WH[WERRNVDGHTXDWHO\ Ryan   said   she   would   make   sure   the   suggestions  provided  are  taken  into  consid-­ eration  when  revising  SEIs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   am   really   happy   that   we   have   sug-­ gestions   because   a   lot   of   the   time   in   these   meetings,   and   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   if   the   faculty   does  it  on  purpose,  but  they  kind  of  take  it   into  the  faculty  realm,â&#x20AC;?  said  Ryan. Ryan  also  initiated  a  discussion  regard-­ ing   potential   bylaw   amendments   for   Con-­ ferences   which   the   legislative   body   will   continue  to  discuss  throughout  the  semester.   Sen.   Megan   Grieco   presented   a   draft   that   she,   Sens.   Kossin,   Marc   Pottak   and   Chris   Thurston  worked  on  regarding  the  funding   for  student  presenters  and  attendees  of  con-­ ferences.   The   potential   bylaw   amendment   said  presenters  or  Tier  1  applicants  should   be  given  precedence  over  attendees  or  Tier   2  applicants  if  they  are  requesting  funding  

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

for  the  same  conference. $WWKHQH[WVWXGHQWVHQDWHPHHWLQJWKH legislative  body  will  discuss  whether  or  not   Conferences  should  be  split  into  two  lines-­-­   one   for   Tier   1   applicants   and   one   Tier   2   DSSOLFDQWVVR FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFW RQ ZKR FDPH ÂżUVW could  be  avoided. 'XULQJ KHU ([HFXWLYH %RDUG UHSRUW Ryan  said  elections  for  senators  will  be  held   on  Dec.  7  to  9. Vice   President   of   Finance   Youssoff   Kouyo  said  he  is  organizing  a  workshop  to   WUDLQFOXEUHSUHVHQWDWLYHVRQKRZWRÂżOORXW paperwork  such  as  line  item  budget  forms.   There  will  be  three  sessions  planned  for  dif-­ ferent  times  on  Thursday,  Feb.  4.  If  a  club   has  a  line  item,  it  is  mandatory  to  attend  one   of  the  sessions.  Sign-­up  sheets  will  be  avail-­ DEOHRQWKHÂżUVWZHHNRIWKHVSULQJVHPHVWHU During   his   report,   Vice   President  An-­ thony  Lino  announced  that  the  music  festi-­ val  is  scheduled  for  Dec.  5  from  5  to  9  p.m.   This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   concert   is   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   Paltz   Winter   Festâ&#x20AC;?   and   will   feature   local   artists   like  Adir  Cohen,  Arielle  Lindstrom  and  The   Notion  Stompers.   7KH QH[W JHQHUDO VWXGHQW VHQDWH PHHW-­ ing  will  be  held  on  Tuesday,  Nov.  30  in  Stu-­ dent  Union  418.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

Testing  Keeps  New  Paltz  on  the  Alert By  Pamela  Vivanco &RS\(GLWRU_Pvivanco57newpaltz.edu

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Council  of  Orgs  Creates  New  Board By  Pete  Thompson &RS\(GLWRU_Pthompson51@newpaltz.edu

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NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Series  of  Thefts  Lead  to  Arrest  of  Non-­Student By  Justin  McCarthy News  Editor  |  Jmccarthy46@newpaltz.edu

A   19-­year-­old   was   arrested   earlier   this   month   on   multiple   charges   after   an   investigation  of  a  series  of  alleged  thefts   on  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  campus. According   to   University   Police   Chief   Ray   Bryant,   Julius   Judd   faces   a   number   of   charges   including   burglary,   petit   larceny,   grand   larceny,   trespassing   and  criminal  impersonation. Bryant  said  Judd  had  allegedly  com-­ mitted   thefts   of   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   unattended   knapsacks   and   laptops   in   both   Hasb-­ rouck   Dining   Hall   and   the   Sojourner   Truth  Library  (STL). â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   were   quite   a   few   altogether   that  we  believe  he  was  responsible  for,â&#x20AC;?   said  Bryant.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just  before  we  made  the  ar-­ rest,  I  put  an  advisory  out  to  all  students,   advising  them  that  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  had  thefts  in  the   dining   hall   [and]   to   protect   their   prop-­ erty.â&#x20AC;? Mary   Ritayik,   investigator   for   the   university   police   force,   said   Judd   had   been  arrested  on  charges  of  four  cases  of   theft.  There  are  also  nine  additional  lar-­ ceny  cases  that  are  still  open  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;may  or   may  notâ&#x20AC;?  have  been  committed  by  Judd,   she  said. According  to  Ritayik,  there  were  10   incidents   of   theft   in   Hasbrouck   Dining   Hall  between  Sept.  24  and  Oct.  24. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  in  the  library,  there  were  three   in  that  time  period,â&#x20AC;?  said  Ritayik.â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  it   was   like   the   same   days,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   get   three   larcenies   all   within   two   hours   at   dinner   time  in  the  dining  hall.  So  we  were  like,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;somebody   just   went   in   here   and   ran-­ sacked  cubby  holes.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? After   noticing   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;spikeâ&#x20AC;?   in   thefts,   Ritayik  said,  the  department  took  up  the   investigation.   Through   a   combination   of   student   tip-­offs   and   video   footage   of   Judd   making   a   purchase   with   a   credit   card   stolen   from   the   bag   of   one   of   the   VWXGHQWV -XGG ZDV LGHQWLÂżHG FKDUJHG and  arrested. Ritayik,   who   had   been   following   the  investigation,  was  the  one  to  contact   Judd  about  his  impending  arrest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   spoke   to   him   on   the   phone,â&#x20AC;?   Ritayik  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  got  a  warrant  for  him   when   we   found   out   it   was   him.  And   he   was   out   of   state,   so   we   had   to   call   him   and  let  him  know  that  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;you  have  a  war-­ rant   here   and   you   need   to   turn   yourself  

in.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Ritayik   said   Judd   turned   himself   in   and   was   taken   to   jail.   She   said   he   was   later   bailed   out,   but   now   awaits   a   court   trial. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   where   it   sits   right   now,â&#x20AC;?   said   Ritayik.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   has   been   charged,  but  it  hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  gone  to  court  yet.   I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  know  if  he  pled  guilty  or  if   he  pled  not  guilty  or  if  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  plea  on   the  table  .  .  .  It  takes  a  couple  of  weeks.â&#x20AC;? Judd   was   contacted,   but   was   not   available  for  comment. A  number  of  media  outlets  have  re-­ ported  Juddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  address  to  be  215  Main  St.   in   New   Paltz.   But   according   to   Bryant,   Judd   â&#x20AC;&#x153;didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   have   a   placeâ&#x20AC;?   at   the   time  of  arrest  and  had  been  evicted  from   the  Main  Street  address.  Bryant  also  said   Judd  was  a  former  student  at  SUNY  New   Paltz. While   Bryant   said   Hasbrouck   Din-­ ing   Hall   has   installed   cameras   by   the   cubby  area  as  a  result  of  the  thefts,  the  li-­ brary  also  continues  to  take  precautions.   According  to  Donna  Provenzano,  a  night   and   weekend   supervisor   at   STL,   the   li-­ brary  monitors  â&#x20AC;&#x153;all  overâ&#x20AC;?  the  library. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  also  have  put  down  signs  to  be   very  aware  and  not  to  put  anything  down   that  is  of  value  or  anything  and  leave  un-­ attended,â&#x20AC;?  Provenzano  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like  I  tell   students  all  the  time,  if  I  see  them  with   laptops,  I  just  say,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;be  very  aware  of  your   surroundings   and   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   leave   anything   behind.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? For  some  students,  the  recent  thefts   have  been  a  wake-­up  call  to  careless  or   worry-­free  behavior. Student   Association   Vice   President   of   Academic   Affairs   and   Governance   Caitlin   Ryan   said   she   rarely   worries   about  being  a  victim  of  theft.  Ryan,  who   is   from   Queens,   feels   very   safe   in   New   Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  go  to  the  library  and  just  leave   all  my  [stuff]  out  on  the  table  and  leave  .  .   .  and  go  to  the  bathroom  and  come  back,â&#x20AC;?   Ryan   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   if   I   have   my   laptop,   I   usually   pack   up   my   laptop   and   bring   it   with  me.  But  anything  else,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  leave  out,   which  is  probably  not  the  best  thing.â&#x20AC;? For   others,   the   thefts   are   an   alarm-­ ing  reminder  that  outsiders  can  come  on   campus   and   appear   as   a   student   while   taking  advantage  of  those  who  live  there. Bryant   explained   that   the   balance   EHWZHHQIUHHGRPDQGVHFXULW\LVGLIÂżFXOW

to   maintain   throughout   all   facets   of   society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   a   police   chief,   as   an   indi-­ vidual  responsible  for  the  safety  and   security   of   students,   faculty,   staff   and   visitors   in   the   geographical   area   of   this   campus,  I  would  love  to  see  razor  wire,   DUPHG JXDUGV PLQHÂżHOGV FDPHUDV HY-­ erywhere,â&#x20AC;?  said  Bryant.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;As  a  citizen,  I   do  not  want  to  live  that  way.â&#x20AC;? But  some,  like  Ryan,  refuse  to  let  the   incidents   affect   the   way   they   view   the   campus  and  the  community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   reality,   things   like   that   will   happen.  But  what  I  love  about  New  Paltz   is  that  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  the  majority  of  peo-­ ple   here   are   like   that   or   the   majority   of   community  members  are  like  that,â&#x20AC;?  said   Ryan.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   so,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   something   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   cau-­ tious  of,  but  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  let  it  dictate  my  life   because  I  do  like  the  fact  that  it  feels  like   a  safe  place  here  and  it  feels  like  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a   community.â&#x20AC;?

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

2009 Annual Security Report

SUNY  New  Paltz   On-­Campus  Property Burglary  Statistics:

2007:  13 2008:  10 2009:  12


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

Pg 7

Hertz  Connects  Students  with  Rental  Cars By  Julie  Mansmann Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Jmansmann@60newpaltz.edu

Campus  Auxiliary   Services   (CAS)   is   currently   gearing   up  for  the  introduction  of  a  car-­sharing  program  for  students   next  semester.   $FFRUGLQJ WR 0DU\ 2Âś/HDU\ D ÂżIWK\HDU VWXGHQW KLUHG to   work   on   the   project,   CAS   began   discussing   car   sharing   programs  and  eventually  signed  a  contract  with  Connect  by   Hertz.  The  program  allows  participants  to  sign  out  a  car  on-­ line  depending  on  availability. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  very  similar  to  the  Zipcar  program,â&#x20AC;?  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  is  a  popular  program  at  larger  universities,  and  my  main   goal  is  to  make  it  work  in  the  best  way  for  this  school.â&#x20AC;? To  participate,  students  would  log  in  with  an  account  that   must  be  created  prior  to  signing  out  a  car  on  connectbyhertz. com,  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary  said.  There,  she  said  participants  will  be  able  to   choose  a  date  and  check  the  time  and  availability  for  signing   out  a  car  at  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  location.  Waiting  lists  will   EHJHQHUDWHGRQOLQHDVDUHQRWLÂżFDWLRQVRIZKHQFDUVEHFRPH available  at  a  participantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  desire  location. At   SUNY   New   Paltz,   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary   said   students   will   have   the  option  of  borrowing  the  larger  Toyota  RAV4  or  the  hybrid   7R\RWD3ULXVDÂłPRUHIXHOHIÂżFLHQWRSWLRQ´ Second-­year   art   major   Erin   Healy   said   she   thinks   stu-­ dents  who  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  bring  their  car  to  New  Paltz  or  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  afford   one  may  be  interested  in  these  options. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For  certain  people  who  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  their  own  car,  whether   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  because  of  money  or  something  else,  this  could  be  really   convenient,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. According  to  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary,  students  will  have  the  chance  to   borrow  these  cars  at  hourly  rates,  depending  on  demand.  Af-­ ter   registering   for   initial   membership   and   paying   a   $25   ap-­ plication   fee,   participants   will   choose   one   of   three   options:   Connect,  Connect  50  and  Connect  125. Each   of   the   different   accounts   is   geared   for   taking   the   car  out  more  or  less,  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary  said.  She  added  that  one  would   choose  the  one  that  best  suits  the  amount  of  times  they  think  

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR.COM

Students  who  pay  to  use  the  Connect  program  will  have  the  option  of   renting  a  Toyota  RAV4  or  the  hybrid  Toyota  Prius. they  will  want  to  sign  out  the  car.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   would   pay   as   you   need   the   car   hourly,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each  plan  is  designed  to  lower  your  rate  per  hour  if  you  are   using  the  connect  program  more  often.â&#x20AC;? The  rates  range  from  $8  to  $10  per  hour,  and  the  rate  is   dependent  upon  which  Connect  account  a  member  have,  ac-­ cording  to  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary.  Students  will  also  be  required  to  pay  all   fees  before  they  can  access  the  car.   If  students  are  going  to  be  late,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  charged  the  full   booking   feeand     additional   over-­run   charges.  These   charges   will  be  calculated  in  15-­minute  increments,  in  addition  to  the   late-­fee  charge  of  $50. Although   she   said   some   students   will   show   interest   in   car-­sharing,   Healy   said   others   may   not   want   to   pay   hourly   rates  when  other  forms  of  temporary  transportation  are  avail-­ able. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  feel  like  many  people  might  not  use  [the  program]  be-­ cause  there  are  taxis  in  New  Paltz,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. Those   who   do   choose   to   borrow   a   vehicle   through   the   program  would  be  given  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Connect  cardâ&#x20AC;?  that  acts  as  a  per-­ sonal  key  to  the  car.  A  fuel  card  is  also  included  as  a  method  

of  paying  for  the  vehicleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  gas.  In  addition,  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;never  lostâ&#x20AC;?  in-­ car  GPS  system  will  be  installed  in  both  cars. After  having  applied  and  been  accepted  to  take  on  the  job   of  being  a  student  contact  between  Hertz  and  CAS,  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary   is   now   working   with   CAS   to   develop   a   marketing   calendar   and  strategies  for  reaching  out  to  the  student  body  about  the   program. First-­year  students,  who  are  not  permitted  to  have  cars  on   campus,   said   they   look   forward   to   learning   more   about   this   SURJUDP +RZHYHU WKRVH OLNH ÂżUVW\HDU SV\FKRORJ\ PDMRU Anne   Concepcion   said   they   still   have   concerns   about   Con-­ nect  by  Hertz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know  how  much  of  a  pain  it  is  for  me  to  run  errands   without  a  car,  and  I  am  the  type  of  person  who  would  rather   walk  than  depend  on  a  bus,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;However,  I  feel  like   this   might   be   a   hit   or   miss   type   of   thing   because   with   cars,   there  is  always  an  increased  risk  of  accidents.â&#x20AC;? 2Âś/HDU\VDLGVKHWKLQNVWKHVHÂżUVW\HDUVWXGHQWVZLOOEH among  those  most  attracted  to  the  Connect  by  Hertz  options  at   SUNY  New  Paltz.  However,  she  also  said  students  living  on   campus  who  may  want  to  leave  their  cars  at  home  or  those  off   campus  who  need  transportation  for  tasks  like  grocery  shop-­ SLQJFRXOGEHQHÂżW Citing  herself  as  an  example  of  a  student  who  has  a  driv-­ erâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  license  but  not  a  car,  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary  said  the  car-­sharing  pro-­ JUDPFDQSURYLGHHIÂżFLHQWPHDQVIRUDOOHYLDWLQJWKHQXPEHU of  vehicles  on  campus  and  help  students  get  around  the  area   more  easily. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At  times  it  would  be  nice  to  have  a  car,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   option   can   give   students   more   independence;Íž   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nicer   than   having  to  always  ask  someone  for  a  ride.â&#x20AC;? Hertz   will   be   sending   a   representative   to   join   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary   for   a   question   and   answer   session   about   the   program   at   the   next  Council  of  Organizations  meeting.    A  launch  of  the  pro-­ gram  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  has  already  been  planned  for  next   semester,   and   students   will   have   the   opportunity   to   register   with  Connect  by  Hertz  at  an  enrollment  drive  slated  for  early   February.  The  cars  will  arrive  on  campus  in  January.

Campus  to  Get  Toilet  Stalls  for  One  and  All By  Samantha  Huertas Copy  Editor  |  Shuertas18@newpaltz.edu

SUNY  New  Paltz  administrators  have  announced  the  future   implementation  of  gender-­neutral  facilities  on  campus. The   project,   according   to   Architect   Designer   Micheal   :HDWKHUO\LVSURMHFWHGWREHÂżQLVKHGDWWKHHDUOLHVWWKLVZLQWHU break  and,  at  the  latest,  sometime  this  summer. The   change   for   gender-­neutral   facilities   has   been   in   the   works  for  quite  some  time,  beginning  with  efforts  made  by  for-­ mer   Student   Association   (SA)   Executive   Vice   President   Abe   Uchitelle.   Uchitelle   wrote   legislation   for   the   project   and   met   with  directors  on  campus. Current  SA  Executive  Vice  President  Eve  Stern  picked  up   the  project  during  her  term  by  collecting  data  on  gender-­neutral   bathrooms  and  calculating  estimates  for  the  project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  for  SUNY  New  Paltz  to  get  on  board  with   gender-­neutral   bathrooms   as   many   other   SUNY   schools   have   already  done  so,â&#x20AC;?  Stern  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gender-­neutral  bathrooms  create   a  safe,  comfortable  environment,  not  just  for  the  LGBTQ  com-­ munity,  but  for  everyone  in  the  New  Paltz  community.  It  sends  a  

message  to  our  community  that  we  are  tolerant,  welcoming  and   conscious  of  gender  issues.â&#x20AC;? John  McEnrue,  the  director  of  Facilities  Design  and  Con-­ struction,  recognizes  the  need  for  gender-­neutral  bathrooms  as  a   way  to  allow  everyone  safe  usage  of  school  facilities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SUNY  New  Paltz  recognizes  the  need  for  gender-­neutral   facilities,â&#x20AC;?  said  McEnrue.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  people  should  have  the  right  to   access  public  facilities  without  fear  of  ridicule  or  judgment,  re-­ JDUGOHVVRIWKHLUJHQGHULGHQWLÂżFDWLRQ´ Implementing   gender   neutrality   and   still   keeping   in   line   with  building  codes  can  pose  a  challenge  to  the  project,  however.   The  simplest  way  to  implement  these  changes,  Weatherly   said,   is   to   take   current   single-­occupant   facilities   and   convert   them  through  signage  into  gender-­neutral  bathrooms.  For  build-­ ings  that  only  contain  multi-­stall  bathrooms,  SUNY  New  Paltz   must  make  sure  any  new  gender-­neutral  facilities  installed  would   QRWWDNHEDWKURRPÂż[WXUHVDZD\IURPWKHIDFLOLWLHVLQSODFH Âł7KHEDVLFFRQFHSWRIWKHSOXPELQJÂż[WXUHFRXQWFRGHLV WKDWLQRUGHUWRFUHDWHDJHQGHUQHXWUDOUHVWURRPWKHRYHUDOOÂż[-­ ture  count  in  a  building  per  code  will  not  take  away  any  toilet  

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

Âż[WXUHFRXQWVIURPRWKHURFFXSDQWV´VDLG:HDWKHUO\Âł6RXQGV confusing,  but  is  really  designed  to  make  a  restroom  available   when  needed.â&#x20AC;? To  Stern,  the  campus  reception  of  these  facilities  poses  its   own  set  of  issues.  She  thinks  the  students  on  campus  who  would   QRWEHRSHQWRWKHVHPRGLÂżFDWLRQVDUHÂłSHRSOHZKRDUHDIUDLGRI change,  which  is  a  problem  with  any  new  idea.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  people  may  think  gender-­neutral  bathrooms  only  af-­ IHFWWKH/*%74FRPPXQLW\ZKLFKWKH\>GRQÂśWÂżQG@LPSRUWDQW to  themselves,  as  well  as  many  people  who  are  not  conscious  of   the  idea  of  gender  neutrality,â&#x20AC;?  Stern  said. -RH3LQHDWKLUG\HDUÂżQHDUWVPDMRUDQGSUHVLGHQWRIWKH Queer   Action   Coalition,   thinks   that   while   the   gender-­neutral   bathroom  project  is  a  step  in  the  right  direction,  it  falls  short  of   a  larger  goal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond  this  new  policy,  I  think  that  more  attention  needs   to  be  paid  to  the  diversity  policy  on  campus,  which  is  quite  lack-­ ing  in  comparison  to  other  schools,â&#x20AC;?  Pine  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  universi-­ ties  even  offer  gender-­neutral  housing;Íž  something  which  many   have  fought  for  on  this  campus,  but  it  has  been  a  losing  battle.â&#x20AC;?


NEWS

Pg 8

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

New  Paltz  and  Purchase  UPDs  to  Collaborate By  Andrew  Wyrich Sports  Editor  |  Andrew.wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

Senate  Chair  Terrell  Coakley  and  other  stu-­ dents  have  been  looking  into  methods  to  improve   student-­police  relations  at  SUNY  New  Paltz.   Coakley   and   other   members   of   the   Student   Association   (SA)   executive   board   (E-­board)   de-­ veloped  the  idea  after  attending  the  State  Univer-­ sity  of  New  York  Assembly  where  they  met  other   SUNY  school  representatives.  After  meeting  with   representatives   from   Purchase   College,   the   E-­ board   believed   relations   between   students   and   police  were  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  lot  betterâ&#x20AC;?  than  relations  at  SUNY   New  Paltz. One  way  Coakley  said  he  hopes  to  improve   the  current  relationship  between  students  and  po-­ lice  on  campus  is  to  organize  a  conversation  be-­ tween  SUNY  New  Paltz  University  Police  Chief   Ray  Bryant  and  the  Purchase  Police  Chief  Joseph   Olenik. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  feel  like  it  would  be  great  to  get  another   perspective  of  a  university  that  seems  to  have  bet-­ ter   communication   between   people   on   campus   and  those  put  in  the  power  to  protect  and  serve,â&#x20AC;?  

Coakley  said. SA   Vice   President   of   Academic   Affairs   and   Governance   Caitlin   Ryan,   who   attended   the   SUNY   Assembly,   said   that   Purchase   Stu-­ dent   President   Nico   Marceca   has   been   making     progress  in  improving  relations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Marceca]   set   up   meetings   between   the   chief   of   police   of   Purchase   and   gave   us   advice   on  how  to  improve  relationships  with  our  depart-­ ment,â&#x20AC;?  Ryan  said. 1HZ 3DOW] 3ROLFH 2IÂżFHU 'DYLG 0HOLGHR ZKRVHUYHGDVDQRIÂżFHUDW3XUFKDVH&ROOHJHDQG has  been  in  law  enforcement  for  25  years,  said  he   did  not  see  many  problems  between  students  and   police  on  campus.  However,  he    said  he  thought  a   meeting   or   conversation   between   the   two   chiefs   was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;an  interesting  idea.â&#x20AC;? Coakley  said  students  at  Purchase  have  some   say  in  who  is  hired  to  the  police  staff,  which  is  an   example  of  the  relationship  the  Purchase  student   FRPPXQLW\KDVZLWKLWVRIÂżFHUV 0DWW=DQNRZVN\DÂżUVW\HDUVFXOSWXUHPDMRU at  Purchase,  said  the  average  relationship  between   police  and  students  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;non-­contactâ&#x20AC;?  oriented. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  police  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  go  out  of  their  way  to  in-­



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teract  with  the  general  student  body,â&#x20AC;?  Zankowsky   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  are  pretty  lenient  about  small  things.â&#x20AC;? Melideo   said   he   believes   New   Paltz   and   Purchase   have   similarities,   but   have   differences   UHJDUGLQJ FULPLQDOLW\ 7KH RIÂżFHU VDLG ZKLOH WKH student  population  is  similar  at  both  schools,  Pur-­ chaseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  crime  comes  from  off-­campus  visitors.  He   also  said  Purchaseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  proximity  to  New  York  City   affects  its  crime  rate. However,   Zankowsky   said   the   New   Paltz   student  body  may  prefer  what  he  described  to  be   a  more  relaxed  attitude  of  the  cops  on  his  campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   Paltz   students   might   like   not   getting   hassled  as  much,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Ryan   said   organizing   a   potential   meeting   between  Bryant  and  Olenik  would  be  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  different   tacticâ&#x20AC;?   for   examining   student-­police   relations   in   New  Paltz,  and  the  potential  dialogue  between  the   police  chiefs  would  be  helpful.   According   to   Ryan,   important   issues   sur-­ rounding   student-­police   relations   have   been   dis-­ cussed  for  a  long  time. Âł7KHUHDUHRIÂżFHUVZKRDUHZLOOLQJWRPDNH strides   while   there   are   others   who   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;?   Ryan   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those  who  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  give  the  rest  of  the  depart-­

ment  a  bad  reputation.â&#x20AC;?   Melideo   said   that   while   he   has   never   had   problems  with  students,  he  believes  that  younger   cops   are   more   aggressive   and   are   actively   look-­ ing  for  criminal  conduct  -­  something  he  believes   is  visible  across  law  enforcement.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Realistically,   everyone   tries   to   do   a   good   MRE DQG JR RXW RI RXU ZD\ WR DVVLVW WKH VWXGHQW body,â&#x20AC;?  Melideo  said.   Melideo   added   that   most   complaints   the   83' UHFHLYHV DUH QRW IURP VWXGHQWV EXW IURP other  members  of  the  community  or  town. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  would  say  that  I  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  had  a  complaint   against  me  by  a  student  in  a  long  time,  if  ever  re-­ ally,â&#x20AC;?  said  Melideo. Though   the   meeting   between   the   chief   has   yet  to  be  scheduled,  SA  is  hosting  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Know  Your   5LJKWV´SURJUDPLQFRQMXQFWLRQZLWK6WXGHQWVIRU 6HQVLEOH 'UXJ 3ROLF\ WKH 1DWLRQDO 2UJDQL]DWLRQ IRUWKH5HIRUPRI0DULMXDQD/DZVDQG$OSKD3KL $OSKD RQ 'HF  LQ 6WXGHQW 8QLRQ  $W WKH HYHQWDÂżOPZLOOEHVKRZQWKDWLVPHDQWWRVKRZ students  â&#x20AC;&#x153;basic  rules  to  remember  in  police  situ-­ ationsâ&#x20AC;?  and  a  lawyer  will  be  available  to  answer   questions.

Shooting  for  a  Cure By  Ryan  Patrick  Hanrahan Copy  Editor  |  Rhanrahan13@newpaltz.edu

7KH 5HOD\ IRU /LIH &RPPLWWHH LV KROGLQJ LWV ÂżUVW HYHU EDVNHWEDOO NQRFN-­ out   competition   to   raise   awareness   and   money  for  cancer  research  on  Nov.  20. Knockout   Cancer   with   Relay   for   /LIHZLOOSLWWHDPVRIIRXUSOD\HUVDJDLQVW one  another  in  a  basketball  shootout.  To   register,   each   player   must   donate   $2,   adding  up  to  $8  per  team.  The  commit-­ tee  hopes  to  raise  over  $100  in  all.  Ac-­ cording  to  the  eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Facebook  group,   the   winners   of   the   competition   will   be   awarded  â&#x20AC;&#x153;awesomeâ&#x20AC;?  prizes.   The  competition  also  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  require   funds   to   organize,   according   to   Jess   Abrams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   to   put   any   money   into  the  event,  so  whatever  we  make  will   be  put  towards  future  fundraising  activi-­ ties  as  well  as  the  actual  relay  event  it-­ self,â&#x20AC;?  Abrams  said. As   of   yet,   only   a   few   teams   have   signed  up  for  the  competition  so  far,  but   Abrams   said   she   anticipates   many   last   minute  registrations. Those   who   wish   only   to   be   specta-­

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

tors  have  the  opportunity  to  donate  $1  at   WKHGRRUDQGEHHQWHUHGLQWRDUDIĂ&#x20AC;HIRUD VSHFLDOÂł'RRU3UL]H´7KHFDPSXVUDGLR staff  will  also  be  involved  with  the  event   DQGZLOODFWDV'-V The   knockout   competition   will   be   the  last  event  the  committee  puts  on  this   semester,  but  next  year,  numerous  others   are   planned.   The   â&#x20AC;&#x153;highly   anticipatedâ&#x20AC;?   Cuties  for  a  Cure  Auction  will  be  held  on   Feb.  19  and  a  scavenger  hunt  is  planned   to   be   held   in   March.   The   actual   Relay   IRU/LIHHYHQWZLOOEHKHOGRQ$SULO If  the  upcoming  knockout  competi-­ WLRQLVVXFFHVVIXO&KDLURI:HEVLWH'H-­ velopment   Alicia   Paczkowski   believes   DQRWKHURQHMXVWOLNHLWZLOOEHVFKHGXOHG for  the  near  future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully  it  goes  well  and  we  can   do  it  annually,â&#x20AC;?  Paczkowski  said. The  knockout  competition  will  take   place  from  1  to  4  p.m.  this  coming  Satur-­ day  in  the  Elting  Memorial  Gym.  Those   who   have   organized   the   event   such   as   $EUDPVVWUHVVWKHEHQHÂżWVLWZLOOKDYH Âł,WÂśV MXVW JRLQJ WR EH D IXQ ZD\ WR spend   a   few   hours   and   raise   awareness   and   funds   for   a   great   cause,â&#x20AC;?   Abrams   said.


The GUNK

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Theatre Department takes on farcical comedy in final fall production,

‘NOISES OFF’ Story on page 6B

PLUS... FLOW Recycling club shows awardwinning documentary

CLOTHESLINE ART SHOW Students find new way to display work Photo provided by Jack Wade

STUDENTS BREAKING RACIAL BOUNDARIES Club attempts to integrate diversity on campus

AND MORE!


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

2B  |  FEATURES BOOKS REVIEW

Literature to Long For FOUR BOOKS THAT SHOULD BE REQUIRED READING REGARDLESS OF MAJOR By  Zan  Strumfeld Features  Editor  |  Sstrumfeld34@newpaltz.edu

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  an  English  major  for  about  three  years  now  and,  to  put  it  bluntly,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  beginning  to  grow  tired  of  reading.  After  taking  at  least  three   OLWHUDWXUHFODVVHVHDFKVHPHVWHULWJHWVIUXVWUDWLQJZKHQERRNVDUHDVVLJQHGDQGH[SHFWHGWREHFRPSOHWHO\ÂżQLVKHGZLWKLQWZRFODVVHV/DVW semester  I  had  to  read  at  least  two  books  a  week.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really  not  humanly  possible  for  the  average  college  student,  no  matter  what  you  say.   But,  aside  from  complaining,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  read  some  incredibly  life-­changing  books  that  remind  me  of  why  I  love  English  so  much.   So,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  attempted  to  create  a  top  four  list  of  the  best  assigned  books  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  read  so  far  at  SUNY  New  Paltz.  

All The Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Men by Robert  Penn  Warren Class: American  Literature  I General  Honors  I Professor: Harry  Stoneback

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony  Burgess Class: General  Honors  II Professor: Donna  Baumler

A

lthough  the  book  jacket  may  tell  you   this  story  is  about  Willie  Stark,  War-­ renâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  representation  of  New  Orleanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  gov-­ HUQRU+XH\Âł.LQJÂżVK´/RQJÂł$7.0´LV really  about  Jack  Burden,  the  novelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nar-­ rator.  Through   the   rise   and   fall   of   Stark,   we  learn  about  Burdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  past  and  his  three   stages:   Brass-­bound   idealism/solipsism,   The   Great   Twitch/determinism   and   the   Spider   Web.   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   explain   these   in   less   than   200   words,   but   I   overheard   people  talking  about  the  spider  web  con-­ cept,  where  I  then  chimed  into  their  con-­ versation  -­  which  is  exactly  what  the  web   applies.  This  probably  makes  no  sense,  so   you  should  just  read  the  book.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  good   700  pages,  but  it  is  one  of  the    best  books   I  have  ever  read.  Hands  down.

W

hen  I  was  about  10  or  so,  I  watched   WKH ÂżOP YHUVLRQ RI WKLV ERRN ZLWK my  brother.  I  loved  it,  but  it  scared  me.  But   LQ WKLV FODVV VSHFLÂżFDOO\ ZKLFK IHDWXUHG books   like   Hubert   Selby   Jr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Requiem   IRU D 'UHDP´ , ZDV UHDG\ WR IDFH P\ IHDUDQGÂżQGRXWZKDWWKHKHOOVFDUHGPH LQWKHÂżUVWSODFH:KDWGLG,UHDOO\ÂżJXUH out?  This  book  is  an  absolute  masterpiece.   Once  you  get  used  to  the  dialect  and  writ-­ ing  style,  the  horrifying  story  unfolds  into   the  realities  of  a  violent  youth  culture  un-­ der  a  totalitarian  society.  I  went  in  and  out   of  having  sympathy  for  the  main  character   Alex,   and   by   the   end   I   basically   just   felt   awful.  Watching  the  movie  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  the   book   justice,   as   it   never   does,   especially   because  the  endings  are  different.  

The Scarlett Letter by Nathaniel  Hawthorne

Class: American  Renaissance Professor: Andrew  Higgins

Frankenstein by Mary  Shelley

Class: Analysis  &  Interpretation   of  Literature Professor: Jackie  George

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

I    

read   this   book   in   high   school   and   absolutely   hated   it.   Yet   after   studying   many  Hawthorne  short  stories  in  this  class   and  really  appreciating  his  style  of  writing   and  absolute  brilliance  when  it  comes  to  the   craft   of   stories,   reading   this   novel   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   as  much  of  a  pain  the  second  time  around.   Since  I  knew  the  story,  I  could  instead  fo-­ cus  on  the  aesthetic  value  of  the  piece,  and   wow,   is   this   book   amazingly   well   put   to-­ gether.  And   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   so   much   sexual   imag-­ ery  that  I  would  never  have  cared  to  catch   GXULQJP\ÂżUVWUHDGLQJ+HXVHVWKHZRUG ÂłHMDFXODWLRQ´ LQ D QRQVH[XDO ZD\ $O though  I  still  think  that  a  good  30  pages  or   so  can  be  removed,  I  am  deeply  surprised  at   how  much  I  truly  enjoyed  this  book.  If  you   get  a  chance,  try  it  again.

A

h.   I   had   always   wanted   to   read   this  book  when  I  was  younger  but   never  did  for  some  reason.  When  it  was   ÂżQDOO\ DVVLJQHG DQG , ZDV IRUFHG WR read  it,  I  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  wait.  First  thing  I  was   shocked  about  was  that  Frankenstein  is   QRW)UDQNHQVWHLQ:HOO,WKRXJKWZKDW was  Frankenstein  is  actually  just  called   ÂłWKH FUHDWXUH´ DQG 9LFWRU )UDQNHQ stein   is   the   creator.   Crazy.   This   book   is  eerie,  taking  the  reader  on  a  surpris-­ ingly   sad   journey.   I   never   thought   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   sympathize   with   a   monster   as   much   as   I   did   in   this   book.  After   reading,   I   ZHQW KRPH DQG ZDWFKHG 0HO %URRNÂśV Âł<RXQJ)UDQNHQVWHLQ´ZKLFKZDVMXVW perfect  -­  almost  in  the  same  category  as   Âł6SDFHEDOOV´


                                       FEATURES  |  3B  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle CLUB PROFILE

Club Crusades Against Ignorance

STUDENTS BREAKING RACIAL BOUNDARIES PROMOTE DIVERSITY ON CAMPUS

By  Zan  Strumfeld

Features  Editor  |  Sstrumfeld34@newpaltz.edu

A   group   of   students   have   formed   Students   Breaking   Racial   Boundaries   (SBRB),   a   club   striving  to  erase  ignorance  through  education.   The  club  began  in  the  spring  of  2010  when   president  and  co-­founder  Lisa  Pomerantz  said  she   and  a  friend  saw  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  campus  as   diverse  but  with  little  integration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  wanted  to  create  an  environment  where   people  can  comfortably  come  together  and  meet   people   of   different   backgrounds,   discussing   pressing  issues  and  even  comfortably  clarify  per-­ ceptions  about  others,â&#x20AC;?  said  Pomerantz. According   to   the   clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mission   statement,   the  club  supports  â&#x20AC;&#x153;pride  in  oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  own  racial  back-­ ground,  while  aiming  to  heighten  awareness  for   the  need  of  unity  as  members  of  the  human  race.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   recognize   that   prejudice   and   racism   only   exist   because   of   ignorance   and   a   lack   of   knowledge  about  cultures  other  than  oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  own,â&#x20AC;?   said  Pomerantz.   The  club  hopes  to  address  the  fact  that  rac-­ ism  is  still  an  issue  in  this  country.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  to  get  more  people  to  care  about   it,â&#x20AC;?   Pomerantz   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;because   so   many   are   apa-­

thetic  and  never  think  about  it  unless  they  are  a   person  of  color  who  experiences  racism.â&#x20AC;? Currently,   the   club   is   working   on   events   that   will   better   educate   students.   This   semester,   they  hosted  a  large-­scale  event  with  Muslim  Stu-­ dent  Association  (MSA)  and  Men  of  All  Nations   (MANU)   on   the   Muslim   Community   Center   in   the  city.   On  Wednesday,  Nov.  17,  the  club  hosted  an   event  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dating  Outside  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Limitsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  where   they  discussed  the  different  aspects  of  interracial     dating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  interfaith  dating,  intercultural  dat-­ ing,   endless   possibilities,â&#x20AC;?   said   Pomerantz.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   address   what   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   like   to   be   this   sort   of   couple.â&#x20AC;? The  event  was  mostly  open  forum  while  also   discussing  issues  such  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;weddings,  raising  kids,   even  in  funeral  practices,â&#x20AC;?  Pomerantz  said. Other  discussions  for  meetings  include  cul-­ ture,  where  Pomerantz  said  they  will  soon  discuss   the  beauty  of  Africa.  The  club  has  held  meetings   about   a   variety   of   societal   and   political   topics,   such  as  the  Arizona  immigration  laws. SBRB   is   also   trying   to   work   with   Latin   American  Student  Assocation.  

SBRB  recently  hosted  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dating  Outside  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Limits.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?                    PHOTO  BY  LAURA  LUENGAS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even  if  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  working  on  projects  with   other  clubs,  we  make  efforts  to  attend  their  meet-­ ings,â&#x20AC;?  said  Pomerantz.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Networking  is  key  in  this   type  of  activism.â&#x20AC;? Second-­year   economics   major   and   Black   studies  minor  Jaunia  M.  Coombs  is  the  Council   of  Organizations  representative  and  said  she  got   involved   in   SBRB   because   there   were   no   clubs   on  campus  she  felt  addressed  the  issues  of  racism   across  all  ethnic  backgrounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Club-­wise,  my  main  goal  is  to  have  a  pro-­ gram  that  draws  in  a  large  majority  of  New  Paltz   students   and   faculty,   in   which   we   discuss   the  

things  that  separate  us  and  what  we  can  do  to  be-­ come   a   more   united   campus,â&#x20AC;?   said   Coombs.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   would  like  others  to  become  involved  by  simply   attending  a  program  and  bringing  a  friend,  or  two,   to  the  next  one.â&#x20AC;? SBRB   currently   has   seven   E-­board   mem-­ bers  but  the  amount  of  students  in  the  group  var-­ ies  with  each  meeting.  Their  meetings  are  on  se-­ lect  Wednesdays  at  8  p.m.  in  Student  Union  407.   Next  semester  they  will  be  more  consistent  with   their  meeting  dates.  Visit  their  Facebook  page  for   more  information.

UPGRADE YOUR CAREER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ONLINE. ON-SITE. OR BOTH. Hofstraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s M.S. in Computer Science is a flexible program designed for working professionals. If you are a software engineer, software developer or computer science professional, Hofstra Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Master of Science in Computer Science program is designed with you in mind. Improve your skills and advance your career while accommodating your demanding schedule. Take classes online, in the classroom, or do both. Our program offers maximum flexibility and challenging course work in areas such as medical informatics, cyber security, data mining, and mobile computing. Our graduates have gone on to become successful entrepreneurs, continue their education in doctoral studies, or pursue successful careers in software engineering and project management, database administration, and systems and network administration and security analysis. Hofstra alumni are currently working in software manufacturing, health care, communication, banking and financial services, government organizations and research laboratories.

! Find Out More Graduate Open House November 21 @ 1 p.m. hofstra.edu/grad-day

find your edgeÂŽ $G+RI06&RPS6FLB1HZ3DOW]LQGG

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

30


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

4B  |  FEATURES CLUB FEATURE

Awareness FLOWs at Campus Events

RECYCLING CLUB HOSTS DEMO AND DOCUMENTARY SCREENING FOR STUDENTS By  Pete  Thompson

Copy  Editor  |    3WKRPSVRQ#QHZSDOW]HGX

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  NEW  PALTZ  RECYCLES

Water  bottles  on  display  in  front  of  Humanities.

To   coincide   with   its   water   consumption   demonstration   on   Thursday,   Nov.   11,   the   Recy-­ cling  Club  hosted  a  screening  at  7:30  p.m.  in  the   CSB  Auditorium  of  Irena  Salinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  award-­winning   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flow:  For  Love  of  Waterâ&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  a  documentary  on   the  worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  water  crisis  and  the  underlying  greed   behind  it. While  asking  the  question  of  whether  or  not   DQ\RQHFDQUHDOO\RZQZDWHUWKHÂżOPVKRZFDVHV groups  and  individuals  â&#x20AC;&#x153;providing  practical  solu-­ tions  to  the  water  crisis  and  those  developing  new   technologies  [creating]  blueprints  for  a  successful   global   and   economic   turnaround,â&#x20AC;?   according   to   ZZZĂ&#x20AC;RZWKHÂżOPFRP. Recycling   Club   President   and   campus   Re-­ cycling  Coordinator  Lauren  Brois  said  she  chose   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flowâ&#x20AC;?   because  it   offers   a   lot  more   information   on  water  than  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tapped,â&#x20AC;?  her  other  option,  while   connecting   to   the   audience.   Although   it   sheds   light  on  many  truths  of  such  a  relevant  world  is-­ sue,  it  remains  accessible  and  inspiring. 3ULRUWRWKHÂżOP&KDULW\:DWHUFR3UHVLGHQW Nick   DePalma   had   â&#x20AC;&#x153;a   little   exerciseâ&#x20AC;?   in   store,   handing   out   a   number   of   cups   to   various   mem-­ bers  of  the  audience.  He  continued  to  pass  around  

a   full   bottle   of   water,   representing   all   the   water   in  the  world,  telling  each  person  to  pour  as  much   as  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like,  keeping  the  worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  population  (or   other  cups)  in  mind. In   the   end,   one   cup   on   display   was   full   and   the   others   held   equal,   miniscule   amounts   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   the   full   one   representing   Ameri-­ ca,   which   blindly   uses   and   contaminates   an     alarming  amount  every  day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   see   other   people,â&#x20AC;?   he   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[so]   we  really  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  a  concept  of  it.â&#x20AC;? 2QH RI WKH SRLQWV WKH ÂżOP PDNHV LV WKDW LW would  take  $30  billion  to  supply  the  entire  world   with   water,   yet   three   times   that   amount   is   spent   annually   on   bottled   water,   which   only   contami-­ nates  the  supply. 7KHÂżOPDOVRWRXFKHVRQWKHKLJKDPRXQWRI ÂżOWUDWLRQWHVWLQJWDSZDWHUPXVWJRWKURXJKZKLOH the  same  requirements  are  not  in  place  for  bottled   water.  It  continues  to  highlight  the  fact  that  Nestle   pumps   over   450   gallons   per   minute,   while   not   paying  one  cent  for  it.  At  one  point  environmental   lawyer  Jim  Olson  claims,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Water  is  for  survival,   and  who  owns  the  water  for  survival  owns  you.â&#x20AC;? This  constant  pumping,  in  turn,  drains  natu-­ ral  supplies  and  bodies  of  water,  eventually  con-­ taminating  their  contents  as  the  cycle  resumes.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anytime  you  buy  anything,  you  vote  for  it,â&#x20AC;?   Brois  said  on  the  necessity  of  being  an  educated   consumer.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  have  to  make  sure  anything  you   buy  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  hurting  yourself  or  others.â&#x20AC;? Brois   said   she   received   a   number   of   posi-­ tive  responses  from  the  audience,  and  felt  it  was   a   great,   enlightening   end   to   an   environmentally   conscious   day   on   campus.   The   Recycling   Club   had  about  487  water  bottles  set  up  in  various  spots   in  the  Humanities  area  from  8  a.m.  to  8  p.m.,  ac-­ companied  by  a  variety  of  signs.  These    signs  said   things   such   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;On   average   bottled   water   costs   900   times   the   amount   of   tap   waterâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   year,  Americans  will  spend  $40  billion  on  bottled   water.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;People   can   interpret   what   we   are   present-­ ing  and  use  the  information  to  their  own  accord,â&#x20AC;?   Brois  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even  if  people  are  saying  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  silly,  or   something   [they]   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   understand   the   point   of,   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  thinking  about  something  they  other-­ wise  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have.â&#x20AC;? As   of   yesterday,   the   Recycling   Club   has   the  Sojournor  Truth  Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lobby  reserved  for   posters  and  signs  regarding  composting,  trash  and   various   other   topics.  These   will   remain   up   until   Nov.  30.  Meetings  are  held  every  Monday  in  Stu-­ dent  Union  401  at  8  p.m.

BEARD EXPERIMENT

Scruff  Times  Ahead  

No Shave Novembeard: WEEK 3

FRANK GREENAWAY

JOHN MICHAEL CASTILLO

TYLER PRINCEGARDINER

SEAN BAILEY

RAY VASSARSEMANCHIK

NEIL PICKUS

FIRST  FOUR  PHOTOS  BY  CHRIS  THURSTON.  LAST  TWO  PHOTOS  PROVIDED  BY  RAY  VASSAR-­SEMANCHIK  AND  NEIL  PICKUS

Thursday,  November  18,  2010


                                         FEATURES  |  5B  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle COMMUNITY FEATURE

Town Talks Turkey HOLIDAY FUN RUN EVENT HELPS NEW PALTZ COMMUNITY

By  Pete  Thompson Copy  Editor  |  Pthompson51@newpaltz.edu

Before   talking   turkey   this   Thanksgiving,   all   are   welcome   to   sprint,   stride   or   stroll   through   the   Family   of   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   seventh   an-­ nual   Turkey   Trot   on   Nov.   25   at   9   a.m. The   morning   â&#x20AC;&#x153;trotâ&#x20AC;?   is   an   ap-­ proximately   5   kilometer   (or   3.1   mile)  run,  starting  at  the  Water  Street   Market,   trailing   down   to   Plains   Road   and   looping   back   around   on   the   Wallkill   Valley   Rail   Trail.   All   proceeds   go   directly   to   the   Family   of  New  Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  money  we  raise  buys  a  lot   of   food   and   helps   us   out   tremen-­

dously,â&#x20AC;?   Program   Director   Kathy   Cartagena  said. The   annual   event   is   sponsored   by   a   variety   of   local   businesses,   with   its   headlining   sponsors   be-­ ing   New   Paltz   Health   &   Nutrition   Center  and  Feldman,  Kleidman  and   Coffey,   each   of   which   is   donating   $1,500. While  Family  of  New  Paltz  has   been   helping   the   community   for   years,   providing   various   support   groups,   a   food   pantry,   shelter   and   a  24-­hour  hotline,  the  turkey  trot  is   the   product   of   Suzanne   Holt.  After   moving   to   New   Paltz   from   Brook-­ lyn,  Holt  felt  it  necessary  to  imple-­ ment  such  an  event  into  the  town.  

   

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&DUWDJHQD VDLG WKH ÂżUVW WURWÂśV turnout  only  brought  about  300  run-­ ners,  but  the  event  has  been  gaining   momentum  and  becoming  more  of  a   big  reunion  spot  where  community   members  bring  their  families  to  take   a   nice   run   before   the   big   holiday   dinner.   She   said   last   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   turnout   was  somewhere  between  1,300  and   1,500  people,  raising  about  $28,000. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re]   very   lucky   to   be   in   a   generous   community   where   people   are   aware   of   issues   and   poverty,â&#x20AC;?   Cartagena  said. Meant   to   be   more   of   a   fun   run   than   a   competition,   markers   and   timers  will  be  provided  in  approxi-­ mate  spots  along  the  course,  with  a   FORFNDWWKHÂżQLVKEXWQRRIÂżFLDOUH sults  will  be  provided. There   will   also   be   a   mashed   potato  half-­mile  fun  run  for  kids  10   and  under.  Each  trotting  tot  will  re-­ ceive   either   a   complimentary   treat   or  donated  gift.  This  will  begin  at  9   a.m.  with  the  5k  to  start  promptly  at   9:30  a.m. Early   birds   who   have   yet   to   sign-­up   can   do   so   at   8   a.m.   Break-­ fast   will   also   be   available,   and   any   who  registered  prior  to  Nov.  12  will   be  able  to  pick  up  their  T-­shirts. The   registration   form   can   be   found   at   www.newpaltzturkeytrot. com.   The  fee  until  5  p.m.  the  day  be-­ fore  Thanksgiving  at  for  runners  18   and  under  or  65  and  over  is  $10,  and   $15  for  anyone  19  to  64.  If  register-­ ing   after   5   p.m.   or   on   the   day   of,   entrants   must   pay   a   minorly   raised   price  of  $12  for  anyone  18  or  under   and  $17  for  anyone  19  or  older. If   long   lines   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   your   thing,   you  can  get  a  head  start  by  register-­ ing  the  day  before  at  Rock  and  Snow   from  12  to  5  p.m.  You  can  also  reg-­ ister   through   www.active.com     until   5   p.m.   on   Nov.   24.   If   interested   in   helping   and   volunteering,   e-­mail   turkeytrot@gmail.com.

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

FAMILIAR FACES ...with  Annie  Yu

Larry Carr  Lecturer  in   English,   Creative/Dramatic   Writing

Annie  Yu:  How  long  have  you  been  at  SUNY  New   Paltz  and  what  brought  you  here? Larry  Carr:  1995,  I  started.  I  was  asked  by  Beverly   Brumm  in  the  Theatre  Department  to  come  and  teach   my  dramatic  writing  class,  and  she  asked  the  Chair  of   English  so  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  covering  both  English  and  Theatre.  I   lived  across  the  street  from  Beverly  in  New  Paltz. AY:  What  is  your  favorite  thing  about  teaching? LC:  This  is  just  a  great  place  to  be.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  working  with   so  many  students  who  are  interested  in  writing  plays,   VFUHHQSOD\VDQGÂżFWLRQ,ÂśPDFWXDOO\TXLWHDPD]HG The  caliber  of  students  has  gotten  higher  since  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been  here.  I  work  with  undergrads  who  are  working  on   a  professional  level  in  dramatic  and  creative  writing. AY:  What  do  you  like  to  do  during  your  free  time  when   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  teaching? LC:  Write.  Cook.  My  wife  and  I  travel  around.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   into  Mediterranean  cooking  and  eastern  Mediterra-­ nean,  things  like  that.  Moroccan.  We  go  to  Northern   California  every  year,  which  I  really  like.  And  New   England.  We  just  go  where  we  want. AY:  If  you  could  meet  one  person  in  the  world,  who   would  it  be  and  why? LC:  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  very  interested  in  talking  to  political  lead-­ ers  that  both  I  agree  with  and  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  agree  with  so  I   can  see  what  they  are  about.  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  anyone  in   VSHFLÂżF:KHUHDV\RXFDQNQRZDERXWZULWHUVIURP their  writing,  I  think  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  always  a  veil  over  politi-­ cal  leaders  on  a  worldwide  basis    â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  people  who  have   held  great  power.  And  say,  things  like,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  were  you   thinking?â&#x20AC;?  I  would  be  rude.  (Laughs)  Just  kidding.  I   would  try  not  to  be  rude. AY:  Since  Thanksgiving  is  right  around  the  corner,   what  are  your  plans? LC:  My  wife  and  I  go  to  New  York  City  and  we  have   Thanksgiving  with  a  group  of  20  friends  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been   meeting  with  since  1984.  And  we  always  bring  the   same  food  so  you  know  whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  bring  the   sweet  potatoes.  And  then  when  we  come  back  on   Friday,  we  cook  another  turkey.   AY:  If  you  had  to  pick  one,  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  accomplishment   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  more  proud  of  than  other  ones? LC:  Just  that  I  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  stopped  my  creative  output.  It   goes  slow  and  then  it  speeds  up  on  different  levels.   I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  one  big  accomplishment.  I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  con-­ tinuing  to  work  with  writers  and  getting  my  work  out  to   WKHSXEOLFÂąERWKP\SOD\VDQGP\ÂżFWLRQ


6B  |  ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

THEATRE FEATURE

Theatre Department Makes ‘Noise’ PHYSICAL COMEDY AND RELATABLE CHARACTERS CONTRIBUTE TO LATEST PRODUCTION

8WLOL]LQJSURSVDUHYROYLQJVHWDQGPDVWHULQJSK\VLFDOFRPHG\ZHUHDOOFKDOOHQJHVWKHFDVWDQGGLUHFWRURI³1RLVHV2II´VDLGWKH\PHW3+2723529,'('%<-$&.:$'( By  Julie  Mansmann (GLWRULQFKLHI_Jmansmann60@newpaltz.edu

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ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  |  7B  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle MUSIC PROFILE

A Home For Harmony Cold Spring Musician Finds Comfort in New Paltz Music Scene

Musician  Jake  Harms  can  be  seen  performing  at  open  mics  around  New  Paltz,  including  Oasis  Cafe,  Snug  Harbor,  Slash  Root  and  Cafeteria.                            PHOTO  BY  MEGHAN  ROBERTS                                 By  Maeve  Halliday Copy  Editor  |  0KDOOLGD\#QHZSDOW]HGX

In   the   past   few   years,   musician   Jake  Harms  has  lived  everywhere  from   Marlboro   to   Minneapolis   to   Marthaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Vineyard.  But  a  few  months  ago,  in  his   hometown  of  Cold  Spring,  N.Y.,  he  said   he  started  to  feel  stagnant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold  Spring  was  dead  and  cultur-­ ally   blue-­balled,â&#x20AC;?   Harms   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every-­ body  there  is  50  and  writes  songs  about   their  kids.â&#x20AC;? While  searching  for  a  place  that  al-­ lowed  him  to  play  music  at  any  time,  he   stumbled   upon   a   New   Paltz   apartment   on   Main   Street,   where   he   said   he   was   able  to  grow  as  an  artist  and  boil  out  of   his  restlessness. Now   living   in   New   Paltz   for   four   months,   Harms   can   currently   be   heard   at   Oasis   Cafe,   Snug   Harbor,   Slash   Root   and   Cafeteria.   Described   by   fans   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;lyrically   driven   acoustic   rock,â&#x20AC;?   he   said   his   music   actually   falls   under    

the  category  of  pop.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   play   pop   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   confession-­ al   singer-­songwriter   stuff   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   a   lot   of   words,â&#x20AC;?   Harms   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   the   real   important  part  of  it  for  me  is  being  able   to  feel  good  about  what  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  saying  and   that  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  resonant,  not  cheap  or  stupid.â&#x20AC;? Harms   said   his   initial   impres-­ sion   of   the   music   scene   in   New   Paltz   was   that   it   was   â&#x20AC;&#x153;a   little   all   over   the   placeâ&#x20AC;?   in   terms   of   style   and   artists.  At   ÂżUVW KH VDLG KH ZDV VRPHZKDW MXGJ-­ mental   of   it   for   that   reason,   and   un-­ able   to   pinpoint   who   â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   tastemakers     of  the  music  sceneâ&#x20AC;?  were. He  said  seeing  some  of  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   popular   bands   perform   has   given   him   an   opportunity   to   be   less   criti-­ cal   of   himself   and   feel   more   free   in     his  performances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bands   like   Godchilla,   they   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   expect   much   from   you   other   than   that   you  show  up,  shake  your  ass  and  have   fun,  and  to  me  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  music  really  

is,â&#x20AC;?   Harms   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   a   weird   way,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   more  encouraged  by  that  to  do  my  own   thing,  which  is  a  bit  more  demanding  on   the  audience  in  terms  of  content,  with-­ RXWWKLQNLQJWRRPXFKMXVWGRLQJLW´ Since   settling   here   in   New   Paltz,   Harms   has   been   regularly   treading   in   the   open   mic   circuit,   and   has   recently   played   shows   set   up   by  Adir   Cohen,   a   staple  of  the  New  Paltz  music  scene.     He   also   performs   with   New   Paltz-­ based  band  Nelsonvillains,  of  which  he   is   a   vocalist   and   guitarist.  The   band   is   currently  recording  an  EP  and  scouting   out  venues  both  in  and  outside  of  New   Paltz.     With  a  good  turnout  to  many  of  his   shows,  Harms  said  he  is  appreciative  of   the  many  people  that  come  out  to  sup-­ port  local  musicians  in  New  Paltz.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   had   forgotten   people   being   en-­ thusiastic   and   not   weird   and   cagey,â&#x20AC;?   Harms  said.     Currently,   Harms   has   released   two  

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

DOEXPV  ERWK XQRIÂżFLDO +LV ÂżUVW DO-­ bum,   That   Big   Sad   Thing   (That   You   Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   Quite   Put   Your   Finger   On),   was   recorded   last   winter.   His   more   recent   work,   The   Things   I   Missed   When   The   Year   Dried   Up,   was   recorded   in   both   Marlboro  and  New  Paltz.  Both  albums   can  be  downloaded  for  free  at  PHGLDÂżUH FRPMDNHKDUPV         Harms   said   since   arriving   in   New   Paltz  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  recorded  plenty  of  music,  and   while  New  Paltz  is  a  bit  of  a  small  town   ÂłEXEEOH´ KHÂśV HQMR\HG SHUIRUPLQJ IRU SHRSOHZKRHQMR\KLVPXVLFDQGEXLOG-­ ing  his  fan-­base. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   crowd   all   the   time   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  way  better  than  trucking  down  to  the   city  to  play  a  show  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  kind  of  limp,   where  people  are  sitting  down  and  kind   of   half-­hearted,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m]   play-­ ing  a  lot  of  shows  in  one  place  for  lots   of  people  who  are  having  fun  and  seem   WRHQMR\LW,ÂśYHEHHQPRUHFRPIRUWDEOH here  than  anywhere  else.â&#x20AC;?


8B  |  ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

ART FEATURE

Student Art Hangs In There CLOTHESLINE ART SHOW PROVIDES HINDERANCE-FREE FORUM FOR EVERYONE

By  Brian  Kearney

Contributing  Writer  |  Bkearney82@newpaltz.edu

With   the   help   of   third-­year   printmaking   major  Anthony   Tino,   SUNY   New   Paltz   stu-­ dents  gathered  on  Friday,  Nov.  12  to  show  off   WKHLU FUHDWLRQV LQ D JDOOHU\ GHVLJQHG VSHFL¿-­ cally  for  them. “I  decided  to  create  the  show  as  an  alter-­ native   to   dealing   with   galleries   in   town   and   because   there   is   no   student   gallery   on   cam-­ pus,”   said  Tino.   “If   we   don’t   have   a   gallery   we’ll  just  make  it  ourselves.” Held  in  Student  Union  100,  the  Clothes-­ line   Art   Show   included   various   pieces   submitted   by   students,   which   were   hung   on   a   clothesline   rather   than   displayed   on   a   wall.   Works   on   the   clothesline   includ-­ ed   prints,   paintings,   drawings   and   pho-­ tos.   Video   submissions   were   shown   on   a   monitor   and   included   both   live   action   and    

stop-­motion  videos. Tino,   who   conceived   and   organized   the  entire  show,  said  the  event  was  not  only   a   presentation   of   students’     work  but  entirely   student-­run   as   well. “I’ve   never   displayed   any-­ thing   in   a   gal-­ lery   setting   before,”   said   third-­year   geog-­ raphy   major   and   art   minor   Ryan   Reutershan,   who   submitted   two   stop-­ motion   videos.   “I   found   the   show   ap-­ pealing   because   it’s   being   organized   and     run  by  [us].”

In   order   to   have   their   work   considered,   students   submitted   pieces   to   an   all   student   panel,  which  decided  on  what  art  would  and   wouldn’t  make  it  into   the   show.   However,   every   piece   submit-­ ted   was   ultimately   accepted   into   the   show. At   the   event,   artwork   wasn’t   the   only   attrac-­ tion.   Guests   were   JUHHWHG E\ D ¿YH gallon   keg   of   root   beer,   plenty   of   food,   a   performance   from   the   band   Giant   Peach   and   a   guy   walking   around   in   an   alligator     costume. The   idea   of   the   event,   according   to  

can have “ We shows like this

anytime and they can go anywhere”

-ANTHONY TINO

Tino,   stemmed   from   a   desire   to   create   a   fo-­ rum  where  students’  work  could  be  presented   without  any  hindrances. “We   can   have   shows   like   this   anytime   and  they  can  go  anywhere,”  Tino  said. Third-­year   geography   major,   Angela   DeVivo  showed  off  an  ink  drawing  and  many   of   her   photos   in   the   show   and   said   it   was   a   wonderful  experience  for  someone  who  is  not   studying  art  professionally.   “I   submitted   because   I   do   work   on   the   side  of  my  studies  and  thought  it’d  be  nice  to   see  it  in  a  local  show,”  she  said. Tino  hopes  that  future  student-­run  events   will  prosper  and  said  there’s  a  future  for  more   clothesline  galleries.   He   said   he   hopes   the   event   will   inspire   more  exhibits  organized  by  students.   “I   wanted   something   to   spark   campus   unity,”  he  said.  

$ONTåBRAVEåTHEåSNOWåANDå COLDåTHISåWINTERåBREAK Get ahead with FLCC’s Online Learning. No matter where you plan to spend your break, you can get ahead with online classes at FLCC this winter. With nearly 30 courses to choose from, it’s easy to get a few electives out of the way. FLCC’s Online Winter Session classes start December 13. Learn more! Visit www.flcc.edu/winter for details.

Thursday,  November  18,  2010


ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  |  9B  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

T.V. With A Bite TELEVISION REVIEW

AMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x153;WALKING DEADâ&#x20AC;? BRINGS A HUMAN ELEMENT TO THE DECEASED

By  Maxim  Alter A&E  Editor  |  Malter42@newpaltz.edu

Even   little   girls   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   safe   from   the   ZUDWK RI Âł7KH :DONLQJ 'HDG´ WKH ÂżUVW show   in   the   history   of   cable   programming   to  kick  off  by  blowing  the  brains  out  of  an   LQQRFHQW ]RPELÂżHG FKLOG :LWK WKUHH HSL VRGHV RI WKH ÂżUVW VHDVRQ DOUHDG\ DLUHG RQ AMC,  this  zombie  apocalypse  series  based   on  the  monthly  comic  of  the  same  name  is   SXVKLQJ WKH ERXQGDULHV RI PRGHUQ WHOHYL VLRQDQGGHYRXULQJP\HYHU\WKRXJKW Adapted   from   Robert   Kirkmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   graphic  novel  series,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Walking  Deadâ&#x20AC;?   is  a  television  show  that  plays  like  an  epic   PRYLH ,WÂśV GHHS GDUN WKRXJKW SURYRNLQJ DQGHYHQDOLWWOHFRPHGLF%XWZKDWPDNHV it   so   successful   is   that   each   episode   puts   you  into  the  mind  of  its  characters,  focusing   RQWKHKXPDQVLGHRIDP\WKRORJLFDOWUDJ HG\ :LWK LQWHVWLQHV EHLQJ VOXUSHG XS OLNH linguine,   and   hordes   of   monsters   snacking   on  loved  ones,  the  plot  still  manages  to  feel   UHDO DQG VRPHZKDW WHUULI\LQJ 7KH DWPR sphere   is   gloomy   and   perfectly   crafted   to   NHHS\RXIHHOLQJWHQVHDQGRQHGJH 6LPLODU WR IDQ IDYRULWHV OLNH Âł%DWWOH star   Galactica,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Walking   Deadâ&#x20AC;?   has   taken  a  fantastical  plot  device  and  made  it   IHHOJULWW\DQGUHDOLVWLF7KLVLVQRHDV\WDVN

but  with  Frank  Darabont,  director  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Shawshank   Redemption,â&#x20AC;?   taking   the   helm   as   executive   producer,   director   and   writer   for  the  series,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  surprise  that  the  level   RI TXDOLW\ KDV EHHQ VR PRQXPHQWDO (DFK character,   major   and   minor,   is   portrayed   beautifully   by   an   amazing   cast,   and   even   some  of  the  earliest  scenes  will  tug  at  your   KHDUWVWULQJV Lead   character   Rick   Grimes,   played   by  Andrew  Lincoln,  is  relatable  because  of   KLV LPSHUIHFWLRQV +H FDUULHV KLPVHOI ZLWK FRQÂżGHQFH DQG LV REYLRXVO\ D OHDGHU EXW he  struggles  to  understand  his  wife  and  be   WKHUH IRU KLV VRQ :KHQ KH ZDNHV XS LQ D hospital  bed  and  is  greeted  by  the  end  of  the   ZRUOGHYHU\WKLQJFKDQJHV+LVRQO\JRDOLV WRVXUYLYHORQJHQRXJKWRÂżQGKLVIDPLO\ As  he  battles  his  way  through  Atlanta,   *D\RXFDQÂśWKHOSEXWIHHOFODXVWURSKRELF 7KHUHDUHPRPHQWVZKHQ,OLWHUDOO\FDXJKW myself  shouting  at  my  television  screen  in   FRPSOHWHVKRFN2QHYLVLRQLQSDUWLFXODU, canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  seem  to  wipe  from  my  brain  includes   Rickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  horse  being  treated  like  a  four  course   PHDO E\ D KRUGH RI ]RPELHV$QG DQRWKHU when   Rick   and   his   new   ally   Glenn   must   FRYHUWKHPVHOYHVZLWKWKHLQQDUGVRIDGH ceased  zombie  in  order  to  smell  dead  enough   to  walk  undetected  through  a  crowded  street  

RI LQIHFWHG 5LFN HYHQ GRQV WKH ]RPELHÂśV IHHWDVDQHFNODFH 7KLV VKRZ DVNV LWV DXGLHQFH WR WKLQN ,WGRHVQÂśWWUHDW\RXOLNHDEUDLQOHVV]RPELH but  rather  poses  questions  like,  how  would   you   survive   and   who   would   you   trust?   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   betrayal,   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   heartbreak   and   there  are  standalone  stories  that  could  exist   ZLWKRUZLWKRXWD]RPELHLQYDVLRQ$OOWKUHH RIWKHÂżUVWEDWFKRIHSLVRGHVKDYHEHHQSHU fect,  interspersing  long  portions  of  dialogue   ZLWK ZHOOFKRUHRJUDSKHG DFWLRQ VHTXHQFHV DQGKDXQWLQJLPDJHU\$QRWKHUWKLQJ,WKRU RXJKO\ DSSUHFLDWH LV WKDW LWÂśV VKRW RQ ÂżOP something   long   forgotten   in   the   realm   of   VFLHQFH ÂżFWLRQ WHOHYLVLRQ &RPSXWHUJHQ erated   images   are   also   used   sparingly   and   VSHFLDOHIIHFWVDUHSUDFWLFDOUDWKHUWKDQ0L FKDHO%D\LÂżHG ,I\RXKDYHQÂśWVHHQWKLVVKRZ\HWVWRS what   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   immediately   and   get   UHDG\WREHKRRNHG(YHQLI\RXÂśYHUHDGWKH FRPLFERRNVHULHVWKHFUHDWRUVKDYHSURP ised   to   keep   things   fresh,   changing   story   DUFVDQGHYHQDGGLQJQHZFKDUDFWHUV$V, ZDLWIRUWKHQH[WHSLVRGHZLWKJLGG\DQWLFL SDWLRQ,FDQWUXO\VD\Âł7KH:DONLQJ'HDG´ has  the  potential  to  rise  from  the  grave  that   LVWHOHYLVLRQPHGLRFULW\(DW\RXUKHDUWRXW Âł7ZRDQGD+DOI0HQ´

?

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEXT ON

Nov. 21: Episode 4 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vatosâ&#x20AC;? In  an  episode  written  by  Robert   Kirkman,  creator  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Walk-­ ing  Dead,â&#x20AC;?  Rickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  excursion  into   Atlanta  to  rescue  Merle  Dixon   and  retrieve  guns  and  ammo   becomes  jeopardized  when  things   go  awry.  Back  at  camp,  Jim   becomes  unhinged  while  danger   lurks  just  around  the  corner.

COMING LATER... 1RY(SLVRGH´:LOGĂ&#x20AC;UHÂľ Dec. 5: Episode 6 â&#x20AC;&#x153;TS-­19â&#x20AC;? AND  MORE!  But  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  too   comfortable.  Even  though  13  more   episodes  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Walking  Deadâ&#x20AC;?   KDYHDOUHDG\EHHQFRQÂżUPHG thanks  to  stellar  ratings,  fans   will  have  to  wait  till  fall  2011  to   see  what  happens  in  season  two.   Bummer. Photos  courtesy  of  amctv.com/ walkingdead.

FROM COMIC BOOK TO TELEVISION

Rick Grimes

Andrea

Glenn

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

Laurie Grimes


10B  |  ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Due Dateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Delivers

MOVIE REVIEW

TODD PHILLIPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; LATEST FILM PREGNANT WITH COMEDIC GOLD AND ABSURDITY By  Nick  Fodera   Staff  Writer  |  n01949888@newpaltz.edu

As   I   sat   back   in   the   theater,   waiting   with   bated   breath   for   the   latest   come-­ dic   effort   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Hangoverâ&#x20AC;?   director   Todd  Phillips  to  begin,  a  thought  crossed   my   mind:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will   this   be   as   funny   as   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The   Hangover?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Can   lightning   really   strike  twice?â&#x20AC;?  Admittedly,  my   inner  cynic  kicked  in,  say-­ ing   that   there   was   no   way   Phillips   could   follow   up   a   movie   so  brilliant  in  its  un-­ controllable  comedic   madness.   To   my   sur-­ prise,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Due   Dateâ&#x20AC;?   turned   out   to   be   pretty  much  everything   I  wanted  it  to  be.   The   story   follows   high-­strung   architect   Peter   Highman   (played   by   the   con-­ sistently   hilarious   Robert   Downey  Jr.)  as  he  attempts   to  make  it  home  to  Cal-­ ifornia  in  time  for   the   birth   of   KLV ÂżUVW

child.   Everything   goes   according   to   plan,   until  a  chance  encounter  with  aspiring  ac-­ tor   and   destructive   force   of   nature   Ethan   7UHPEOD\ =DFK *DOLÂżDQDNLV  JHWV KLP mistaken  for  a  terrorist,  kicked  off  a  plane   DQGSXWRQWKHQRĂ&#x20AC;\OLVW1RZVWXFNZLWK out  a  wallet  and  no  way  to  get  home,  Peter   is   forced   to   take   the   cross-­country   road   trip   from   hell   with   Ethan   to   get   to   his  wife  in  time.   Most  of  the  humor  comes   from  the  absurd  situations   the   pair   repeatedly   ends   up   in,   or   Ethanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   amaz-­ ing   ability   to   screw   up   just   when   everything   VHHPVWREHJRLQJÂżQH This   really   helps   the   audience   to   stay   capti-­ vated,  as  you  really  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  hap-­ pen  next.  I  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  spoil  some   of   the   more   outrageous  

VFHQHVEXWVXIÂżFHWRVD\WKDWPRVWRIWKH ÂżOPÂśVIXQQLHVWPRPHQWVFDQÂśWEHGRQHMXV tice  with  simple  words.   :KDW PDNHV WKH ÂżOP UHDOO\ FOLFN LV the  strength  of  its  performances.  Downey   Jr.   plays   Peter   like   a   normal   man   pushed   to  the  edge  of  sanity  for  reasons  he  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   understand.   You   get   the   feeling   that   ev-­ ery   time   Ethan   says   something   stupid,   or   gets   himself   into   trouble,   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   strug-­ gling   with   the   urge   to   choke   the   life   out   of   him.   He   starts   to   crack,   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hilarious   when-­ ever   he   does.   Con-­ versely,   the   best   way   to   describe   Ethan   would   be   D GLJQLÂżHG LGLRW Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  hurricane   of   stupidity   and   RDÂżVKQHVV ZKR canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   seem   to   do   anything   right.   %XW *DOLÂżDQDNLV shows   us   that  

Robert  Downey  Jr.  and  Zach  *DOL¿DQDNLVVWDULQ³'XH'DWH´

thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   more   to   Ethan   than   pure   moronic   chaos.   With   every   puppy-­eyed   glance,   we  learn  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  lonely,  well-­meaning  soul   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   do   and   say   just   about   anything   to   be  liked.  Like  his  character  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Hang-­ RYHU´*DOLÂżDQDNLVGDUHVXVWRV\PSDWKL]H with  Ethan  even  though  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dumber  than   a   sack   of   bricks.  Trust   me,   by   the   end   of   the  movie  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  care  about  him,  stupidity   and  all.   If   there   is   one   complaint   I   have   with   WKLV ÂżOP LWÂśV WKDW VRPH RI WKH VKH nanigans   Peter   and   Ethan   end   up   in   border   on   the   ridiculous.   Thankfully,   these   scenes   are  rarely  played  straight,   which   hinders   my   abil-­ ity   to   criticize   them   too   much.  Honestly,  at  some   points  I  was  laughing  so   hard   I   barely   even   no-­ ticed.   The   bottom   line   is,   even   if   you   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   a   fan   of   Phillipsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  earlier  work,  this  is   one  movie  every  fan  of  com-­ HG\ VKRXOG GHÂżQLWHO\ VHH DV the  performances  alone  make   it   well   worth   a   trip   to   the   theater.

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  MOVIEDESKBACK.COM

Thursday,  November  18,  2010


ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  |11B  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle PERFORMANCE REVIEW

Quadruple Threat Comes to New Paltz â&#x20AC;&#x153;COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? STAR DONALD GLOVER GARNERS LOADS OF LAUGHS

By  Pierce  Lydon

Managing  Editor  |  Lydon47@newpaltz.edu

An   Emmy   award-­winning   television   writer,  a  rapper,  an  actor  and  a  stand-­up  co-­ median   came   to   SUNY   New   Paltz   on   Nov.   13  and  they  all  have  the  same  name.   Donald  Glover.   The   night   before   his   stand-­up   perfor-­ mance   on   campus,   the   26-­year-­old   star   of   NBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Communityâ&#x20AC;?   played   a   show   as   Childish   Gambino,   his   rapper   alter   ego,   in   Los  Angeles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  like  to  stay  busy,â&#x20AC;?  said  Glover.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   I  was  a  kid,  I  always  wondered  why  my  mom   was  so  busy  ...  [Now]  I  like  living  on  planes.â&#x20AC;? Despite   his   taxing   schedule,   Glover   and  fellow  comedian  Hannibal  Buress  were   ready  to  entertain  the  students  who  attended   the  event  in  the  Student  Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Multi  Pur-­

pose   Room.   According   to   Student   Activi-­ ties  and  Union  Services  Events  Coordinator   Brendan   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien,   the   show   was   sold   out   with   approximately   300   students   in   atten-­ dance  give  or  take  a  few  absentees. Buress,  a  former  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday  Night  Liveâ&#x20AC;?   writer   and   current   30   Rock   scribe,   opened   the  show  with  a  short  set.  His  comedy  ranged   from   the   colors   of   the   chairs   in   the   audito-­ rium   to   how   much   he   wanted   to   punch   his   cousin  at  Thanksgiving. Glover   followed   with   an   approximate-­ O\ KRXU ORQJ VHW7KH ÂżUVW WKLQJ KH GLG ZDV warn   the   audience   that   this   would   be   noth-­ ing   like   the   kind   of   comedy   many   fans   of   his   expect   after   watching   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Communityâ&#x20AC;?   or   his  Derrick  Comedy  skits.  His  comedy  was   actually   much   more   akin   to   his   rapping;Íž   vulgar,   pop   culture   reference-­laden   and    

most  importantly,  hilarious. Glover  touched  on  a  number  of  subjects   from  his  days  babysitting  in  New  York  City,   encounters  with  bums,  farting  in  public,  his   experiences  living  in  a  foster  home  and  the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donald  for  Spider-­Manâ&#x20AC;?  campaign. The   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donald   for   Spider-­Manâ&#x20AC;?   bit   fo-­ cused  around  the  Internetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  desire  for  Glover   to  don  the  red,  webbed  and  blue  tights  in  the   reboot   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spider-­Man.â&#x20AC;?   The   Internet   was   unsuccessful  but  it  would  have  been  a  dream   come   true   for   Glover.   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   liked   comics   since   he   was   a   kid   because   he   always   â&#x20AC;&#x153;felt   like  a  weirdo.â&#x20AC;? Ultimately,  his  whole  set  built  up  to  the   one   thing   missing   from   most   comediansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   routines:  an  epic  poop  joke. After  the  show,  Glover  was  on  the  move   again,   catching   a   ride   back   down   to   New  

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

York  City  almost  as  quickly  as  he  arrived  in   New  Paltz. Next   up   for   Glover,   a   stand-­up/ music   tour   with   himself   called   the   I   AM   DONALD   tour.   (BeyoncĂŠ   already     used  the  I  AM  TOUR.) Âł5LJKWQRZ,FDQEHVHOÂżVK´VDLG*ORY-­ er   of   his   â&#x20AC;&#x153;sleep   when   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   deadâ&#x20AC;?   mentality   while   on   the   way   to   his   car.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   probably   NHHSEHLQJVHOÂżVKIRUDERXWÂżYHPRUH\HDUV´ 7KHÂżUVWYHUVHRQKLVPL[WDSHCuldesac   VXPVXS*ORYHUÂśVQH[WÂżYH\HDUVSHUIHFWO\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;N****s  wanna  have  some,  all  I  wantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   to   have   it   all.   They   wanted   something   dif-­ ferent,   n****   problem   solved.   Drunk   off   the   high   life,   death   is   when   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   sleep     it  off,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. 1RZ OHWÂśV MXVW KRSH KLV VHOÂżVK VWUHDN ODVWVORQJHUWKDQÂżYH\HDUV


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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS M

SC IN W

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

Pg 11 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; en   ch AR oa YE r  C HE T ce oc OF s  S CH e  13

OA g Pa

SET FOR

NEXT YEAR 7KH:RPHQœV9ROOH\EDOOWHDPœVVHDVRQFDPHWRDFORVHRQ1RYZKHQWKHWHDPORVWWR681<&RUWODQGLQWKH681<$&¿QDOV By  Andrew  Wyrich   Sports  Editor  |  Andrew.wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

The  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volleyball  season  came   to  an  end  on  Nov.  6  when  the  Hawks  fell   to   Cortland   in   the   SUNYAC   Volleyball   &KDPSLRQVKLS7RXUQDPHQWÂżQDO The  team,  which  had  previously  been   riding   an   eight-­match   winning   streak,   competed   against   Buffalo   State   and   Fredonia  before  losing  to  Cortland.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   competed   against   them   until   the  third  game  where  we  got  in  a  rut  we   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   out   of,â&#x20AC;?   Head   Coach   Matt   Giufre  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  competed,  we  just  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have  enough  and  they  played  better.â&#x20AC;?   Giufre,   who   has   coached   the   Hawks   for  nine  years,  has  guided  the  team  to  26   wins  in  each  of  the  past  seven  seasons  and   has  led  his  teams  to  the  SUNYAC  cham-­ pionships  in  the  past  three  seasons.   The  tournament  had  many  high  points   for   the   Hawks,   including   a   win   against   host  SUNY  Fredonia.    

Giufre  believed  beating  Fredonia  was   a  big  match  for  the  Hawks.   Âł7KHLUIDQVĂ&#x20AC;RRGHGWKHSODFHDQGZHUH loud   and   obnoxious,â&#x20AC;?   Giufre   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   had  to  equal  their  defensive  ability  â&#x20AC;Ś  and   doing  that  was  hard  â&#x20AC;Ś  we  were  able  to  do   that  and  I  was  proud  of  how  our  players   responded  to  that  situation.â&#x20AC;?   After   beating   Fredonia   in   the   semi-­ ÂżQDOVWKH+DZNVIDFHG&RUWODQGDQGXOWL mately  lost  the  game.   7KH +DZNV ÂżQLVKHG WKH VHDVRQ ZLWK a   28-­11   record   overall,   and   went   6-­2   in   the  conference.    The  team  also  had  a  10-­0   record  at  home,  keeping  their  home  win-­ ning  streak  alive.   Giufre   said   he   thought   the   Hawks   excelled   this   season   despite   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   young   roster.     The   Hawks   had   only   two   starters   from   last   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   squad   return   for   the   2010   season,   but   Giufre   said   he   was  pleased  with  how  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  season   turned  out.   Second-­year   player   Michelle   Jacob-­

son  agreed  and  thought  the  team  did  well   considering   the   rosterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   relatively   young   group  of  players.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   everyone   stepped   up   and   worked  hard  and  played  together,â&#x20AC;?  Jacob-­ son  said. The   Hawks   played   strong   matches   in   the   middle   of   their   season,   including   a   sweep   in   a   nine   game   home   stretch   dur-­ ing  the  Hawkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Invite  and  SUNYAC  Pool   Play.   Looking   back   on   the   season,   Giufre   said  he  hoped  to  address  the  consistency   the   team   lacked   over   the   course   of   the   season  when  the  team  plays  next  year.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   was   bit   of   a   disappointment   not   making  the  national  tournament,  and  we   had   some   stretches   where   we   played   re-­ ally   good   volleyball,   but   we   also   had   stretches  where  we  struggled  a  bit,â&#x20AC;?  Giu-­ fre  said.   The   Hawks   stumbled   at   the   Welles-­ ley  Invite  in  October,  but  had  a  12-­game   winning   streak   in   September.   They   also  

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

COURTESY  OF  STOCKTON  PHOTOS

VWUXJJOHG WR ÂżQG D JURRYH HDUO\ LQ WKH season,  and  started  off  the  year  with  a  6-­4   record  heading  into  their  home  games.   As   for   next   year,   Giufre   said   he   ex-­ pects  the  same  as  every  year  -­  to  compete   for  a  championship.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  a  great  core  group  next  year   that   has   been   through   a   lot   of   ups   and   downs  and  a  lot  of  big  moments,â&#x20AC;?  Giufre   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  can  rely  on  that  experience  to   carry  them  through  next  year.â&#x20AC;?   The  Hawks  will  be  losing  fourth-­year   students  Dana  Kindelmann  and  Stephanie   Skrobach   to   graduation,   but   will   be   re-­ taining  the  rest  of  their  roster.   Despite  losing  Kindelmann,  who  was   recently   named   a   2010   American   Vol-­ leyball   Coaches   Association   (AVCA)   All-­America   Honorable   Mention   and   Skrobach,   Giufre   believes   the   team   will   be  strong  next  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   long   as   we   work   hard   and   keep   our  cohesiveness  ...  my  expectation  is  to   be  in  the  postseason,â&#x20AC;?  Giufre  said.  


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pg 12

Hawks  Players  of  the  Week As  Announced  On  Nov.  15

Danielle  Harmon

Rob  Webb  

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Cross  Country

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Swimming  

Behind  Harmonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  performance  in   the  6K,  New  Paltz  placed  13th  out   of   33   teams   at   the   2010   NCAA   Division   III   Cross   Country     Atlantic  Regional  Championships   Saturday  afternoon  at  Fortin  Park   in   Oneonta,   N.Y.   Harmonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   time   of   23:24.6   eclipsed   her   former   program   record   of   23:25,   which   she  set  last  year  at  the  2009  Paul   Short   Invitational.   She   placed   WKLQD¿HOGRIUXQQHUV

Webb   helped   the   Hawks   edge     Ramapo   College   on   Saturday   in   Mahwah,   N.J.,   notching   two     ¿UVWSODFH ¿QLVKHV DQG RQH   UXQQHUXS UHVXOW LQ 1HZ 3DOW]¶V  YLFWRU\ +H FRYHUHG WKH 200   breaststroke   and   the   200     LQGLYLGXDO PHGOH\ LQ HYHQWEHVW times   of   2:21.66   and   2:03.65,     respectively,   and   clocked   a     VHFRQGSODFH  LQ WKH  EXWWHUÃ&#x20AC;\

Thursday,  November  18,  2010


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pg 13

Watson  Wins  Coach  of  the  Year By  Andrew  Wyrich   Sports  Editor  |  Andrew.wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

After   leading   the   Hawks   to   their   best   record   since   2004,   fourth-­year   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  Head  Coach  Eric  Watson   was  named  the  SUNYAC  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer   Coach  of  the  Year  award  by  the  confer-­ HQFHRIÂżFHRQ6XQGD\ Watson   led   the   Hawks   to   a   8-­9-­ 1   record   in   2010,   and   kept   the   team   in   playoff   contention   until   the   last   day   of   681<$&SOD\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  always  a  good  feeling  to  be  rec-­ ognized   by   your   peers,â&#x20AC;?   Watson   VDLGÂł7KLVDZDUG is   something   that   I   share   with   the   HQWLUHWHDP´ The   Coach   of  the  Year  award   is   decided   by   the   coaches   in   the   SUNYAC     con-­ ference   who   nominate   up   to   three   coaches   for   WKH DZDUG (DFK coach   puts   in   their   suggestion   IRUDÂżUVWVHFRQG and   third   place   nomination,   and   the  coach  with  the   most   points   wins   WKHDZDUG In   addition   to   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   record,   Watson   coached   the  Hawks  to  seven  shutouts,  which  was   as  many  as  the  team  had  in  the  previous   WKUHHVHDVRQVFRPELQHG Watson   said   that   he   credits   the   award   to   the   team   for   their   hard   work   and   dedication   over   his   tenure   as   head   FRDFK Fourth-­year  forward  Dave  Gardiner   thought  Watson  deserved  the  award  be-­ cause  of  the  direction  in  which  he  led  the   SURJUDPRYHUWKHSDVWIHZ\HDUV+HVDLG that   looking   back   at   where   the   soccer  

program  was  when  he  was  named  head   coach  and  what  it  has  become  shows  the   VLJQLÂżFDQFH:DWVRQKDGRQKLVWHDP â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The   program]   was   not   taken   se-­ ULRXVO\´ *DUGLQHU VDLG Âł7KLV \HDU ZH went   into   every   game   and   had   a   great   FKDQFHRIZLQQLQJ´ Gardiner  said  that  Watsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  style  of   coaching  was  calm  and  collected,  which   KHDSSUHFLDWHG â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   breaks   the   game   down   for   us   at  practice  and  halftime  and  he  explains   to  you  what  to  do  and  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  talk  down   to   you,â&#x20AC;?   Gardiner     VDLG Watson   also   had   the   team   ZRUN RQ WKHLU ÂżW-­ ness,   something   Gardiner   believes   helped   them   suc-­ FHHGWKLVVHDVRQ A c c o r d i n g   to   Gardiner,   Wat-­ son   would   have   the   team   split   up   practice   between   SOD\LQJ DQG ÂżW-­ QHVV GULOOV +H said   that   this   led   to   the   team   â&#x20AC;&#x153;go-­ ing   100   percentâ&#x20AC;?     LQ WKH ÂżQDO PLQ-­ utes   of   a   game,   and  allowed  them   to   make   good   decisions   as   the   FORFNZRXQGGRZQ The  last  New  Paltz  soccer  coach  to   win   Coach   of   the   Year   is   current   Ath-­ OHWLF 'LUHFWRU 6WXDUW 5RELQVRQ 5RELQ-­ son  gained  the  recognition  after  his  2004   VTXDGZRQJDPHV Despite   the   strong   season   and   step   in   the   right   direction,   Watson   never   thought  of  winning  the  award  during  the     VHDVRQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   goal   all   season   long   had   been   to  make  our  team  the  best  we  could  be,â&#x20AC;?   PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  STOCKTON  PHOTO :DWVRQOHGWKH+DZNVWRDUHFRUGWKLVVHDVRQZKLFKZDVWKHWHDPÂśVEHVWUHFRUGVLQFH :DWVRQVDLG

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  always  a  

good  feeling  to  be   recognized  by  your   peers,  this  award   is  something  that   I  share  with  the   entire  teamâ&#x20AC;?

 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Eric  Watson  

Do  you  want  to  join  The  New  Paltz  Oracle?   Come  to  our  elections  on  Sunday,  Nov.  21  at  7  p.m.  in  Student  Union  403!   E-­mail  oracle@newpaltz.edu  for �� more  information. Thursday,  November  18,  2010


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pg 14

Team  Swims  For  A  Cure    

By  Cat  Tacopina

Staff  Writer  |  Ctacopina97@newpaltz.edu

The    2010-­11  swim  season  may  only  be  four  match-­ es   in,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   already   something   team   members   will   never  forget.   7KHVZLPWHDPSDUWLFLSDWHGLQWKHÂżIWKDQQXDO7HG Mullin  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leave  it  in  the  Poolâ&#x20AC;?  Hour  of  Power  Relay  for   Pediatric  Sarcoma  research  on  Nov.  9.   The   event   derives   its   name   from   former   Carleton   College  athlete  Ted  Mullin,  who  succumbed  to  synovi-­ al-­cell  sarcoma  in  September  of  2006. Âł,WIHOWUHDOO\JRRGWRVZLPIRUDFDXVH´VDLGÂżUVW year  swimmer  Luke  Meyers.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  a  lot  of  fun  for  all   of  us.â&#x20AC;? 2QHRI0XOOLQÂśVÂżQDOVSHHFKHVWRKLVWHDPPDWHVEH-­ fore  he  died  was  about  â&#x20AC;&#x153;leaving  everything  in  the  pool,â&#x20AC;?     and  the  event  was  named  after  that.   The   relay   is   a   one-­hour   intensive   practice   where   swim   team   members   participate   in   continuous   relays,   swimming  as  hard  as  they  can.  The  event  was  held  from   5   to   6   p.m.   on   Tuesday   and   took   place   in   the   Elting   Gym   pool.     New   Paltz   was   one   of   the   134   groups   to   participate  in  the  event,  with  89  being  collegiate  groups   that  come  from  Divisions  I,  II  and  III.  The  other  groups  

came  from  club  teams,  high  school  teams  and  student-­ abroad  teams.  The  relays  are  not  only  as  a  memorial  to   Mullinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   legacy,   but   also   as   a   way   to   raise   money   for   synovial-­cell  sarcoma  research. Âł7KHUHOD\UDLVHVPRQH\IRUUHVHDUFKWRZDUGVÂżQG-­ ing   a   cure,â&#x20AC;?   said   Head   Coach   Scott   Whitbeck.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   year,  we  made  a  donation  of  $245,  which  will  amount   to  $2,450  due  to  each  contribution  being  multiplied  by     ten.â&#x20AC;? Whitbeck  did  not  enlist  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  swim  team  just   to  raise  money  and  awareness  for  sarcoma.  He  and  as-­ sistant   coaches   Kevin   Milkovich   and   Kristy   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien   decided  to  sign  New  Paltz  up  for  the  event  because  they   believed   there   was   more   to   gain   out   of   the   event   than   just  an  intense  workout.    The  coaches  felt  an  experience   such  as  this  is  eye-­opening  for  the  swimmers  and  some-­ thing  one  could  never  forget. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   actually   have   a   friend   who   swam   for   Carleton,   VRLWÂśVVRPHWKLQJWKDW,ÂżQGUHDOO\LPSRUWDQW´:KLWEHFN said. Milkovich  agreed  with  Whitbeck,  believing  the  re-­ lay  was  important  for  the  team.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  it  is  something  that  gives  the  team  a  lot  of   perspective,â&#x20AC;?  said  Milkovich.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  shows  them  that  there  

Thursday,  November  18,  2010

SUNY New Paltz 5â&#x20AC;? x 6.5â&#x20AC;?

is   something   bigger   out   there   for   them   to   realize.   We   DOVRZDQWWKHPWRWKLQNDERXWDQGUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWRQWKHSHRSOH who  pushed  them  and  got  them  to  the  collegiate  level  of   swimming  that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  involved  in  right  now.â&#x20AC;? Milkovichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  feelings  were  shared  by  the  team  mem-­ bers,  who  thought  the  relay  was  a  great  way  to  start  off   the  season. New   Paltz   was   not   the   only   SUNYAC   school   to   participate  in  the  event.    Teams  from  SUNY  Cortland,   SUNY  Fredonia  and  SUNY  Oswego  also  swam  in  the   relay.   Georgetown   University,   Massachusetts   Institute   of  Technology,  Babson,  University  of  Chicago  and  Carn-­ egie  Mellon  University  also  had  participating  teams. The  event  attracted  swimming  groups  from  across   the   globe   as   well.   Groups   from   Prague,   New   Delhi,   Madrid,   Seville   and   Copenhagen   also   participated   in   the  event.    Despite  differences  in  time  zones,  everyone   started   and   ended   together,   creating   a   unifying   experi-­ ence  amongst  all  of  the  swimmers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   (Milkovich)   even   came   out   of   retirement   to   participate  in  the  event,â&#x20AC;?  said  Whitbeck.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  in  the  end,   we  just  wanted  to  do  something  fun  that  was  also  for  a   really  good  cause.â&#x20AC;?  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

With  the  general  manager  meetings  under-­ ZD\WKH0HWVDUHFXUUHQWO\LQWKHPLGVWRIÂżJ uring  out  who  will  be  leading  the  team  for  2011   and  beyond.  Sandy  Alderson  and  his  new  group   RIIURQWRIÂżFHJXUXVKDYHLQWHUYLHZHGDERXW candidates  and  they  have  narrowed  the  list  of   second  round  interviewees  down  to  four.   Terry  Collins,  Bob  Melvin,  Wally  Back-­ man  and  Chip  Hale  will  be  called  back  to  give   one  last  push  to  Alderson  and  company  and   explain  why  they  should  be  the  ones  to  lead  the   Mets.    Collins  and  Melvin  are  the  perceived   front  runners.  However,  it  has  been  reported   that  both  Hale  and  Backman  surprised  Alderson   with  their  strong  interviews.    Either  way,  the   Mets  should  know  who  will  be  the  man  at  the   helm  by  Thanksgiving.  Hopefully  Mets  fans   will  be  giving  thanks  for  their  newly  anointed   manager.   TERRY  COLLINS:  Many  believe  that   Collins  will  end  up  with  the  manager  job  for   various  reasons.  Collins  served  as  the  Metsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   minor  league  coordinator  last  year,  and  has  

TERRY COLLINS

SPORTS

Pg 15

Somehow  Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  Manage received  rave  reviews  for  his  work  in  the  orga-­ QL]DWLRQ&ROOLQVLVNQRZQIRUKLVÂżUHDQGPDQ\ liken  him  to  Mets  fan  favorite  Bobby  Valentine.     While  Collins  is  intriguing,  and  has  ties  to  a   few  of  the  Mets  players,  he  previously  managed   the  Astros  and  Angels  and  has  had  mixed  re-­ sults.  After  he  was  hired  by  the  Astros  in  1993,   he  led  the  team  to  three  straight  second  place   ÂżQLVKHV%XWKLVWHQXUHZLWKWKH$QJHOVHQGHG LQÂżUHDVKLVFOXEKRXVHIHOODSDUWDURXQGKLP Many  question  if  Collins  is  the  right  choice  to   lead  the  current  group  of  players,  and  while  he   is  intriguing,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  completely  sold  on  him   yet.  Collins  is  also  favored  by  new  Mets  front   RIÂżFHDSSRLQWHH3DXO'H3RGHVWDZKLFKFRXOG be  the  deciding  factor  of  this  search.    Some   believe  that  Collins  is  also  being  considered   because  of  his  intensity  that  he  would  bring  to   an  otherwise  stagnant  clubhouse.   BOB  MELVIN:  Melvin  is  considered  a   front-­runner  for  the  job  because  of  his  previous   managerial  experience  as  the  head  coach  of  the   'LDPRQGEDFNVDQG0DULQHUV0HOYLQDOVRKDG mixed  records  over  the  course  of  his  manage-­ rial  career-­  which  includes  high  points  and  low   SRLQWV0HOYLQÂśVÂżUVWJLJZDVDVWKH0DULQHUVÂś head  coach  in  2003.  He  led  the  Mariners  to  a   93-­69  record,  but  the  Mâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  narrowly  missed  the   playoffs.  The  Mariners  never  recaptured  the   magic  of  that  year,  and  over  the  course  of  the   next  year  the  team  began  a  tailspin  which  ended   in  a  99  loss  season  in  2004.  Melvin  was  let  go   at  the  end  of  that  season,  but  soon  signed  on  as   WKHPDQDJHURIWKH\RXQJ'LDPRQGEDFNV7KH 'LDPRQGEDFNVÂżQLVKHGLQQGSODFHGXULQJ KLVÂżUVW\HDUEXWLQWKHWHDPORVWLQWKH

BOB MELVIN

NLCS  and  narrowly  missed  a  World  Series   EHUWK0HOYLQZDVÂżUHGE\WKH'ÂśEDFNVLQ DIWHUWKHWHDPVWDUWHGRIIWRDUHFRUG7KH Mets  hired  Melvin  as  a  scout  (or  as  a  potential   PDQDJHUVKRXOG-HUU\0DQXHOKDYHEHHQÂżUHG mid-­season)  last  offseason,  and  he  impressed   the  Mets  higher-­ups.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Mad  Scientist,â&#x20AC;?  as   Melvin  is  known  as  for  the  different  (success-­ ful)  lineup  changes  he  concocts,  could  be  a   calm  and  collected  manager  that  potentially   would  be  the  answer  the  Mets  have  been  look-­ ing  for.  However,  I  see  Melvin  as  more  of  a   bench  coach  candidate  than  anything.   WALLY  BACKMAN:  Ah,  Wally  Back-­ man.  Ever  since  his  hiring  last  year  to  man-­ DJHWKH0HWVVLQJOH$DIÂżOLDWHLQ%URRNO\Q Backman  has  garnered  a  cult-­like  following   amongst  the  Mets  fan  base,  while  also  be-­ FRPLQJDSRODUL]LQJÂżJXUHZKHQKLVQDPHLV discussed.    Some  believe  that  Backman  would   bring  the  Mets  an  instant  jolt  of  energy  and   intensity  that  would  ripple  down  throughout   the  roster  and  revitalize  the  team.  They  often   FLWHSOD\HUVOLNHQHZ$WODQWD%UDYH'DQ8JJOD who  say  that  Backman  brings  the  best  out  of   his  players  and  always  has  their  back,  and  in   return  the  team  plays  its  heart  out  for  him.     Others  believe  that  awarding  Backman  a  major   league  job  after  a  single  season  at  A  ball  would   be  premature  and  irresponsible.  Both  sides  of   the  argument  are  interesting  and  are  certainly   valid  points.  I  would  like  to  see  Backman  rise   through  the  Mets  minor  league  system  over  the   next  few  years,  and  potentially  overtake  the   managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  position  in  the  future.  I  think  there  is   no  question  that  Backman  possesses  the  skills  

WALLY BACKMAN

to  become  a  top  notch  manager,  but  I  question   his  ability  to  jump  from  low  minor  leagues  to   the  majors.   CHIP  HALE:  The  dark  horse,  and  my   personal  choice  for  the  Metsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  managerial  posi-­ tion  Chip  Hale,  served  as  the  Metsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  third  base   coach  last  season  and  instantly  made  a  good   impression  on  an  otherwise  disappointing  team.     It  is  said  that  Hale  is  motivated  and  energetic,   and  many  see  him  as  a  future  manager.  The   TXHVWLRQWKDW$OGHUVRQDQGKLVIURQWRIÂżFHQHHG to  ask  themselves  is  if  that  future  is  now.  Hale   KDVWKHTXDOLWLHVOLNHSDVVLRQDQGÂżUHWKDW Backman  has,  but  seems  to  be  less  public  about   it  (you  will  know  what  I  mean  if  you  have  seen   Backmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  quite  famous  argument  with  an  um-­ pire.  Check  it  out  on  YouTube.)    Hale  started  his   PDQDJHULDOFDUHHULQWKH'LDPRQGEDFNVÂśV\VWHP and  slowly  rose  through  it,  winning  at  every   OHYHOKHPDQDJHGDW,QWKH'LDPRQG backsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  El  Paso  AA  team  had  their  leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best   UHFRUGDQGLQ+DOHPDQDJHGWKH'Âś%DFNVÂś AAA  team  to  a  league  championship.  Besides   his  previous  awards  and  success,  Hale  has   something  all  of  the  other  candidates  have  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  a   relationship  with  the  current  Mets  roster.    Hale   is  said  to  have  a  strong  connection  to  many   of  the  players  on  the  team,  which  could  go  a   long  way  in  turning  the  Metsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  ship  in  a  differ-­ ent  direction.  If  I  had  to  choose  the  Mets  next   manager,  it  would  be  Hale.  

CHIP HALE

COLLINS  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  7TRAINTOSHEA.COM                                                                    MELVIN  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  PHOTOBUCKET.COM                                                                      BACKMAN  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  METSZILLA.COM                                                 ��                                                                         HALE  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR.

Thursday,  November  18,  2010


SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

L IA NT TE RS PO E G AG IN N 5 IN MA GE 1 AM TS PA EX ME

WHAT’S INSIDE

Watson Wins Men’s Soccer Coach of the Year PAGE 13

DOWN TO THE Team Swims For A Cure PAGE 14

WIRE

PHOTO  BY  LAURA  LUENGAS SIDE  PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  STOCKTON  PHOTO

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL FALLS TO CORTLAND IN FINALS: PAGE 11


The New Paltz Oracle, Volume 82, Issue 9