Issuu on Google+

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  85,  Issue  IX

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  November  29,  2013

OPENING THE DIALOGUE SUNY NEW PALTZ HOSTS “LET’S TALK ABOUT...” FORUM STORY ON PAGE 5

ALL PHOTOS BY ROBIN WEINSTEIN

TURNING POINT?

Park Point Discussions Set to Start Again STORY ON PAGE 3

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡6XVWDLQDELOLW\&RPPLWWHH([DPLQHV:DWHU)RXQWDLQV..3J‡$QQXDO.QRZ<RXU5LJKWV)RUXP+HOG3J ‡135&&WR6SRQVRU5HJLRQDO*LIW&DUG3J‡%LNH3ROLF\&RQVLGHUHGIRU5HYLVLRQ3J


Cat  Tacopina EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Katherine  Speller   MANAGING  EDITOR

_________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

Ben  Kindlon FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF

Andrew  Lief

FEATURES          PG.  4B A&E                      PG.  6B

SPORTS  EDITOR

_________________

Dana  Schmerzler Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Rosalie  Rodriguez

Assistant  PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITOR

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Madeline  Anthony Abbott  Brant Anthony  DeRosa   Roberto  LoBianco Jennifer  Newman COPY  EDITORS

Hannah  Nesich

ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITOR _________________

Nicole  Brinkley WEB  CHIEF

Maxwell  Reide MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

_________________

Maya  Slouka

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI SUNY  New  Paltz.  Our  circulation  is  2,500.  The  New  Paltz  Oracle   LVVSRQVRUHGE\WKH6WXGHQW$VVRFLDWLRQDQGSDUWLDOO\IXQGHGE\WKH student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   5RRP'HDGOLQHIRUDOOVXEPLVVLRQVLVSPRQ6XQGD\VLQ The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG E\WKHEXVLQHVVPDQDJHU&RPPXQLW\DQQRXQFHPHQWVDUHSXEOLVKHGJUDWXLWRXVO\EXWDUH VXEMHFWWRUHVWULFWLRQGXHWRVSDFHOLPLWDWLRQV7KHUHLVQRJXDUDQWHHRISXEOLFDWLRQ&RQWHQWV RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH fax  line  is  845-­257-­3031.

Volume  85 Issue  IX THE  GUNK  

1B-­8B

THE  DEEP  END EDITORIAL   COLUMNS

8B 9

DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER

SPORTS  

Incident:  Suspicious  Person   Date:  11/16/13 Location:  Bouton  Hall Residence  Life  staff  reported  an  unknown  male   within  the  hall.  Female  Student  advised  that   non-­resident  male  was  her  guest. Incident:  Suspicious  Activity Date:  11/19/13 Location:  Fine  Arts  Building Employee  reported  a  suspicious  individual.   3ROLFHRI¿FHUUHVSRQGHG6XEMHFWZDVODWHU LGHQWL¿HGDVDSURIHVVRU

10

BUSINESS  MANAGER

Emily  Weiss

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

NEWS

VISIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ORACLEâ&#x20AC;? ONLINE:

University  Police  Blotter

Index

11-­16

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE $SULO&DVWLOOR.HOVH\'DPUDG1LFN)RGHUD5LFDUGR+HUQDQGH]6DOO\ 0RUDQ(LOHHQ/LHEOHU-DKQD5RPDQR.D\FLD6DLOVPDQ6KHOE\6HLS .HOO\6HL]-DFN6RPPHU5\DQ:DO].ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

@NewPaltzOracle

Five-­Day  Forecast Thursday,  Nov.  21 Partly  Cloudy High:  44  Low:  36

Friday,  Nov.  22

Showers  High:  48  Low:  37

Saturday,  Nov.  23 Snow High:  42  Low:  25

Sunday,  Nov.  24 Partly  Cloudy High:  29  Low:  18

WANT  TO  WRITE  FOR  THE  ORACLE?

&RQWDFWXVDW Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   for  more  information!

STAFF

SPORTS                  PG.  14

Monday,  Nov.  25 Partly  Cloudy High:  33    Low:  26


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   3

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Planning  Board  Surveys  Park  Point  Land Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Park  Point  is  one  step  closer  to  fruition.   The   New   Paltz  Town   Planning   Board   has   recently  accepted  a  Final  Environmental  Impact   Statement   (FEIS)   on   the   proposed   Park   Point   New  Paltz  Housing  Project. Park  Point  is  a  residential  housing  project   on   42   acres   of   land   on   Route   32   to   be   leased   from  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  Foundation.  Accord-­ ing  to  the  Park  Point  website,  the  proposed  proj-­ ect  includes  a  732  bed  purpose-­built  student  and   faculty/staff  housing  community  full  of  modern   conveniences  and  on-­site  amenities.   It   also   includes   a   clubhouse,   maintenance   areas  in  two  buildings,  parking  areas,  stormwa-­ ter   management   facilities,   recreation   areas,   in-­ ternal  roads,  and  water  and  sewer  utilities.   Chair   of   the   New   Paltz   Planning   Board,   Michael   Calimano   said   the   FEIS   encompasses   some   of   the   boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   conclusions   about   all   the   environmental  impacts  that  have  been  discussed   and  received  by  the  board  after  the  public  com-­ ment   period   closed   on   Nov.   26,   2012,   on   the   draft  environmental  impact  statement  last  year.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   Park   Point   there   were   some   issues   that  were  not  addressed  in  the  draft  because  they   were  not  ready  at  the  time,â&#x20AC;?  Calimano  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   told  the  public  once  we  got  the  FEIS,  we  would   open  up  the  public  hearing  again.â&#x20AC;?   According   to   the   Department   of   Environ-­ mental  Conservation  (DEC),  a  public  hearing  on   the  FEIS  will  be  held  on  Nov.  25,  2013  and  will   continue  on  Dec.  9,  at  7  p.m.  at  the  Town  Hall   in  New  Paltz. Some  of  the  issues  Calimano  said  will  most   likely  be  discussed  at  the  hearing  pertain  to  the   ZDWHUDQGVHZHUV\VWHPVRLOVDQGWKHÂżVFDOLP-­ pact  of  the  project.   New   Paltz   Planning   Board   member   Tim   Rogers  said  he  hopes  the  session  will  be  well  at-­ tended  and  that  the  board  will  hear  from  a  cross   section  of  the  community,  including  SUNY  fac-­ ulty  and  students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  primary  concern  has  been  whether  the   projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   economic   and   environmental   impacts   can  be  mitigated,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.     According  to  page  15  of  the  FEIS,  the  pes-­ ticide  Dieldrin  and  arsenic  were  found  in  surface   samples  at  levels  above  guidance  criteria  set  by   the  New  York  State  Department  of  Environmen-­ tal  Conservation  for  Restricted  Residential  Use.   Calimano  said  the  project  sponsor  and  ap-­ plicant,  Wilmorite  Inc.,  is  planning  on  moving   the  contained  soil  to  be  part  of  the  burm,  or  bar-­ rier,  around  the  pond  and  cover  that  soil  with  an-­ other  6  inch  layer  of  topsoil  they  must  provide.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  growing  vegetables  on  it,  

but  you  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  good  top-­ soil,   there   are   trees   in   it   now,   but   because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   arsenic  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  just  going  to  bury  it  because  we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  get  close  to  that  to  make  sure  that   theres  no  human  impact.â&#x20AC;?   Calimano  said  he  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  go-­ ing  to  be  restriction  because  of  the  soil.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   transporting   it,   but   actually   burying  it,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  not  water  soluble  so  it   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  move  much  at  all.â&#x20AC;? Other   issues   addressed   include   pesticide   and  herbicide  use,  groundwater  contamination,   wetland  zoning  and  taxes. The   present   version   of   the  Town  Wetland   Law  provided  a  basis  for  an  analysis  of  a  poten-­ tial  project  layout  that  would  be  in  compliance   with   the   law.   The   Town   of   New   Paltz   is   cur-­ rently  in  the  process  of  appealing  a  decision  by   the   Ulster   County   Supreme   Court   that   revised   the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Wetlands  and  Watercourse  Protection   Law.  The  law  requires  a  100  foot  buffer  between   the  wetlands  and  a  construction  site.   According   to   the   FEIS,   the   project   spon-­ sor  approached  wetland  considerations  as  if  that   town  law  was  currently  enforceable.   Based   on   conversations   with   the   Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Wetlands   Consultant   and   Planning   Board,   the   current   plan   includes   some   encroachment   into   the  buffer,  much  of  which  is  in  areas  determined   to  have  lower  environmental  value,  is  preferable   to   a   layout   that   honors   the   wetland   buffer,   but   has  a  greater  impact  on  upland  woodlots  having   a  higher  environmental  value. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  the  town  wetland  law  went  into  effect,   Park   Point   would   need   permits   from   the   plan-­ ning  board  for  all  of  the  wetlands  for  the  site,â&#x20AC;?   Calimano  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  trying  to  do  in  the   )(,6LVWRGHVLJQWKHSURMHFWZLWKLQWKHFRQÂżQHV of  the  wetlands  law  so  if  the  law  came  into  ef-­ fect,  they  would  need  permits.â&#x20AC;? There   are   more   environmental   concerns   than   listed   in   the   FEIS   that   students   are   con-­ cerned   about.   Third-­year   anthropology   major   Rebecca   Berlin   said   her   main   concern   is   the   lack  of  green  energy  planned  to  be  used  for  the   project.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Besides   a   geothermal   pump   to   heat   and   cool  the  clubhouse,  no  renewable  energy  sources   will  be  used,â&#x20AC;?  Berlin  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  will  try  to  use   as  many  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;energy  savingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  appliances  as  they  pos-­ sibly  can  so  they  can  check  these  things  off  their   list  and  call  the  project  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;greenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  and  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;sustainable.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   These   various   attempts   at   being   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;greenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   seem   like  trivial  items  on  a  checklist  to  be  crossed  off,   so  that  the  bare  minimum  is  done  to  make  the   project  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;green.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Berlin  said  she  thought  the  design  would  be   rendered  useless  in  40  years  as  fossil  fuels  cease  

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN There  will  be  another  meeting  concerning  Park  Point  on  Nov.  25  at  New  Paltz  Town  Hall.

being  an  abundant  resource  â&#x20AC;&#x153;leaving  us  with  a   shell  of  cookie  cutter  McMansions.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;SUNY   New   Paltz   likes   to   call   itself   a   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;green  campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  but  in  reality  these  efforts  are  re-­ ally  just  a  minimal  attempt  to  be  seen  as  a  trendy   progressive  school,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. Currently,   Wilmorite   is   in   the   process   of   seeking  tax  exemptions  for  the  project  through   the   Ulster   County   International   Development   Agency  (UCIDA).   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhere  along  the  line  the  UCIDA  put   on   the   books   that   they   would   give   tax   exemp-­ tions  for  dormitory  projects.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nothing  that   anyone  in  New  Paltz  had  to  do  with,â&#x20AC;?  Calimano   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   developer   is   making   an   application   for   this   exemption.   I   think   from   a   developer   point   of   view   Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   see   every-­ thing  that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  eligible  for  and  apply.  From  a   town  point  of  view  we  need  to  know  what  these   costs  will  be  for  the  town  and  get  reimbursed  at   a  minimum.â&#x20AC;? He  said  there  are  no  set  numbers  right  now   and  that  the  town  is  trying  to  identify  the  range   RI H[SHQVHV LW ZRXOG WDNH RQ LQ WKH ÂżUVW \HDU Calimano   said   the   current   state   of   the   exemp-­ tions  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;more  like  a  negotiation.â&#x20AC;?   However,   he   hopes   for   Wilmorite,   the   town,  UCIDA  and  the  school  to  come  up  with  a   ÂżJXUHWKDWZRXOGZRUNIRUHYHU\RQH Even   though   building   plans   have   already  

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

been   submitted   to   the   building   department   and  the  FEIS  has  been  written  by  the  board,   there  are  still  many  more  stages  for  Wilm-­ orite   to   go   through   before   they   are   able   to   break  ground,  Calimano  said. The   board   needs   to   hold   public   hear-­ ings  on  some  new  information  that  was  un-­ DYDLODEOHLQWKHGUDIWUHSRUWVXFKDVWKHÂżV-­ cal   impact   of   the   project.   Then,   they   must   complete   the   environmental   assessment   form,   take   in   that   information   and   address   TXHVWLRQV RQ WKRVH QHZ VSHFLÂżF DUHDV DQG ZULWHXSDÂżQGLQJVWDWHPHQW7KHQWKHSODQ-­ ning  board  will  be  able  to  vote,  he  said.  If   approved,   then   the   environmental   impact   part  of  Park  Point  application  is  completed. If  the  board  approves  the  environmen-­ tal  impact  part  of  the  application,  there  are   still  site  plan  approvals  and  a  number  of  agree-­ ments  that  have  to  be  drawn  up  with  the  town   and,  once  approved  and  all  of  the  necessary  con-­ ditions  are  put  in  place,  the  applicant  can  start   the   project,   Calimano   said.    The   project   spon-­ sor  would  like  to  be  moving  dirt  next  spring,  he   said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  would  be  Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  goal  to  get  the   infrastructure  in  by  August  of  2015,â&#x20AC;?  Calimano   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  push  to  do  it,  but  a   number  of  different  agreements  have  to  still  be   put  in  place.â&#x20AC;? COURTESY  OF  FLICKR  USER  SAE  BRYO

By  Jennifer  Newman


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD CAR  BOMB A  suicide  car  bomb  hit  a  bus  convoy  of   off-­duty   Egyptian   soldiers   in   the   Sinai   Peninsula  on  Wednesday,  killing  11  and   wounding  37,  in  the  latest  of  a  stepped-­ up   wave   of   attacks   blamed   on   Islamic   militants   sympathetic   to   ousted   Presi-­ dent  Mohammed  Morsi. AFGHANISTAN   With  Afghanistanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   next   presidential   elec-­ WLRQMXVWÂżYHPRQWKVDZD\DXWKRULWLHVVD\ they  are  facing  a  possible  repeat  of  the  abus-­ es  that  have  discredited  the  countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  efforts   WREXLOGDGHPRFUDF\(OHFWLRQRIÂżFLDOVVD\ they  can  only  estimate  how  many  voters  are   really  on  the  rolls.   NUCLEAR  TALKS A  new  round  of  Iran  nuclear  talks  be-­ JDQLQÂżWVDQGVWDUWV:HGQHVGD\ZLWK WKHWZRVLGHVHQGLQJDÂżUVWVHVVLRQMXVW minutes   after   it   began   amid   warnings   from   Iranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   supreme   leader   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;red   linesâ&#x20AC;?   beyond   which   his   country   will   not  compromise. RODMAN  VODKA A   Denis   Rodman-­branded   vodka   is   set   to   GHEXWWKLVZHHNMXVWWKHODWHVWEXVLQHVVYHQ-­ WXUH KHÂśV KDG D Ă&#x20AC;LQJ ZLWK VWUHWFKLQJ IURP wrestling  to  authoring  a  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  book  to   HYHQ\HVXQRIÂżFLDOEDVNHWEDOODPEDVVDGRU to  North  Korea.  He  can  count  Kim  Jung  Un   as  a  fan  of  the  vodka  -­  the  duo  drank  from   two  cases  Rodman  brought  over  for  his  re-­ cent   visit   in   September,   where   they   talked   hoops   and   planned   an   exhibition   game   in   January. TOO  FAT  TO  FLY Frenchman   Kevin   Chenais   has   been   turned  down  by  planes,  trains  and  even   a  cruise  ship  in  his  quest  to  return  home   -­  and  his  family  says  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  because  he  has   been  deemed  too  fat  to  travel.   RIO  DE  JANEIRO  2016

Rio   de   Janeiroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   endless   beaches   and   lush   tropical   forest   will   be   a   photog-­ rapherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dream  during  the  2016  Olym-­ pics.  But  zoom  in  on  the  likes  of  once-­ pristine  Guanabara  Bay,  and  the  picture   is  of  household  trash  and  raw  sewage. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Sustainability  Committee  Pushes  Bottle  Free  Campus By  Andrew  Lief Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Members  of  the  Hydration  Commit-­ tee   and   H20ccupy   are   working   with   the   2IÂżFHRI&DPSXV6XVWDLQDELOLW\DQG)D-­ cilities  Management  this  semester  to  ex-­ amine  water  fountains  on  the  campus  of   SUNY  New  Paltz.   The  goal  of  the  testing  is  to  encour-­ age  the  use  of  reusable  water  bottles  and   to   allow   an   easier   way   to   drink   clean,   healthy   and   free   water,   according   to   Lisa  Mitten,  sustainability  coordinator  at   SUNY  New  Paltz. 0LWWHQVDLGWKHSXUSRVHRIWKLVSURM-­ ect   is   to   identify   water   fountains   that   FDQEHUHWURÂżWWHGZLWKJRRVHQHFNZDWHU ERWWOHÂżOOLQJIDXFHWV²QR]]OHVWKDWZLOO PDNHUHÂżOOLQJZDWHUERWWOHVHDVLHU â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   gooseneck   faucets   will   fur-­ ther  promote  a  culture  of  reusable  water   bottles  on  campus,â&#x20AC;?  Mitten  said.   Mitten   said   once   the   surveying   is   complete,  the  students  and  sustainability   staff  will  analyze  the  results  to  see  which   ZDWHU IRXQWDLQV RQ FDPSXV FDQ EH ÂżWWHG with   gooseneck   faucets   and   determine   which   water   fountains   on   campus   that   need  to  be  replaced  or  repaired.     7KHLU EXGJHW IRU Âż[LQJ IRXQWDLQV

will   depend   on   how   many   water   foun-­ WDLQVQHHGWREHÂż[HGDQGZKHWKHURUQRW a   $40,000   grant   they   received   through   Campus   Auxiliary   Services   from   Pepsi-­ &RZLOOEHSXWWRZDUGVWKHSURMHFWZKLFK is  unclear  at  this  time.     Shannon   Fabiani,   a   fourth-­year   psy-­ FKRORJ\PDMRUZDVDVNHGWREHLQYROYHG ZLWK WKLV SURMHFW EHFDXVH RI KHU H[SHUL-­ ence  as  a  Sustainability  Committee  intern   last  semester,  as  well  as  her  desire  to  help   make  SUNY  New  Paltz  a  disposable  wa-­ ter  bottle  free  campus. Fabiani   said   when   fountains   are   in-­ spected,  they  take  into  account  how  well   LWZRUNVDQGWKHDPRXQWRIWUDIÂżFDURXQG its  location. So  far,  Mitten  said  they  found  a  water   fountain  with  a  gooseneck  faucet  at  Has-­ brouck  Dining  Hall. Mitten  said  the  new  faucets  on  cam-­ pus  will  be  installed  this  year.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Facilities  operations  will  be  install-­ ing  a  test  gooseneck  faucet  on  one  water   fountain  on  campus,â&#x20AC;?  Mitten  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dur-­ ing  the  rest  of  the  school  year,  additional   water   fountains   will   be   equipped   with   gooseneck  faucets.â&#x20AC;? The  hardest  part  of  this  process  will   be  educating  the  campus  on  the  change  to   reusable  bottles,  Fabiani  said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  biggest  step  to  tackle  though  is   the  shift  of  students  and  professors  to  be   on   board   with   the   sustainable   change,â&#x20AC;?   Fabiani   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most   people   are   used   to   water   bottles.   Education   on   the   impor-­ tance   of   using   the   fountains   over   water   ERWWOHV ZLOO EH D KXJH SDUW RI WKLV SURM-­ ect.â&#x20AC;? Fabiani  said  they  are  putting  the  in-­ formation  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  found  into  an  updated   Ă&#x20AC;RRUSODQRIWKHZDWHUIRXQWDLQVRQFDP-­ pus,   so   each   one   is   labeled   and   recog-­ nizable.    This  will  allow  maintenance  to   know   the   exact   location   of   each   water   fountain   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   chosen   to   be   renovated   and  receives  a  gooseneck  addition. Fabiani   said   the   changes   made   will   provide  cleaner  water  for  the  campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While   most   people   assume   bottled   water   is   safer   than   tap   water,   evidence   shows  that  tap  water  is  tested  daily,  com-­ pared  to  weekly  testing  of  bottled  water,â&#x20AC;?   Fabiani  said.     Current   Sustainability   Intern   Annie   &RXUWHQV VDLG WKLV SURMHFW PD\ KDYH D PDMRULPSDFWRQWKHFDPSXVLQWKHIXWXUH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thousands,   if   not   millions   of   dis-­ posable   plastic   bottles   could   be   saved   over  the  course  of  a  few  years  once  and   if   bottled   water   is   banned   on   campus,â&#x20AC;?   Courtens  said.

Chamber  of  Commerce  Card  Keeps  Currency  Local By  Katherine  Speller Managing  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Starting  in  early  2014,  the  New  Paltz   Regional   Chamber   of   Commerce   will   in-­ troduce  the  New  Paltz  Regional  Gift  Card.   The   card   acts   as   a   prepaid   gift   and   reward   card   program   designed   to   ensure   â&#x20AC;&#x153;money  stays  local,â&#x20AC;?  Peter  Ingellis,  interim   president  of  the  chamber,  said.     Ingellis  said  the  card,  accepted  by  par-­ ticipating  merchants  within  the  Chamber  of   Commerce,  would  work  similarly  to  Hawk   Dollars,  offering  options  for  residents  and   students  to  use  them  instead  of  cash  at  lo-­ cal  establishments.  The  shops,  restaurants   and  other  participating  merchants  can  then   choose  to  offer  gift  or  reward  opportunities   at  their  discretion.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   a   lot   of   a   people   out   of   touch  with  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;buy-­localâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  movement,â&#x20AC;?  In-­ gellis  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But,  it  is  all  driven  by  what  the   merchant  and  consumers  want.â&#x20AC;? Rittenhouse   Payments   partner   Andy   Perry,  who  designed  the  program,  said  the  

card  is  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;win-­win  scenarioâ&#x20AC;?  for  merchants   and  consumers.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;To  begin  with,  the  card  is  designed  to   be  a  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;shop  localâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  card,â&#x20AC;?  Perry  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   only  need  one  gift  card  to  be  used  at  mul-­ tiple  different  merchants.â&#x20AC;? Perry   said   the   versatility   of   the   card   offers  many  opportunities  for  cross-­selling   between  businesses.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  think  about  it,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  see  a  lot   of  new  faces  and  returning  faces,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  live  in  the  area,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  have  the  op-­ portunity  to  get  the  card  and  access  to  the   list  of  participating  businesses.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  like  go-­ LQJLQWRWKH*DOOHULDZLWKMXVWRQHFDUG´ Perry  said  the  card  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;superiorâ&#x20AC;?  to  the   Hawk   Dollar   system   as   there   will   be   no   charge  for  customers  to  redeem  cards  and   they   can   be   reloaded   at   any   participating   establishment.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  can  be  loaded  anywhere  from  $5  to   $1000,â&#x20AC;?  Perry  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  merchants  can  re-­ ward  customers  in  a  myriad  of  ways  on  top   of  it  from  free  lunch,  dinner  to  discounts.â&#x20AC;?    

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

Perry  said  the  current  structure  of  the   program  offers  the  cards  to  members  of  the   chamber  at  a  $17  monthly  fee  that  will  be   eliminated  once  they  garner  the  support  of   100   businesses.  The   fee   covers   the   initial   start-­up   costs   of   cards,   swipe   pads,   pro-­ cessing  and  marketing  materials  and  busi-­ nesses  will  only  have  to  purchase  the  cards   once,  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  sandwich  and  a  cup  of  cof-­ fee  these  days,â&#x20AC;?  Perry  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  the  more   businesses   we   get,   the   more   participants,   the  more  successful  we  are.â&#x20AC;?     With   a   goal   of   100   to   150   retail,   res-­ taurant  and  local  businesses  by  2015,  Perry   said   the   Chamber   hopes   to   use   different   advertising  methods  and  word-­of-­mouth  to   get  the  attention  of  local  businesses.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;All   us   businesses   are   doing   some-­ thing  together  for  one  another,  advertising   and   hoping   to   keep   money   local,â&#x20AC;?   Perry   VDLGÂł3HRSOHMXVWQHHGWRSLFNLWXSORDG it,  pass  it  on  and  take  it  with  them.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the  goal.â&#x20AC;?


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Talk  About  Itâ&#x20AC;?  Event  Addresses  Campus  Issues

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

HONORING  KENNEDY Honoring   the   legacy   of   John   F.   Ken-­ nedy,   President   Barack   Obama   laid   a   wreath   at   the   assassinated   presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   gravesite   as   a   nation   remembers   that   terrible  day  in  Dallas  a  half-­century  ago   Friday.  Obama  also  recognized  a  group   of  distinguished  Americans  -­  including   Bill  Clinton  and  Oprah  Winfrey  -­  with   the  Presidential  Medal  of  Freedom,  an   award  created  by  Kennedy.

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

oracle.newpaltz.edu

ALLEGATIONS   OF   RACIAL   PRO-­ FILING 3URELQJ DOOHJDWLRQV RI UDFLDO SURÂżOLQJ New  York  City  is  giving  17  major  retail   stores   until   Friday   to   submit   informa-­ tion  on  how  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  dealt  with  shoppers   suspected  of  stealing.

Students  and  faculty  come  together  to  discuss  issues  of  intoelrance.  

By  Jennifer  Newman Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Talk  About  Race,  Gender,   and   Identityâ&#x20AC;?   Symposium   held   Saturday,   Nov.   16   brought   around   300   students   to-­ gether   to   bring   up   topics   aimed   at   open   discussions. Student   Association   (SA)   President   Manuel  Tejada  served  as  MC  of  the  event,   while  Associate   Professor   of   Black   Stud-­ ies,  Karanja  Keita  Carroll  and  SUNY  New   Paltz  President,  Donald  Christian  provided   opening  remarks. Christian  began  by  acknowledging  the   work  done  by  Tejada  and  his  colleagues  in   planning   and   organizing   the   symposium   and   quickly   addressed   the   recent   racist   slurs  found  in  residence  halls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  all  aware  of  the  recent   racial   postings   and   writings   on   this   cam-­ pus,â&#x20AC;?  Christian  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;These  are  examples   of  the  kinds  of  offensive,  obnoxious,  igno-­ rant  and  hateful  speech  that  occurs  on  col-­ lege  campuses  all  across  this  country.â&#x20AC;? Christian   said   an   example   of   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   efforts   to   strive   towards   diversity,   equity   and   inclusiveness   is   the   new   non-­ discrimination   policies   recently   imple-­ mented  to  include  gender  identity. But  he  said  more  still  needs  to  be  done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Policy   or   structure   will   not   prevent   the   kinds   of   speech   or   writing   that   has   caught   our   attention   most   recently,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;One  of  the  most  powerful  responses   to  such  speech  is  more  speech  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  instruc-­ tive,  thoughtful,  respectful  speech  that  uni-­ ÂżHVUDWKHUWKDQGLYLGHVXV/HWWLQJWKHXW-­

terances  of  one  person  armed  with  a  felt  tip   marker  divide  us,  or  harm  our  community,   yields  immense  power  to  evil  or  ignorance   and  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  any  of  us  wants  to  give   the  perpetrator  of  these  acts  such  satisfac-­ tion.â&#x20AC;? Three   workshops   followed   opening   remarks.   Desiree   Burch,   a   New   York-­ based  performer,  writer  and  producer,  and   J  Mase  III,  a  transgender  poet  and  activist   led   the   breakout   sessions.   Actor   Michael   Fowlin  served  as  the  keynote  speaker. The  symposium  concluded  with  small   facilitated  discussion  groups.   Second-­year   public   relations   major   Luisanna  Sosa  said  she  thought  the  speak-­ ers  were  very  enlightening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   enjoyed   the   different   ways   the   presenters   tackled   each   theme,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  all  had  their  unique  style  that  made   me  feel  engaged.â&#x20AC;? Sosa   said   the   event   showed   that   the   administration,   faculty   and   students   care   about   coming   together   when   incidents   of   racial  intolerance  occur.   Although   Sosa   said   she   thought   the   event   was   successful   in   delivering   the   message  to  educate  students  and  to  spread   knowledge   learned   at   the   event   to   peers,   she  said  she  would  have  liked  to  see    the   presence   of   more   faculty   at   the   sympo-­ sium.   However,  in  an  email  sent  out  after  the   event   by   Christian,   he   said   he   was   â&#x20AC;&#x153;very   proud   of   the   student,   faculty   and   admin-­ istrative   participation   and   commitment   to   such  a  critical  discussion.â&#x20AC;? 7KLUG\HDUÂżQHDUWVPDMRU&ORH*UR]LV

agreed   that   the   event   was   overall   very   good,   but   questioned   certain   speakers   techniques.   Fowlin  acted  out  a  scene  as  if  he  were   a  man  with  cerebral  palsy,  and  told  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;life   storyâ&#x20AC;?   from   that   personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   point   of   view,   Grozis  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[At]  our  discussion  group  at  the  end,   [we]  talked  about  whether  it  was  okay  for   the  last  speaker  [Fowlin]  to  portray  differ-­ ent  groups  like  he  did,  especially  [portray-­ ing]  someone  with  cerebral  palsy,â&#x20AC;?  Grozis   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  meant  well  and  I  think  it  had  a   good   impact,   but   I   know   a   lot   of   people   had  issue  with  it  from  a  moral  standpoint.â&#x20AC;?   Stephanie  Pina,  a  fourth-­year  Spanish   major,  said  she  enjoyed  the  workshops  she   attended. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  to  a  lot  of  lectures  on  LG-­ BTQ  issues  so  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  I  enjoyed  [J  Mas   III],â&#x20AC;?   Pina   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   second   workshop   [Burch]   was   great   because   she   made   us   open  our  eyes  to  how  we  see  ourselves  and   how  we  judge  others.â&#x20AC;? Christian  said  healing  as  a  community   will   continue   to   take   time.   However,   in   order  to  combat  hateful  speech,  he  asks  in   his  email  for  every  member  of  the  commu-­ nity  to  write  a  hopeful,  positive  or  unifying   message  to  be  displayed  on  their  residence   DQGRIÂżFHGRRUV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let   these   words   set   the   tone   for   our   community   and   serve   as   the   roadmap   to   our  next  steps,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   The  college  is  planning  another  sym-­ posium  on  race,  gender  and  identity  to  be   held  in  the  spring  semester.

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

ALLOWING   SAME-­SEX   WED-­ DINGS  IN  ILLINOIS Illinois   Gov.   Pat   Quinn   signed   legis-­ lation   Wednesday   allowing   same-­sex   weddings   starting   this   summer,   mak-­ ing   President   Barack   Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   home   state   the   16th   overall   -­   and   largest   in   the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  heartland  -­  to  legalize  gay   marriage. TSA  GUNMAN The   Transportation   Security   Adminis-­ WUDWLRQRIÂżFHUZKRZDVNLOOHGLQDJXQ-­ manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   attack   at   Los   Angeles   Interna-­ WLRQDO$LUSRUWGLHGWZRWRÂżYHPLQXWHV DIWHU KH ZDV VKRW FRURQHUÂśV RIÂżFLDOV said  Wednesday. MISSOURIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   FIRST   EXECUTION   IN  THREE  YEARS Joseph  Paul  Franklin,  a  white  suprema-­ cist  who  targeted  blacks  and  Jews  in  a   cross-­country   killing   spree   from   1977   to   1980,   was   put   to   death   Wednesday   LQ0LVVRXULWKHVWDWHÂśVÂżUVWH[HFXWLRQLQ nearly  three  years. BULLIES

Lawyers  for  two  teenage  girls  charged   with   stalking   a   Florida   classmate   who   complained   of   being   bullied   before   her   suicide   say   charges   against   both   have   been   dropped.   Last   month,   Polk   County  Sheriff  Grady  Judd  announced   the   arrest   of   a   12-­year-­old   girl   and   a   14-­year-­old  girl.   Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


NEWS

 6      oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

By  Patrick  Thurlow Contributing  Writer  |  N02572419@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Know  Your  Rightsâ&#x20AC;?  forum,  held  on  Tuesday,  Nov.  12,   was  a  collaborative  effort  between  the  Student  Association  (SA),   Students  Against  Mass  Incarceration,  Queer  Student  Union  and   Students  for  a  Sensible  Drug  Policy. The  current  marijuana  policy  was  the  focus  of  this  semes-­ terâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s    forum. The  forum  opened  with  statements  made  by  Student  Associa-­ tion  (SA)  Vice  President  Zachary  Rousseaus  and  continued  with  a   PowerPoint  presented  by  SA  Senator  Kelly  Brennan.  The  presen-­ tation  said  that  New  Paltz  has  one  of  the  strictest  marijuana  drug   policies  in  the  SUNY  system  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;No  Second  Chanceâ&#x20AC;?  policy.   According  to  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  Student  Handbook,  the   ÂżUVW RIIHQVH IRU D VWXGHQW FDXJKW ZLWK PDULMXDQD PD\ HQWDLO D VWULNHGLVFLSOLQDU\SUREDWLRQWKHVWXGHQWÂśVSDUHQWVEHLQJQRWLÂżHG and  a  required  attendance  of  a  rehabilitation  seminar;Íž  the  second   strike  reads  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  less  than  expulsion.â&#x20AC;?   The   PowerPoint   presentation   continued:   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;No   Second   Chanceâ&#x20AC;?  policy  is  one  of  the  strictest  marijuana  policies  not  only   compared   to   other   schools   in   the   SUNY   system,   but   also   com-­ pared   to   other   four-­year   universities.   The   PowerPoint   said   that   Harvard  University  has  a  less  strict  marijuana  policy  than  New  

Paltz  does. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  marijuana  laws  on  this  campus  are  heavy,â&#x20AC;?  SA  Presi-­ dent  Manuel  Tejada  said.   Tejada  and  Brennan  noted  that  many  cases  in  the  University   Police  Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  log  are  non-­violent  marijuana  charges.   Student  rights  advocate  and  local  lawyer  Andrew  Kossover,   who  has  participated  in  Know  Your  Rights  forums  in  the  past,  em-­ SKDVLVHGWKHIRXUWKÂżIWKDQGVL[WKDPHQGPHQWVSURWHFWLRQIURP illegal   search   and   seizure;Íž   right   to   due   process;Íž   and   right   to   an   attorney,  respectively.   6WXGHQWVWKHQZDWFKHGWKHÂżOPÂł5XOHVIRU'HDOLQJZLWK 3ROLFH´E\WKHRUJDQL]DWLRQ)OH[<RXU5LJKWV7KHÂżOPIHDWXUHV lawyer  Billy  Murphy  and  aims  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;show  you  how  to  make  the  law   workâ&#x20AC;?  by  instructing  viewers  on  10  rules  that  will  help  them  in   SROLFHHQFRXQWHUV7KHÂżOPZDVIROORZHGE\DQRSHQGLVFXVVLRQ between  Kossover  and  students  attending  the  forum. Kossover   reminded   students   that   their   basic   freedoms   are   protected  under  federal  law.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  everybody  [in  New  Paltz]  wanting  to  be  a  cop   and  for  whatever  reason  they  love  picking  on  students,â&#x20AC;?  Kossover   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  do  not  check  your  constitutional  rights  at  the  gates  of   campus.â&#x20AC;? Cards  outlining  basic  student  rights  were  handed  out  at  the   forum  for  students  to  keep.  One  bullet  states:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  police  are  here  

Authors, Poets, Playwrights M.F.A. in Creative Writing Hofstraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s M.F.A. in Creative Writing program offers a challenging and exciting program of study integrating literary scholarship and focused instruction in writing. Students may concentrate in playwriting, fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction, exploring the art and craft of writing while grounding themselves in the rich literary traditions that offer exemplary models of these forms. Core Faculty

Erik Brogger Playwriting

Phillis Levin Poetry

Julia Markus Fiction

Martha McPhee Fiction

! Find out about these graduate programs and more. Graduate Open House, November 24 hofstra.edu/GradEnglish

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

PHOTO  BY  ROSALIE  RODRIGUEZ

Forum  Analyzes  Marijuana  Policy

Cards  were  distributed  to  forum  attendees.                  

to  keep  you  safe.  Always  be  aware  of  your  surroundings  and  help   them  do  their  job.â&#x20AC;? Tejada  said  he  hopes  the  Know  Your  Rights  forum  will  give   students  â&#x20AC;&#x153;some  sense  of  empowermentâ&#x20AC;?  when  it  comes  to  dealing   with  police  encounters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be  smart  with  the  knowledge  you  have,â&#x20AC;?  Tejada  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Use   it  to  the  most  positive  use.â&#x20AC;?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   7

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Senate  Discusses  Park  Point  And  Sustainability By  Hannah  Nesich Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Hnesich@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

On   Wednesday   Nov.   20,   the   56th   Student   Senate   con-­ vened   for   their   weekly   meeting   where   they   discussed   their   stance  on  supporting  the  construction  of  Park  Point,  a  propo-­ sition  regarding  gender-­inclusive  housing  and  a  judicial  board   bill.   Student  Association  (SA)  President  Manny  Tejada  started   by   thanking   Senate   for   all   of   their   help   and   the   hard   work   they  put  into  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Talk  About  Itâ&#x20AC;?  symposium  on  Satur-­ day  Nov.  16.   Vice   President   Zachary   Rousseas   also   thanked   those   in   SA  who  attended  the  vigil  for  the  National  Transgender  Day   of  Awareness  on  Nov.  20.     Rousseas  said  he  recently  met  with  University  Police  De-­ partment  Committee  to  develop  ways  to  create  awareness  for   the  marijuana  policy.  He  also  updated  SA  on  the  letter  to  the   editor  the  executive  board  is  crafting.  It  will  address  the  mari-­ juana  policy  and  Rousseas  said  it  will  â&#x20AC;&#x153;hopefully  be  doneâ&#x20AC;?  by   the  end  of  the  semester.   Executive   Vice   President   of   Academic   Affairs   Jordan   Taylor   spoke   about   his   recent   meeting   with   the   dean   of   the   library,  where  they  discussed  potential  new  locations  for  the   campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  late  night  study  room,  including  Parker  CafĂŠ. Newly   hired   Campus   Sustainability   Coordinator   Lisa  

Mitten  presented  to  Senate  on  the  recent  water  fountain  sur-­ vey,   campus   recycling   upgrades   and   this   past   weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Food   Waste   Education   and  Awareness   Initiative   and   what   results   have  found.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  waste  1,000  lbs.  of  food  per  day,â&#x20AC;?  Mitten  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;On   0RQGD\,ZDVGRLQJRXWUHDFKIRUWKUHHWRÂżYHKRXUVDQGVDZ that  we  wasted  145  lbs.  of  food  that  could  have  been  eaten.â&#x20AC;?   After   Mitten   spoke,   Senate   discussed   a   judicial   board   bill  law,  which  included  a  clause  that  addressed  the  frequency   with  which  the  chief  justice  should  be  attending  weekly  SA   meetings.   SA  also  addressed  the  decision  to  support  the  construc-­ tion  of  the  controversial  Park  Point  apartment  complexes.   Rousseas   said   he   was   considering   writing   up   a   formal   statement  of  the  SA  executive  boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  conditional  support  for   3DUN3RLQWDQGWKDWKHZDQWHGWRUXQLWE\VHQDWHÂżUVW This   list   of   limitations   includes   Park   Point   being   built   100  feet  away  from  New  Paltz  wetlands,  silkcreen  being  used   during   construction   to   further   protect   the   wetlands,   the   use   RIVHPLSHUPHDEOHDVSKDOWWRUHGXFHFKDQFHVRIĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJWKH non-­use  of  natural  gas,  the  installation  of  solar  panels  on  roofs   of   Park   Point   structures,   the   use   of   alternative   energies   and   that  Park  Point  pay  the  full  taxes  to  the  town.   The   list   of   conditions   also   proposed   the   removal   of   a   VHSDUDWHJ\PEXLOGLQJÂżHOGDQGFOXEKRXVHWKDWZRXOGEHLQ

cluded  with  Park  Point  to  bring  down  the  average  rent  at  the   complex,  which  Rousseas  said  he  estimated  would  be  about   $700.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   rent   is   going   to   be   $700,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ridiculous,â&#x20AC;?   Senator   Dana  Hershkowitz  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  solving  any  problem  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   WKDWLVPDNLQJDJHQWULÂżHGDSDUWPHQWEXLOGLQJRQRXUFDPSXV´ Other  senators  questioned  whether  Park  Point  was  neces-­ sary  and  suggested  the  new  residence  hall,  which  will  be  com-­ SOHWHG LQ$XJXVW  ZLOO IDFLOLWDWH ÂżUVW\HDU DQG WUDQVIHU students  comfortably.  Another  senator  brought  up  the  issue  of   which  police  department  would  be  responsible  for  patrolling   Park  Point.   6HQDWHÂśVÂżQDODFWLRQZDVWRSDVVWKHYRWHWRFRVSRQVRU Proposition   5,   which   proposes   the   addition   of   gender-­inclu-­ sive  housing  options,  originally  referred  to  as  gender-­neutral,   to  campus,  Rousseas  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whether  that  passes  or  not,  I  will  be  meeting  with  [Resi-­ dence  Life  Director]  Corinna  in  the  coming  week,â&#x20AC;?  Rousseas   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  hoping  it  will  be  passed  by  then.  She  is  down  to   make  part  of  Lefevre    [Hall]  gender-­inclusive,  but  she  needs   a  formal  statement.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  trying  to  get  â&#x20AC;Ś.  a  house  area  [to   become  gender-­inclusive].â&#x20AC;?     7KHQH[W6HQDWHPHHWLQJDQGWKHODVWRQHEHIRUHWKHÂżQDO meeting  of  the  semester,  will  take  place  Wednesday  Dec.  4  at   7:30  p.m.  in  SUB  418.

WINTER SESSION IN NEW YORK CITY REGISTRATION IS OPEN!

WHY LEHMAN COLLEGE THIS WINTER?

LEARN MORE ABOUT GRADUATE STUDIES Accounting - Art - Art Education - Biology - Business - Computer Science - Counseling, Leadership, Literacy, & Special Education - English - Geographic Information Science - Health Education - History - Liberal Studies Mathematics - Nursing - Nutrition - Pre K - Grade 12 Education Programs - Public Health- Recreation Education - Spanish - Speech-Language Pathology - TESOL

www.lehman.edu/grad

Thursday,  November  21,  2013


 8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Peddling  A  New  Bike  Policy By  Anthony  DeRosa Copy  Editor  |  N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   SUNY   New   Paltz   Sustainability   Committee   met  Tuesday,  Nov.  19  to  discuss  issues  and  goals  re-­ lated  to  the  campus  bicycle  policy. Released  in  mid-­September,  the  campus  bike  pol-­ icy  states  bicycles  locked  to  areas  other  than  the  des-­ ignated  bicycle  racks,  such  as  lamp  posts  or  railings,   will  have  their  chains  or  locks  cut  and  be  relocated  to   the  nearest  bike  rack  by  a  member  of  Campus  Facili-­ WLHVLIWKHRZQHUFDQQRWEHLGHQWLÂżHGRULIWKHLUELNHLV registered  with  the  school  and  does  not  respond  to  a   call  from  Facilities  staff.   7KH UHORFDWHG ELNHV DUH WR EH ÂżWWHG ZLWK D WHP-­ porary   lock   that   Facilities   will   unlock   upon   the   bike   owner  contacting  them  and  proving  ownership  of  the   bike.   +RZHYHU WKLV VSHFLÂżF FODXVH ZLWKLQ WKH SROLF\ has  yet  to  go  into  effect,  according  to  Co-­chair  of  the   Sustainability  Committee  Lisa  Mitten.     The   meeting,   attended   by   Sustainability   Com-­ mittee  members  as  well  as  some  concerned  students,   faculty   and   town   residents,   focused   on   the   issue   of   cutting  the  locks  of  improperly  stowed  bicycles  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  dis-­ FXVVLQJLWVMXVWLÂżFDWLRQVZK\ELNHVDUHEHLQJLPSURS-­ erly  stowed  and  what  to  do  about  it. Student   and   member   of   the   New   Paltz   Bicycle   and   Pedestrian   Committee  Ari   Kaputkin   said   the   88   bike  racks  listed  in  the  bike  policy  outreach  email  sent   to  campus  in  mid-­September,  which  has  increased  to   91   racks   since   then,   provided   an   inadequate   number   of   bike   parking   spaces   to   satisfy   student   needs,   par-­ ticularly  in  the  area  of  the  classroom  buildings  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Hu-­ manities,  Lecture  Center,  Sojurner  Truth  Library  and   Coykendall   Science   Building   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   where   the   highest   amount  of  improperly  stowed  bikes  on  campus  were   observed. The   meeting   began   with   attendees   listing   their   goals   for   biking   on   campus.   Committee   members   quoted   language   from   the   Sustainability   Committee   developed   2012   SUNY   New   Paltz   Campus   Sustain-­ ability   Plan   and   its   goal   of   reducing   the   New   Paltz   college  campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  carbon  dioxide  emissions  and  creat-­ LQJDPRUHHQHUJ\HIÂżFLHQWHQYLURQPHQWWKURXJKWKH promotion  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenâ&#x20AC;?  policy  implementation.   6SHFLÂżFDOO\ KLJKOLJKWHG ZDV WKH 6XVWDLQDELOLW\ Planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  section  on  Transportation  Action  that  looks  to   lower  carbon  emissions  by  advocating  biking  and  bike   culture  on  campus  through  the  proposed  creation  of  a   bike  share  program  and  the  installation  of  bike  racks   near  every  campus  building.   The  committee  started  the  bike  policy  discussion   deliberating  on  the  reasons  why  some  students  choose   to  improperly  park  their  bikes  outside  of  bike  racks.   The  number  of  bike  racks  was  questioned  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  as  well   as  the  convenience  of  location  of  bike  racks  for  stu-­ dents.    

There  are  600  bike  parking  spaces  available  on  campus.

Mitten   posed   a   question   to   the   committee   to   be   addressed  if  change  was  to  be  pursued.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  put  this  to  the  group,â&#x20AC;?  Mittend  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;How  can   we  institute  rules  about  biking  and  also  promote  a  bike   culture  at  the  same  time?â&#x20AC;?   Kaputkin   created   a   map   of   campus   where   bike   racks   are   located   and   the   number   of   parking   space   they   provided.   He   estimated   that   only   around   50   to   70  percent  of  the  600  bike  parking  spaces  available  on   campus  provided  natural  accommodation  when  racks   were   fully   utilized,   meaning   that   given   the   various   size,  shape  and  orientation  of  different  bikes,  it  creat-­ ed  a  physical  space  discrepancy  between  the    amount   of  bikes  the  racks  are  thought  to  allow  parking  for.   Kaputkin   said   that   according   to   the   League   of   American  Bicyclistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  critique  of  campuses  for  bicycle   infrastructure,   the   minimum   suggested   ratio   for   un-­ dergraduate  students  to  bike  racks  is  1:4.  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ratio   is   1:11.   Given   the   numbers,   Kaputkin   said   it   made  sense  that  bikes  were  being  improperly  parked.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[There   are]   about   600   spots   to   6,685   students,â&#x20AC;?   Kaputkin  said.   Kaputkin  said  he  would  like  to  set  up  a  time-­lapse   camera   outside   of   the   Jacobson   Faculty   Tower   area   to  gather  incremental  data  on  whether  the  bike  racks   ZHUHEHLQJÂżOOHGDQGDWZKDWWLPHVGLGWKH\UHDFKFD-­ pacity.   Co-­chair  of  the  Sustainability  Committee  KT  To-­ bin   suggested   postponing   the   lock   cutting,   and   said  

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

   PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

that   if   the   campus   could   not   provide   the   necessary   means  for  students  to  act  in  accordance  with  the  bike   policy,  it  was  unfair  to  punish  them  for  not  following   it.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  seems  to  me  that  the  question  is  do  we  really   have  what  we  need,â&#x20AC;?  Tobin  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  put  a  pu-­ nitive  reaction  in  place  unless  the  structure  allows  for   students  to  behave  the  way  you  want  them  to  behave.â&#x20AC;?   The   committee   also   called   to   attention   the   fact   that   the   construction   of   new   residence   halls   like   the   proposed  Park  Point  apartments  and  the  residence  hall   to  be  build  behind  Lenape  Hall  would  lead  to  the  need   for  more  bike  racks,  particularly  at  Park  Point,  due  to   its  location  on  Route  32  making  students  more  likely   to   bike   to   campus.   The   use   of   bicycles   by   students   currently  living  off  campus  to  travel  to  class  was  also   mentioned.   Chair   of   the   Department   of   Sociology   and   Sus-­ tainability  Committee  member  Brian  Oboch  drafted  a   recommended  course  of  action.  It  states  that  bike  lock   cutting   be   suspended   unless   they   egress   safety   until   the  bike  policy  can  be  reviewed.  It  also  stated  that  an   ad-­hoc  policy  sub-­committee  be  created  to  gather  and   analyze  data,  that  the  sub-­committee  be  composed  of   volunteers  appointed  by  the  sustainability  committee   and  representatives  from  facilities  management.   The   motion   was   passed   by   voting   sustainability   committee  members  to  be  given  to  the  Budget  Goals   and  Plans  Department.


The GUNK

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Baking Brothers Deliver At

Doughnut. Story on pages 2b PHOTO  BY  RICHARD  SCHLEIDER


  2B

FEATURES

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

From Weiners to Doughnuts

NEW DOUGHNUT SHOP OPENS ON WATER STREET After a year and a half spent executing â&#x20AC;&#x153;a modern take on the traditional art of street foodâ&#x20AC;? by selling organic hot dogs from their Kosiner Brothers Hot Dog Cart at the entrance of the Water Street Market, brothers Jed and Brock Kosiner have undertaken a new business endeavor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a doughnut shop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone thought we were going to do hot dogs [here],â&#x20AC;? Jed Kosiner said, as he stood in his new doughnut shop: Doughnut. The store, a 7x13 cottage at the edge of Water Street Market, is just feet away from where the brothers set up their hot dog cart. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We decided pretty much right away that we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to be doing hot dogs out of here because the cart is what our hot dog business is,â&#x20AC;? Jed said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That kind of inspired us to go in a completely different direction.â&#x20AC;? Jed said that a lack of doughnut places in the area â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sans Dunkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Donuts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; partnered with the growing trend of â&#x20AC;&#x153;hipâ&#x20AC;? doughnut shops across the country inspired the brothers to pursue the new venture. Because of its small shape and orientation near the entrance of the market, Jed said he sometimes sees the new store resembling an information booth. Jed and Brock take all orders through a sliding window that they built shortly after they began construction on the location in July. The installation of the window saves customers the hassle of sifting through 91 square foot â&#x20AC;&#x153;closet,â&#x20AC;? and Jed said it allows the brothers the space to turn out their homemade doughnuts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we went into this, same thing as the hot dog cart, we wanted to make everything from scratch,â&#x20AC;? Jed said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My brother and I are kind of particular with food, like we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eat fast food, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very conscious of organic meat and no antibiotics. So with both businesses that was our strong goal: to produce stuff we would eat.â&#x20AC;? Jed said he arrives at the store at 8:20 a.m. every day to get the oil heated in preparation to make between 10 and 12 dozen doughnuts for the day. Although Doughnut is technically open until 6 p.m., the brothers said that they close once they sell out of doughnuts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; typically between 4:30 and 5 p.m. The maple bacon doughnut and Sriracha glaze doughnut are the most popular among customers, Jed VDLG2WKHUĂ DYRUVLQFOXGHYDQLOODJOD]HFKRFRODWHDQG cream, cinnamon, strawberry, root beer and gluten free doughnuts on the weekends. Each morning, the brothers

PHOTO  BY  RICHARD  SCHLEIDER

By  John  Tappen News  Editor|  john.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Kosiner  Brothers  just  opened  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doughnut,â&#x20AC;?  a  new  doughnut  shop  on  Water  Street FKRRVHĂ&#x20AC;YHĂ DYRUVWRVHOOIRUWKHGD\ ´:HDUHFRQVWDQWO\Ă LSSLQJĂ DYRUVÂľ-HGVDLG´:H¡UH constantly messing around and trying different things out. A lot of sampling.â&#x20AC;? Jed said the two will begin to tinker with the idea of apple cider donuts because so many people have been asking for it since the store opened on Oct. 23. Jed plans to have a grand opening for the store some-

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

time soon. In the more distant future, Brock said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s given thought to possibly taking food on the road. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We own the hot dog cart, so I guess future plans would be to take this on the road at some point, start doing gigs out with this as well, maybe a mobile unit,â&#x20AC;? he said. But for now, the store is in its â&#x20AC;&#x153;infancy stage.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll] just go with what people want,â&#x20AC;? Jed said.


  Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

3B

Reacting to Activism DOCUMENTARY FILMS SPARK A REACTION

By  Hannah  Nesich Assistant  Copy  Editor  |  Hnesich@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

women are portrayed in the media and within society, ´,W FRVWV D ORW RI PRQH\ WR VFUHHQ HDFK Ã&#x20AC;OPµ 5LDQG ZRXOG FUHDWH PDUNHWLQJ VXSSRUW DQG DVVLVW ZLWK bowsky, a fourth-year media production and French maVFUHHQLQJV MRUVDLG´:HKDYHWREX\WKHULJKWVIURP5HDFW7R)LOP Film buffs with fervor for social activism now have ´(YHQWXDOO\ LW EHFDPH FOHDU WKDW WKH 5HDFW WR )LOP WRVFUHHQWKHPZKLFKJHWVFRVWO\µ the chance to explore both passions in one of SUNY FRPSRQHQWRIRXUFOXEKDGJURZQLQVFRSHµ%UD\DOVR 5HJDUGOHVVRIWKHUHDVRQVWKHFOXELQLWLDOO\HQGHGLWV New Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recently revived clubs, React to Film. WKHPHGLDDQGMRXUQDOLVPVRFLHW\DGYLVRUVDLG´$QGVR UXQ$ULFR VDLG XVLQJ D XQLYHUVDOO\ SRSXODU DQG UHFRJ5HDFW WR )LOP LV D QDWLRQDO QRQSURÃ&#x20AC;W RUJDQL]DWLRQ React to Film branched out on its own as its own student QL]HG ZD\ WR FRPPXQLFDWH WKHVH VRFLDO LVVXHV Ã&#x20AC;OP LV WKDW KRVWV SUHWKHDWULFDO VFUHHQLQJV RI ´WKH EHVW LVVXH RUJDQL]DWLRQµ RQH RI WKH PRVW HIIHFWLYH DSSURDFKHV WR HGXFDWLQJ WKH EDVHG Ã&#x20AC;OPVµ WR VWDUW D GLDORJXH DPRQJ \RXQJ SHRSOH Bray said he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen much of the club or its masses. XVXDOO\ KLJK VFKRRO DQG FROOHJH VWXGHQWV DFFRUGLQJ WR VFUHHQLQJVVLQFHODVWIDOODQGWKDWIRUWKHSDVWIHZVHPHV´)RUPHZKHQ,ZDWFKDÃ&#x20AC;OP,GHYHORSDERQGZLWK WKHRIÃ&#x20AC;FLDOZHEVLWH the characters and am immersed in 5HDFW WR )LOP·V XOWLPDWH JRDO LV WR WKLV RWKHU ZRUOG DOPRVWµ $ULFR HQDFWVRFLDOFKDQJHRQDORFDODQGJOREVDLG´,W·VDQLFHHVFDSHIURPUHDOal level. New Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chapter of the club ity. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not real. But you have intentions are no different, former React documentaries where you witness to Film intern Samantha Morello said. WKLQJV WKDW DUH JRLQJ RQ DQG FDQ ´5HDFWWR)LOPLVLPSRUWDQWEHFDXVH enter this world but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the world not only are these documentaries inZH·UHOLYLQJLQµ IRUPLQJVWXGHQWVDERXWLVVXHVWKDWWKH\ However, Arico said she likes may have otherwise not heard about, documentaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to inspire as WKH\ DUH DOVR OHDUQLQJ WKDW FKDQJH LV a medium. SRVVLEOHµ0RUHOORDIRXUWK\HDUPHGLD ´'RQ·W JHW PH ZURQJ WKH SURGXFWLRQ PDMRU VDLG ´7KH\ HPSKD¶'DUN .QLJKW· LV JUHDW ¶7KH VL]H WKDW QRW RQO\ LV FKDQJH SRVVLEOH $YHQJHUV· LV DZHVRPH EXW \RX but students can be the ones to enact FDQ·W GR DQ\WKLQJ ZLWK LWµ $ULFR WKLVFKDQJHµ VDLG´:LWKDGRFXPHQWDU\\RXVHH 7KH 681< 1HZ 3DOW] FKDSWHU RI LWDQGWKLQN¶:RZSHRSOHDUHUH5HDFW WR )LOP KRVWV WZR Ã&#x20AC;OP VFUHHQDOO\ JRLQJ WKURXJK WKLV7KHVH DUH LQJVHDFKVHPHVWHUWKRXJKWKLVVHPHVLVVXHVWKDWDUHJRLQJRQDQGSHRSOH ter there was only one due to the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s QHHGWRGRVRPHWKLQJDERXWLW·µ mid-semester kickoff. ,IWKHRSSRUWXQLW\DURVH$ULFR Chapter Leader Victoria Arico besaid sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to screen a docucame involved in the New Paltz chapter mentary that examines racial isDIWHU VSHDNLQJ ZLWK 'LUHFWRU RI (GXVXHV LQ OLJKW RI WKH UHFHQW UDFLDO FDWLRQDO 3URJUDPV 'DKOLD *UDKDP DW VLJQDJHLQFLGHQWVRQFDPSXV the SUNY New Paltz internship fair. 2Q:HGQHVGD\1RY5HDFW After a successful application process, WR )LOP VFUHHQHG ´+RZ WR 0DNH Arico was selected to be the chapter 0RQH\ 6HOOLQJ 'UXJVµ D Ã&#x20AC;OP DGOHDGHUEULQJLQJEDFNWROLIHDFOXEWKDW GUHVVLQJ GUXJ SROLF\ DQG $ULFR VFUHHQHGÃ&#x20AC;OPVVHPHVWHUVDJRWKURXJKDQ PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  BLOGSPOT  USER  INTERVIEWARCHIVIST VDLGLWZDV´DVXFFHVVµDQGWKDW DOUHDG\H[LVWLQJRUJDQL]DWLRQ people attended. 5HDFW WR )LOP EHJDQ LWV RXWUHDFK ZLWK 681< 1HZ WHUVLWVHHPVWRKDYHEHHQRQKLDWXVWKRXJKKHLVXQVXUH Ultimately, Arico said she hopes students learn of Paltz as a series of activities housed within SUNY New of the reason why. the presence of React to Film and how powerful it can be 3DOW]·VVWXGHQWPHGLDRUJDQL]DWLRQQRZFDOOHGWKH0HGLD Former React to Film club member Sasha Ribowsky WRHQDFWVRFLDOFKDQJHWKURXJKVWXGHQWV DQG-RXUQDOLVP6RFLHW\DFFRUGLQJWR$VVLVWDQW3URIHVVRU said the last time the club was active was the fall of 2012 ´<RX FDQ OHDUQ DERXW VRFLDO PRYHPHQWV LQ DOO WKH RI0HGLDDQG)LOPDQG9LGHR6WXGLHV0LQRU&KDLU*UHJJ DQG VSULQJ RI  DQG WKDW LW JUDGXDOO\ EHFDPH LQDF- classes you want, but React to Film allows students to be Bray. WLYHDIWHUPHPEHUVZKRVSHDUKHDGHGHYHQWVJUDGXDWHGRU a part of a movement, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a social media move%UD\ VDLG WKH\ VFUHHQHG PXOWLSOH Ã&#x20AC;OPV LQFOXGLQJ became too busy to devote the necessary time. She also PHQWµ$ULFRVDLG´,WKLQNLW·VUHDOO\LPSRUWDQWVWXGHQWV ´0LVV 5HSUHVHQWDWLRQµ ZKLFK H[SORUHV WKH VH[LVW ZD\V FLWHGÃ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOUHDVRQV GHYHORSDSDVVLRQOLNHWKLVµ

Visit  Our  Award-­Winning  Website!

oracle.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  November  21,  2013


4B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Crowning Mr. and Mrs. Africa

ASU EVENT INFORMS CAMPUS COMMUNITY ABOUT AFRICAN CULTURE The   SUNY   New   Paltz   African   Student   Union   (ASU)  will  host  their  second  annual  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Af-­ rica  Pageant  on  Nov.  23  in  SUB  MPR  at  5  p.m.   ASU   group   members   will   present   a   pageant   ex-­ hibiting   traditional   cultural   values   of   Africa’s   “less-­ er-­known”   countries,   ASU’s   Media   Coordinator   and   fourth-­year   computer   engineering   and   black   studies   double  major,  Monique  Bailey  said. Bailey   said   that   although   the   event   has   the   word   “pageant”  in  the  title,  the  group  doesn’t  want  it  to  be   perceived   as   a   “beauty   pageant”   per   se.   She   said   the   pageant  structure  is  more  of  a  skit,    meant  to  be  more   informative  than  judgmental  or  competitive. The  skit  revolves  around  a  life-­changing  decision   in   a   young  African   prince’s   life:   his   family   choosing   KLVEULGHWREH6HYHQRIWKH¿QHVWSULQFHVVHVRI$IULFD are   presented   to   him,   the   king,   queen   and   their   chief   advisors  for  consideration. Of  the  seven  lovely  princesses  presented,  only  one   is   suitable   to   be   named   the   next   queen.  These   poten-­ tial  queens  must  present  their  favorable  qualities  to  the   royal  family  and  their  closest  advisors  in  an  attempt  to   claim  their  spot  on  the  throne. Each  of  the  princesses  will  be  dressed  in  traditional   clothing  and  will  be  given  a  chance  to  showcase  a  spe-­ cial  talent,  Bailey  said.  Through  song  and  dance,  each   will  be  given  a  chance  to  exemplify  their  allure  to  the   judges.  Bailey  said  some  contestants  will  demonstrate   time-­honored  praise  singing  and  dancing,  customary  to   traditional  values. “In  African  culture  the  king  and  queen  have  very   close  chief  advisors,”  Bailey  said.  “They  would  have  a   VSHFL¿FFULWHULDIRUMXGJLQJWKHJLUOV´ President   of   ASU,   third-­year   business   marketing   major  Andre  Smith,  said  that  each  of  the  girls  will  rep-­ resent   a   different   country,   which   helps   to   support   the   overlying   theme   of   the   event.   He   said   that   there   are   more  than  720  countries  and  languages  spoken  in  Af-­ rica   and   that   a   vast   majority   of   them   are   overlooked.   Smith   said   he   feels   the   pageant   can   serve   as   a   more   fun  and  interactive  way  to  inform  people  about  the  vast   diversity  that  exists  throughout  the  entirety  of  the  con-­ tinent,  not  just  its  “more  popular”  countries. Smith  said  he  is  looking  forward  to  the  event.  The   ASU  has  been  preparing  diligently  to  create  a  smooth   running,  educational  and  fun  event  for  the  public  to  in-­ dulge  in.  He  said  he  can  hardly  wait  to  see  all  of  their   hard  work  come  together,  and  seeing  that  happen  is  go-­ ing  to  be  “the  best  feeling  in  the  world.” “It’s  another  way  we  can  educate  our  peers,  instead   of  just  learning  in  a  classroom,”  Smith  said. PHOTOS  BY  JASMINE  PECHECHO

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

PHOTO  BY  RICHARD  SCHLEIDER

By  Ben  Kindlon Features  Editor  |  n02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

ASU  members  prepare  for  the  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Africa  Pageant.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

5B

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Belting Out â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Til Death Do Us Part MIAMI THEATRE PLAYERS TUNE UP FOR AN ONSTAGE ROCK ROMANCE By  Suzy  Berkowitz A&E  Editor  |  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Miami  Theatre  Players  plan  to  let  their   hair  down  and  rock  out  on  tune  during  their  production  of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Wedding  Singer.â&#x20AC;?   Set   in   1985,   the   movie-­inspired   musical   follows   the   career   of   rockstar   wannabee   Robbie   Hart   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   played   by   third-­year  digital  media  management  major  Justin  Bankos   ²ZKRLVFRPSOHWHO\VKRWWKURXJKWKHKHDUWDIWHUKLVÂżDQ-­ cĂŠe  leaves  him  hanging  at  the  altar.   Angered  by  his  shattered  love  life,  Hart  takes  his  rage   out  on  other  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  happiness  by  ruining  each  wedding   KHSHUIRUPVDWWKDWLVXQWLOÂżQGLQJWKHJLUORIKLVGUHDPV â&#x20AC;&#x201C;waitress  Julia  Sullivan,  played  by  second-­year  communi-­ cation  disorders  major  Laureen  Scianimanico. On  a  quest  for  a  happy  ending,  Hartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  love  life  comes   down  to  one  make-­or-­break  performance  to  win  the  affec-­ tion  of  the  showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  leading  lady.    Bankos  said  he  was  initially  hard  on  himself  because   he   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   he   was   vocally   capable   of   succeeding   in   this  role  but  that  he  eventually  learned  to  believe  in  himself   and  was  motivated  to  work  harder.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  love  to  perform  and  I  love  to  be  onstage,â&#x20AC;?  Bankos   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  love  the  rush  that  I  get.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  had  a  blast  singing  the   songs  and  being  the  character.â&#x20AC;? A  rehearsal  process  that  began  last  May,  The  Miami   Theatre   Players   have   been   consistently   working   on   this   musical   since   mid-­September   and   rehearse   several   times   a  week.   A   completely   student-­run   organization,   The   Miami   Theatre  Players  choose  a  production  and  executive  board   at  the  end  of  each  semester  for  the  following  semester.   Productions   are   nominated   and   voted   on   based   on   budget  allowances  and  which  shows  will  lend  themselves   to   casting   a   variety   of   students   and   generating   enough   hype  to  bring  in  a  good  audience,  according  to  second-­year   communication   disorders   major   Emily   Sarra,   the   showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   assistant  director  and  choreographer.     The  executive  board  consists  of  a  president,  treasurer,   director,  assistant  director,  stage  manager,  public  relations   RIÂżFHUDQGGHSHQGLQJRQWKHSURGXFWLRQÂśVUHTXLUHPHQWVD choreographer  and  musical  director.   According  to  the  productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  director,  third-­year  sec-­ ondary  education  and  history  double-­major  Ben  Abrams,   who   assistant   directed   Miamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   last   production   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Urinet-­ own,â&#x20AC;?  a  longer  rehearsal  process  makes  for  a  stronger  bond   within  the  cast  and  between  the  cast  and  the  creative  team.  

The  Miami  Theatre  Players  tune  up  for  this  semesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  musical.

Sarra,  who  is  usually  in  front  of  the  curtain  instead  of   behind  it,  is  a  rookie  on  the  creative  team,  but  said  work-­ ing  behind  the  scenes  has  given  her  a  new  appreciation  for   those  who  work  those  roles  on  a  regular  basis.   A   large   difference   between   being   a   performer   and   a   part  of  the  creative  team,  according  to  Sarra,  is  not  being   outwardly  recognized  by  the  audience  via  applause  at  the   end  of  each  performance.   She  said  her  recognition  is  more  internalized  and  has   WREHPRUHVHOIIXOÂżOOLQJ On  a  similar  note,  Abrams  said  directing  the  produc-­ tion  has  taught  him  how  many  extra  hours  go  into  working   so   closely   on   a   show   with   a   cast   and   creative   team   of   a   collective  27  people.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything   that   was   happening   was   falling   on   my   shoulders   and   I   really   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   completely   prepared   for   that,â&#x20AC;?  Abrams  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  had  to  be  able  to  delegate  and  look   to  the  rest  of  the  creative  team  and  trust  that  their  vision  for   the  show  matched  mine.â&#x20AC;?  

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

PHOTO  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER

Being   an   entirely   student-­run   club,  The   Miami  The-­ atre  Players  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  the  luxury  of  relying  on  faculty  to   get  necessities  together,  which,  while  posing  an  inconve-­ nience,   allows   for   the   students   involved   in   the   shows   to   take   more   ownership   over   the   production,   according   to   Bankos.   $OWKRXJK WKH SURGXFWLRQ GRHV QRW KDYH WKH ÂżQDQFLDO or   insightful   help   of   the   New   Paltz   Theater   Department,   Sarraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ultimate  hope  is  that  audience  members  walk  out   of  the  show  not  having  realized  that  there  was  no  faculty   input  or  assistance  in  the  musicalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  production  process.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  downgrade  ourselves  a  lot  by  saying  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  stu-­ dent   run   and   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   different   resources,â&#x20AC;?   Sarra   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  always  say  that  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  trying,  but  I  want  people   not  to  know  or  care  that  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  student-­run  and  wanting  to   be  involved  with  us  anyway.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Wedding   Singerâ&#x20AC;?   will   run   in   Studley   Theatre   from   Thursday,   Nov.   21   through   Saturday,   Nov.   23   with   performances  at  8  p.m.


6B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Department Conjures Up The Perfect Storm

SHAKESPEAREAN SHOW SAILS SMOOTHLY THROUGH THE MAINSTAGE By  Suzy  Berkowitz A&E  Editor  |  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   New   Paltz   Theater   Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   production  of  Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Tempestâ&#x20AC;?   turned   what   could   have   been   a   shipwreck   into  a  smooth-­sailing  performance.   Having  never  read  the  romantic  comedy,   I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  quite  know  what  I  was  getting  my-­ self  into  by  seeing  the  show  without  looking   up  a  synopsis  beforehand.  Big  mistake.   Considering  the  nature  of  the  antiquated   jargon,   there   were   many   lines   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   pick   XSRQDQGVHYHUDOQXDQFHVWKDWĂ&#x20AC;HZVWUDLJKW over  my  head.   Regardless  of  my  initial  lack  of  under-­ standing  of  the  playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  content,  the  consistent   acting   from   the   shining   stars   of   the   depart-­ ment  was  more  than  enough  to  carry  the  pro-­ duction  straight  through.   Directed  by  Associate  Professor  Nancy   Saklad  and  set  designed  by  Assistant  Profes-­ sor  Ken  Goldstein,  the  major  visual  choices   made  were  grand,  yet  tastefully  executed.   The   large,   low-­hanging   moon,   periodi-­

cally   doubling   as   a   clock,   looked   unbeliev-­ ably  realistic,  as  did  the  post-­tempested  ship   several   passengers   had   been   traveling   to   Italy  on. The  productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  protagonist  and  former   Dutchess  of  Milan,  Prospera,  played  by  As-­ sistant  Professor  and  the  showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Movement   Director  Connie  Rotunda,  was  absolutely  ex-­ quisite  in  her  performance.   Banished  to  the  island  on  which  Queen   Alonsa,  played  by  fourth-­year  theater  perfor-­ mance   major   Julia   Register,   the   royal   party   and   her   mariners   found   themselves   ship-­ wrecked;Íž   Prosperaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   possession   and   use   of   magical   knowledge   gave   her   the   ability   to   conjure  the  tempest  which  brought  together   characters   of   differing   fortunes   on   one   de-­ serted  island.   Rotundaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   movements,   which   ranged   from  grand  to  gentle,  exuded  both  power  and   maternal  protection  throughout.   I   understand   why   the   part   would   not   have  been  able  to  be  played  by  a  student  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the  vast  wisdom  and  experience  it  was  nec-­

essary   for   Prosperaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   character   to   give   off   could   only   have   been   translated   through   a   more  seasoned  actor. Prosperaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  spirit  helper,  Ariel,  played  by   third-­year   theater   performance   major   Brit-­ tany  Martel,  was  a  similarly  gentle  character.   A   spirit   whose   freedom   served   as   the   SURGXFWLRQÂśV ÂżQDOH WKH FRVWXPH FKRLFH WR conceal  Arielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   face   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   arguably   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   distint   personality   trait   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   was   a   very   insightful  one,  as  it  communicated  the  level   of   devotion   to   Prospera  Ariel   retained   until   the  last  scene.   Every   one   of   Martelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   movements   was   graceful  and  delicate,  and  I  especially  appre-­ ciated  the  almost  angelic  audio  manipulation   of  her  voice  every  time  she  spoke.   Trinculo,  who  served  as  Queen  Alonsaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   jester  and  Stephano,  the  drunken  butler,  were   two   comedic   relief-­esque   characters   played   by   fourth-­year   theater   performance   major   Anika   Krempl   and   fourth-­year   theater   per-­ formance   major   Mike   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor,   respec-­ tively.  

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

Their   ridiculous   antics   and   altogether   hilarious   demeanor   brightened   up   the   stage   each   time   they   stumbled   and   sprawled   out   across  it.   One  component  of  the  show  I  appreciat-­ ed  was  the  gender-­bending  within  characters   who  were  traditionally  male  (read:  Prospero,   King  Alonso  and  Trinkulo).  This  stray  from   tradition   was   one   I   found   tasteful   and   pro-­ gressive.   One  point  in  the  show,  when  the  watersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Ă&#x20AC;RZZDVZURQJO\UHGLUHFWHGKRZHYHUZDV during  the  nymph  dance  break,  accompanied   by  the  all-­too  contemporary  background  mu-­ sic.  I  applaud  the  creative  team  for  attempt-­ LQJWRDGGWKHLURZQĂ&#x20AC;DUHWRWKLVFODVVLFWDOH but   those   waves   crashed   a   bit   too   hard   for   my  liking. Overall,  however,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Tempestâ&#x20AC;?  was  a   wonderful  recreation  of  a  timeless  romantic   comedy   that   was   able   to   communicate   the   poignancy  and  relevance  of  theater,  regard-­ less  of  the  time  period  of  origin.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

Growing In A New Direction

oracle.newpaltz.edu  7B

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: RYAN LEVIN

BOY BAND RELEASES MATURE NEW SOUND

By  Katherine  Speller

YEAR: Third MAJOR: Geology HOMETOWN: White Plains, N.Y.

0DQDJLQJ(GLWRU_katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newnewpaltz.edu

One Direction Midnight Memories WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY?

One   Directionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Midnight   Memo-­ ries VRXQGV VLJQL¿FDQWO\ PRUH OLNH D JURXSRIVRPHWKLQJVWKDQWKHLUSUH YLRXVDOEXPV ,W¶VHDVLHUWREHOLHYHWKDWLWZDVQ¶W ZULWWHQVROHO\E\DURXQGWDEOHRIPLG GOHDJHGSRSFUDIWVPHQDQGWRVHHZKDW LQÃ&#x20AC;XHQFHG WKH ER\V¶ WDVWHV , JXHVV LW KHOSV WKDW DW OHDVW RQH EDQG PHPEHU KROGVDZULWLQJFUHGLWRQHDFKWUDFN 7KH VRXQG LV DOPRVW OLNH LW ZDQWV WREHGDGURFNEXWZLWKDKHDY\µV LQÃ&#x20AC;XHQFH WKDW¶V WRR FOHDQ DQG Ã&#x20AC;XII\ ,W¶VPRUHOLNHGUHVVLQJXSLQ\RXUGDG¶V KLJKVFKRROFORWKHVSRSURFN ³'RHV+H.QRZ´LVHVVHQWLDOO\DQ XSGDWH RI 5LFN 6SULQJ¿HOG¶V ³-HVVLH¶V *LUO´,W¶VSUREDEO\P\IDYRULWHRIIWKH UHFRUGEHFDXVHRIWKDW 7KRXJK,¶PFRQFHUQHGWKLVERUGHU OLQH VDPSOLQJ RI DQ ROGHU WUDFN LV EH FRPLQJ D WUHQG WKH WLWOH WUDFN VRXQGV HHULO\OLNH'HI/HSSDUG¶V³3RXU6RPH 6XJDU 2Q 0H´ DQG ³%HVW 6RQJ (YHU´ VRXQGVMXVWOLNH³%DED2¶5HLOO\´ZLWK LWVV\QWKDQGSLDQROD\HUHGRSHQLQJ, KDYHWRVD\LWVWLOOZRUNV 1RZIRUWKRVHVNHSWLFVZKRZULWH RII ER\ EDQGV RQ SULQFLSDO , KRSH \RX¶UHVWLOOZLWKPH 7KHER\EDQGVXEJHQUHLVDFWXDOO\ D IDVFLQDWLQJ PDUULDJH RI D KRUULEOH DQGVXFFHVVIXO DWWHPSWWRVHOOVH[WR SXEHVFHQW JLUOV WKH OHVV VXFFHVVIXO  DWWHPSWIRUDQGURJ\QRXVO\QRQWKUHDW HQLQJ \RXQJ PHQ ZKR GRQ¶W SOD\ LQ VWUXPHQWVWREUHDNLQWRUDGLRSOD\DQG WKH XQEHOLHYDEOH EX\LQJ SRZHU RI WKH WHHQDJHJLUOGHPRJUDSKLF,W¶VEL]DUUH O\FRROZKHQEURNHQGRZQWKDWZD\DW OHDVWWRPH %XWVRRQDQHZLVVXHDULVHVZKDW KDSSHQV ZKHQ WKH ER\LVK SHUVRQDV FDQ¶WKROGDQGWKH\ZDQWWRJURZLQWR PHQ" 7KH ER\ EDQG DUFKHW\SHV FDOO IRU

The   guitar   for   the   past   10   or   so   years.   I   feel   that   I   can   get   the   most   expression   through  this  instrument  and  it  allows  me  a   nice  relief  from  any  stress  I  may  be  feeling. WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? In   high   school,   I   was   in   the   Songwriters   Club.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   also   done   some   open   mics   in   White  Plains.   WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? 3+272&2857(6<2)WONGIESMUSICWORLD.BLOGSPOT.COM

WKH -XVWLQ WKH /DQFH WKH +RZLH WKH %ULDQ WKH 1LFN HWF WR VWDQG DQG EH FRXQWHGULVHWRVXSHUVWDUGRPVFDQGDO GUXJV RU IDOO WR REVFXULW\ $QG WKDW¶V ZKDW ,¶P VWDUWLQJ WR VHH ZLWK WKLV DO EXP 7KLVSDUWLFXODUWLPHLQ2QH'LUHF WLRQ¶V FDUHHU LV VR FUXFLDO WR WKHLU GH YHORSPHQWDVDPXVLFDOHQWLW\DQGDVD YLDEOH FRPPRGLW\ :LWK D FRQWUDFWXDO REOLJDWLRQ DQG PRQHWDU\ LQFHQWLYH WR FRPSOHWH WKUHH PRUH DOEXPV DV D XQLW EHIRUHWKH\VWLOOQHHGWRKROGRQ WR WKHLU \RXQJ IDQ EDVH IRU VWDGLXP DQG DOEXP VDOHV WR UHPDLQ VXFFHVVIXO +RZHYHU ,¶P VWDUWLQJ WR VHH WKHLU DW WHPSWV WR RZQ WKHLU VRXQG DQG DJH LW ZLWKWKHPDORQJZLWKDKHIW\FKXQNRI WKHLUIDQV =D\Q0DOLN/LDP3D\QHDQG+DU U\6W\OHVVHHPWRUHPDLQWKHYRFDOVWD SOHV RI PRVW VRQJV ZKLOH WKHUH¶V D ORW RI EDFNJURXQG VLQJOH OLQH GHDOV IURP /RXLV7RPOLQVRQDQG1LDOO+RUDQ 7KLVODFNRIEDODQFHLVQRWXQFRP PRQLQER\EDQGV WKH³-XVWLQ´HIIHFW  EXW FHUWDLQO\ GRHV QRW \LHOG HTXDO RS SRUWXQLWLHVIRUWKHODWWHUWZRWREHWKH EUHDNRXWRIWKHJURXS 2I FRXUVH LW¶V KDUGO\ SHUIHFW ³%HWWHU WKDQ :RUGV´ LV SUREDEO\ P\ OHDVW IDYRULWH 7KH ZKLVWOLQJ RSHQLQJ EDUV WKDW VHHP WR FURS XS LQ VR PDQ\ PDLQVWUHDP WUDFNV DUH JUDWLQJ WR PH HVSHFLDOO\ZKHQSDLUHGZLWKWKHEL]DUUH

KRZOLQJWRZDUGWKHHQG ³+DOI $ +HDUW´ LV WKHLU WRNHQ ZHHS\ FXGGOH WUDFN ,W¶V QRW RQ WKH VDPH OHYHO RI ORYHO\ DV WKHLU SUHYLRXV DOEXP¶V³/LWWOH7KLQJV´DQGLWVFRQFHSW LVDOLWWOHWRRZRUQIRUPH %XWIRUWKHVRQJVWKDWPLVVWKH\¶UH WKHVWURQJWUDFNVWKDW¿WP\QHFHVVDU\ ER\ EDQG HDU FDQG\ FULWHULD ¿W IRU ERWKXJO\FU\LQJDQGVLQJLQJLQWKHFDU 7KH VLQJOH ³6WRU\ RI 0\ /LIH´ LV WKH ULJKW PL[ RI HPRWLRQ DQG SDFLQJ DQG ,¶YH DOUHDG\ HQVXUHG LW SDVVHV WKH DIRUHPHQWLRQHGWHVW ³+DSSLO\´ LV DJJUHVVLYHO\ XSEHDW ,¶P ¿QH ZLWK LW IRU QRZ EXW , FRXOG HDVLO\ VHH LW DV D PLJUDLQH ZDLWLQJ WR KDSSHQ ZKHQ LW¶V XQGRXEWHGO\ RYHU SOD\HG LQ P\ FDU GXULQJ ORQJ GULYHV ZLWKP\OLWWOHVLVWHU Midnight   Memories   VHHV D YHU\ FOHDUFKDQJHLQWKHEDQG¶VDSSURDFKWR WKHLUVRXQGIURPWKHVH[DSSHDOLQWKHLU O\ULFV WKHEHVWLDO>\HWVWLOOQRQWKUHDW HQLQJ@PDOHEUDYDGRLVHYHULQFUHDVLQJ IURP WKHLU GHEXW ³8S $OO 1LJKW´  WR WKHORZHUUDXQFKLHUZD\WKH\XVHWKHLU YRLFHV 7KHVRQJVVWLOOIROORZDIDLUO\VWDQ GDUG IRUPXOD WKLQN YHUVH FKRUXV YHUVHFKRUXVDOWHUHGNH\FKDQJHFKR UXVZLWK+DUU\VLQJLQJDVORZPRXWKHG EUHDNGRZQDQG=D\QZDLOLQJRXWVRPH KLJKQRWH EXWLW¶VVWLOOVRPHKRZQRW DWDOOPRQRWRQRXV

7KXUVGD\1RYHPEHU

Slash  (the  old  guitarist  from  Guns  Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Roses),  Stevie  Ray  Vaughan   and  Jimi  Hendrix. WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY?  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  listening  to  a  lot  of  Jack  John-­ son.  His  music  is  so  relaxing  and  helps  me   stay   calm   when   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   feeling   stressed   out   about  school  or  work  or  whatever. WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? 'H¿QLWHO\EHLQJDEOHWRKDYHDFDUHHUWKDW can  support  my  hobbies  of  playing  and   performing  music.   ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? Listen   to   a   wide   variety   of   styles   and   try   to   implement   them   into   your   own   styles.   And   most   importantly,   practice!   Whether   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   20   minutes  a  day,  a  constant  schedule  will  yield   awesome  results. CHECK  OUT   RYAN  LEVIN PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE  WITH   ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? &RQWDFWCarolyn  QuimbyDWCarolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   &RQWDFWSuzy  BerkowitzDWsabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  


8B

oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  DEEP  END

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END KIM ZITZOW

Major: Metal Year: Third

Inspirations: Ann Hamilton, Robert Smithson, Arte Povera, Yoko Ono, Gordon-Matta Clark, Joseph Beuys, Simon Starling, Dario Robleto, Laure Prouvost, Gabriel Orozco, Zoe Sheehan Saldana

Nomadism, feeling nowhere. I explore origin nomadically, from the position that there is no fixed origin, only moments of fixity within contingency. A scene from Invisible Cities comes to mind: Marco Polo is reading imperceptible maps. While playing chess with Kublai Khan he reconstructs a map from a scratch in the wood on the chessboard, discovering what kind of tree it is made from, where it grows [and] the kind of craftsmanship used to make it. Artistic activity is making invisible maps visible. Drawing is a place to discover rootedness, to catch and untangle moving insights. PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  KIM  ZITZOW.  CAPTION  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

CALL  WAITING  

CARTOON  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN At   a   recent   Sustainability   Commit-­ tee   meeting   regarding   the   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   new   bike  policy,  a  reporter  from  The  New  Paltz   Oracle  was  asked  to  leave  by  an  adminis-­ trator   sitting   on   the   committee   who   took   issue   with   his   presence.   Later,   when   the   committee   voted   to   allow   our   reporter   to   remain,   the   aforementioned   administrator   refused   to   speak   for   the   remainder   of   the   meeting. Our   reporters   were   initially   barred   from  attending  presentations  by  food  ser-­ vice  vendors  last  spring  by  Campus  Aux-­ iliary  Service  (CAS),  only  gaining  access   after  we  fought  for  it. While  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to  be  able  to  say  that   incidents  like  this  are  rare,  we  at  The  New   Paltz   Oracle   have   found   that   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   be-­ come  all  too  common. ,WÂśV EHFRPH LQFUHDVLQJO\ GLIÂżFXOW IRU us   to   contact   our   sources,   particularly   administrators,   directly   for   comment   on   SUHVVLQJ LVVXHV DQG HYHQ PRUH GLIÂżFXOW to  have  face-­time  with  them.  Recent  can-­

cellations   of   meetings   with   both   student   media   and   student   government   bodies   are   troubling   to   us,   particularly   given   the   emotionally  and  politically-­charged  nature   of   campus   issues.   These   interactions,   or   lack-­thereof,  with  our  campus  administra-­ tors  make  us  question  their  commitment  to   maintaining  open  and  transparent  lines  of   communications   with   student   media   and,   ultimately,  the  student  body.   As  journalists,  we  believe  our  duty  is   WRWUXWKIXOO\DQGHIÂżFLHQWO\EULQJWKHSXOVH of   information   through   the   bureaucratic   red   tape   and   into   the   hands   of   students.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  here  to  report  the  news.   Now,   of   course,   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   take   this   responsibility   lightly.   Speaking   with   our   sources   is   a   privilege,   one   that   allows   us   to  truly  get  a  grasp  of  the  inner-­workings   of  our  stories  without  spin;Íž  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  our  lifeline   and  the  closest  we  can  get  to  truth.     That  commitment  to  truth  and  to  cre-­ ating   an   informed   campus   community   is   something   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   hopeful   our   administra-­

tion   shares.   We   want   nothing   more   than   WRIXOÂżOORXUUROHDVWKHÂłIRXUWKHVWDWH´WR provide  the  service  we  value  so  much.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the  very  discipline  the  bulk  of  our  staff  is   studying  at  this  institution,  after  all.   We   recognize   then,   as   a   media   body,   that   there   are   proper   channels   needed   to   ensure  interviews  are  handled  profession-­ ally.   We   appreciate   that   they   look   to   as-­ sist   us   and   remain   respectful   to   the   busy   schedules  of  campus  employees.  However,   when   the   proper   channels   interfere   with   our   ability   to   accomplish   our   aforemen-­ tioned  goals  by  deadline,  when  the  stories   cannot  be  told  and  the  sharing  of  informa-­ tion   is   halted,   we   start   to   wonder   if   the   channels  are  in  need  of  repair.   We   as   a   student   body   need   transpar-­ ency   from   our   administration.   Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   access   to   independently   and   impartially   gathered   information   should   be   a   prior-­ ity.   Accountability   should   be   paramount.   Forthright  and  honest  communication  be-­ tween   leaders   and   those   they   are   respon-­

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

sible   for   should   be   sacred.   We   cannot   condone   attitudes   that   fail   to   value   these   things.     Even  though  our  institution  does  not,   on   paper,   operate   in   the   same   manner   as   a  democratic  body,  we  believe  the  college   should  act  as  a  microcosm  of  our  society  at   large.  To  act  in  the  spirit  of  democracy  in   every  facet  is  imperative  to  the  intellectual   growth   of   our   campus.   As   an   institution   that  prides  itself  on  a  progressive,  intellec-­ tually   nurturing   environment,   we   should   be  an  example  for  others  and  strive  to  act   in  accordance  with  the  ideals  we  hold. Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the   majority  of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,   op-­eds  and  letters,  excluding  editorials,   are  solely  those  of  the  writers  and  do  not   necessarily  represent  the  views  of  The   New  Paltz  Oracle,  its  staff  members,  the   campus  and  university  or  the  Town  or   Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS

ANDREW  LIEF Sports  Editor

N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Sayonara,  Sweet  Summer  Camp

One   of   the   hardest   things   people   have   to  decide  in  life  is  when  to  walk  away  from   something  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  passionate  about.     People   are   forced   to   do   this   everyday.     Whether  they  retire  from  their  job  or  stop  par-­ WDNLQJLQWKHLUIDYRULWHKREE\,WÂśVDGLIÂżFXOW decision  to  make. There   are   many   factors   one   needs   to   consider  when  making  this  life-­changing  de-­ cision.   The   factors   range   from   oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   age   to   health  to  family,  and  so  much  more.     As  a  sports  fan,  the  most  notable  retire-­ ment   that   comes   to   mind   is   that   of   Michael   Jordan,  who  retired  twice  from  the  Bulls  and   then   made   a   surprising   decision   to   return   to   the  league  as  a  member  of  the  Wizards  a  few   years  later.     I  was  forced  to  make  my  own  life-­chang-­ ing  decision  on  Oct.  28.    Days  before  I,  along   with  my  co-­staff  from  last  summer,  received   a  text  message  from  one  of  the  assistant  di-­ rectors  at  the  sleep  away  camp  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  attended   for  the  last  12  summers.    He  commended  us   for  how  well  we  did  last  summer  and  told  us  

KATHERINE  SPELLER Managing  Editor

   Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

I   tend   to   speak   in   the   same   sort   of   kitschy  catch-­phrases.  Maybe  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  ver-­ EDOFUXWFKRUDVLJQWKDW,WKLQN,ÂśPVLJQLÂż cantly  cleverer  than  I  actually  am,  but  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   neither   here   nor   there   and   hardly   the   point   of  this  column.  The  â&#x20AC;&#x153;lexicon,â&#x20AC;?  as  we  at  The   Oracle  refer  to  it,  persists.   One   phrase   I   use   again   and   again   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;do  the  thing.â&#x20AC;?  Someone  suggests  a  word  or   layout  or  activity  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pretty  much  my   FRQVWDQWDIÂżUPDWLYHUHVSRQVH,WÂśVDEDVWDUG ization  of  an  internet-­ism  that  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  adopted   as  my  own.  But  it  works  for  me.   So,  I  say  it  a  lot.   Do  the  thing.  Just  do  it.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  weirdly  vague  and  annoying  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   seeped  into  my  quote-­unquote  â&#x20AC;&#x153;real  worldâ&#x20AC;?   conversations  (class,  interviews,  uncomfort-­ able  small  talk)  as  most  of  my  abuses  of  the   English  language  do,  making  me  seem  sev-­ eral  IQ  points  dumber.

to  reach  out  to  him  about  next  summer.     Up   until   this   point   every   year   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   discussed  the  upcoming  summer;Íž  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  always   been   a   no-­brainer   that   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   be   returning   to   camp. But  this  year,  that  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  the  case.     Besides   my   family,   camp   is   the   thing   WKDWKDVLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHGP\OLIHWKHPRVW&DPSLV where  I  learned  that  what  you  put  into  some-­ thing  is  what  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  get  out  of  it.     Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   camp,   so   a   lot   of   the   events  are  created  with  the  intention  of  enter-­ taining  the  younger  kids. As   you   get   older,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   natural   not   to   get   excited   about   these   types   of   events.   But   the   great   thing   about   camp   is   regardless   of   the   situation,   if   you   go   into   it   with   the   mindset   that  99  out  of  100  times  it  will  be  fun. &DPSLVZKHUH,PDGHIULHQGVWKDW,NQRZ I  will  have  for  life.  I  know  that  sounds  clichĂŠ,   and  if  you  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  experienced  camp  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   probably  rolling  your  eyes,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  true. The  people  I  was  fortunate  enough  to  be-­ come  friends  with  are  some  of  the  best  people  

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  ever  met.    They  will  be  there  for  you  no   matter   what   and   always   provide   a   fun   time   ZKHQ \RX DUH WRJHWKHU &DPS LV ZKHUH RQH OHDUQVWRPDNHVDFULÂżFHV $VIXQDVFDPSLVDORWRIVDFULÂżFHVDUH made  from  the  life  one  lives  at  home.  There   is   no   air   conditioning   (unless   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   one   of   the  lucky  few),  so  you  wake  up  in  a  puddle  of   sweat  from  the  tremendous  heat.     Also,   with   the   way   the   world   pretty   much   runs   on   technology   now,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   major   adjustment  for  someone  to  not  have  their  de-­ vice  on  them  at  all  times. Overall,  camp  is  the  best.     Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  when  I  told  the  assistant  di-­ rector  that  I  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  return  for  this  summer,   I   felt   terrible.   But,   ultimately,   I   was   content   with  the  decision. I  knew  it  was  my  time  to  call  it  a  career.     I  had  an  amazing  12-­year  run,  but  returning   this  summer  just  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  the  best  thing  for  me.     All  of  my  friends  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  returning  this   summer  and  last  summer  I  had  such  an  amaz-­ ing   time   working   side-­by-­side   with   my   best  

friends.    I  felt  this  summer  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  live  up  to   the  standard  of  camp  I  set  over  the  years  and   I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  I  should  commit  to  something  I   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  fully  behind.   I   thought   about   this   long   and   hard,   and   even   made   a   list   of   the   reasons   I   thought   I   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  return  this  summer  just  to  make  sure   I  was  making  the  right  choice.     But,  overall,  hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  lesson  for  all  of  you   NLGV RXW WKHUH$V GLIÂżFXOW DV LW PD\ EH IRU you  to  make  a  life-­changing  decision,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  im-­ portant  to  not  give  in  because  of  what  other   people   are   saying   to   make   you   change   your   mind.  Do  what  you  think  is  best  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   your   life   and   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   important   is   how   you  feel  about  your  decision.    

Andrew  Lief  is  a  third-­ year  journalism  major  and   cheeseburger  lover  who  cries   during  the  movie  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Click,â&#x20AC;?   starring  Adam  Sandler.  

On  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Doing  The  Thingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  (Whatever  That  Is) Yet,   somehow,   I   still   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   shake   the   thing.   I   consider   myself   the   kind   of   person   who  really,  genuinely  values  written  word.  I   try  to  be  that  person  anyway.  So,  when  I  say   something,  I  want  to  understand    the  origins   and  semantics  of  it.   This  is  my  attempt  at  doing  that  for  this   little  monster  of  a  verbal  tick  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  not  simply   justifying   why   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   saying   something,   but   maybe  picking  my  own  brain  for  what  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   saying.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  hardly  what  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  call  spiritual,   but   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   reluctant   to   call   most   anything   ar-­ bitrary. So,  what  does  it  mean  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;do  the  thing,â&#x20AC;?   anyway?   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   like   to   think   of   it   as   a   way   of   tak-­ ing  advantage  of  the  grey  areas  of  language.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  universal  beauty  in  the  details,  sure.   But  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  power,  something  strangely  and   equally  universal,  in  the  pairing  of  a  unde-­

niably,  literally  active  verb  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;to  doâ&#x20AC;?  with   the  almost  meaningless  term  pounded  out  of   every  second  graderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  marble  notebook.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   forcefulness   and   ownership   there  somewhere,  paired  with  a  level  of  non-­ chalance.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  marriage  of  extremes  that  I   FDQÂśWKHOSEXWÂżQGDSSHDOLQJ $QGUHDOO\ZLWKLQWKHFRQÂżQHVRIWKDW great,  amorphous  thing,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  much  to  be   done.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  your  too  long  essay,  your  too  short   naptime,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  dishes  you  let  sit  overnight   and   the   person   you   pushed   away   one   time   too  many.  For  me,  that  thing  is  so  massive   and   all-­encompassing   that   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   simultane-­ ously  overwhelming  and  freeing.     Weirdly  enough,  one  of  my  favoritedes-­ VD\V $OEHUW &DPXVÂś Âł0\WK RI 6LV\SKXV´ KDVRQHOLQHWKDWÂżWVKHUH,QUHIHUHQFHWRWKH mythic  boulder,  the  image  representative  of   all  the  absurd  activities  occupying  our  con-­ VFLRXVKRXUV&DPXVZULWHVÂłWKHURFNLVKLV

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

thing.â&#x20AC;?     Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  in  those  things  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  mundane,  the   absurd,  the  painful,  the  intoxicating  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  that   we  come  the  closest  to  meaning.   And   maybe   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   little   heavy   for   a   kitschy   catchphrase,   but   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   help   but   think   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   so   many   layers   and   moments   under  words  that  we  so  easily  overlook.  The   ones  that  seem  to  mean  nothing  can  maybe   mean  everything.  Those  things  uttered  over   and  over,  that  seem  like  place-­holders  on  the   surface   level,   might   just   hold   stake   some-­ where.  Maybe  nothing  means  nothing.

Katherine  Speller  is  a  fourth-­ year    journalism  major  and   psychopath  who  cannot  help   but  overthink  every  stupid   thing  and  then  spew  irritating   metacognitive  bullshit  about  it.    


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS

 11

oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

CUT SHORT 7KH:RPHQ¶V9ROOH\EDOOWHDPPDGHWKHUHJLRQDO¿QDOVRIWKH1&$$7RXUQDPHQW

By  Abbott  Brant &RS\(GLWRU_N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   Women’s   Volleyball   team   made   LWWRWKHUHJLRQDO¿QDOVRIWKH1&$$ 'LY,,,:RPHQ¶V9ROOH\EDOO&KDPSLRQVKLS 7RXUQDPHQW EHIRUH ORVLQJ  WR 1R  &ODUNVRQ8QLYHUVLW\RQ1RY 7KH /DG\ +DZNV HGJHG WKH /DG\ *ROGHQ.QLJKWVLQWKH¿UVWVHWEHIRUH GURSSLQJWKHQH[WWKUHHVHWV IDOOLQJLQWKHWKLUGURXQGRIWKHWRXU QDPHQWWR&ODUNVRQIRUWKHVHFRQG\HDULQ a  row. :LWKDRYHUDOOUHFRUGSULRUWRWKH WKHWRXUQDPHQWDQGDUHJXODUVHDVRQFRQIHU HQFHUHFRUGRI+HDG&RDFK0DWW*LX IUHVDLGKHZDVSURXGRIWKHVHDVRQWKHWHDP SURGXFHG GHVSLWH ORVLQJ WR %XIIDOR 6WDWH LQWKH681<$&)LQDOV ³,WKRXJKWDERXWWKHVHDVRQZHSXWWR JHWKHUDQG,WKRXJKWµLW¶VVRFOHDUWKH\GH VHUYHWKHRSSRUWXQLW\WRSOD\>LQWKH1&$$ 7RXUQDPHQW@¶´*LXIUHVDLG 7KH1&$$WKRXJKWVRWRR *LXIUH VDLG KH ZDV LQ WKH RI¿FH ZLWK PDQ\RIWKHSOD\HUVZKHQWKH\ORRNHGRQ OLQHDQGIRXQGRXWWKH\ZRXOGEHWUDYHOLQJ WR3RWVGDPWRSOD\&ROE\6DZ\HU&ROOHJH

LQWKH¿UVWURXQG7KHURRPH[SORGHGZLWK H[FLWHPHQW :KLOH PDNLQJ LW WR WKH WRXUQDPHQW GLGQ¶WFRPSOHWHO\WDNHDZD\WKHELWWHUWDVWH RI QRW ZLQQLQJ 681<$&V *LXIUH VDLG LW WRRNDZD\VRPHRIWKHVWLQJ ³,WIHOWUHDOO\JRRGPDNLQJLWWR1&$$V DQGZHIHOWDVLIZHKDGVRPHWKLQJWRSURYH DIWHU ORVLQJ WR %XIIDOR 6WDWH´ WKLUG\HDU RXWVLGHKLWWHU$OH[%L]XEVDLG 7KH /DG\ +DZNV VZHSW WKH /DG\ &KDUJHUV RI &ROE\6DZ\HU    ZKLFKZDVQRWZLWKRXWVRPHFKDO OHQJHV*LXIUHVDLG ³:H KDG VHHQ YLGHR RI WKHP SOD\LQJ EXWWKH\KDGQ¶WSOD\HGDVZHOOWKHQDVWKH\ ZHUHSOD\LQJDJDLQVWXVQRZ´*LXIUHVDLG ³:HZHUHGRZQDQG,WROGWKHPµLW¶V XSWR\RXJX\VQRZ¶´ $IWHUZLQQLQJWKH¿UVWWZRVHWVRIWKH PDWFK*LXIUHVDLGWKH/DG\&KDUJHUVZHUH GLVFRXUDJHGDQGFRXOGQ¶WFORVHWKHOHDGWKH /DG\+DZNVKDGFUHDWHGIRUFLQJDWWDFN ing  errors  in  the  third  set  alone. 7KH WHDP FRQWLQXHG D KLJK OHYHO RI SOD\LQWRWKHLUVHFRQGURXQGPDWFKDJDLQVW 5LFKDUG6WRFNWRQ&ROOHJHWKHQH[WGD\5H FRUGLQJDWDOO\RIVHUYLFHDFHVNLOOV

DQGDKLWWLQJSHUFHQWDJHRIFRPSDUHG WR 5LFKDUG 6WRFNWRQ¶V  *LXIUH VDLG WKLVZDVWKHEHVWPDWFKWKHWHDPKDVSOD\HG all  year.   ³:HZHQWLQZLWKDSODQDQGZHNQHZ ZH KDG WR H[HFXWH´ *LXIUH VDLG ³(YHU\ SOD\HU GLG WKHLU MRE FRUUHFWO\ DQG ZH DF FRPSOLVKHGHYHU\WKLQJZHZDQWHGWRGRLQ WKDWJDPH´ 7KH /DG\ +DZNV ZRQ WKH PDWFK   DGYDQFLQJRQWRWKH WKLUG URXQG DQG UHJLRQDO ¿QDO DQG NQRZ LQJWKH\ZRXOGRQFHDJDLQIDFH&ODUNVRQLQ WKHVDPHURXQGDVODVW\HDUZKHQWKH/DG\ +DZNVIHOOWRWKH/DG\*ROGHQ.QLJKWV   ³:H DOZD\V JR LQWR JDPHV ¿UHG XS QRW DVVXPLQJ WKDW ZH DUH JRLQJ WR ZLQ but   with   the   mindset   that   we   are   going   to   ZLQ´ IRXUWK\HDU &DSWDLQ 0DULVVD .LQJ said.  “We  did  the  same  thing  going  into  this   JDPH´ .LQJ VDLG ZKLOH WKH WHDP NQHZ WKH\ KDG JUDGXDWHG WKUHH IRXUWK\HDUV ODVW \HDU DQG &ODUNVRQ KDG JUDGXDWHG QRQH PDN LQJD³KXJHGLIIHUHQFH´LQWHUPVRIH[SHUL HQFHDQGOHYHORISOD\WKLVGLGQ¶WDIIHFWWKH RXWFRPH RI WKH JDPH EHFDXVH ERWK WHDPV

7KXUVGD\1RYHPEHU

                                                                                                                                                      3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

ZDQWHGWKHUHJLRQDOWLWOHMXVWDVEDGO\ *LXIUHVDLGWKHWHDPZHQWLQZLWKWKH JDPH SODQ WR SXW SUHVVXUH RQ WKH /DG\ *ROGHQ .QLJKWV DQG SXVK WKHP DURXQG WKH FRXUW EHIRUH WKH\ FRXOG GR WKH VDPH WR WKHP$IWHU ORVLQJ WKH ¿UVW WZR JDPHV KRZHYHUKHVDLGLWZDVFOHDUWKH¿UHSRZHU IURPWKHELJJHUDQGVWURQJHU&ODUNVRQWHDP ZDV³WRRPXFKWRRYHUFRPH´ZLWKD KLWWLQJ SHUFHQWDJH FRPSDUHG WR WKH /DG\ +DZNV¶DQGDUHFRUGHGNLOOVWRWKH /DG\+DZNV¶ ³, WKLQN RXU SDVVHUV GLG D JUHDW MRE DJDLQVWWKHP´*LXIUHVDLG³%XWVRPHWLPHV WKHVL]HRI\RXUKHDUWLVEHDWHQRXWE\WKH VL]HRI\RXUSHUVRQ´ /RRNLQJ IRUZDUG *LXIUH VDLG &ODUN VRQLVERWKWKH/DG\+DZNV¶QHZULYDODQG DVSLUDWLRQ 7KH WHDP ZLOO UHFRQYHQH DIWHU 7KDQNVJLYLQJ EUHDN DQG ZLOO EH ZRUNLQJ ZLWK WKH VWUHQJWK DQG FRQGLWLRQLQJ FRDFK *DU\*DOODVZHOODVZRUNLQJRQVWUHQJWK HQLQJWKHLUVHUYLQJJDPHEHLQJDJJUHVVLYH DQGSHUIHFWLQJWKHLUDFFXUDF\ ³:HZLOOFRQWLQXHWRUHFUXLWJUHDWDWK OHWHV DQG FRQWLQXH WR ZRUN KDUG´ *LXIUH said.  “We  have  the  tools  to  be  at  the  level   ZHZDQWWREH´


12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Stock,  Conklin  To  Play  in  Fourth-­year  Game Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Fourth-­year   Captain   Alyssa   Stock   and  fourth-­year  forward  Danielle  Conk-­ lin  were  named  to  the  2013  Front  Rush/ National   Field   Hockey   Coaches   Asso-­ ciation  (NFHCA)  NCAA  Div.  III  Senior   Game  roster.     Sixty   fourth-­year   players   from   across  the  country  will  be  competing  in   WKH JDPH 7KLV LV WKH ÂżUVW \HDU SOD\HUV from   SUNY   New   Paltz   will   be   partici-­ pating  in  the  event. Stock,   a   three-­time   First   Team  All-­ SUNYAC   member   and   two-­time   SU-­ NYAC   All-­Tournament   Team   member   said  she  received  text  messages  that  said   ��&#x20AC;&#x153;congratulations,â&#x20AC;?   but   she   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   why.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   very   surprised,â&#x20AC;?   Stock   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  got  a  lot  of  text  messages  saying  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;con-­ gratulations,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   and   I   was   like   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What?   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   do   anything.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Then   I   saw   I   made   WKHVHQLRUJDPH,WÂśVYHU\Ă&#x20AC;DWWHULQJ´ Head   Coach   Shanna   Vitale   said   Stockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   leadership,   both   on   and   off   the  

ÂżHOG HOHYDWHG WKH SOD\ RI WKH WHDP WKLV season.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   quarterback   of   our   team   and   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   a   phenomenal   leader,â&#x20AC;?   Vitale   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   girls   all   look   up   to   KHU+HUSUHVHQFHRQWKHÂżHOGLVDOZD\V known,  whether  from  what  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  bring-­ LQJ WR WKH ÂżHOG RU LI VKHÂśV UHDOO\ YRFDO and  assertive  with  the  girls.    They  all  re-­ spect  her.â&#x20AC;? 6WRFNÂżQLVKHGWKHVHDVRQZLWKWKUHH goals,  nine  assists  and  15  points.    Her  18   career  assists  ranks  third  in  program  his-­ tory.   She   has   started   every   game   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   SOD\HGVLQFHKHUÂżUVW\HDU Conklin,  a  two-­time  First  Team  All-­ SUNYAC   member,   said   she   originally   received   an   email   telling   her   she   was   an  alternate,  then  she  received  another  a   few   days   later   telling   her   she   made   the   game.    Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  excited  to  be  playing  in  the   game   and   said   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   cool   that   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   at   the   VDPHORFDWLRQDVWKHQDWLRQDOVHPLÂżQDOV DQGÂżQDOV Vitale   said   Conklin   is   a   dominant   player  when  she  has  the  ball  in  her  pos-­

session  and  puts  a  lot  of  pressure  on  op-­ posing  defenses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Danielle  is  just  a  very  smooth  play-­ er,â&#x20AC;?  Vitale  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  poised  with  the   ball  and  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  able  to  create  a  lot  of  scor-­ ing  opportunities.â&#x20AC;? &RQNOLQ ÂżQLVKHG KHU FDUHHU DV WKH programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   all-­time   leader   in   goals   (35),   assists  (25)  and  points  (95).    She  led  the   SUNYAC  this  season  in  these  categories. Vitale   said   both   players   earned   this   recognition  and  will  represent  the  school   in  a  good  manner.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  had  a  great  season  this  year,â&#x20AC;?   Vitale   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Danielle   led   the   team   in   goals  and  Stock  is  just  a  playmaker.â&#x20AC;? 6WRFNVDLGKHUÂżUVWWKRXJKWZDVKRZ surprised  she  was  Conklin  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  picked   to  the  team  initially,  but  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  happy  she   now   gets   to   experience   the   game   with   her.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   had   an   amazing   year   this   year,â&#x20AC;?  Stock  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  very  happy  that   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  playing  together.â&#x20AC;? Conklin   said   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   glad   she   gets   to   experience  this  moment  with  one  of  her   Photo  Courtesy  of  Ed  Diller  Photpgraphy

By  Andrew  Lief

teammates.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  will  make  it  so  much  more  mem-­ orable,   having   someone   to   relate   with,â&#x20AC;?   Conklin  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  awesome  play-­ er.â&#x20AC;? In   addition   to   playing   in   the   2013   NCAA  Div.  III  Senior  Game,  both  play-­ ers  were  named  to  the  2013  Longstreth/ National  Field  Hockey  Coaches  Associa-­ tion  (NFHCA)  NCAA  Div.  III  All-­North   Atlantic  Region  First  Team.   Both   players   said   they   are   happy   they  were  named  to  the  senior  game  be-­ cause  it  gives  them  one  more  opportunity   WRSOD\DJDPHRIFROOHJHÂżHOGKRFNH\ Vitale  said  she  is  going  to  miss  what   Conklin  and  Stock  brought  to  the  team.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   going   to   miss   Stockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   leader-­ ship  her  ability  to  raise  the  bar  at  practice   and  in  the  game,â&#x20AC;?  Vitale  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Danielle,   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   able   to   score.     Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   going   to   miss   that,   someone   who   can   score?   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  just  good  team  players.â&#x20AC;? The   game   will   take   place   on   Sat-­ urday,  Nov.  23  at  4  p.m.  at  the  Virginia   Beach  Sportsplex  in  Virginia  Beach,  V.A.

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Field  Hockey  Finishes  Strong Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After  upsetting  No.  9  William  Smith   &ROOHJHLQWKHÂżUVWURXQGRIWKH1&$$ 7RXUQDPHQWWKH681<1HZ3DOW]ÂżHOG hockey  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  season  came  to  an  end  on   Nov.  16  in  a  5-­2  loss  to  No.  5  Bowdoin   College.     The   Lady   Polar   Bears   scored   their   ÂżUVWJRDORIWKHJDPHLQWRWKHJDPH and  never  looked  back.    Fourth-­year  for-­ wards  Danielle  Conklin  and  Alicia  Ara-­ gosa  scored  the  Lady  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  two  goals,   while  fourth-­year  goalie  Toni  Pjetri  add-­ ed  six  saves.     Head  Coach  Shanna  Vitale  said  her   team   played   the   best   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ever   seen   them   play   against   William   Smith,   but   they  just  met  a  superior  team  in  the  sec-­ ond  round.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  weak  link  on   their  team,â&#x20AC;?  Vitale  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  thing  is  we   just  kept  working  and  we  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  give  up  

until  the  end.â&#x20AC;? 7KH/DG\+DZNVÂżQLVKHGWKHVHDVRQ DQGDGYDQFHGSDVWWKHÂżUVWURXQGRI WKH1&$$7RXUQDPHQWIRUWKHÂżUVWWLPH in  program  history.     Fourth-­year   Captain   Alyssa   Stock   said  she  is  proud  of  the  team  because  of   the  way  in  which  they  battled  adversity   this  season.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   had   some   bumps   along   the   way,   but   to   see   that   we   ended   playing   so   well   was   great,â&#x20AC;?   Stock   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   last   game   we   played   against   Bowdoin,   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  pretty  good,  but  we  have  nothing   to  be  ashamed  of.â&#x20AC;? Conklin   said   she   is   glad   the   team   improved   throughout   the   season   and   played  their  best  when  it  was  most  im-­ portant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   we   peaked   at   that   right   time,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what   everybody   has   been   saying,â&#x20AC;?  Conklin  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  played  our   best  hockey  during  the  playoffs  and  the  

NCAA  Tournament,   which   is   when   we   needed  it  the  most.â&#x20AC;? 7KH WHDPÂśV ÂżYH JUDGXDWLQJ IRXUWK \HDUVKHOSHGWKHSURJUDPZLQWKHLUÂżUVW two   SUNYAC   Championships   and   had   two  players,  Conklin  and  Pjetri,  set  pro-­ gram  records.     Conklin   is   the   all-­time   leader   in   goals   (35),   assists   (25)   and   points   (95)   and  Pjetri  is  the  all-­time  leader  in  saves   (443)  and  shutouts  (14). Vitale  said  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  miss  this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   class   of   fourth-­years   because   of   the   leadership   they   provided   to   allow   the  team  to  win  back-­to-­back  conference   titles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  brought  a  lot  to  this  program   and  have  put  in  a  lot  of  time  and  sacri-­ ÂżFHWRJHWZKHUHZHQHHGHGWREH´9L-­ tale   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   work   really   hard   and   just  raised  the  bar  at  practice  and  pushed   their  teammates  to  be  better.â&#x20AC;? Stock  said  she  is  going  to  miss  play-­ Photo  Courtesy  of  Ed  Diller  Photpgra-­

By  Andrew  Lief

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

ing  the  sport  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  played  in  a  team  set-­ ting  for  all  of  her  life.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   such   a   special   bond   as   teammates,   we   really   are   a   family,â&#x20AC;?   Stock   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   going   to   EH KHDUWEUHDNLQJ QRW EHLQJ RQ WKH ÂżHOG playing  with  them.â&#x20AC;? Conklin   said   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   miss   playing   an   organized   sport   with   the   teammates  she  loves.     Vitale  said  she  has  a  great  group  re-­ turning  next  year  and  is  looking  forward   to  what  they  can  do  after  most  of  them   have  won  back-­to-­back  titles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   were   able   to   experience   a   season   this   year   with   many   obstacles   and  what  is  exciting  about  them  is  that   they   learned   to   work   through   obstacles   and   overcome   adversity,â&#x20AC;?   Vitale   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   taste   and   getting   that   far   and   not   going   any   further   is   a   good   thing   be-­ cause   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   raise   the   bar   higher   for   next  year.â&#x20AC;?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

14oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

S13PORTS

Women’s  Rugby  Stays  Up  ‘Til  Dawn By  Andrew  Lief Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Women’s  Rugby  team  participat-­ ed  in  the  Up  ‘Til  Dawn  event  on  Nov.  15.     The   event,   which   raised   money   for   St.   Jude   Children’s   Hospital   in   Mem-­ phis,   TN,   raised   over   $12,000,   with   the   Women’s   Rugby   team   raising   $3,568   of   the  amount.   Families   don’t   have   to   pay   medical   bills   at   St.   Judes,   so   events   like   Up   Til’   Dawn  help  cover  the  $1.8  million  it  costs   to  operate  the  hospital  on  a  daily  basis.    In   addition,   the   money   raised   goes   to   fund   research   on   childhood   cancer   and   other   deadly  diseases. The   team   found   out   about   the   event   on  Nov.  8  and  raised  all  of  their  money  in   a   span   of   one   week,   according   to   fourth   -­year  Captain  MacKenzie  Bachar.     The   team’s   philanthropy   chair,   sec-­ RQG\HDUSURSDQGÀDQNHU'DQLHOOD0RQ-­ ticciolo  said  the  team  decided  to  partake   in  this  event  to  help  out  people  in  need.    

“We  wanted  to  get  more  involved  on   campus   and   in   the   New   Paltz   communi-­ ty,”  Monticciolo  said.  “As  a  team,  we  are   made  up  of  over  40  girls,  so  we  have  a  lot   of   participants   to   contribute   to   organiza-­ tions  looking  to  raise  money  for  charity.” Up  ‘Till  Dawn  lasted  from  11:30  p.m.     to   5:30   a.m.     During   this   time,   the   26   teams  that  were  signed  up  played  games   and  competed  against  each  other  in  order   to  raise  even  more  money  for  their  teams.     The   evening   began   with   a   dance   contest   to  see  who  could  dance  the  longest. Among   the   group,   the   team   divided   themselves  into  six  smaller  teams  to  com-­ pete  against  each  other.     The   team   “Women’s   Rubgy   Two,”   captained  by  Bachar,  earned  the  most  out   of  the  six  smaller  teams  by  raising  $1,265   between  the  team’s  six  members.     Monticciolo  said  she  enjoyed  the  vid-­ eos  that  were  played  because  they  showed   patients   at   St.   Jude   and   gave   the   partici-­ pants  an  image  of  the  children  who  they  

were  working  for. “My   favorite   part   of   the   event   were   the   small   clips   they   showed   in   between   the   different   games   and   competitions,   of   children   at   the   hospital,”   Monticciolo   said.   Fourth-­year   Captain   Dara   Lebenger   said   she   loved   how   every   participant   re-­ mained  enthusiastic  even  when  it  was  get-­ ting  very  late  into  the  night.     “My   favorite   part   had   to   have   been   musical   chairs   because   even   though   it   was   around   3   a.m.,   there   was   still   so   much   positivity   and   excitement   in   the   room  knowing  we  were  working  towards   something   incredibly   important,”   Leb-­ enger  said.     Bachar  said  was  glad  she  able  to  be  a   part  of  such  a  great  cause.     “The   event   itself   was   great   and   the   people  running  it  did  an  awesome  job  at   keeping   people’s   interest   throughout   the   night,”   Bachar   said.   “I   have   to   say   my   favorite   part   was   seeing   my   team   keep  

up   the   smiles   and   energy   throughout   the   entire   event.   I   was   really   proud   walking   away  that  night.” The  team  has  been  active  with  chari-­ ties,   third-­year   captain   Irene   Corvinus   said.   Last   spring   they   hosted   a   “Prom   Dress   Rugby   Tournamnet,”   where   all   of   their   proceeds   went   to   the   Grace   Smith   House   in   Poughkeepsie,   which   houses   people  in  order  to  protect  them  from  do-­ mestic  abuse.    The  team  is  hoping  to  run   that  tournament  again  this  year.     Going  forward,  Monticciolo  said  the   team   will   be   participating   in   other   fund-­ raisers  and  events  where  they  can  help  the   community. “This  Saturday  we  will  be  taking  part   in  The  Family  of  New  Paltz  Turkey  Trot,”   Monticciolo   said.   “We   are   also   looking   into  doing  some  volunteer  work  closer  to   the   holidays   with   the   Daily   Bread   Soup   Kitchen.” 7KHWHDPVKDYHXQWLO'HFWR¿QLVK fundraising  for  Up  ‘Til  Dawn.  

 Perfect      Start Urgent  Medical  Care   Urgent  Medical  Care   No  Appointment  Needed                                                            X-­Ray  and  Laboratory  Testing          Suturing  And  Wound  Care                                          Testing  And  Treatment  For  All  STDs

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN  

The  Women’s  Swim  team  improved  their  record  to  2-­0  after  beating  SUNY   Oswego   135-­65   on   Nov.   16.     Fourth-­year   Chelsea   Allocco   won   the   1,000m   freestyle  and  second-­year  Cassidy  Griger  won  the  50m  and  500m  freestyle.    

Weekdays:  8  a.m.  to  7:30  p.m.                    Weekends:  10  a.m.  to  4  p.m. Weekdays:  8  a.m.  to  7:30  p.m.  Weekends:  10  a.m.  to  4  p.m.

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

Thursday,  September  


14oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  Owns  the  West  Coast

   The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  is  off  to  a  2-­0  start  to  their  season.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

By  Abbott  Brant Copy  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  recorded  a   pefect  start  to  the  2013-­14  season  at  the  Lee   Fulmer   Tip-­Off   Classic   in   Redlands,   CA.   last  weekend.   The   Hawks   narrowly   defeated   Whit-­ tier  College  69-­66  on  Nov.  15,  before  top-­ ping  The  University  of  Redlands,  82-­60  on   Nov.  16.  Third-­year  Captain  Taylor  Sowah   and  fourth-­year  guard  Andrew  Joseph  were   named  to  the  All-­Tournament  Team. +HDG&RDFK0LNH5HMQLDNVDLGWKHÂżUVW game   against   Whittier,   where   the   Hawks   trailed   the   Poets   35-­32   at   the   half,   was   a   ÂłJULQG´ ² D YHU\ GHPDQGLQJ ÂżUVW WHVW IRU the   team   and   a   true   testament   to   their   per-­ severance.   7KHZLQJDYHWKHWHDPFRQÂżGHQFHDQG got   rid   of   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   jitters   of   starting   a   season  before  the  second  game  against  the  

Bulldogs,   Rejniak   said.     The   team   posted   DSRLQWOHDGLQWKHÂżUVWKDOIWKDWKHOSHG them  keep  the  momentum  on  their  side  and   defeat  the  defending  Southern  California  In-­ tercollegiate  Athletic  Conference  champion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   were   all   pretty   pumped   about   having   the   opportunity   to   travel   across   the   country  to  play,  although  our  coach  made  it   very  clear  that  this  was  a  business  trip,  not   a  vacation,â&#x20AC;?  second-­year  forward  Alex  Perl-­ man  said.   Rejniak  said  the  trip  provided  the  team   with   a   unique   experience   and   allowed   the   Hawks  to  compete  against  successful  teams   with  a  different  style  of  play  prominent  on   the  west  coast  that  they  are  not  accustomed   to.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  teams  were  more  of  a  run-­and-­gun   style  teams,â&#x20AC;?  Sowah  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  were  more   fast   paced   and   shooting   teams,   but   it   was   nothing  we  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  ready  for.â&#x20AC;? Perlman   agreed,   and   said   both   Whit-­

tier  and  Redlands  ran  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grinnell  Offense,â&#x20AC;?   where  the  offense  attempts  to  get  a  shot  up   as   quickly   as   possible.   Although   this   can   lead  to  high-­scoring  games,  it  can  also  lead   to  the  majority  of  attempts  being  low-­qual-­ ity.   The   team   used   this   to   their   advantage,   putting  pressure  on  the  offense  and  making   sure  to  secure  rebounds. Rejniak   said   although   the   team   lost   two   1,000   point   players   in   Matt   Devine   DQG 6KHUHHI7D\ORU WKH ÂżUVW WZR JDPHV RI the  season  have  shown  him  that  the  Hawks   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  need  a  set  of  prominent  scorers  to  be   successful.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  team  has  a  team  mentality,â&#x20AC;?  Rej-­ niak  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  can  be  anybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  night.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what  makes  us  dangerous.â&#x20AC;?   5HMQLDNFLWHVÂżUVW\HDUIRUZDUG$QGUHZ 6HQLXN ÂżUVW\HDU JXDUG .HZDQ %HHEH DQG transfer  third-­year  guard/forward  R.J.  Rosa   as  the  three  new  additions  to  the  team  he  can   foresee  making  a  major  impact  this  season  

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

                                                                                                                                                      PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN      

on  the  court.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   those   are   just   the   new   players   to  the  program,â&#x20AC;?  Rejniak  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any  given   QLJKW ZH FRXOG KDYH ÂżYH JX\V SXWWLQJ XS double  digits.â&#x20AC;? Looking  forward,  Rejniak  said  the  team   will   keep   emphasizing   on   diving   on   balls   and   capitalizing   on   rebounds,   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;trademarks.â&#x20AC;?   The   Hawks   will   look   to   de-­ crease  turnovers  and  keep  free  throw  num-­ bers  strong  as  they  continue  through  the  sea-­ son  and  begin  competing  against  conference   teams.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   biggest   competition   this   year   I   would  say  is  Brockport  and  Plattsburgh,  for   the  simple  fact  that  they  are  fastpaced  teams   and  very  versatile,â&#x20AC;?  Sowah  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  look-­ ing  forward  to  playing  them  and  working  on   our  ways  to  beat  them.â&#x20AC;? The  Hawks  will  take  on  Vassar  College   in  the  season  home  opener,  Nov.  21  at  6  p.m.   in  the  Hawk  Center.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

boarder patrol

                             

N02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

15

Gear  Up  and  Go  Out  

Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

When   Rick   Nash   was   traded   to   the   Rangers  in  the  summer  of  2012,  everyone   was  over  the  moon,  and  for  good  reason.   Not  only  did  Glen  Sather  pull  off  a  trade   that  saw  the  Rangers  gain  more  than  they   lost,  but  the  team  got  the  goalscorer  they   had   desperately   needed   since   JaromĂ­r   JĂĄgr  left.   But  if  Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  2-­1  loss  to  the  Bos-­ ton  Bruins  proved  anything,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  that  Nash   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   the   single   driving   force   of   the   Rangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  offense. To   be   fair,   Rick   Nash   has   had   his   fair  share  of  the  cosmic  slap.  Last  season   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   start   until   January   and   as   a   result   he,   along   with   the   rest   of   the   team   was   never  able  to  play  up  the  level  they  were   expected  to  be  at  prior  to  the  season.  This   season,  he  got  a  concussion  early  on,  dur-­ ing  that  embarrassing  9-­2  loss  to  San  Jose.

WLRQV VWDQG ÂżUPO\ SODQWHG LQ VROLGLW\ GH spite  gusty  deterrents.    The  effort  and  dedi-­ cation  I  see  on  the  East  Coast  is  what  makes   me  proud  to  be  a  rider  from  New  York.     Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   glad   that   my   riding   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   born   with  a  silver  spoon.    I  cherish  every  bit  of   Ă&#x20AC;XII\VQRZOLNHLWÂśVP\ODVWRIWKHVHDVRQ because   it   could   very   well   be.     Rocks,   ice   or  a  car  thermostat  that  reads  four  degrees   Fahrenheit   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   deter   me   from   coming   EDFNDVVRRQDV,ÂśYHÂż[HGP\ERDUGÂśVPRVW recent  core-­shot.   It  is  not  to  say  that  a  rider  from  Idaho   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  appreciate  a  good  powder  day,  but   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  sure  they  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  in  the  same  way.    Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   DOO DGGLFWV MRQHVLQÂś IRU WKH VDPH Âż[ EXW HYHU\RQH FDQ DGPLW WKH Âż[ LVQÂśW DV HDVLO\ found  on  this  side  of  the  country.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  November,  so  we  can  still  all   pretend  to  be  optimistic  for  a  solid  year  of   snow,  but  soon  reality  will  set  in.    The  East   Coast  is  not  heavenly  riding.  The  cold  and   ice  will  come  with  its  usual  vengeance.    Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   inevitable.   This  is  war.    Gear  up,  sharpen  your  edg-­ es  and  prepare  for  battle  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  winter  is  coming.   East  coast,  beast  coast.  Later  skaters.

                     PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR  USER  WILLANDBEYOND

HYTHM & LUESHIRTS

were   getting   rained   on   during   our   trips   to   Hunter  as  late  as  February.     One  day,  as  we  rode  up  the  Broadway   LTD.  Quad  chair  over  Park  Avenue,  we  sat   in   silence   clutching   our   bandanas   close   to   our   faces   in   a   feeble   attempt   to   keep   the   wind   out.     The   ice-­covered   lips   and   land-­ ings  of  all  the  park  features  glared  menac-­ ingly   in   our   direction   as   if   to   say,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even  try  it.â&#x20AC;?     â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  sucks,â&#x20AC;?  I  said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yup,â&#x20AC;?  he  responded. After   experiencing   such   consistently   terrible  conditions,  Nye  and  I  changed  ab-­ solutely  nothing.    We  continued  to  beat  our-­ selves   up   and   forced   our   way   through   the   frosty  awfulness  every  chance  we  got.    And   the   park   crew   would   deliver   as   much   as   they  could  with  what  Mother  Nature  would   allow.     The  name  of  the  game  was,  and  always   is,   persistence.   These   are   the   tests   of   my   commitment  to  prove  to  myself  how  much   snowboarding  truly  means  to  me.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Words   go   with   the   wind,â&#x20AC;?   a   friend   once  told  me.     Words   may   go   with   the   wind,   but   ac-­

 

Screeching   and   sputtering   like   broken   nails  on  a  crusty  chalkboard,  the  metal  edge   of   my   snowboard   grinds   sketchily   across   the  ice.  Flailing  my  arms  and  regaining  my   balance,   I   have   just   enough   time   to   pop   a   sizeable   ollie.   Luckily,   the   ollie   was   high   enough  to  clear  the  patch  of  grass  and  lump   of  rocks  left  uncovered  of  snow.     Johnny   Drama,   from   HBOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Entou-­ rage,â&#x20AC;?  said  it  best: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hell,  if  you  can  ski  Hunter  Mountain,   you  can  ski  anywhere.â&#x20AC;?   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  with  Drama  on  this  one.       East   coast   riding   is   the   jankiest.   Con-­ ditions   are   inconsistent,   drastically   cold,   excessively   windy   and   powder   days   come   few   and   far   between.     Waking   up   to   four   days  of  below  freezing  weather  without  any   VQRZDQGRQWKHÂżIWKLWÂśOOZDUPXSDQGUDLQ only  to  freeze  again  and  restart  the  annoy-­ ing  cycle.     Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   funny   to   hear   a   kid   from   Colorado  tell  you  that  they  had  a  bad  sea-­ son.   By   funny,   I   mean   the   most   spoiled   sounding  pretentious  bull  shenanigans  that   I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  any  patience  to  listen  to.   Last   year,   my   mate   Alex   Nye   and   I  

Hunter  Mountain  in  Hunter,  N.Y.

The  Rangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Wish  List 7XHVGD\ÂśV ORVV ZDV 1DVKÂśV ÂżUVW DS pearance   in   the   lineup   since   that   game   in   San   Jose,   and   yes,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   take   time   for   him   to   get   back   to   normal.   But   him  being  in  top  form  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  change  the   fact  that  the  Rangers  need  more  than  one   pure   goalscorer.   Sure,   the   supplemental   goals  from  the  bench  can  win  us  games  at   times,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nothing  compared  to  what   Nash   and   a   second   goalscorer   could   do   for  us.   The   trade   deadline   is   pretty   far   off,   but  here  are  a  couple  of  players  the  Rang-­ ers  should  consider  adding  into  the  lineup.   1.  Devin  Setoguchi-­Winnipeg  Jets Setoguchi   is   the   kind   of   player   who   would  thrive  not  only  from  having  Alain   Vigneault  as  a  coach,  but  in  the  Rangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   new   system   in   general.   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   kind   of   forward  who  does  need  to  be  disciplined,  

but  when  he  is  and  is  given  the  freedom   to  move  up  on  the  wing,  he  can  be  lethal.   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   proven   himself   as   a   useful   power   play  asset  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  something  the  Rang-­ ers   are   always   desperate   for.   Could   be   a   bit  of  a  gamble,  but  could  end  up  making   DVLJQLÂżFDQWGLIIHUHQFH 2.   Matt   Duchene-­Colorado   Ava-­ lanche 7KLV RQH LV GHÂżQLWHO\ D VWUHWFK EXW hey,   if   the   Rangers   could   get   Rick   Nash   for   what   they   got   him   for,   maybe   this   could   happen,   too.   I   mean,   could   you   LPDJLQH\RXUÂżUVWOLQHEHLQJ1DVK'XFK ene  and  Ryan  Callahan?  It  would  hurt  ev-­ ery  opponent  the  Rangers  go  up  against.   He   can   go   on   the   wing   as   well,   which   PLJKW EH PRUH EHQHÂżFLDO VLQFH WKH WHDP is  pretty  much  set  in  terms  of  forwards.   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   this   trade   is   going   to  

Thursday,  November  21,  2013

happen  in  a  million  years  and  I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  see   Colorado  wanting  to  part  with  him  at  the   trade   deadline.   But,   like   I   said,   Sather   has  pulled  off  miracles  before,  so  I  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   completely  rule  this  dream  out. 3.  Bobby  Ryan-­Ottawa  Senators I  mention  Ryan  just  about  every  year   whenever  I  write  a  column  about  players   who  the  Rangers  should  get.  Ryan  would   be   perfect   for   any   team   really,   but   he   would  be  especially  perfect  for  the  Rang-­ ers.  Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  phenomenal  with  setting  up  the   play  and  is  more  than  useful  on  the  face   off.  Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  complete  package  and  what   you   would   want   in   a   forward.   Sure,   he   can  be  a  bit  lazy  and  he  would  have  been   even  better  with  Tortorellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Rangers,  but   I  think  Vigneault  will  also  do  a  good  job   of  making  Ryan  work  in  the  Rangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  sys-­ tem.  Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  perfect  for  them.


SPORTS SEASON ENDING THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

Women’s Rugby Raises Money For Charity PAGE 13

Men’s Basketball Starts The Season 2-­0 PAGE 14

PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN  

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL LOSSES IN THE NCAA TOURNAMENT: PAGE 11


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 85, Issue IX