The New Paltz Oracle, Volume 82, Issue 8

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The New Paltz Oracle

NEWS

Pg 3

UPD Encourages Cautiousness By Andrew Wyrich Sports Editor | Andrew.wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

In light of the alleged rape of a SUNY New Paltz student on Nov. 1, University 3ROLFH 'HSDUWPHQW 83' RI¿FLDOV DUH stressing that students exercise caution. Twenty-­three-­year-­old Brennan G. De-­ brosky was charged with attempted rape after the New Paltz Police Department was dispatched to a multi-­unit home occupied by SUNY New Paltz students at 5:30 a.m on Saturday. While investigating, police learned that Debrosky was visiting a tenant of the home and attempted to rape the SUNY New Paltz student, according to the Daily Freeman. University Police offered their opin-­ ions on safety both on or off campus. Lt. Johnny G. Coxum said he believed students must always be cautious, whether they are on or off campus. He said he feels they should take the same safety precau-­ tions because both are “the same environ-­ ment, so to speak.” According to the 2009 Annual Security Report, which is published to meet the re-­ quirements of the Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act of 1990 (now known as the Clery Act) SUNY New Paltz reported three forcible sex offenses on cam-­ pus property in 2009. The number of forc-­ ible sex offenses has decreased over the last three years. The report also states that in order for SUNY New Paltz to educate students about sexual offenses, all new students are given a “comprehensive orientation session on rape and sexual violence prevention” and UPD offers sexual assault education and information programs to students and em-­ ployees upon request. One of these courses is “RAD” which stands for Rape, Aggression and Defense.

PHOTO BY MATHEW JOHN JR.

SUNY New Paltz’s Annual Security Report said the number of forcible sex offenses on campus have decreased over the last three years. The course teaches female students about situations involving sexual offenses and how to react. “We teach them not to freeze or panic during these situations,” said Coxum. “De-­ pending if a weapon is involved they may be able to get themselves out of the situa-­ tion.” According to the New Paltz website, “RAD” is “a comprehensive course for women that begins with awareness, preven-­ tion, risk reduction and avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands-­on defense training,” and is open to students, faculty, staff or community members. 2I¿FHU -HQHOOH .HOVH\ VDLG VKH DGYLVHV

students to trust their instincts when in po-­ tential situations that lend themselves to possible sexual violence. “If you feel like something is not right, give us a call,” Kelsey said. Kelsey said she believes the best way to avoid dangerous situations is to not walk alone, be aware of your surroundings and stay in well lit areas. “Don’t go off the beaten path,” Kelsey said. “Don’t go behind buildings or bushes or places where predators can hide and eas-­ ily take you away quickly.” Coxum stressed that students should take advantage of the Police Department’s Escort service, which is designed to bring

students from location to location on cam-­ pus if walking alone is their only option. According to New Paltz’s website, the service is available for students, staff and faculty at SUNY New Paltz and stops at various parts on campus. While teaching students how to defend themselves is important, Coxum said the police’s main concern is teaching students not to get themselves into potential danger-­ ous situations. “If you allow yourself to get into these situations, it’s going to happen,” Coxum said. “If you’re not trained to defend your-­ self, most times, you are in big trouble. You may not survive.”

Do you want to join The New Paltz Oracle? Come to our elections on Sunday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m. in Student Union 403! Thursday, November 11, 2010


Pg 4

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

News Briefs National  The  Paterson  administration  says  FORVLQJ WKH ODWHVW GHÂżFLW PD\ UHTXLUH cuts  of  perhaps  1  percent  in  every  area  including  a  midyear  cut  in  school  aid. Budget  Director  Robert  Megna  says  the  $315  million  shortfall  in  the  current  budget  must  be  addressed  by  Decem-­ ber  31.  That’s  when  Paterson’s  term  ends  and  Andrew  Cuomo,  a  fellow  'HPRFUDW WDNHV RIÂżFH In  January,  the  state  Senate  may  also  be  in  Republican  hands  pending  a  recount  of  votes  from  Tuesday. ***** $ ZRPDQ FKDUJHG ZLWK ÂżUVW GHJUHH murder  in  the  slaying  of  her  4-­year-­ old  daughter  in  suburban  Chicago  told  police  she  killed  her  child  to  prevent  her  from  being  raped  and  sold  as  a  sex  slave  online,  prosecutors  said. Marci  Webber,  of  East  Nassau,  N.Y.,  was  being  held  Monday  at  DuPage  County  Jail  on  $5  million  bond  in  the  death  of  Magdalene  â€œMaggieâ€?  Webber.  Her  body  was  found  last  week  in  an  upstairs  bathroom  of  a  Bloomingdale  town  house.  The  child’s  throat  was  slashed  and  the  words  â€œdivine  mercyâ€?  were  scrawled  in  blood  on  a  nearby  wall,  according  to  DuPage  County  prosecutors. ***** A  woman  has  been  killed  after  she  was  struck  by  a  dump  truck  in  Milwaukee. Witnesses  tell  WTMJ-­TV  in  Milwau-­ kee  that  the  woman  appeared  to  cross  DJDLQVW D WUDIÂżF OLJKW RQ 0RQGD\ DW DQ intersection  on  the  city’s  south  side.  $XWKRULWLHV KDYH QRW \HW FRQÂżUPHG GHWDLOV RU LGHQWLÂżHG WKH ZRPDQ  International  Briefs  on  Page  5

The  student  senate  discussed  how  they  would  clarify  bylaws  in  regards  to  campus  charity  events  in  the  future.

PHOTO Â BY Â LAURA Â LUENGAS

Senate  to  Remedy  Appeals  Problems By  Pamela  Vivanco Copy  Editor  |  Pvivanco57@newpaltz.edu

The  50th  student  senate  discussed  the  potential  amendment  of  bylaws  at  their  most  recent  general  meeting. Webmaster  and  Chief  Justice  of  Judi-­ cial  Board  Travis  Nanek  stood  before  the  senate  and  presented  suggestions  aimed  to  prevent  appeals  like  the  ones  made  to  senate  in  the  last  couple  of  weeks.  Those  include  the  appeals  on  Oct.  26  made  by  Invisible  Children  and  Student  Association  President  Jennifer  Sanchez,  and  the  Nov.  2  appeal  made  by  the  Art  History  Association. $IWHU EHLQJ FRQ¿UPHG IRU D SDUWLDO DS-­ peal  by  senate,  the  Art  History  Association  presented  its  appeal  to  the  judicial  board.  The  appeal  was  approved  in  full  by  the  board  because  the  error  was  a  result  of  mis-­ information,  said  Nanek. On  Oct.  26,  the  legislative  body  ap-­ proved  an  appeal  made  by  Sanchez  regard-­ ing  a  trip  to  the  American  Speech  and  Hear-­

ing  Association  (ASHA)  Conference  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  where  she  and  three  other  students  will  present  selected  research. After  being  approved  for  the  full  amount  by  the  Budget  and  Finance  Com-­ mittee  to  cover  the  expenses  of  the  trip,  the  National  Student  Speech  Language  Hear-­ ing  Association  requested  money  to  go  to  the  ASHA  conference  as  well. BFC  decided  to  spread  the  money  out  evenly  reducing  the  amount  of  money  the  research  group  was  originally  awarded.  Senators  decided  that  because  their  re-­ VHDUFK ZDV VSHFLÂżFDOO\ VHOHFWHG E\ WKH ASHA  convention  to  present,  they  should  be  given  the  money. In  regards  to  Sanchez’s  appeal,  it  was  suggested  the  senate  should  amend  the  bud-­ get  so  conferences  have  two  separate  lines,  â€œone  for  presenters  and  one  for  attendees.â€?  In  order  to  prevent  another  case  like  the  one  presented  by  Invisible  Children,  Nanek  and  the  judicial  board  suggested  senate  clarify  bylaws  in  regards  to  charity Â

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

events  on  campus. A  few  senators  will  meet  on  Friday,  Nov.  12  to  research  and  possibly  draft  by-­ law  amendments  that  will  be  presented  at  the  next  senate  meeting  to  be  approved  or  rejected. During  her  report,  Sanchez  announced  VKH LV LQ WKH SURFHVV RI ¿JXULQJ RXW D ZD\ WR add  another  line  to  the  Oasis/Haven  hotline  because  currently  they  only  have  one  line. Vice  President  of  Programming  An-­ thony  Lino  said  last  week  SA  Productions  met  and  brainstormed  ideas  about  the  Dec.  4  show.  Lino  said  collaboration  with  Na-­ tional  Organization  for  the  Reformation  of  Marijuana  Laws  (NORML)  might  be  pos-­ sible. Executive  Vice  President  Eve  Stern  and  Lino  are  encouraging  slam  poets,  mu-­ sicians  and  bands  to  contact  them  for  a  spot  in  the  Dec.  4  concert. The  next  student  senate  general  meet-­ ing  will  be  held  on  Tuesday,  Nov.  16  in  the  Student  Union  418.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

Supervisor,  Chief  Oppose  Fund  Cuts By  Justin  McCarthy News  Editor  |  Jmccarthy46@newpaltz.edu

Amidst  the  struggle  to  keep  down  property  tax  increases  to  the  Town  of  New  Paltz  budget,  Town  Su-­ pervisor  Toni  Hokanson  and  New  Paltz  Police  Chief  Joseph  Snyder  questioned  the  Town  Board’s  decision  to  cut  funding  to  the  police  personnel  line. The  board  heard  arguments  from  Snyder  Wednesday  after  a  3-­2  vote  was  made  at  the  previous  budget  meeting  to  remove  funding  for  the  personnel  line. “A  majority  of  the  board  voted  to  take  out  almost  $138,000  out  of  the  police  personnel  line,â€?  Hokanson  said  shortly  before  the  meeting.  â€œThe  rest  of  the  mem-­ bers  who  pushed  for  this  think  that  we  can  eliminate  RQH RIÂżFHU SRVLWLRQ DQG WKDW ZH GRQÂśW QHHG WR KDYH D dispatcher  from  11  p.m.  to  7  a.m.â€? Hokanson,  who  said  she  is  â€œabsolutely  opposedâ€?  to  the  cuts,  voted  in  the  minority  against  them  because  she  felt  they  would  negatively  â€œhave  a  direct  impact  on  public  safety.â€? In  his  arguments  to  the  Town  Board,  Snyder  agreed  with  Hokanson. “They  talked  about  eliminating  the  night  dis-­ patch,â€?  Snyder  said  after  the  meeting.  â€œI  said,  â€˜You  can’t  do  that.’  We  have  evidence,  we  have  an  armory  in  the  station.  We  can’t  leave  it  unattended.  Someone  could  break  in  and  we’d  have  some  major  issues.â€? Snyder  felt  the  community  may  not  be  entirely  in  agreement  with  the  board’s  cuts  and  may  show  opposi-­ tion  to  the  decision.  He  said  that  when  a  town  super-­ visor  attempted  to  eliminate  the  police  department  in  1999  in  an  attempt  to  lower  increases,  â€œthe  community  came  out  in  the  hundredsâ€?  in  opposition  to  the  pro-­ posed  cuts  and  the  town  supervisor  was  not  reelected. In  this  year’s  budget  process,  however,  the  town Â

want  to  keep  that  position,â€?  Snyder  said.  â€œThey  said  WKDW , VKRXOGQÂśW KDYH UHSODFHG WKDW ÂżUVW ZLWKRXW WDONLQJ WR WKHP %XW , KDG VORWV LQ P\ EXGJHW 7KH\ QHYHU VDLG WR PH WKDW WKH\ GLGQÂśW ZDQW PH WR EDFNÂżOO LW ,WÂśV never  been  discussed.â€? Councilwoman  Kitty  Brown  said  that  there  was  â€œno  joyâ€?  in  making  the  decision  the  board  came  to,  but  that  it  needed  to  be  done.  She  said  board  mem-­ EHUV ZHUH QRW DZDUH 6Q\GHU KDG ÂłEDFNĂ€RZHG´ D QHZ SHUVRQ LQWR D UHWLUHG RIÂżFHUÂśV VORW EXW WKDW WKH WRZQÂśV budget  could  simply  not  afford  it.  She  also  pointed  out  WKDW ZKHQ EHQHÂżWV DUH LQFOXGHG LW ZRXOG FRVW WKH WRZQ even  more. She  also  said  a  night  dispatcher  is  a  position  that  many  towns  do  without,  and  that  a  large  percentage  of  people  who  have  emergencies  likely  call  911  and  not  the  police  dispatcher. Snyder,  however,  argued  that  it  isn’t  fair  to  com-­ pare  New  Paltz  to  other  municipalities. “I’ve  been  here  23  years,â€?  he  said.  â€œAnd  since  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FACEBOOK.COM I’ve  been  here,  I’ve  heard  the  argument  comparing  us  Town  Supervisor  Toni  Hokanson  voiced  her  to  other  towns  around  us.  But  New  Paltz  is  unique.â€? opposition  to  cutting  funding  to  the  police  Ultimately,  Brown  said  she  and  the  other  mem-­ personnel  line. bers  have  a  duty  to  lower  the  property  tax  increases  of  the  residents  of  New  Paltz. supervisor  is  very  much  in  agreement  with  the  police  â€œIt’s  just  not  our  money,â€?  she  said.  â€œAnother  department  regarding  potential  cuts.  Hokanson  rep-­ thing  to  remember  is  that  this  is  a  community  of  artists  resented  one  of  two  votes  against  cuts  to  the  depart-­ and  plenty  of  self-­employed  people.  The  economy  is  ment’s  personnel  line. hurting.â€? $GGLWLRQDOO\ 6Q\GHU KDG ÂżOOHG WKH VHDW RI D UH-­ With  only  one  meeting  left  for  board  members  to  cent  retiree  in  the  department.  Under  the  proposed  make  changes  to  the  preliminary  budget,  a  retraction  cuts,  he  will  not  be  able  to  fund  the  salaries  and  ben-­ of  the  cuts  may  not  be  likely,  but  Snyder  is  hopeful. HÂżWV RI DOO SDWURO RIÂżFHU VORWV KH KDV RQ WKH GHSDUW-­ “It’s  not  over  until  it’s  over,â€?  he  said.  â€œI’m  go-­ ment’s  current  roster. ing  to  continue  to  express  my  feelings  and  opinions  of  â€œWe  have  one  person  retiring  this  month,  back-­ what  I  think  is  essential  for  our  services  that  we  offer.  Ă€RZHG ZLWK D QHZ SHUVRQ LQ WKDW WK VSRW $QG I  would  like  to  have  more  public  input.â€? they’re  saying  that  after  the  end  of  the  year,  they  don’t Â

Houses  Discuss  Potential  Changes

By  Zan  Strumfeld Features  Editor  |  Sstrumfeld34@newpaltz.edu

At  this  week’s  Council  of  Organizations  meet-­ ing,  guest  speaker  Mark  Balaban  from  the  Counseling  Center  made  an  announcement  about  National  Eating  Disorders  Awareness  (NEDA)  Week  this  February.  The  Counseling  Center  is  looking  for  more  participation  from  clubs  and  organizations  this  year.  Balaban  passed  around  a  sign-­up  sheet  for  clubs  and  organizations  to  table  at  a  fair  about  eating  disorders.  Balaban  is  also  attempting  to  garner  club  involvement  in  Fearless  Friday,  a  Friday  without  dieting,  which  will  be  the  last  Friday  of  NEDA  Week,  and  will  sup-­ ply  food  for  students. Afterwards,  Council  Chair  Shayna  Bentley  put  up  a  â€œProblems  With  Council?â€?  slide  and  had  every-­ one  split  into  houses  in  order  to  discuss  their  current  problems  with  the  council  and  what  should  be  done.  She  also  said  there  will  be  no  more  Student  Associa-­ tion  (SA)  E-­board  announcements  and  instead,  the  E-­board  will  give  Bentley  their  announcements  be-­ forehand  so  she  can  report  the  most  important  ones.  Bentley  said  the  Pakistan  Relief  Effort  that  SA  Presi-­ dent  Jennifer  Sanchez  is  working  on  has  been  moved Â

to  Dec.  8. There  are  three  seats  open  for  SA  Productions  and  elections  will  be  at  the  next  meeting.  SA  Produc-­ WLRQV ZLOO DOVR EH KROGLQJ D VPDOO IHVWLYDO RQ 'HF LQ the  Student  Union  Multi  Purpose  Room  and  are  look-­ ing  for  any  kind  of  performances.  Those  interested  should  send  an  e-­mail  to  anyone  on  the  SA  E-­board. Finally,  Bentley  announced  that  the  SA  E-­board  had  recently  attended  a  SUNY  Student  Assembly  meeting.  After  talking  to  Purchase  College,  which  has  mandatory  paperwork  training  for  their  club/group  representatives,  SUNY  New  Paltz  SA  has  decided  to  begin  this  policy  next  semester. After  the  Houses  separated  and  spoke  about  their  critiques  of  council,  a  representative  of  each  house  came  to  many  different  conclusions.  Overall,  the  houses  thought  council  was  boring,  ran  long  and  could  be  bewildering  for  new  members  and  caused  confusion  concerning  dates  of  the  meetings. Bentley  announced  she  is  working  to  create  a  FDOHQGDU RI VSHFLÂżF WLPHV DQG HYHQWV ,I VKH LV XQ-­ able  to  create  the  calendar,  she  said  she  will  distribute  â€œprogram  sheetsâ€?  for  groups  to  list  brief  information  and  details  about  upcoming  events.  Bentley  would  then  compile  the  information  and  send  it  out  in  an Â

e-­mail.  It  was  also  recommended  to  spotlight  a  few  clubs  each  week  to  say  who  they  were,  what  they  were  doing  and  what  their  upcoming  events  were. However,  some  houses  said  there  were  positives  to  Council,  including  self-­promotion,  networking  abilities  and  social  aspects. Bentley  then  proposed  her  new  plan  for  Council,  which  stated  that  it  will  only  run  to  an  hour  maximum.  In  regards  to  club  announcements,  instead  of  spend-­ ing  time  announcing  during  the  meetings,  Bentley  VXJJHVWHG D QHZ LGHD RI ÂżOOLQJ RXW IRUPV DERXW LQIRU-­ mation  for  upcoming  events  for  clubs/organizations,  which  Bentley  would  then  organize  into  an  e-­mail  and  send  out  to  all  representatives  by  Thursday  of  that  week.  She  also  wants  to  create  a  council  board,  where  one  representative  from  each  house  would  meet  with  Bentley  to  discuss  the  concerns  or  changes  they  want  made  from  what  they  gathered  from  their  house. %HQWOH\ EHOLHYHV WKH QHZ SODQ ZLOO EH EHQHÂżFLDO for  Council,  which  she  said  has  had  many  problems  for  a  long  time. “Council  is  supposed  to  be  about  you  all  and  it  hasn’t  been,â€?  she  said. The  next  Council  of  Organizations  meeting  will  EH RQ 0RQGD\ 1RY DW S P

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

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World Briefs International  Egypt’s  antiquities  council  said  yes-­ terday  that  New  York’s  Metropolitan  Museum  of  Art  has  agreed  to  send  back  treasures  believed  to  have  been  taken  from  the  tomb  of  the  legendary  Pharaoh,  Tutankhamun. The  museum  agreed  to  recognise  Egypt’s  right  to  19relics  in  its  pos-­ session  since  early  last  century,  the  council  said  in  a  statement. The  artifacts,  which  include  a  bronze  ¿JXULQH RI D GRJ ZLWK D JROGHQ FROODU and  a  sphinx,  part  of  a  bracelet  made  of  semi-­precious  lapis  lazuli,  will  be  returned  next  year  and  will  go  on  display  in  2012,  antiquities  chief  Zahi  Hawass  said. ***** HAITI  is  desperately  seeking  to  halt  a  cholera  epidemic  that  threatens  to  spiral  out  of  control  after  reaching  the  capital’s  crowded  slums,  where  73  cases  and  one  death  have  so  far  been  recorded. “The  epidemic  of  cholera,  a  highly  contagious  disease,  is  no  longer  a  simple  emergency,  it’s  now  a  matter  of  national  security,â€?  the  director  of  Haiti’s  Health  Ministry,  Gabriel  Thi-­ mote,  said  on  Tuesday. Desperate  scenes  were  described  in  the  town  of  Gonaives  where  some  60  people  were  said  to  have  died  in  the  past  few  days,  many  of  them  villag-­ ers  who  couldn’t  make  it  to  hospital  as  taxis  wouldn’t  take  them.  Haitian  authorities  were  warned  to  prepare  for  the  worst  if  the  acute  diarrhoeal  illness  takes  hold  in  tent  cities  crammed  with  earthquake  survivors.  Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


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NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

CAMPUS UNDER Library  To  Be Â

Renovated

3+272 %< /$85$ /8(1*$6 Designed  to  hold  250,000  volumes,  STL  has  primarily  remained  the  same  since  its  completion  in  1968,  according  to  Chui-­chun  Lee.  John  Bonacic.  Interior  renovations  of  the  library  submitted  the  plan  to  SUNY  as  a  capital  project  By  Pamela  Vivanco &RS\ (GLWRU _ Pvivanco57@newpaltz.edu will  follow  in  winter  2011  through  2012,  and  are  of  the  college. estimated  to  be  completed  by  December  2013. Âł,Q 0D\ VWDWH IXQGLQJ PLOOLRQ SUNY  New  Paltz  administrators  announced  In  his  report  to  the  Academic  and  Profession-­ LQFOXGLQJ PLOOLRQ IRU URRI UHSODFHPHQW ZDV that  renovation  plans  for  Sojourner  Truth  Library  al  Faculty  on  Oct.  22,  Interim  President  Donald  approved  and  allocated  to  renovate  the  library  (STL)  are  expected  to  go  into  effect  in  2011. Christian  offered  an  update  on  the  library  renova-­ building,â€?  said  Lee. Designed  to  hold  250,000  volumes,  STL  has  tion  project. 0XFK RI WKH UHQRYDWLRQ SODQV IRU WKH OLEUDU\ primarily  remained  the  same  since  its  completion  Christian  announced  that  the  planning  for  were  generated  from  the  feedback  upheld  by  two  in  1968.  However,  the  facility  now  houses  more  the  library’s  renovation  is  being  led  by  Baltimore-­ separate  surveys  given  to  students  and  faculty/ than  twice  that  number  of  voluma,  said  Dean  of  EDVHG DUFKLWHFWXUDO ÂżUP $\HUV 6DLQW *URVV $6* staff  regarding  the  library,  Christian  said.  In  ad-­ the  Library  Chui-­chun  Lee. and  lead  architect  Sandra  Vicchio,].  Christian  said   dition,  two  student  focus  group  meetings  and  two  â€œDespite  a  number  of  enhancements  over  the  both  have  â€œextensive,  successful  experience  in  the  open  forums  were  organized  for  faculty  and  staff  years,  the  building’s  infrastructure  has  not  kept  design  of  academic  buildings,  especially  librar-­ to  express  their  views  on  library  renovation. pace  with  the  current  demands  for  electric  power  ies.â€?  After  taking  the  survey  results  into  account,  and  telecommunications  to  meet  21st  century  aca-­ The  design  team  includes  Christian,  Lee,  -RKQ 0F(QUXH GLUHFWRU RI IDFLOLWLHV GHVLJQ DQG demic  library  functions,â€?  said  Lee.  â€œLibrary  reno-­ several  staff  members,  an  academic  faculty  mem-­ construction,  said  an  almost-­complete  interior  vation  is  sorely  needed.â€?  ber  who  has  coordinated  ongoing  input  from  fac-­ UHQRYDWLRQ WR WKH OLEUDU\ÂśV PDLQ Ă€RRU ZLOO EH GRQH The  project,  which  will  begin  with  the  re-­ ulty  on  the  Library  Committee,  campus  architects  He  said  it  will  include  â€œimproved  collaborative  URRÂżQJ RI WKH OLEUDU\ LQ 0D\ WKURXJK IDOO LV and  SUCF  representatives. study  spaces,  updating  power  and  data  access  in  a  being  supported  by  funds  from  the  State  Universi-­ Lee  said  that  in  2006  the  campus  hired  an  new  information  commons,  adding  and  improving  ty  Construction  Fund  and  secured  as  an  additional  DUFKLWHFWXUDO ÂżUP WR FRQGXFW D IHDVLELOLW\ VWXG\ seating,  lighting  -­  including  more  natural  light,  or-­ state  appropriation  by  legislators  Kevin  Cahill  and  of  library  space  reallocation.  President  Poskanzer  JDQL]DWLRQ RI WKH VSDFH DQG LQWHULRU ÂżQLVKHV ´ ,P-­

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

SURYHG VHDWLQJ DUHDV DQG LQWHULRU ÂżQLVKHV ZLOO EH DGGHG WR WKH ORZHU Ă€RRUV $ VSULQNOHU V\VWHP ZLOO also  be  added  to  the  building. Third-­year  international  relations  major  Jes-­ sica  Prestia  said  she’s  glad  that  natural  lighting  is  included  in  the  library’s  design  plan. Âł0RUH ZLQGRZV ²DOZD\V D SOXV ´ VDLG 3UHV-­ tia.  â€œIt’s  just  more  refreshing  than  staring  at  four  white  walls.â€? Christian  said  the  surveys  displayed  a  stu-­ dent  need  for  longer  library  hours.  He  said  the  results  showed  that  students  have  interest  in  using  the  library  until  about  2  a.m. “We  are  talking  about  ways  in  the  renova-­ tion  that  we  can  design  passages  and  security  so  that  students  could  have  access  to  the  information  FRPPRQV RQ WKH PDLQ Ă€RRU RI WKH OLEUDU\ ODWHU LQWR the  evening,â€?  he  said. Initially,  environmentally-­friendly  options  for  the  roof’s  construction  were  explored,  but  0F(QUXH VDLG ÂłWKH RULJLQDO OLEUDU\ VWUXFWXUH ZDV not  designed  to  withstand  the  load-­bearing  needed  to  support  such  a  roof.â€?  However,  the  new  science  EXLOGLQJ PD\ LQFRUSRUDWH JUHHQ URRÂżQJ ,Q DQ HIIRUW WR EH HFR IULHQGO\ 0F(QUXH VDLG the  project  will  include  the  use  of  recycled  and  UHF\FODEOH PDWHULDOV LQ FDUSHWV DQG RWKHU ÂżQLVKHV PRUH HQHUJ\ HIÂżFLHQW OLJKW Âż[WXUHV HQHUJ\ HIÂż-­ cient  exterior  glazing,  water  conserving  plumbing  ¿[WXUHV D EHWWHU LQVXODWHG URRI ORZ 92& SDLQWV DQG ÂżQLVKHV DQG VXEVWDQWLDO UHF\FOLQJ RI GHPROL-­ tion  and  construction  waste. Third-­year  communication  and  media  major  Josh  Koopersmith  said  he’s  a  bit  concerned  about  the  availability  of  the  library  while  it  is  under  con-­ struction.  â€œWhenever  I  need  to  get  away  from  my  room  and  need  to  concentrate  to  get  work  done,  I  can  always  go  to  the  library,â€?  Koopersmith  said. %XW DFFRUGLQJ WR 0F(QUXH ÂłWKHUH ZLOO EH carefully  thought  out  construction  phasing,â€?  which  means  that  while  parts  of  the  library  are  be-­ ing  renovated,  functions  will  relocated  and  avail-­ able  elsewhere.   â€œThere  is  no  doubt  there  will  be  some  in-­ convenience,  but  one  of  our  goals  is  to  be  sure  that  key  library  functions  and  support  for  students  continues  throughout  the  whole  project,â€?  Chris-­ tian  said.   â€œServices  will  be  relocated  within  the  library  during  this  process,  and  every  effort  is  be-­ ing  made  to  minimize  disruptions  to  our  academic  mission.â€?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

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CONSTRUCTION

Old  Main  Construction  Nearly  Complete

Building  Plans  Progress

PHOTO  BY  MATHEW  JOHN  JR. McEnrue  said  there  will  be  10  new  classrooms,  two  new  computer  labs  and  two  new  education  science  labs  in  Old  Main  when  it  is  open  again. By  Julie  Mansmann complete,  McEnrue  said  there  will  be  10  new  Students  in  the  department  said  this  is  Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Jmansmann60@newpaltz.edu classrooms,  two  new  computer  labs  and  two  one  of  the  reasons  they  look  forward  to  the  new  education  science  labs.   There  will  also  building’s  return  in  fall  2011.  After  three  years  of  construction,  the  Old  EH RIÂż FHV LQ WKH EXLOGLQJ “All  of  our  classes  are  so  spread  out  on  Main  Building  of  SUNY  New  Paltz  will  re-­ McEnrue  said  this  is  a  sharp  increase  campus  now,â€?  said  third-­year  elementary  ed-­ open  its  doors  next  fall. IURP WKH SUHYLRXV QXPEHU RI RIÂż FHV DYDLODEOH ucation-­English  major  Sarah  Schmidt.  â€œThis  According  to  Director  of  Facilities  De-­ in  Old  Main. can  be  one  space  that’s  kind  of  ours.â€? sign  and  Construction  John  McEnrue,  renova-­ Âł:H FUHDWHG WKUHH OHYHOV RI QHZ RIÂż FHV McEnrue  said  because  of  the  increase  tions  made  throughout  the  facility  were  fund-­ in  the  south  wing  of  the  facility  which  pre-­ WKH QXPEHU RI IDFXOW\ RIÂż FHV DYDLODEOH RWKHU ed  through  the  State  University  Construction  viously  housed  an  obsolete  and  abandoned  GHSDUWPHQWDO RIÂż FHV ZLOO DOVR EH DEOH WR PRYH Fund,  with  costs  expected  to  be  approximate-­ gymnasium,â€?  he  said.  into  the  renovated  south  wing  of  Old  Main.  ly  $25,000,000. 7KH ZDOO Âż QLVKLQJ Ă€ RRU LQVWDOODWLRQ SUNY  New  Paltz’s  original  gymnasium  used  McEnrue  said  new  electrical  wiring  in-­ new  lighting,  telecommunication  and  smart  to  be  located  in  the  area.   stallation  has  been  completed  in  Old  Main,  classroom  installation  work  remains  incom-­ Access  to  Old  Main  will  not  be  available  as  has  most  of  the  heating,  ventilating  and  plete  in  the  building,  according  to  McEnrue.  XQWLO WKH VFKRRO UHFHLYHV D FHUWLÂż FDWH RI RF airconditioning  equipment  and  support  duct  He  said   â€œa  new  elevator  and  disabled  liftsâ€?  cupancy  for  the  facility,  McEnrue  said.   This  work.  The  plumbing  supply  and  return  piping  also  need  to  be  installed. will  only  happen  when  renovation  is  substan-­ has  been  installed,  in  addition  to  most  of  the  Old  Main  Building  housed  the  School  tially  complete. telecommunications  wiring  throughout  the  McEnrue  said  the  of  Education  prior  to  construction.  After  the  facility. project  began,  classes  were  dispersed  in  fa-­ renovations  will  have  Interim  President  Donald  Christian  said  cilities  like  the  South  Classroom  Building  a  lasting  impact  on  the  adminstrators  anticipate  the  building  to  be  (which  will  soon  serve  as  a  â€œswing  spaceâ€?  campus  community.  open  again  in  one  year’s  time.  for  Wooster  Science  Building  occupants  dur-­ “We  are  upgrading  â€œWe  are  being  assured  that  the  construc-­ ing  renovation),  Humanities  Building  and  the  SUNY  New  Paltz’s  original  tion  will  be  done  in  the  spring,  probably  May,â€?  Coykendall  Science  Building.  McEnure  said  DQG PRVW KLVWRULFDOO\ VLJQLÂż FDQW he  said.  â€œThen,  we  can  begin  relocating  into  2OG 0DLQÂśV DFWLYH Ă€ RRU VSDFH SULRU WR WKH UHQ building,â€?  he  said.  â€œOur  technology  that  building  during  the  summer   to  be  ready  ovation  totaled  72,000  square  feet,  while  the  has  to  be  state  of  the  art  because  we  are  to  support  academic  programs  in  fall  2011.â€? South  Classroom  Building  only  totals  20,000  educating  tomorrow’s  educators.â€? When  the  construction  at  Old  Main  is  square  feet.

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

By  Julie  Mansmann Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Jmansmann60@newpaltz.edu

SUNY  New  Paltz  has  began  the  early  concept  and  programmatic  stage  of  design  for  a  new  science  building,  adminstrators  said.  Interim  President  Donald  Christian  said  a  survey  of  students  in  science  and  engineering  courses  was  conducted  earlier  this  fall  so  those  working  on  the  project  could  get  some  sense  of  what  students  were  interested  in  for  the  building.  Though  they  must  factor  LQ SUHOLPLQDU\ FRVWLQJ &KULVWLDQ VDLG VFKRRO RIÂż FLDOV have  begun  to  consider  the  design  of  the  new  facility.  â€œWe’ve  gotten  to  the  point  where  we  have  the  ba-­ sic  components  of  the  building  laid  out,  and  now  we  are  trying  to  translate  that  into  a  schematic  that  would  EH ODLG RXW LQ D PRUH VSHFLÂż F IDVKLRQ ´ KH VDLG Director  of  Facilities  Design  and  Construction  John  McEnrue  said  the  new  science  building  will  be  ORFDWHG RQ WKH QRUWKHDVW FRUQHU RI WKH FDPSXV VSHFLÂż cally  at  the  corner  of  South  Manheim  Boulevard  and  Plattekill  Avenue.  According  to  McEnrue,  it  is  too  early  in  the  process  to  know  the  style  of  architecture  that  will  be  used  for  the  facility. Christian  said  the  building  will  be  part  two-­story,  part-­three  story,  to  take  advantage  of  views  in  the  area.  The  survey  showed  that  science  students  would  prefer  WR KDYH D ÂłVFLHQFH FRPPRQV´ RQ WKHVH XSSHU Ă€ RRUV VR they  could  look  at  the  views  to  the  west.  McEnrue  said  the  new  facility,  which  will  have  a  gross  square  footage  of  approximately  80,000  square  feet,  will  offer  wireless  technology,  smart  classrooms,  seminar  rooms  and  four  new  research  labs.  The  build-­ ing  will  also  house  the  geology,  geography,  physics,  computer  science  and  mathematics  departments.  Facilities  Management  will  consider  incorporat-­ ing  rainwater  harvesting,  grey  water  recycling,  green  URRÂż QJ DQG SKRWRYROWDLF SDQHO LQVWDOODWLRQ DV GHVLJQ possibilities  for  the  building. Though  the  design  is  not  yet  complete,  McEnrue  said  the  new  science  building  construction  is  scheduled  to  begin  in  the  fall  2012.  Construction   is  expected  to  be  com-­ plete  either  in  late  2014  or  early  2015.

COURTESY Â OF THE Â MASTER Â PLAN


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NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Healing  Tragedy  with  Beauty

By  Pierce  Lydon 0DQDJLQJ (GLWRU _ Lydon47@newpaltz.edu

In  an  effort  to  alleviate  the  effects  of  the  devastation  in  Pakistan  at  the  shift-­ ing  faults  and  rising  waters  of  earth-­ TXDNHV DQG Ă€RRGV WKH 681< 1HZ 3DOW] 6WXGHQW $VVRFLDWLRQ 6$ LV SUHSDULQJ WR KROG WKH ÂżUVW PDOH EHDXW\ SDJHDQW LQ UH-­ cent  history. 6SHDUKHDGHG E\ 6$ 3UHVLGHQW -HQ-­ QLIHU 6DQFKH] WKH SDJHDQW NQRZQ DV 0U 1HZ 3DOW] ZRXOG SLW UHSUHVHQWD-­ WLYHV IURP YDULRXV VWXGHQW RUJDQL]D-­ tions  against  each  other  while  charging  a  small  amount  at  the  door  to  raise  money.  6DQFKH] DOVR KRSHV WR JHW WKH 5HVLGHQFH +DOO 6WXGHQW $VVRFLDWLRQ 5+6$ LQ-­ YROYHG LQ RUGHU WR KDYH D VHSDUDWH FRP-­ SHWLWLRQ IRU UHSUHVHQWDWLYHV IURP HDFK residence  hall. Âł,I WKLV LV VXFFHVVIXO 0U 1HZ 3DOW] could  become  an  annual  event  for  the  6WXGHQW $VVRFLDWLRQ ´ VDLG 6DQFKH] Âł$QG HYHU\ \HDU WKH\ FRXOG SLFN D GLI-­ IHUHQW FKDULW\ RUJDQL]DWLRQ WR JLYH WR ´

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Students  to  Present  Phonetic  Findings By  Pete  Thompson &RS\ (GLWRU _ Pthompson51@newpaltz.edu

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“Kids  have  been  misdiagnosed  when  they  really  just  didn’t  have  the  opportunity  to  make  those  soundsâ€?

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

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The GUNK

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Graduate student Keith Hoyt takes top prize in

INTERNATIONAL SCULpTURE COMPETITION Story on page 5B

PLUS... CARRYING Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art informs community members of college gun control laws

JOE GARDNER International student seeks career in journalism

KILL BILL: VOLUME 3 Photo provided by Emily Puthoff

Culture Shock Dance Troupe performs popular flick with a twist

ONE BOOK/ONE NEW PALTZ Local group reads and discusses Dave Egger’s “Zeitoun”

AND MORE!


2B Â | Â FEATURES

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COMMUNITY FEATURE

New Paltz Builds Community Through Reading ONE BOOK/ONE NEW PALTZ SHARES LOVE OF LITERATURE WITH DAVE EGGERS

By  Pete  Thompson Copy  Editor  |  Pthompson51@newpaltz.edu

While  reading  a  book  can  spark  a  per-­ sonal  journey,  it  can  also  work  wonders  on  a  community  level,  just  as  One  Book/One  New  Paltz  (OB/ONP)  has  continued  to  do  in  re-­ cent  years.  Currently  in  its  sixth  year  running,  group  events  and  discussions  will  be  underway  from  Nov.  12  to  20  for  this  year’s  selection,   â€œZeitounâ€?  by  Dave  Eggers. “Zeitoun,â€?  a  true  account  chosen  because  of  WKH ÂżIWK DQQLYHUVDU\ RI +XUULFDQH .DWULQD FKURQL-­ cles  the  life  of  Syrian-­born  Abdulrahman  Zeitoun  after  he  chooses  to  remain  in  New  Orleans  and  SURWHFW KLV SURSHUW\ DIWHU KLV IDPLO\ Ă€HHV 7KLQJV go  awry,  leading  to  questions  of  human  rights,  when  accusations  of  al-­Qaida  involvement  are  made  in  the  tale.  Eggers  used  a  series  of  inter-­ views  and  oral  histories  as  the  basis  of  his  story.  ³>Âľ=HLWRXQÂś@ FRQQHFWV HYHQWV IURP ÂżYH DQG ten  years  ago  â€“  events  that  occurred  far  away  and  events  that  occurred  in  our  area  â€“  in  a  straight-­ forward  but  nuanced  manner  that  will  challenge  and  reward  New  Paltz  readers,â€?  according  to  a  OB/ONP  press  release.  â€œ[It]  has  been  a  popular Â

choice  due  â€Ś  to  the  timely  subject  matter,  the  lively  writing  and  the  dramatic  story.â€? Suggestions  are  made  by  the  planning  com-­ mittee  and  accepted  from  the  community  during  the  program  week  for  the  following  year,  with  the  only  requirement  being  accessibility;Íž  it  must  be  a  well-­written,  reasonably  lengthed  story  that  opens  up  a  number  of  discussion  topics  for  a  wide  UHDGHUVKLS 7KH OLVW LV WKHQ WKLQQHG GRZQ WR WKUHH or  four  works,  each  of  which  is  read  by  every  committee  member.  A  lengthy  discussion  fol-­ lows,  and  the  choice  is  made. Previous  selections  include  Washing-­ ton  Irving’s  â€œRip  Van  Winkle,â€?  appropriate  of  WKH WK $QQLYHUVDU\ RI +HQU\ +XGVRQ VHW-­ WLQJ VDLO DQG (ZLGJH 'DQWLFDWÂśV Âł7KH 'HZ %UHDNHU ´ ZKLFK FRLQFLGHG ZLWK WKH ÂżUVW \HDU read  for  Composition  I.  Danticat  actually  came  to  New  Paltz,  gracing  the  community  with  a   discussion  on  the  novel. OB/ONP  is  the  2005  brainchild  of  Center  for  Research,  Regional  Education  and  Outreach  (CRREO)  Director  Gerald  Benjamin,  who  was  formerly  the  Dean  of  Liberal  Arts  and  Science. “Gerry  thought  up  the  idea  of  a  community  read  as  a  town  gown  activity,â€?  said  OB/ONP  Co-­

ordinator  Jacqueline  Andrews,  who  is  also  the  as-­ sistant  vice  president  of  institutional  research  and  planning  on  campus.  Since  its  start,  the  group  has  been  working  at  its  goal  of  promoting  reading,  while  also  building  and  celebrating  community. Funding,  although  not  much  is  required,  is  SURYLGHG E\ &55(2 7KLV LQFOXGHG WKH KLULQJ RI DGMXQFW (QJOLVK SURIHVVRU .DWKHQD 'H*UDVVL who  has  been  trying  to  further  coordinate  the  project  with  the  English  department. $OWKRXJK WKHUHÂśV GHÂżQLWHO\ D JRRG UHODWLRQ-­ VKLS ZLWK 'HSDUWPHQW &KDLU 7RP 2OVRQ $QGUHZV said,  â€œWe’re  still  trying  to  encourage  people  to  get  into  the  community  reading  spirit.â€? Scheduled  events  for  the  2010  OB/ONP  include  a  poetry  workshop  and  reading,  an  aca-­ demic  panel,  a  student  panel  with  the  New  Paltz  FKDSWHU RI $PQHVW\ ,QWHUQDWLRQDO 86$ D .D-­ trina  volunteer  panel,  a  screening  of  Spike  Lee’s  â€œWhen  the  Levees  Brokeâ€?  and  a  number  of  com-­ munity  book  discussions  facilitated  by  a  variety  of  volunteers. “[OB/ONP  is]  ultimately  largely  a  com-­ munity  project,â€?  DeGrassi  said,  â€œand  all  vol-­ unteer,  based  out  of  the  goodness  of  their   hearts  and  schedules.â€?

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3+272 &2857(6< 2) Â AMAZON.COM

“Zeitounâ€?  by  Dave  Eggers. Each  venue,  ranging  from  Elting  Memorial  /LEUDU\ WR WKH &DPSXV +RQRUV &HQWHU WR :DWHU Street  Market’s  Mudd  Puddle,  has  also  volun-­ teered  for  the  group.  An  entire  schedule  of  events  can  be  found  at  onebookonenewpaltz.org. Â


FEATURES | 3B

The New Paltz Oracle STUDENT PROFILE

Across the Pond, Across the Globe

BRITISH STUDENT JOE GARDNER PREPARES FOR A CAREER IN JOURNALISM

By Gabe Rosenberg

Contributing Writer | Rosenb31@newpaltz.edu

As the son of a travel agent, Joe Gardner has always had one foot in London and the other in the air. “We traveled around Europe once or twice a month,” said Gardner, whose mother receives fare dis-­ counts from her travel agency, “and longer distances, to America or Asia, maybe twice a year.” Gardner, a second-­year student from England’s Kingston University, came to SUNY New Paltz in Au-­ gust to study journalism and creative writing for a year. As an aspiring writer, he already has a rich stock of ex-­ periences to draw from: he has traveled extensively in Europe, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Egypt, Austra-­ lia, the Caribbean islands and the United States. If his global learning isn’t enough to pre-­ pare him for a journalism career, he also has valuable newsroom experience. “I did an internship at the BBC three years ago which was amazing,” he said. “They kind of threw me in at the deep end. One day I was putting together reports for BBC World News and the next day they let me read the cricket results for Australian radio. It was crazy.” Gardner has brought his real-­world education to New Paltz, where he has joined WNPC TV, the cam-­ pus television station, as a business news anchor. He has yet to see himself on television because he thinks that it would add a “new layer of pressure” to the job. Gardner has also been involved with the Queer Action Coalition (QAC) at SUNY New Paltz. At his

BEARD EXPERIMENT

PHOTO BY LAURA LUENGAS

International student Joe Gardner.

home university, he served on the committee for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) So-­ ciety, a group similar to the QAC, but his decision to study overseas this year meant he couldn’t run for a second term. Gardner said that the QAC is more polit-­ ically-­minded than Kingston’s LGBT society, which is more of a social gathering. That’s just one of the differences Gardner has noticed in his new culture.

“I think the main difference is the drinking,” said Gardner. “If you go to a bar here, you go to drink. At home, pubs have always been more of a meet-­ ing place. I miss just being able to sit in a pub. It’s such a big part of British culture. In America it’s more about coffee shops.” In February, when Gardner turns 21 years old, he plans on celebrating in true American style—either in New Orleans or Las Vegas. A trip down south (which Gardner might time to coincide with Mardi Gras) would also turn into a musical pilgrimage. With a honed taste for country and Western artists such as Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton and Gretchen Wilson, Gardner has his eye on the musical capitals of New Orleans and Memphis. His New Paltz friends don’t understand why. “The music down there is really good,” said Gard-­ QHU ³, ¿QG WKDW ZH KDYH D JUHDWHU DSSUHFLDWLRQ IRU FRXQ-­ try and Western music at home because we don’t associ-­ ate it with the politics so much. When I speak to people at New Paltz and I tell them I like country and Western music, they always put it down and say ‘oh, it’s just right-­wing, Republican music.’” Before coming to the United States last August, Gardner, a self-­confessed “city-­lover,” had already seen San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York and Las Vegas. Since August, he has added Washington D.C. to that list. By May, he hopes to have seen New Or-­ leans, Memphis and Toronto, Canada. Gardner’s com-­ pulsion to see and learn about the world embodies the true spirit of a journalist.

Scruff Times Ahead

NOVEMBEARD: WEEK 2

FRANK GREENAWAY

JOHN MICHAEL CASTILLO

TYLER PRINCEGARDINER

SEAN BAILEY

RAY VASSARSEMANCHIK

NEIL PICKUS

FIRST FOUR PHOTOS BY CHRIS THURSTON. LAST TWO PHOTOS PROVIDED BY NEIL PICKUS

Thursday, November 11, 2010


 4B  |  FEATURES

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

TREND FEATURE

Undeclared Dead ZOMBIE ZEITGEIST PLAGUES SUNY NEW PALTZ STUDENT BODY

By  Ryan  Patrick  Hanrahan Copy  Editor  |  Rhanrahan13@newpaltz.edu

The  fever  rises,  the  coma  deepens.  Final,  desperate  breaths  pass  cold,  dry  lips  and  then,  death.  But  what  if  death  wasn’t  the  end  and  WKH ERG\ FDPH EDFN WR OLIH QRZ D Ă€ HVK HDW LQJ JKRXO ZKR OHDYHV D FDQQLEDOLVWLF EORRG EDWK EHKLQG DV LW VKXIĂ€ HV RII WR MRLQ WKH mindless  horde  that  is  slowly  taking  over  the  world.  This  is  the  cultural  zeitgeist  that’s  infecting  a  generation.  This  is  zombies. Zombieism  occurs  due  to  some  form  RI FRQWDJLRQ DFTXLUHG EHIRUH GHDWK FDXV LQJ D UHFHQWO\ GHFHDVHG FRUSVH WR UHDQL PDWH EHFRPLQJ D SXUHO\ LQVWLQFWXDO ZDON ing  virus,  whose  sole  purpose  is  to  turn  you  into  one  of  them.   At  SUNY  New  Paltz,  the  undying  love  RI DOO WKLQJV ]RPELH LV LQ IXOO RQ SDQGHPLF mode.  Zombiephilia  can  be  found  in  any  dorm,  what  with  video  games  like  â€œLeft  4  Dead,â€?  shows  such  as  â€œThe  Walking  Deadâ€?  and  popular  movies  like  â€œZombielandâ€?  and  â€œ28  Days  Laterâ€?  being  all  the  â€œrage.â€?  Zombie  lovers  who  are  also  closet  Nerf  *XQ HQWKXVLDVWV FDQ UHMRLFH DV ZHOO NQRZ LQJ WKDW LI WKHLU WULJJHU Âż QJHU LV WZLWFKLQJ WR EORZ VRPH EUDLQV RXW DQ RQ FDPSXV JDPH RI +XPDQV YV =RPELHV ZLOO EH MXVW what  the  doctor  ordered. The  recent  obsession  with  the  walking  dead  has  created  numerous  theories  that  try  to  explain  what  all  the  hubbub  is  about.  7HPSOH 8QLYHU VLW\ 3URIHVVRU 3H ter  Logan  said  in  an  interview  with  PhysOrg.com  that  he  EHOLHYHV WKH UHFHQW REVHV

VLRQ ZLWK DOO WKLQJV XQGHDG LQFOXGLQJ YDP pires,  stems  from  a  social  landscape  not  VHHQ VLQFH 9LFWRULDQ (QJODQG WKH WLPH SH ULRG ZKHQ VXFK OHJHQGV DQG IRONORUH Âż UVW became  popular  with  the  general  public. “It  was  the  beginning  of  the  world  as  we  know  it  today,  and  it  was  beset  with  some  of  the  same  problems  associated  with  being  a  world  power  that  we  are  currently  facing,â€?  Logan  said. While  Logan  said  the  popularity  of  ]RPELHV LV MXVW KLVWRU\ UHSHDWLQJ LWVHOI RWK ers  like  Max  Brooks,  the  mind  behind  the  highly  popular  books  â€œThe  Zombie  Survival  Guideâ€?  and  â€œWorld  War  Z:  An  Oral  History  of  the  Zombie  War,â€?  believe  the  popularity  RI WKH OLYLQJ GHDG WR EH IHDU EDVHG DV ZHOO Âł2WKHU PRQVWHUV PD\ WKUHDWHQ LQ dividual  humans,  but  the  living  dead  threaten  the  entire  human  race,â€?  Brooks  said  in  an  interview  with  USA  Today.  â€œZombies  are  slate  wipers.â€? With  international  travel  and  exchange  becoming  easier  and  more  common,  and  FRQWDJLRXV GLVHDVHV VXFK DV WKH $YLDQ Ă€ X and  H1N1  virus  becoming  global  concerns,  LWÂśV QR ZRQGHU SHRSOH DUH DIUDLG DQG PHV merized  by  a  disease  that  not  only  wipes  out  the  human  race,  but  conquers  death  as  well. 1LFKRODV $QGHUVHQ D VHFRQG \HDU PXVLF WKHRU\ DQG FRPSRVLWLRQ PDMRU DQG YLFH SUHVLGHQW RI WKH +XPDQV YV =RPELHV FOXE RQ FDPSXV KDV EHHQ D ORQJWLPH =HG head  and  it  is  his  belief  that  as  the  amount  RI ]RPELH UHODWHG PHGLD JURZV VR ZLOO WKH movement’s  popularity.  ³, WKLQN WKDW WKHUHÂśV MXVW D IDVFLQD tion  with  the  supernatural  that  always  captivates  people‌  9DPSLUHV MXVW UH cently  had  their  IXQ LQ WKH VSRW light  and Â

now  its  time  for  the  zombies  to  take  over,â€?  said  Andersen.  $OWKRXJK ]RPELH OXVW LV DW DQ DOO WLPH high  here  in  the  U.S.,  across  the  pond  the  FUD]H KDV \HW WR UHDFK WKH VDPH OHYHO RI GH YRWLRQ 1DWDOLH %DNHU D VHFRQG \HDU (QJOLVK DQG WKHDWUH PDMRU IURP (QJODQG VDLG WKDW until  she  came  to  America,  zombies  never  crossed  her  mind.  Although  she  had  seen  ¿ OPV OLNH Âł6KDXQ RI WKH 'HDG ´ WKH ZKROH fad  never  really  captured  her  attention.  â€œI’m  not  really  into  watching  things  that  DUHQÂśW UHDO ,I , ZDWFK D Âż OP ,ÂśG ZDWFK RQH that  I’d  actually  get  something  out  of.  I’ve  MXVW QHYHU EHHQ LQWHUHVWHG LQ LW ´ VDLG %DNHU Baker  said  while  vampires  are  pretty  big  in  the  U.K.,  other  undead  entities  are  OHVV SRSXODU %DNHU DOVR VDLG WKDW ]RP bies  don’t  even  creep  her  out,  instead  WKH\ MXVW ORRN RII SXWWLQJ Âł7KH\ÂśUH MXVW QRW YHU\ QLFH WR ORRN DW are  they?â€?  said  Baker. Still,  the  fear  and  uncertainty  caused  by  a  zombie  apocalypse  serves  to  nourish  the  imaginations  of  many  fans. Âł, JXHVV WKH WKLQJ DERXW ]RP ELHV WKDW , ORYH PRVW LV HQGOHVV SRV VLELOLWLHVÂŤ ]RPELHV MXVW DSSHDO WR P\ imagination,â€?  said  Andersen. 7KH DELOLW\ WR PDNH SHRSOH FUHDWH VFH narios  where  a  zombie  attack  is  occurring  is  an  impressive  quality  even  for  a  fad.  For  zombies  to  have  such  a  distinct  effect  on  the  populace  is  a  testament  to  how  long  the  present  day  â€œzombie  nationâ€?  might  last. Âł6DGO\ HYHQ ]RP ELHV KDYH WR GHFRP pose  sometime,â€?  said  Andersen,  â€œbut  I  don’t  think  that  day  will  be  a n y t i m e  soon.â€?

FAMILIAR FACES ...with  Annie  Yu

Erik

Tellone MBA  Grad.  Student,  CDA  in  DuBois  Hall,  Customer  Service  Employee  at  Stop  &  Shop

Annie  Yu:  Where  are  you  from  originally?  And  how  did  you  end  up  in  New  Paltz? Erik  Tellone:  Washingtonville.  I  started  here  in  2005.  Something  just  told  me  to  go  here.  Oneonta  and  here  were  my  top  two,  and  I  passed  by  this  school  one  day  and  just  had  a  feeling. AY:  Do  you  have  any  pets? ET:  Yes.  Two  dogs  and  a  cat.  Zoe  is  the  one  dog  and  the  other  dog  is  new,  so  I  think  her  name  is  Cassie.  And  the  cat’s  name  is  Sassy.  That’s  right,  they  rhyme. AY:  6LQFH \RXÂśYH EHHQ KHUH IRU DERXW Âż YH \HDUV ZKDW LV D KDUG REVWDFOH RU D GLIÂż FXOW VLWXDWLRQ \RXÂśYH RYHUFRPH" ET:  I  guess  really,  honestly,  just  opening  up.  I’m  not  necessarily  a  shy  person  but  more  of  a  private  person.  It  took  about  a  semester  and  a  half  and  when  I  did,  it  was  really  great  â€“  that’s  what  led  to  Hall  Government  and  RA,  and  now  CDA. AY:  Looking  back  on  your  years  here,  what’s  a  good  memory? ET:  Working  as  an  RA  and  meeting  so  many  people.  Even  still,  that’s  the  one  thing  that  holds  me  to  this  school.  All  the  different  everything  â€“  people,  friend-­ ships,  etc. AY:  Since  you’ve  been  in  the  education  undergrad  program  and  now  the  business  grad  program,  has  there  been  someone  who’s  inspired  you  and  made  your  stay  here  better? ET:  I  worked  as  a  TA  last  semester  with  a  chemistry  professor  and  that  was  cool  because  I  got  to  see  the  other  side.  The  professor’s  name  was  Pamela  St.  John.  Also,  Chris  Sgro  was  my  organic  chemistry  lab  instructor  and  I  ended  up  observing  him  in  Highland  +LJK 6FKRRO IRU P\ Âż HOGZRUN REVHUYDWLRQV DQG ZHÂśYH kept  in  touch  ever  since.  It’s  cool  that  I’ve  been  able  to  keep  in  touch  with  professors  outside  the  classroom  setting. AY:  If  a  new  student  came  to  you  for  advice  about  how  to  make  the  most  of  their  experience  at  NP,  what  would  you  say? ET:  Try  new  things.  Getting  involved.  Just  doing  any-­ thing  that  you  wanna  do  or  even  things  that  you  don’t  ZDQW WR GR ÂľFDXVH \RX PLJKW Âż QG WKDW \RX OLNH LW $W least,  that’s  my  experience.

CARTOON Â BY Â DEREK Â ZIMMERMANN

Thursday,  November  11,  2010


  ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  |  5B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle ART FEATURE

Excellence is ‘Standard Issue’ SCULPTURE STUDENTS ENJOY HONORS IN INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION

By  Maxim  Alter $ ( (GLWRU _ Malter42@newpaltz.edu

After  high  school,  Keith  Hoyt  decided  to  go  to  SUNY  Purchase  to  WDNH KLV ¿ UVW SDLQWLQJ FRXUVH %XW WKH DZDUG ZLQQHU ZDV JLYHQ OHVV WKDQ HQFRXUDJLQJ ZRUGV IURP RQH RI KLV WHDFKHUV ³$UH \RX WKLQNLQJ DERXW EHLQJ D SDLQWLQJ PDMRU"´ KLV SURIHV VRU VDLG WR KLP :KHQ +R\W DQVZHUHG ³1R ´ KLV WHDFKHU TXLFNO\ UHVSRQGHG ³*RRG EHFDXVH \RX¶UH WHUULEOH DW LW DQG \RX VKRXOG SXUVXH VRPHWKLQJ HOVH ´ $OWKRXJK KH KDG DOUHDG\ GHFLGHG RQ D GLIIHUHQW IRUP RI DUW IRU KLV IXWXUH VWXGLHV +R\W VDLG WKLV EUXWDO KRQHVW\ ³SXW WKH QDLO LQ WKH FRI¿ Q´ DQG VHDOHG KLV IDWH DV D VFXOSWXUH PDMRU 1RZ D JUDGXDWH VWXGHQW DW 681< 1HZ 3DOW] ZRUNLQJ WRZDUG KLV 0 ) $ LQ VFXOSWXUH +R\W KDV EHHQ EHVWRZHG WKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO 6FXOS WXUH &HQWHU¶V 2XWVWDQGLQJ 6WXGHQW $FKLHYHPHQW LQ &RQWHPSRUDU\ 6FXOSWXUH $ZDUG EHDWLQJ RXW KXQGUHGV RI QRPLQHHV IURP XQLYHUVLW\ VFXOSWXUH SURJUDPV DFURVV 1RUWK $PHULFD )RU +R\W ZLQQLQJ WKLV DZDUG ZDV PRUH WKDQ MXVW DQ DFKLHYHPHQW ± LW ZDV YDOLGDWLRQ ³$UW LV VR VXEMHFWLYH ´ +R\W VDLG ³,¶P FRQVWDQWO\ DVNLQJ P\VHOI µ:KDW DP , GRLQJ" ,V LW JRRG" $UH SHRSOH LQWHUHVWHG LQ LW"¶ 6R UHFHLYLQJ WKLV NLQG RI UHFRJQLWLRQ ZDV UH DOO\ KHOSIXO WR NHHS PH PRY LQJ DORQJ LQ WKLV GLUHFWLRQ ´ 6WDQGLQJ IHHW WDOO IHHW ZLGH DQG IHHW LQ OHQJWK +R\W¶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¶V WUDGH V\VWHP +R\W VDLG KH ZDV LQÀ XHQFHG WR EXLOG WKLV FRQWDLQHU EHFDXVH RI LWV LQVSLULQJ DUFKLWHFWXUH DQG LPSRUWDQW UROH LQ HYHU\GD\ OLIH ³7KH VKLSSLQJ FRQWDLQHU KDV LQÀ XHQFHG RXU PRGHUQ HFRQR P\ VR SURIRXQGO\ ´ KH VDLG ³7KLV RQH REMHFW LV VRPHWKLQJ SHRSOH WDNH IRU JUDQWHG ,W LV LQWHUHVWLQJ WR PH WKDW LQ WKLV WHFKQRORJL FDO LQIRUPDWLRQ DJH WKHUH LV WKLV UHDO ZRUOG REMHFW WKDW¶V SXVKLQJ JOREDOL]DWLRQ VR JUHDWO\ ´

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6B Â | Â ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

ART FEATURE

‘Carrying’ a Cause for the Community SDMA SPREADS GUN CONTROL LAWS THROUGHOUT THE TOWN AND VILLAGE OF NEW PALTZ

       PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  BELSHEPROWN.COM By  Maxim  Alter A&E  Editor  |  Malter42@newpaltz.edu

Instead  of  bringing  people  to  the  art,  members  of  the  Samuel  Dorsky  Muse-­ um  of  Art  (SDMA)  decided  it  was  time  to   bring  art  to  the  people.   In  partnership  with  the  Village  and  Town  of  New  Paltz,  the  SDMA  opened  an  exhibi-­ tion  in  August  entitled  â€œCarrying,â€?  made  up  of  50  signs  dispersed  throughout  the  community.  Each  sign  within  the  exhibit  describes  the  laws  governing  concealed  guns  on  college  campuses   within  a  single  state. “It  was  conceived  as  a  public  art  project,  as  in  art  that  should  ideally  be  seen  outside  the  mu-­ seum,â€?  said  SDMA  curator  Brian  Wallace.  Created  by  Peekskill  artists  Curt  Belshe  and  Lise  Prown,  Wallace  said  the  project  interested  him  because  it  was  both  informative  and  exciting.  So  that  no  local  laws  were  broken  during  the  installation  process,  Wallace  said  he  was  required  WR ÂżUVW SUHVHQW WKH LGHD WR D FDPSXV FRPPLWWHH

A  visitor  views  all  50  signs  from  the  â€œCarryingâ€?  exhibit  in  the  Samuel  Dorsky  Museum  of  Art.   PHOTO  BY  MATHEW  JOHN  JR.

designed  to  assess  potential  public  art  projects.  His  next  step,  he  said,  was  to  reach  out  to  Town  DQG 9LOODJH RIÂżFLDOV LQFOXGLQJ 9LOODJH 0D\RU Terry  Dungan,  Village  Trustee  Shari  Osborn  and  Town  of  New  Paltz  Supervisor  Toni  Hokanson. “It  seemed  like  more  of  a  challenge  if  we  could  actually  get  the  signs  out  there  off  the  campus  and  into  the  real  world,â€?  he  said,  â€œWith  WKH KHOS RI >WRZQ DQG YLOODJH RIÂżFLDOV@ , ZDV able  with  some  letters  of  support  from  them  to   convince  the  campus  group  that  this  was  a  project  that  was  worth  doing.â€? :KHQ WU\LQJ WR ÂżQG ORFDWLRQV IRU WKH SLHFHV +RNDQVRQ VDLG DUHDV JHDUHG WRZDUG IRRW WUDIÂżF were  chosen.  Some  various  places  where  posts  currently  sit  include  the  Rail  Trail,  Town  Hall  and  Hasbrouck  Park.  According  to  Hokanson,  sign  placement  ZDV YHU\ VSHFLÂżF 6KH VDLG VKH ZDV LQLWLDOO\ DVNHG if  the  artwork  could  be  installed  on  street  signs. Âł7KDWÂśV QRW ZKDW >WKH\@ ZDQWHG WR GR because  the  New  York  State  Department  of  Â

Transportation  has  the  ultimate  authority  on   every  sign  post  on  every  road,  whether  it’s  in  the  town  or  the  village,â€?  she  said.  â€œThat  was  a  level  of   bureaucracy  I  did  not  recommend  getting  into.â€? As  an  alternative,  Hokanson  said  she  recommended  placing  the  signs  on  town-­ owned  properties  where  permission  would  be   obtained  more  easily. When  combined,  all  50  signs  cre-­ ate  an  image  of  the  United  States  decorated  with  gun  imagery.  For  co-­creator  Prown,   placing  the  signs  individually  rather  than  together   had  a  profound  effect. Âł7KH ZKROH SRLQW RI XVLQJ WUDIÂżF VLJQV was  to  encapsulate  the  authority  that  signs  have  in  our  world,â€?  she  said.  â€œThat  was  really   emphasized  when  you  saw  it  down  in  the  town   or  on  the  Rail  Trail.â€? Prown  said  she  and  her  husband  Belshe  cre-­ ated  â€œCarryingâ€?  to  shed  light  on  an  issue  that  was  very  important  to  them.  With  information  on  each  state’s  laws  re-­

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

searched  by  the  pair  and  included  on  each  sign,  Prown  said  a  major  goal  of  the  project  was  to  keep  the  community  informed. “This  is  something  we  were  both  pretty  pas-­ sionate  about  because  we  were  both  working  in  education  at  one  time,â€?  she  said.  â€œWe  know  how  fragile  the  educational  environment  can  be.  It  just  seemed  like  something  we  needed  to  take  on.â€? Until  Nov.  14,  Wallace  said  anyone  inter-­ ested  in  viewing  the  pieces  should  take  a  walk  through  New  Paltz.  For  those  wanting  to  see  a  combination  of  all  50  signs,  he  recommended  visiting  the  SDMA  for  a  complete  set  on  display.  Even  though  both  showings  contain  the  same  content,  Wallace  said  each  evokes   a  different  feeling. “You  can  have  a  realization  of  just  how  big  and  complicated  the  world  is,â€?  he  said.  â€œThe  very  same  artwork  that’s  made  up  of  50  signs  in  a  mu-­ seum,  it  looms  over  you.  But  you  get  the  signs  up  into  the  world  and  you  feel  really  puny.  It’s  very  humbling.  It  puts  the  message  into  perspective.â€?


ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT Â | Â 7B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle DANCE FEATURE

A Shocking Dose of Popular Culture DANCE TROUPE INTERPRETS TARANTINO FILM FOR NEW PALTZ AUDIENCES

By  Justin  McCarthy News  Editor  |  Jmccarthy46@newpaltz.edu

The  Culture  Shock  Dance  Troupe  presented  its  annual  â€œDance  Evolutionâ€?  show/competition  on  Nov.  6  at  New  Paltz  High  School.  The  event,  titled  â€œKill  Bill:  Volume  3,â€?  drew  hundreds  of  family,  friends  and  alumni  who  came  to  support  the  dance  team. After  using  themes  from  a  number  of  magi-­ FDO DQG IDQWDV\ EDVHG ÂżOPV WKH WURXSH WRRN RQ something  new.  Dey  Armbrister,  the  group’s  public  relations  and  music  coordinator  said  the  7DUDQWLQR Ă€LFN WKHPHG VKRZ ZDV DSSURSUL-­ ate  for  the  Culture  Shock  Dance  Troupe,  which  strives  to  incorporate  various  cultural  elements   into  its  performances. “We  [don’t  only]  do  hip-­hop,  we  do  a  whole  array  of  genres,â€?  Armbrister  said.  â€œWe  do   voguing,  reggae,  contemporary  â€“  we  even  dab-­ bled  in  Irish  dancing  before.  Anything  you  can  name,  we’ve  tried  it  out.â€?

Having  chosen  â€œKill  Billâ€?  as  the  inspira-­ tion  for  this  year’s  event,  the  dancers  of  Culture  Shock  Troupe  stomped  and  swiped  at  one  another  in  a  series  of  deadly  dance-­offs.  Dancers  acted  as  FKDUDFWHUV IURP WKH ÂżOP DQG SHUIRUPHG URXWLQHV in  a  condensed  mash-­up  of  the  â€œKill  Billâ€?  series. The  performance  didn’t  follow  the  exact  lines  of  the  movie,  however. “We  watched  both  parts  of  the  movie  and  we  chose  what  stuck  out  for  us  and  then  we  re-­ vamped  it,â€?  he  said.  â€œWe  take  certain  elements  out  of  the  movies,  but  we  make  them  our  own,  which  is  why  this  year  it  was  â€œKill  Bill  Volume  3.â€?  We  would  highlight  original  â€œKill  Bills,â€?  but  we  put  our  own  spin  to  it.â€? The  â€œKill  Billâ€?-­themed  performance  began  ZLWK D SV\FKLDWULF LQVSLUHG YHUVLRQ RI WKH ÂżOPÂśV hospital  scene.  Hospital  patients  moved  mechani-­ FDOO\ WR D FKLPH ÂżOOHG YHUVLRQ RI Âł7ZLVWHG 1HUYH´ before  Beatrix  Kiddo,  played  by  Culture  Shock  Dance  Troupe  Treasurer  Amanda  Grappone,  tore  Â

off  her  hospital  gown. Wearing  the  infamous  yellow  tracksuit,  Grappone  performed  a  number  of  routines  with  the  Crazy  88,  who  surrounded  her  menacingly  as  they  fought  for  O-­Ren  Ishii. “What’s  interesting  about  this  show  was  that  as  it  progressed,  if  you  were  killed  off,  you’d  be-­ come  part  of  the  Crazy  88,â€?  said  Armbrister.  The  introduction  of  O-­Ren  Ishii,  played  by  Vice  President  Miyah  Tomlinson,  evoked  $VLDQ LQĂ€XHQFHV VXFK DV WKH .XQJ )X SRVHV the  dancers  took  and  the  fan-­like  movements   of  their  gloved  hands. Many  dance  troupe  members  said  they  were  proud  of  their  ability  to  include  other  cul-­ tural  elements  into  their  routines  because  in  previous  years,  the  performances  were  largely   hip-­hop  centric. “I  think  the  audience,  particularly  the  Cul-­ ture  Shock  alumni,  saw  how  diverse  we’ve  be-­ come  and  how  strong  we  were  as  a  team,â€?  said Â

Grappone.  â€œAnd  even  how  the  production  ran,  it  was  a  lot  smoother  than  prior  years.  I  think  we  impressed  a  lot  of  people.â€? )RU VRPH RQ &XOWXUH 6KRFN WKLV \HDUÂśV SHU-­ formance  topped  those  of  the  past. Âł(YHQ DOXPQL ZKR KDYH EHHQ LQ LW ÂżYH \HDUV before  me,  they  said  that  this  was  the  best  they’ve  ever  seen,â€?  Grappone  said. Alumni  were  present  at  the  performance,  in-­ cluding  host  and  former  president  Angel  Espada,  who  graduated  last  year.  Members  of  Culture  Shock  Dance  Troupe  said  they  look  forward  to  the  future. “Part  of  what  we  tried  to  do  this  year  and  what  we  want  to  keep  doing  is  continue  expand-­ ing  out  to  different  groups  of  students  on  campus  because  a  lot  of  the  time,  the  same  students  are  coming  in,â€?  said  Caitlin  Ryan,  a  dancer  in  the  troupe  who  played  a  member  of  the  Crazy  88.  â€œWhat  we’re  hoping  to  do  is  expand  so  more  people  get  exposed  to  us.â€?

Your degree can’t wait. Discover the competitive advantage of a Saint Rose graduate degree.

Application Deadlines: Spring Enrollment: October 15 Summer Enrollment: March 15 Fall Enrollment: June 1 For more information: 1-800-637-8556 www.strose.edu/gradapply Attend an Open House: December 7, 6:30 pm

Do you ever wonder if your degree is going to be enough in these challenging economic times? Do you want to be a force for positive change? The answer is simple — earn a Saint Rose graduate degree. With 45 graduate degrees and 19 graduate certificates to choose from in education, business, computer information systems, and the arts and humanities, a Saint Rose graduate degree provides the employment credentials to boost your earning power and enrich your career. Apply today!

Personal Visits: Call 1-800-637-8556 ext. 2

click

www.strose.edu/gradvisit

School of Arts & Humanities Art Education Communications English History/Political Science Music Education Studio Art School of Business Accounting MBA Financial Planning (Advanced Certificate) Not-For-Profit Management (Advanced Certificate) School of Mathematics & Sciences Computer Information Systems (also Advanced Certificate) Internet Programming (Advanced Certificate)

www.strose.edu/gradapply

School of Education Adolescence Education (Grades 7 – 12) Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, Mathematics, Social Studies, Spanish

Business/Marketing Education (K – 12) Childhood Education (Grades 1 – 6) College Student Services Administration Communication Sciences & Disorders Curriculum and Instruction* Early Childhood Education (Birth – Grade 2) Educational Leadership and Administration Educational Psychology Educational Technology Specialist Instructional Technology (Advanced Certificate) Literacy* Mental Health Counseling Program Evaluation (Advanced Certificate) School Counseling School Psychology Special Education* Technology Education Special Education/Dual Certification Programs Special Education/Adolescence Education Special Education/Childhood Education * Applicants must hold initial certification prior to applying.

The College of Saint Rose Thursday,  November  11,  2010


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$ON TüBRAVEüTHEüSNOWüANDü COLDüTHISüWINTERüBREAK Get ahead with FLCC’s Online Learning. No matter where you plan to spend your break, you can get ahead with online classes at FLCC this winter. With nearly 30 courses to choose from, it’s easy to get a few electives out of the way. FLCC’s Online Winter Session classes start December 13. Learn more! Visit www.flcc.edu/winter for details.

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PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â STOCKTON Â PHOTOS

:KLOH WKH :RPHQœV 6RFFHU WHDP ORVW LQ SHQDOW\ NLFNV WR %XIIDOR 6WDWH WKH +DZNV ¿ QLVKHG ZLWK D UHFRUG By  Cat  Tacopina Staff  Writer  |  Ctacopina97@newpaltz.edu

The  Lady  Hawks’  soccer  season  ended  in  disappointment  after  losing  a  sudden  death  shoot-­out  against  Buffalo  State’s  squad.  Despite  this  disappointment,  the  team  had  a  better  season  than  the  last,  with  a  record  of  7-­8-­4  and  a  determina-­ tion  to  do  even  better  next  season. “Overall,  I  think  we  had  a  good  sea-­ VRQ :H Âż QLVKHG KLJKHU LQ RXU FRQIHU ence  than  we  did  in  the  previous  year  and  made  it  back  to  the  SUNYAC  Champi-­ onships  after  missing  out  last  year,â€?  said  Women’s  Soccer  Coach  Colleen  Bruley.  â€œWe  had  some  tough  losses,  but  each  loss  we  had  was  against  a  team  that  has  been  ranked  in  either  the  region  or  the  nation  at  some  point  this  year.â€? Bruley  said  the  team  will  build  off  this  experience  for  next  year.  While  they   faced  some  tough  losses  early  in  the  sea-­

son,  Brittany  Bennett,  one  of  the  team  captains,  said  she  knows  the  team  have  a  list  of  accomplishments  to  be  proud  of. Âł$ KLJKOLJKW ZH KDG ZDV GHÂż QLWHO\ RXU Brockport-­Geneseo  weekend.  We  really  played  well  and  showed  our  potential  as  a  WHDP , GHÂż QLWHO\ WKLQN WKRVH ZHUH JDPHV that  we  were  really  proud  of.  We  came  together  as  a  team  and  turned  our  season  around,â€?  Bennett,  a  fourth-­year,  said. Cobb  agreed  with  Bennett,  and  said  the  Hawks  always  struggled  against  SUNY  Brockport  and  SUNY  Geneseo  in  \HDUV SDVW PDNLQJ WKH ZLQV PRUH VLJQLÂż cant.  ³,W ZDV GHÂż QLWHO\ D PHPRUDEOH ZHHN end,  one  that  I  probably  won’t  forget.  I  have  wanted  to  beat  those  teams,  espe-­ cially  Geneseo,  for  a  long  time,â€?  Cobb  said.  Another  highlight  of  the  season  was  the  addition  of  second-­year  Shelby  Kon-­

delka,  who  transferred  to  New  Paltz  from  SUNY  Plattsburgh  and  had  a  strong  sea-­ son  for  the  Hawks.  Kondelka  is  expected  to  be  a  driving  force  for  the  team  in  the  future.  â€œShelby  Kondelka  made  a  huge  im-­ pact  for  us  as  a  target  player  and  goal  scorer.  She  has  great  vision  and  ability  on  WKH Âż HOG DQG VKH KHOSHG XV JHW WR ZKHUH we  did  this  year,â€?  Bruley  said.  Another  impact  player  for  the  Hawks  this  season  was  their  goaltender,  Stepha-­ nie  Vega. “Stephanie  Vega  also  pulled  out  some  JUHDW VDYHV IRU XV WKLV \HDU DQG GHÂż QLWHO\ had  an  impact  on  the  success  that  we  did  have,â€?  said  Bruley.  â€œWhen  she  played  well,  the  team  played  well.â€? Bruley  also  said  that  there  were  many  other  players  who  contribute  to  the  team’s  success,  and  it  never  seemed  to  be  the  same  person.  The  ability  of  the  entire Â

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

team  to  contribute  towards  success  will  be  vital  for  the  team  and  something  they  will  keep  in  mind  when  they  are  focus-­ ing  on  making  the  next  season  even  bet-­ ter  than  this  one.  But  for  now,  the  team  knows  exactly  what  they  need  to  improve  upon. “We  are  losing  a  couple  key  players  QH[W VHDVRQ VR ZH KDYH VRPH VSRWV WR Âż OO +RZHYHU , GHÂż QLWHO\ WKLQN LI ZH EULQJ LQ a  few  strong  freshmen  to  supplement  the  girls  we  have  now  we  would  be  looking  pretty  good  for  next  season.â€? Cobb  said  the  biggest  thing  the  team  needs  to  work  on  for  next  season  is  play-­ ing  to  their  potential  consistently.  ³7KH\ KDYH DOUHDG\ EHHQ LQ P\ RIÂż FH talking  about  next  year,  and  that  can  only  be  a  positive,â€?  said  Coach  Bruley.  â€œThey  are  excited  and  so  am  I.  I  feel  we  can  be  even  stronger  next  season.â€? MORE  SOCCER  COVERAGE  ON  PG.  13


Pg 12

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Swim  Team’s  Season  Starts  Swimmingly By  Ryan  Patrick  Hanrahan  Copy  Editor  |  Rhanrahan13@newpaltz.edu

The  SUNY  New  Paltz  Women’s  Swim  team  recently  began  its  2010-­11  season,  and   they’re  hoping  for  streamlined  success. The  team  went  stroke-­for-­stroke  against  SUNY  Oneonta  and  the  United  States  Coast  Guard  Academy  (USCGA)  this  past  week-­ end,  defeating  Oneonta  118-­87  on  Friday  and  coming  just  shy  of  victory  Saturday  at  146-­116  against  the  USCGA.  Although  the  team  received  mixed  results  over  the  week-­ end,  morale  is  high  and  the  team  is  taking  it  RQ WKH FKLQ DQG PRYLQJ WRZDUG ELJJHU ÂżVK The  Women’s  Swim  team,  led  by  Head  Coach  Scott  Whitbeck  (who  has  held  the  position  for  three  years),  has  many  of  the  same  swimmers  from  last  season.  Though  IRXU JUDGXDWHG WKH WHDP DGGHG VHYHQ ÂżUVW years.  Whitbeck  said  this  year  the  team  is  better  than  ever,  and  it  could  potentially  be  â€œone  of  the  best  that  we’ve  ever  had  at  this  college.â€?

Along  with  the  new  and  improved  While  tougher,  this  new  style  of  prac-­ lineup,  Whitbeck  has  changed  the  way  the  ticing  has  been  met  with  positive  results  team  practices  and  add-­ and  reactions  from  the  ed  more  dry  land  train-­ team.  ing.   He  said  the  team  Fourth-­year  soci-­ has  transitioned  from  ology  major  and  swim  a  three  day  a  week  lift-­ team  co-­captain  Allison  ing  program  to  a  four  Wells  thinks  the  new  day  a  week  program  training  regimen  has  where  the  team  spends  made  the  future  of  the  two  days  a  week  in  the  team  all  the  more  bright. weight  room  and  two  â€œIt’s  more  intense  days  doing  dry  land  but  I  really  think  it’s  techniques. going  to  pay  off  at  the  â€œYou  can  do  a  lot  end  of  the  season  when  of  bench  presses  and  bi-­ we  head  to  Buffalo  for  ceps  in  the  weight  room,  championships,â€?  said  but  will  that  necessarily  Wells. Allison  Wells  make  you  a  better  swim-­ According  to  Whit-­ mer?  I’m  really  trying  to  beck,  the  team  is  formi-­ use  motions  and  things,  dable  from  any  angle,  to  help  develop  muscles  with  talented  swimmers  WKDW ZLOO KHOS WKHP VSHFLÂżFDOO\ IRU VZLP-­ ÂżOOLQJ HYHU\ SRVLWLRQ :KLWEHFN VDLG WKDW ming,â€?  he  said. with  such  a  well-­rounded  team,  the  goal  is Â

“It’s  more  intense  but  I  really  think  it’s  going  to  pay  off  at  the  end  of  the  seasonâ€?  â€”  Â

to  live  up  to  that  potential  during  the  sea-­ son,  and  improve  every  day. With  new  teammates,  it’s  hard  for  any  team  to  get  things  in  order  and  get  over  the  awkward  assimilation  stage.  However,  ac-­ cording  to  swimmer  Becky  Baker,  a  fourth-­ year  psychology  major,  the  new  girls  have  been  embraced  by  the  whole  team.  Baker  said  the  new  swimmers  have  also  adjusted  to  the  unique  form  of  practicing  as  well.  Baker  also  highlights  the  close  relationship  between  herself  and  all  of  the  other  girls,  as  one  contributing  factor  to  the  team’s  suc-­ cess. The  hope  of  every  swimmer  is  to  drop  their  times  and  stay  fast  so  that  they  can  continue  accumulating  wins  and  breaking  records,  Baker  said.  With  such  a  positive  RXWORRN DQG ZHOO GHÂżQHG OLQHXS WULXPSK can  only  be  expected  of  the  Lady  Hawks  and  Whitbeck  seems  to  agree. “We’re  training  harder  than  we  ever  had,â€?  said  Whitbeck.  â€œI’m  happy  with  where  we  are.â€?

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30

Thursday,  November  11,  2010


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pg 13

Kondelka  Kills  The  Competition  ByAndrew  Wyrich  Sports  Editor  |  Andrew.wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

While  the  Women’s  Soccer  team’s  sea-­ son  may  have  ended  in  a  penalty  kick  show-­ down  on  Oct.  30,  Shelby  Kondelka’s  soccer  career  is  only  beginning  â€“  and  coaches  and  teammates  said  the  future  looks  bright.  Kondelka,  a  second-­year  transfer  stu-­ dent  from  SUNY  Plattsburgh,  was  the  team’s  leading  scorer  during  their  2010  campaign  DQG D GULYLQJ IRUFH IRU WKH WHDP LQ KHU ÂżUVW year  with  the  Hawks.  Kondelka’s  explosive  attack  as  a  for-­ ward  for  the  Hawks  netted  her  nine  goals  on  the  season,  which  was  triple  the  amount  of  goals  that  the  next  leading  scorer  on  the  team  had.  â€œ[Kondelka]  has  a  great  ability  to  see  through  balls,  and  make  the  passes  for  the  other  forward  to  run  on  to,â€?  Head  Coach  Collen  Bruley  said.  â€œShe  is  our  playmaker.â€? Kondelka’s  road  to  success  began  when  VKH ZDV ÂżYH \HDUV ROG +RZHYHU VKHÂśV DOVR played  travel  soccer  in  middle-­school  and  watched  her  sisters  play  soccer  in  college.  Kondelka’s  success  this  season  was  not  ZLWKRXW LWV FRPSOLFDWLRQV .RQGHOND ÂżUVW DW-­ tended  SUNY  Plattsburgh  but  soon  realized  LW ÂłZDV QRW WKH ULJKW ÂżW´ IRU KHU DQG VKH EH-­ gan  exploring  other  collegiate  options.   Dur-­ ing  this  transition  period,  Kondelka  was  not  able  to  play  soccer  and  missed  it.  After  visit-­ ing  New  Paltz  she  â€œloved  everything  about  itâ€?  and  talked  to  Bruley  about  playing  soc-­ cer.  After  this  discussion,  Kondelka  decided  to  attend  SUNY  New  Paltz.  â€œ[Soccer]  has  always  been  a  passion  of  mine,â€?  Kondelka  said.  â€œI  have  worked  so  hard  over  the  years  to  get  to  the  college  level,  dedicating  so  much  time  and  effort  into  playing  and  becoming  the  best  player  I  could.â€?  :KHQ VKH ÂżUVW DUULYHG DW 1HZ 3DOW] WKH year  away  from  soccer  was  still  fresh  in  her  mind.  She  looked  to  come  back  as  successful  as  she  had  been  earlier  in  her  soccer  career.  â€œI  wanted  to  prove  to  myself,  my  family  and  to  everyone  that  I  can  still  do  it.   It  made  me  have  a  lot  of  determination  and  focus  to  make  the  team,  get  a  starting  position  and  be  a  successful  forward,â€?  Kondelka  said.   Kondelka’s  hard  work  and  determina-­ tion  paid  off,  and  Bruley  remembers  teach-­ ing  her  a  basic  technique  that  allowed  Kon-­ delka  to  become  â€œthe  player  [Bruley]  knew  she  could  be.â€? According  to  Bruley,  she  stressed  that Â

Kondelka  needed  to  step  to  the  ball  instead  of  allowing  it  to  come  to  her,  which  she  mas-­ tered.  After  that,  everything  began  to  click.   Over  the  course  of  the  season  Kondelka  took  28  shots  on  goal,  which  was  second  most  on  the  team.  She  ended  the  season  with  a  .321  shot  percentage  which  was  also  sec-­ ond  on  the  team. Kondelka  said  her  â€œsimpleâ€?  style  of  play  and  â€œrelaxedâ€?  ball  handling  skills  have  allowed  her  to  be  successful.  ³, DP QRW D YHU\ Ă€DVK\ SOD\HU EXW LI , can  take  a  defender  on  and  go  to  goal  I  will  take  advantage  of  it,â€?  Kondelka  said.   As  for  the  future,  Bruley  believes  Kon-­ delka  will  develop  into  a  model  for  the  other  Hawks  by  leading  by  example.   Her  quiet  demeanor  is  something  that  Bruley  believes  will  set  an  example  for  players  on  and  off  WKH ÂżHOG According  to  Bruley,  her  mental  state  is  key  for  Kondelka’s  success,  believing  Kon-­ GHOND ZDV DW KHU EHVW ZKHQ KHU FRQÂżGHQFH was  high.  ³, KRSH WR VHH >KHU FRQÂżGHQFH@ JURZ DQG Ă€RXULVK WKURXJKRXW WKH QH[W IHZ \HDUV ,I she  continues  playing  like  she  did  this  year  she  has  the  ability  to  break  some  goal  scor-­ ing  records  for  us,â€?  Bruley  said.  Kondelka  hopes  to  improve  upon  her  success  this  year  and  continue  playing  for  the  Hawks.   Her  goal  is  simple  â€“  win  a  SU-­ NYAC  championship.  â€œI  want  to  continue  being  successful  here,  scoring  goals  and  help  lead  the  team  WR LWV ÂżUVW HYHU FKDPSLRQVKLS LQ VFKRRO KLV-­ tory.â€?

KONDELKA’S SEASON STATS

9  Goals 1 Assist  28 Shots  .321 Shot  % 15  Shots  on  Goal  .536 Shots  on  Goal  % Â

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Kondelka’s  explosive  attack  as  a  forward  for  the  Hawks  netted  her  nine  goals  on  the  season PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  STOCKTON  PHOTO

Thursday,  November  11,  2010


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pg 14

Lady  Hawks  Awarded  For  Strong  Season By  Cat  Tacopina Staff  Writer  |  Ctacopina97@newpaltz.edu

Hawks  fans  may  have  one  question  on  their  mind:  is  there  anything  the  Women’s  Tennis  team  hasn’t  done? This  year,  the  team  went  undefeated  in  SUNYAC  play,  won  the  SUNYAC  title  (qualifying  them  to  go  on  to  the  2011  NCAA  Tennis  Championships),  had  their  captain  named  SUNYAC  Player  of  the  Year,  their  coach  named  SU-­ NYAC  Coach  of  the  Year,  and  to  top  it  all  off,  six  of  the  nine  team  members  from  this  season  were  named  to  a  SU-­ NYAC  All  Conference  team.  Fourth-­year  students  Stepha-­ nie  Schara  and  Lindsay  Garyn,  second-­year  Kayla  DiPaulo  DQG ÂżUVW \HDU 3DLJH 0XQURH ZHUH QDPHG WR WKH ÂżUVW WHDP ZKLOH VHFRQG \HDUV $OOL (VSRVLWR DQG 0RQWDQD :LOVRQ ZHUH named  to  the  second  team.  Captain  Stephanie  Schara  has  already  been  on  the  SU-­ NYAC  all  conference  team  in  her  college  career,  but  said  it  IHHOV MXVW OLNH LW GLG WKH ÂżUVW WLPH Âł,W WRWDOO\ IHHOV OLNH WKH ÂżUVW WLPH $V DQ DWKOHWH LWÂśV MXVW impossible  to  compare  the  feeling  of  winning  your  confer-­ ence  and  being  number  one.   I  have  a  completely  different  team  this  year  than  when  I  won  my  freshman  year  and  made  all  conference,  and  the  difference  in  atmosphere  and  players  makes  it  even  more  special,â€?  Schara  said.   â€œI  think  it  really Â

shows  how  great  of  a  coach  Rob  is  to  have  an  entirely  dif-­ ferent  team  accomplish  the  same  feat.â€? Garyn,  a  fourth-­year  who  went  undefeated  with  Schara  in  SUNYAC  Doubles  this  season  echoed  Schara’s  senti-­ ment.  ³,WÂśV VXFK DQ KRQRU WR EH QDPHG ÂżUVW DOO FRQIHUHQFH because  I’ve  never  received  it  before.  Last  year  I  received  VHFRQG WHDP VR LWÂśV DZHVRPH WR ÂżQLVK P\ VHQLRU \HDU RQ top,â€?  she  said.  Coach  Bruley,  the  SUNYAC  Coach  of  the  Year,  is  no  stranger  to  watching  his  team  members  gain  success.  In  his  13  years  with  the  tennis  squad,  he  has  led  the  team  to  four  SUNYAC  championship  titles  and  has  had  49  of  his  play-­ ers  placed  on  SUNYAC  teams.  He  is  the  type  of  coach  his  players  never  question  because  they  know  that  they  can  trust  whatever  he  says  and  take  his  advice. “I’m  really  proud  as  a  coach  to  see  the  complete  SUN-­ YAC  team  get  recognized  in  this  way.  It  really  adds  validity  to  our  program  and  shows  how  strong  our  tennis  program  is  at  New  Paltz,â€?  Bruley  said. Even  before  gaining  the  accolades  of  SUNYAC  All-­ Team  members,  the  team  has  been  training  for  the  2011  spring  season.  Not  only  that,  but  they’re  already  planning  for  next  fall,  which  is  important  since  the  team  will  be  los-­ ing  two  of  its  most  important  players,  Schara  and  Garyn. Â

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REGISTER NOVEMBER 22, 2010 ďšťJANUARY 3, 2011 IN THE TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.sunyrockland.edu/go/wintersession 1-800-RCC-SOON

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

However,  early  training  and  conditioning  will  lead  the  team  to  become  even  stronger  of  a  tennis  powerhouse  than  they  DOUHDG\ DUH 6FKDUD KDV FRQÂżGHQFH LQ WKLV “I  have  absolutely  no  doubt  that  they  can  do  it  again,â€?  said  Schara,  â€œespecially  if  they  continue  to  work  as  hard  as  they  did  this  past  season.â€? :KLOH WKH WDVN LV DOZD\V GLIÂżFXOW ERWK 6FKDUD DQG Bruley  believe  that  this  will  be  a  continuing  trend  for  the  Women’s  Tennis  Team. “I’m  always  looking  at  ways  that  will  give  us  the  edge  over  other  teams.  In  total  we  have  had  some  37  athletes  PDNH ÂżUVW WHDP DOO FRQIHUHQFH RYHU \HDUV 0\ DWKOHWHV have  never  questioned:  why  are  we  doing  this  this  way?â€?  Bruley  said.   â€œThey  trust  my  judgment  and  go  with  it  and  we  do  have  a  lot  of  fun  with  the  program.  It  also  comes  down  to  recruiting,  which  other  than  tennis  is  the  biggest  part  of  my  job.  Like  all  the  coaches  in  our  department  I’m  recruiting  12  months  of  the  year  trying  to  bring  in  the  best  players  out  there,  without  offering  athletic  scholarships,  to  our  tennis  program.â€?  The  Lady  Hawks  now  have  the  entire  winter  to  gear  up  for  the  spring  and  fall  seasons  and  they  know  that  they  have  WKH WDOHQW DQG FRQÂżGHQFH WR QRW RQO\ PLPLF EXW H[SDQG RQ their  personal  and  team  accomplishments.  Even  with  the  loss  of  two  key  players,  they  know  that  they  are  ready.


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Potential  Free  Agent  Ideas

The  free  agent  season  began  Sunday,  meaning  teams  are  now  allowed  to  negotiate  contracts  with  players  across  baseball.  The  likes  of  Cliff  Lee,  Jayson  Werth  and  Carl  Crawford  will  begin  talking  to  big  market  clubs  such  as  the  Yankees,  Red  Sox,  Phillies,  Angels  and  Tigers  and  will  all  likely  gain  enormous  contracts  from  those  teams.  The  Mets  and  their  newly  anointed  General  Manager  San-­ dy  Alderson  will  likely  be  in  the  shadows  of  this  incredibly  top  heavy  free  agent  class  and  will  focus  on  plugging  up  holes  with  the  goal  of  becoming  a  player  in  2011-­12’s  free  agent  class.  This  could  include  players  such  as  Adrian  Gonzalez,  Dan  Uggla,  Da-­ vid  DeJesus,  Mark  Buehrle,  Edwin  Jackson,  C.J.  Wilson  and  Jonathan  Papelbon.   That  offseason,  the  Mets  will  be  shedding  the  cumbersome  contracts  of  Carlos  Beltran,  K-­Rod  and  Oliver  3HUH] DOORZLQJ WKHP WR EH Ă€ H[LEOH ZLWK WKHLU SRWHQWLDO SOD\HU personnel  moves.  While  waiting  for  next  offseason  is  the  plan,  the  Mets  real-­ ize  that  the  current  fan  base  is  not  a  patient  bunch  and  expects  the  Mets  to  be  a  competitive  team  next  year.  The  Mets  currently  have  many  needs,  and  short  term  stop  gaps  could  be  helpful  in  creating  a  team  that  is  at  least  intriguing  next  season.  7KH 0HWVÂś Âż UVW QHHG LV WR Âż QG D VWDUWLQJ SLWFKHU :LWK -RKDQ Santana  out  for  much  of  next  season,  the  Mets  will  be  stuck  with  a  rotation  of  Mike  Pelfrey,  Jon  Niese,  R.A.  Dickey  and  two  TXHVWLRQ PDUNV 7KH 0HWV VKRXOG ORRN LQWR Âż QGLQJ VWDUWHUV ZKR can  provide  solid  innings  each  time  they  go  out  to  the  mound,  and  luckily  this  year’s  free  agent  market  offers  a  perfect  solu-­ tion  â€“  Jon  Garland.  Garland  was  rumored  to  be  a  potential  Mets  option  last  off-­ season,  but  ultimately  wound  up  signing  with  the  San  Diego  Pa-­ dres.   I  was  quite  vocal  about  my  opinions  about  Garland  being  a  strong  back  end  of  the  rotation  candidate,  and  Garland  proved  me  right.  Garland  did  not  disappoint  the  Padres,  and  was  a  driv-­ LQJ IRUFH LQ WKHLU LQFUHGLEO\ VXFFHVVIXO FDPSDLJQ +H Âż Q ished  the  season  with  a  14-­12  record  and  3.47  ERA.  While  he  ZDV QRW Ă€ DVK\ RU E\ DQ\ PHDQV D GRPLQDQW IRUFH *DUODQG ZDV WKH GHÂż QLWLRQ RI VROLG Âą ZKLFK LV VRPHWKLQJ WKH 0HWV FRXOG XVH At  the  very  least  Garland  could  become  a  solid  No.4  starter  that  the  Mets  rely  on  for  the  next  few  seasons.  Another  necessity  the  Mets  need  to  address  is  the  second  base  position.  Luis  Castillo  will  likely  be  with  another  club  by  the  start  of  next  season,  leaving  Ruben  Tejada  as  the  Mets’  only  second  base  option.   While  Tejada  is  brilliant  defensively,  it  is  quite  evident  that  the  21-­year-­old  is  not  ready  to  hit  major  league Â

pitching  and  could  use  some  time  to  adjust.   To  provide  this  time  I  would  advocate  signing  either  Orlando  Hudson  or  David  Eck-­ stien.  Both  are  free  agents  this  season  and  would  provide  the  0HWV ZLWK D VLJQLÂż FDQW XSJUDGH RYHU WKHLU SUHYLRXV VHFRQG EDVH men.  While  Hudson,  who  played  for  the  Minnesota  Twins  last  season,  has  previously  stated  his  desire  to  play  for  the  Mets.   He  has  two  things  going  against  him  that  make  me  wary.  Hudson  is  getting  older,  and  his  production  is  dropping,  which  could  mean  giving  him  more  than  a  one-­year  contract  could  be  dangerous.  Hudson  is  likely  to  cost  more  than  Eckstien  as  well.   For  those  reasons,  I  think  adding  Eckstien  would  be  a  wise  move.  Not  only  would  Eckstien  be  cheap,  he  is  a  gritty  player  who  loves  the  JDPH DQG FRXOG EH D VLJQLÂż FDQW SUHVHQFH LQ WKH FOXEKRXVH +H could  be  a  tutor  to  Tejada  while  also  being  a  perfect  hitter  in  the  No.2  slot  in  the  Mets’  lineup.  His  contact  rate  is  extraordinary,   he  never  strikes  out  and  could  provide  the  Mets  with  the  best  1-­2  combo  they  have  had  at  the  top  of  the  order  in  a  long  time.  Finally,  the  Mets  need  to  add  bullpen  depth  and  a  backup  catcher.   Alderson  has  already  shown  that  he  is  unwilling  to  overspend  on  bullpen  arms  by  not  giving  Hisanori  Takahashi  the  three-­year  $15  million  dollar  deal  he  was  reportedly  looking  for.   This  also  likely  means  that  Pedro  Feliciano  is  not  going  to  be  UHVLJQHG E\ WKH 0HWV :KHQ Âż OOLQJ WKHVH KROHV , WKLQN WKH 0HWV VKRXOG NHHS DQ H\H RQ D IHZ QDPHV 7KH Âż UVW RQH LV VRPHRQH I  advocated  acquiring  last  year  (this  is  beginning  to  sound  like  a  theme...),  Joe  Beimel.   Beimel  pitched  for  the  Rockies  last  VHDVRQ DIWHU EHLQJ Ă€ LUWHG ZLWK E\ WKH 0HWV ODWH LQ WKH RIIVHDVRQ Beimel  once  again  proved  that  he  is  a  solid  middle  reliever  and  posted  a  3.40  ERA  despite  pitching  half  of  his  games  in  Den-­ ver’s  cool  air.   Beimel  would  likely  come  cheap,  and  could  be  had  for  a  one  or  two  year  deal  and  would  replace  Feliciano  or  Takahashi  as  one  of  the  lefty  relievers.   Other  names  to  keep  an  eye  on  are:   Jon  Rauch,  Grant  Balfour,  Randy  Choate  and  maybe  even  Brian  Fuentes  if  his  price  drops.  $V IRU D EDFNXS FDWFKHU WKH 0HWV QHHG WR Âż QG VRPHRQH who  could  mentor  likely  starter  Josh  Thole.  Thole  became  the  regular  catcher  late  last  season  and  showed  the  Mets  that  he  seems  to  have  a  future  as  their  backstop.   However,  Thole  is  still  young  and  having  a  seasoned  veteran  behind  the  plate  could  be  helpful.   The  Mets  could  resign  Henry  Blanco,  because  he  is  getting  old  and  giving  money  to  an  aging  veteran  may  not  be  the  wisest  decision.   One  option  that  intrigues  me  is  former  Boston  Red  Sox  star  Jason  Varitek.  Varitek  has  not  been  great  over  the  past  few  seasons,  but  he  could  provide  the  Mets  with  a  veteran  who  could  mentor  Thole  and  could  come  at  a  very  low  price  on  a  one-­year  deal.   :KLOH WKLV RIIVHDVRQ PD\ QRW EH Ă€ DVK\ IRU WKH 0HWV HYHQ though  some  on  the  MLB  Network  predicted  Carl  Crawford Â

Thursday,  November  11,  2010

signing  with  the  Mets)  the  team  still  has  an  opportunity  to  make  small  moves  that  could  make  the  team  competitive  in  2011.  One  WKLQJ WKDW , DP FRQÂż GHQW DERXW KRZHYHU LV $OGHUVRQÂśV DELOLW\ WR make  smart  baseball  savvy  moves  that  will  not  come  back  to  haunt  the  team.   He  proved  it  with  Takahashi’s  contract  situa-­ tion,  and  it  seems  like  the  way  the  Mets  do  business  has  changed  completely,  and  that  makes  me  happy. Â

FREE AGENT PREDICTIONS Cliff  Lee  â€“  Rangers  Jayson  Werth  â€“  Red  Sox  â€“  Red  Sox  Carl  Crawford  â€“   â€“  Angels  Derek  Jeter  â€“  Yankees  Mariano  Rivera  â€“   â€“  Yankees  Vladimir  Gurerro  â€“  Rays  â€“  Rays Manny  Ramirez  -­   Indians   -­   Indians  Victor  Martinez  â€“  Red  Sox   â€“  Red  Sox  Paul  Konerko  â€“  D’backs   â€“  D’backs  Adrian  Beltre  â€“  Angels  Adam  Dunn  â€“  White  Sox   â€“  White  Sox Â

DATES TO REMEMBER Nov.7  Nov.16  to  17  Nov.23  Nov.30  Dec.2  Dec.6  to  9  Jan.18 Â

Free  agents  can  negotiate  with  any  team GM  Meetings,  Orlando,  FL Â

Deadline  to  offer  arbitration  to  their  own  FA

Deadline  for  players  to  accept  arbitration

Deadline  for  teams  to  tender  contracts  to  arbitration  players

Winter  Meetings,  Lake  Buena  Vista,  FL

7HDPV DQG SOD\HUV H[FKDQJH VDODU\ DUELWUDWLRQ Âż JXUHV

GARLAND Â & Â CRAWFORD Â PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â BLOGSPOT.COM Â ECKSTIEN Â PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â WIKIMEDIA.COM Â BIEMEL Â PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â BLEACHEREPORT.COM Â


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