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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  85,  Issue  XX

Thursday,  April  10,  2014 oracle.newpaltz.edu                                                                                                                                                                                            

PHOTO BY ZACH MCGRATH

COUNTER POINTS TIME FOR A CHANGE

IDA PILOT For Park Point Accepted Despite Town Planning Board Re-­ jection;; Zimet Anticipates Legal Action

Start Times Of Classes To Change Next Semester

STORY ON PAGE 4 EDITORIAL ON PAGE 9

PHOTO BY ROBIN WEINSTEIN ILLUSTRATION BY CAT TACOPINA

STORY ON PAGE 3

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡&RXQFLO'LVFXVVHV%)&:HHNHQG3J‡$GPLQLVWUDWRUV3ODQ)RU%XGJHW3J ‡6$6&&+RVW³6WDWH2I7KH&DPSXV´3J‡,'0+7R+RVW$QQXDO&RQIHUHQFH3J


Cat  Tacopina EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Andrew  Lief

MANAGING  EDITOR _________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

Anthony  DeRosa FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF

Abbott  Brant

FEATURES          PG.  4B A&E                      PG.  7B

_________________

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS  EDITOR

Maxwell  Reide Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Zach  McGrath

ASSISTANT  PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITOR

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Madeline  Anthony Melissa  Kramer Zameena  Mejia .ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG COPY  EDITORS

Hannah  Nesich Jennifer  Newman ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITORS _________________

Nicole  Brinkley WEB  CHIEF

Rosalie  Rodriguez MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

_________________

Matt  Ritchie

BUSINESS  MANAGER

John  Sweet

DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER

The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI 681<1HZ3DOW]2XUFLUFXODWLRQLVThe  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG E\WKHEXVLQHVVPDQDJHU&RPPXQLW\DQQRXQFHPHQWVDUHSXEOLVKHGJUDWXLWRXVO\EXWDUH subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH ID[OLQHLV

Volume  85 Issue  XX THE  GUNK  

1B-­12B

THE  DEEP  END COLUMNS

JOHN  TAPPEN,  ANDREW  LIEF

SPORTS  

12B 9

EDITORIAL  

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Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

NEWS

VISIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ORACLEâ&#x20AC;? ONLINE:

University  Police  Blotter

Index

Incident:  Drugs Date:  04/0714 Location:  Dubois  Hall Female  student  complained  of  drug  transaction  in   her  suite.  Police  found  no  evidence  of  drug  activity;͞   investigation  ongoing. Incident:  Suspicious  Person Date:  04/06/14 Location:  Bouton  Hall Residence  Life  staff  reported  a  suspicious  person  loitering   and  allegedly  intoxicated.  Search  of  area  negative.

10 11-­15

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE $SULO&DVWLOOR.HOVH\'DPUDG1LFN)RGHUD%HQ.LQGORQ6DOO\0RUDQ (LOHHQ/LHEOHU-DKQD5RPDQR.D\FLD6DLOVPDQ'DQD6FKPHU]OHU 6KHOE\6HLS.HOO\6HL]-DFN6RPPHU.DWKHULQH6SHOOHU5\DQ:DO]

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

@NewPaltzOracle

Five-­Day  Forecast Thursday,  April  10 Sunny High:  65  Low:  46

Friday,  April  11

Showers  High:  67  Low:  42

Saturday,  April  12 Showers High:  68  Low:  42

Sunday,  April  13 Partly  Cloudy High:  69  Low:  50

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Monday,  April  13 Partly  Cloudy High:  74    Low:  52


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

   3

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Town  Board  Votes  Against  Park  Point  PILOT By  Andrew  Lief

By  Madeline  Anthony

Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Despite  the  Town  of  New  Paltz  Plan-­ ning  Board  voting  against  providing  land   use   to   the   student-­housing   project   Park   Point,  should  a  25-­year  payment-­in-­lieu-­ of-­taxes  (PILOT)  agreement  be  approved   on   Monday,   April   7,   the   Ulster   County   Industrial   Development   Agency   (IDA)   approved   the   PILOT   on   Wednesday,   April  9.     The   approved   PILOT   was   given   to   Wilmorite,  a  Rochester,  N.Y.-­based  com-­ mercial  real  estate  development  and  man-­ agement   company,   who   will   pay   a   total   of  $522,000  to  Ulster  County,  the  Town   of   New   Paltz   and   the   New   Paltz   school   GLVWULFW GXULQJ WKH ÂżUVW \HDU WKH FRP-­ plex   is   up   and   running.   Included   in   the   $522,000,   Wilmorite   will   pay   $750   for   each  of  the  696  beds  in  the  proposed  Park   Point  complex.       IDA  Board  Chairman  Michael  Horo-­ dyski   said   the   uniform   tax   exemption   policy  was  put  in  place  to  take  the  politics   out  through  an  independent  body.     New   Paltz   Town   Supervisor   Susan   Zimet   said   as   of   now   the   project   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   happen   because   the   planning   board   is   a   lead  agency  and  voted  against  it.  She  said   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   unsure   what   the   next   step   is,   but   ³¿QGVLWKDUGWREHOLHYH´WKDWWKHUHZRQÂśW be  legal  action.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   if   that   should   happen   [le-­ gal   action],   I   think   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   be   a   tough   situation   for   the   college   and   the   foundation  to  basically  have  a  developer   building   the   project   for   the   foundation   on   behalf   of   the   college   suing   the   host   FRPPXQLW\´=LPHWVDLGÂł,MXVWGRQÂśWVHH ZKHUHWKLVLVJRLQJ´ Town  Councilman  Jeff  Logan  said  it   ZDVÂłGLVWXUELQJ´WKDWWKH,'$PDGHDGH-­ cision  based  on  over  100  pages  of  docu-­ ments,   with   no   full   review   of   the   docu-­ ments  prior  to  the  meeting.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  board  members  were  obviously   sitting  there  stumbling  through  the  docu-­ PHQWV´/RJDQVDLGÂł7KHLURZQDWWRUQH\ >-RVHSK6FRWW@ZDVKDYLQJGLIÂżFXOW\ÂżQG-­ ing  references  in  the  documents,  and  yet   they  were  able  to  make  a  decision  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going  to  cost  Ulster  County  and  the  Town   of  New  Paltz  and  the  tax  jurisdictions  in   Ulster   County,   without   producing   any   MREV´ ,'$ 7UHDVXUHU 6WHYH 3HUÂżW VDLG SUNY   New   Paltz   is   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;jewel   and   FURZQ´RI8OVWHU&RXQW\DQGLWGHVHUYHV

Council  Meets Copy  Editor  |  N02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

The  New  Paltz  Town  Board  voted  Monday  against  a  PILOT  for  Wilmorite  Inc.

ÂłZRUOGFODVVKRXVLQJ´+HDOVRVDLGZLWK-­ out  the  college,  there  would  be  no  com-­ mercial  industry  in  New  Paltz.     Town  Councilman  Daniel  Torres  said   3HUÂżWÂśVFRPPHQWVVKRZHGDÂłODFNRIXQ-­ GHUVWDQGLQJ´IRUWKHSURMHFWDQGSHRSOHRI New  Paltz.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;His   notion   to   that   it   was   a   county   issue  opposed  to  just  a  local  issue  is  cor-­ rect,   but   I   will   point   out   that   500   New   Paltz   residents   showed   up   at   a   public   hearing   and   told   him   the   exact   opposite   RIZKDWKHVDLG´7RUUHVVDLGÂł+HFDPH with   a   prepared   statement   without   read-­ ing   the   document   and   registered   a   very   LPSRUWDQWYRWH´ /RJDQ VDLG 3HUÂżWÂśV UHPDUNV DERXW New   Paltz   were   â&#x20AC;&#x153;derogatory   and   insult-­

LQJ´ WR WKH WRZQ EHFDXVH KLV FRPPHQWV were   based   on   supporting   the   project,   and  he  has  not  spoken  to  members  of  the   community   about   their   views   on   the   is-­ sue.     Right   now,   Zimet   said   Wilmorite     â&#x20AC;&#x153;wants   to   have     a   shovel   in   the   ground   LQ 0D\´ EXW LI WKHUHÂśV D ODZVXLW LW ZLOO take   two   years.   She   also   said   construc-­ tion  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  able  to  start  in  May,  regard-­ less  of  the  status  of  a  PILOT  because  the   water   and   sewer   process   for   Park   Point   would  still  need  to  be  decided  on.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   really   not   sure   what   the   next   step   is   other   than   [Wilmorite]   trying   to   put   incredible   pressure   on   our   planning   board,  but  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  see  our  planning  board   IROGLQJ´=LPHWVDLG

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

Council   of   Organizations   met   Monday,   April  7  at  7  p.m.  for  their  most  recent  update. $VSRNHVSHUVRQIRUÂł%H3RVLWLYH´DQRQ SURÂżWZKLFKIXQGVUHVHDUFKDQGGHYHORSPHQWIRU ÂżQGLQJ D FXUH WR FKLOGKRRG FDQFHU DQQRXQFHG an  event  that  will  take  place  May  4.   Each  club  and  organization  that  chooses  to   participate   will   pay   $10.   The   participants   will   then  each  come  up  with  a  unique  activity  to  play   and  the  group  with  the  most  people  at  their  activ-­ ity  will  win  money  that  will  be  allocated  to  the   club   or   organization   through   Student  Associa-­ tion  (SA).  For  more  information  students  should   email  Pete  Troiano  at  Patroiano92@gmail.com. Senator  Liason  James  Auer  spoke  about  a   cap  on  how  much  the  state  can  increase  tuition   SHU\HDU&XUUUHQWO\LWLVDWÂżYHSHUFHQWDQGWKH\ are  looking  to  extend  the  cap. SA  Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs  and   Governace  Jordan  Taylor  said  that  the  candidacy   forms  for  SA  elections  are  due  April  14.   Âł:HQHHGPRUHFDQGLGDWHV´7D\ORUVDLG If  students  have  questions  they  can  email   him  at  Vpacademicaffairs@gmail.com. The   activity   fee   needs   to   be   approved   by   12.5   percent   of   the   student   body   so   that   there   is   still   money   to   provide   services   to   students,   Taylor  said. If  the  activity  fee  is  increased,  there  will  be   extended  service  of  the  Loop  Bus.  There  is  also   a  debate  whether  or  not  to  add  money  to  General   Programming  because  this  year  the  Conference   Account  ran  out.  They  took  money  from  other   SODFHVWRPDNHLWZRUNVRDGGLQJWKHÂżYHZRXOG ÂłVPRRWKWKLQJVRXWDELW´7D\ORUVDLG Either  the  increased  budget  or  the  current   budget  needs  to  be  approved  and  voted  on.     Vice   President   of   Budget   and   Finance   Youssouf  Kuoyo  said  that  all  clubs  and  organi-­ zations   that   applied   received   their   budgets   for   next   year.   Next   year,   the   conference   account   will   be   allocated   $8,000,   which   is   less   than   it   was   this   year.   General   programming   will   be   allocated   $150,000.   Everything   else   was   kept   about  the  same. Each  club  and  organization  has  until  next   Monday,   April   14   to   appeal   the   budgets   they   were  given.  If  clubs  or  organizations  were  not  in   good  standing  clubs  with  Council  of  Organiza-­ tions,   they   were   automatically   denied.   If   clubs   or  organizations  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  give  enough  paperwork   to  support  their  club,  they  were  also  denied. Currently,   there   is   no   money   in   general   programming.   Conferences   has   $2,000,   and   $4,500  needs  to  be  moved  into  general  program-­ ming.  


4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Class  Times  To  Change  This  Fall

PISTORIUS   REFUSES   TO   LOOK   AT  PHOTO  OF  DEAD  LOVER A   shaken   Oscar   Pistorius   refused   to   look   at   a   gruesome   photo   of   his   slain   girlfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  bloodied  head  on  Wednes-­ day,  telling  a  prosecutor  through  tears,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  to  look  at  a  picture.  I  was   there.â&#x20AC;? AFGHAN   PROBE   BEGINS   IN   AT-­ TACK  ON  AP  JOURNALISTS Afghan  central  government  authorities   on   Wednesday   began   questioning   the   police  commander  who  killed  an  Asso-­ ciated  Press  photographer  and  wound-­ ed   an  AP   reporter,   a   day   after   he   was   transferred  by  helicopter  to  the  capital. US   TROOPS   MAY   BE   SENT   TO   EUROPE NATOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   top   military   commander   in   Europe,   drafting   countermoves   to   the   Russian  military  threat  against  Ukraine,   said  Wednesday  they  could  include  de-­ %HJLQQLQJQH[WVHPHVWHUVWXGHQWVZLOOKDYHDQDGGLWLRQDOÂżYHPLQXWHVEHWZHHQFODVVHV ployment   of   American   troops   to   alli-­ ance  member  states  in  Eastern  Europe   %\.ULVWHQ:DUÂżHOG tended  to  be  permanent. Copy  Editor  |  :DUÂżHON#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX now  feeling  at  risk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At  the  time,  the  change  created  prob-­ lems  for  faculty  and  students  with  back-­to-­ The   SUNY   New   Paltz   Department   of   BLASTS   IN   CENTRAL   SYRIA   Enrollment  Management  recently  made  the   back  classes  and  the  understanding  was  that   as  classrooms  came  back  online,  we  would   CITY  OF  HOMS  KILL  25 decision  to  change  the  start  time  of  classes.   return   to   15   minutes   between   classes   by   Two   car   bombs   exploded   Wednesday   Beginning   next   semester,   scheduled   eliminating  the  extra  time  zone,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. in  a  government-­held  district  of  Syriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   courses   will   be   switched   from   the   current    The  re-­openings  of  academic  buildings   battleground   city   of   Homs,   killing   at   system  of  10  minutes  apart  to  a  15  minute   throughout   the   past   few   years   has   allotted   least   25   people   and   wounding   more   period  between  classes,  with  the  exception   for  more  classrooms  to  be  available  at  once,   than  100,  state  media  said. of  8  a.m.  classes. now   making   the   seemingly   traditional   10   This   change,   according   to   Vice   Presi-­ WAS   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;CUBAN   TWITTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   PRO-­ dent  of  Enrollment  Management  David  Ea-­ minute  policy  a  notion  of  the  past.   )RU VWXGHQWV OLNH XQGHFODUHG ÂżUVW\HDU GRAM  POLITICAL  OR  NOT? ton,   is   an   implementation   of   the   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Victoria  Calandriello,  this  new  change  is  a   The   Obama   administration   is   looking   previous   policy   for   class   scheduling   from   relief   since   it   will   allow   for   less   of   a   rush   into   whether   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cuban   Twitterâ&#x20AC;?   pro-­ six  years  ago  which  was  changed  when  the   when   walking   to   academic   buildings   that   gram  secretly  backed  by  the  U.S.  gov-­ demand  for  classrooms  increased. are  further  away. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   had   traditionally   been   15   min-­ ernment  contained  messages  that  were   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   feel   like   it   depends   on   the   student,   political   in   nature,   despite   assertions   utes   between   classes   until   2008,   [but]   the   but  for  me  it  will  give  me  a  little  more  lee-­ from   the   administration   that   the   effort   course  schedule  was  changed  because  of  an   way.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  in  an  intro  to  painting  class  in  [the]   ZDVLQWHQGHGRQO\WRLQFUHDVHWKHĂ&#x20AC;RZ ongoing  series  of  renovations  of  classroom   Smiley  Arts  Building  now  where  I  have  to   of  information  in  a  country  that  heavily   buildings  [such  as]  van  den  Berg,  Old  Main,   FOHDQXSÂżYHPLQXWHVHDUO\MXVWWRPDNHLWWR and   Wooster   [which]   created   a   classroom   restricts  Internet  access. my  other  class  in  Humanities  on  time,  where   shortage  that  needed  to  be  addressed,â&#x20AC;?  Ea-­ I   could   be   working   a   little   more   diligently   JUDGE   SLAPS   STATE   DEPART-­ ton  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Course  times  were  subsequently   instead  of  trying  to  give  myself  enough  time   PRGLÂżHG DQG WKH WLPH EHWZHHQ FODVVHV MENT  OVER  BLACKWATER to  get  there,â&#x20AC;?  Calandriello  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  I  had  a   shortened   in   order   to   create   an   extra   time   A  federal  judge  is  calling  for  an  inves-­ zone   to   absorb   the   impact   of   classroom   class   that   was   farther,   like   in   Old   Main   or   College  Hall,  I  would  probably  never  make   tigation   of   the   State   Department   over   closings.â&#x20AC;? it,  so  I  think  the  15  minute  change  will  be   years   of   delays   in   prosecuting   Black-­ Eaton  said  when  the  change  happened   water  security  guards  in  the  shootings   in   2008,   many   students   and   faculty   mem-­ better  for  the  future.â&#x20AC;? $OWKRXJK WKH H[WUD ÂżYH PLQXWHV EH-­ of  dozens  of  Iraqi  citizens  in  2007. bers   were   displeased   and   viewed   it   as   an   tween  classes  will  allow  for  students  to  pre-­ inconvenience,   although   it   was   never   in-­ pare  for  their  next  class,  second-­year  visual   Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

arts   and   art   history   major   Erica   Melville   said  this  change  will  probably  be  a  cause  of   concern  among  people  taking  back-­to-­back   evening  classes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  never  really  had  a  problem  getting   from   class   to   class   in   10   minutes,   but   the   change  is  great  if  you  have  classes  that  are   really  far  apart  or  if  your  professor  always   teaches  until  literally  the  last  minute,â&#x20AC;?  Mel-­ ville  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last  semester  I  had  four  classes   on   Tuesdays   and   Fridays,   so   I   went   from   8:00  a.m.  to  5:45  p.m.  with  one  90  minute   break.  If  I  set  up  my  schedule  the  same  way   next  semester,  the  15  minute  [breaks]  would   mean  that  I  would  go  from  8:00  a.m.  to  6:20   p.m.  instead.  Throughout  the  whole  day  that   WLPH ZLOO DGG XS 7KH H[WUD ÂżYH PLQXWHV doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mean  that  much  between  one  class,   but  [with  back-­to-­back  classes]  it  would  end   XSPDNLQJ\RXUGD\VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ORQJHU´ Eaton  said  this  new  change  will  hope-­ fully  allow  people  more  time  to  comfortably   complete   a   class   and   be   able   to   get   to   the   next   one   if   they   are   back-­to-­back,   even   if   it   is   on   the   other   side   of   campus.   He   also   VDLGWKHH[WUDÂżYHPLQXWHVZLOOJLYHVWXGHQWV more  of  an  opportunity  to  speak  with  their   professors  after  class  if  they  need  to  do  so.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  only  negative  consequence  would   be  if  classroom  availability  became  a  prob-­ lem  because  of  the  loss  of  a  time  zone,  [but]   so  far  the  assessment  is  that  it  will  not,â&#x20AC;?  Ea-­ ton  said.  


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Funds  To  Be  Used  For  New  Positions By  Andrew  Lief Managing  Editor|  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

According  to  SUNY  New  Paltz  Pres-­ ident  Donald  Christianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  March  Faculty   Report,  Christian  has  decided  to  use  the   allocated  funds  from  strategic  initiatives   IRUVHYHUDOQHZSRVLWLRQV The   positions   include:   an   elevated   JLIWVRIÂżFHULQWKH'HYHORSPHQW2IÂżFH DQ$OXPQL 5HODWLRQV 2IÂżFHU D SRVLWLRQ LQ WKH 2IÂżFH RI &RPPXQLFDWLRQ DQG Marketing  and  two  positions  in  the  3-­D   Printing  and  Digital  Design  and  Fabrica-­ WLRQ,QLWLDWLYH Vice  President  for  Finance  and  Ad-­ ministration   Michele   Halstead   said   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  main  budget  is  made  up  of  two   parts:   tuition,   the   largest   part,   and   state   WD[GROODUVXSSRUW This   year,   she   said   the   budget   was   made  up  of  $48  million  of  tuition  reve-­ QXHDQGPLOOLRQRIVWDWHWD[VXSSRUW For   this   upcoming   academic   year,   Halstead   said   she   believes   the   revenue   projection,   which   is   based   on   enroll-­ ment,   will   be   out   near   the   end   of  April   and  will  go  from  $48  million  to  $50  mil-­ lion  because  of  the  increase  in  tuition,  so   the   overall   budget   should   be   about   $66   PLOOLRQ Halstead   said   Christian   had   money   in  an  unallocated  account  that  was  a  part   of  his  budget,  so  he  authorized  more  in-­ vestments   in   development   and   in   com-­ munication   and   marketing   to   further   HQJDJHDOXPQLLQDPRUHHIIHFWLYHZD\ She  said  that  these  investments  are  â&#x20AC;&#x153;an-­ ticipatedâ&#x20AC;?  to  use  most  of  the  unallocated   DFFRXQW â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nice   that   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   putting   those   investments   out   there   because   we   have   a   lot   of   talented   alumni   and   we   have   no   idea   what   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   because   we   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   engaged   them   yet,â&#x20AC;?   Halstead   VDLG Director  of  Alumni  Relations  Bren-­ da  Dow  said  the  new  Alumni  Relations   2IÂżFHU ZLOO EH UHVSRQVLEOH IRU ZRUN-­ ing   with   alumni   and   student   volunteers   WR SODQ HYHQWV  6KH DOVR VDLG HQJDJLQJ alumni  is  one  of  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;eight  essential  ini-­ WLDWLYHV´RIWKHFROOHJHÂśVVWUDWHJLFSODQ 'RZVDLGRYHUWKHÂżYH\HDUVRIWKH plan,   the   college   is   looking   for   oppor-­ tunities   to   revitalize   connections   with   alumni   in   ways   that   are   meaningful   to   DOXPQLDQGEHQHÂżFLDOWRWKHFROOHJHDQG LWVVWXGHQWV2QHRIWKRVHSULRULWLHVZLOO

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

SURVIVOR   SAW   HOMES   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;EX-­ PLODINGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   FROM   MUDSLIDE   FORCE Amanda  Skorjanc  was  watching  videos   with  her  infant  son  when  the  lights  in   KHU KRPH VWDUWHG WR Ă&#x20AC;LFNHU DQG VKDNH She   looked   outside   and   saw   a   terrify-­ ing  sight:  a  massive  mudslide  crashing   down   the   hillside   and   nearby   houses   ÂłH[SORGLQJ´IURPLWVIRUFH TEEN  STABS  22  AT  PITTSBURGH-­ AREA  HIGH  SCHOOL Flailing  away  with  two  kitchen  knives,   a  16-­year-­old  boy  with  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;blank   expressionâ&#x20AC;?  stabbed  and  slashed   21  students  and  a  security  guard  in   the  crowded  halls  of  his  suburban   3LWWVEXUJKKLJKVFKRRO 1  CHILD  DEAD,  14  HURT  IN  FLOR-­ IDA  DAY  CARE  CRASH

A  car  smashed  into  an  Orlando-­area   day  care  Wednesday,  killing  a  girl  and   injuring  14  others,  at  least  a  dozen  of   them  children,  and  authorities  were   searching  for  the  driver  of  an  SUV   ZKRWKH\VD\VWDUWHGWKHFUDVKRI¿FLDOV VDLG 681<1HZ3DOW]3UHVLGHQW'RQDOG&KULVWDLQRXWOLQHGIXQGLQJLQKLV0DUFK)DFXOW\5HSRUW

be  to  increase  the  number  of  alumni  who   sponsor  internships  for  students  through   DFROODERUDWLYHHIIRUWEHWZHHQWKH2IÂżFH of   Development   and   Alumni   Relations   DQGWKH&DUHHU5HVRXUFH&HQWHU The  main  responsibilities  of  the  new   DOXPQL UHODWLRQV RIÂżFH ZLOO EH WR EULQJ more   alumni   support   to   the   campus,   which  will  lead  to  increased  student  in-­ ternships,  additional  speakers  for  panels   and  presentations  within  departments  or   DFURVVSURJUDPVDQGDGGLWLRQDOÂżQDQFLDO support   for   scholarships   and   programs,   'RZVDLG Halstead  said  the  money  that  was  put   into   communications   marketing,   called   Other   Than   Personal   Services   (OTPS),   ZDVXVHGIRULQFUHDVHGDGYHUWLVLQJ1HZ Paltz  billboards  were  placed  on  I-­87  and   banners   were   put   in   the   Poughkeepsie   *DOOHULDPDOO Halstead  said  the  school  is  trying  to   receive   external   funding   outside   of   the   normal  budget  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;hopefully  build  a  new   building   outside   of   the   Resnick   Engi-­

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

neering  Building  and  to  further  invest  in   'SULQWLQJ´ She   said   Christian   has   also   autho-­ rized   money   to   the   departments   of   Sci-­ ence   and   Engineering   and   Fine   and   Performing  Arts   to   teach   students   more   about   3-­D   printing   and   to   create   more   VSDFHIRUWKH0DNHUERWDUUD\ Through   the   Hudson   Valley   Ad-­ vanced   Center   Manufacturing   on-­cam-­ pus,   the   school   is   hoping   to   form   part-­ nerships  with  Hudson  Valley  businesses   ZKRGRQRWKDYHDSULQWHU+DOVWHDGVDLG Overall,  Halstead  said  the  school  is   investing  in  people  and  the  student  expe-­ ULHQFHWRLPSURYHWKHFDPSXVDVDZKROH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   worked   here   for   a   very   long   time  and  was  in  the  position  to  watch  ev-­ ery  penny  come  in  and  now  every  penny   JRRXWRIWKHFDPSXV´+DOVWHDGVDLGÂł, have  to  say  my  colleagues  are  very  good   VWHZDUGV RI WKHLU PRQH\ 7KH\ ORRN WR get  the  most  bang  for  their  buck  and  pour   the   most   money   into   areas   that   are   im-­ SRUWDQW´

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

SAILORS   RECALL   ROUGH   SEAS   DURING  RESCUE  OF  FAMILY

Navy  sailors  say  conditions  during  the   rescue  of  a  family  with  a  one-­year-­old,   critically  ill  girl  were  so  bad  that  even   the  para-­jumpers  who  dropped  into  the   sea  to  help  grew  seasick  as  5-­  to  8-­foot   ZDYHVFUDVKHGLQWRWKHERDW CALIFORNIA   MAN   CONFESSES   TO  40  KILLINGS A  suspected  contract  killer  charged  in   Central  California  with  murdering  nine   people  confessed  to  investigators  that   he  carried  out  up  to  40  slayings  in  a   career  spanning  decades,  a  prosecutor   VDLG:HGQHVGD\ GOP   CHAIR   PUSHES   MCALLISTER  RESIGNATION Captured  on  tape  kissing  another   manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  wife,  a  married  Republican   congressman  was  urged  Wednesday   by  the  leader  of  the  Louisiana  GOP   to  resign  from  the  seat  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  held   VLQFH1RYHPEHU Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


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Senate  Hosts  State  Of  The  Campus

 6

y orth w s New ewman N

Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

By  Jennifer  Newman Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

6HQDWHDQG6&&KRVWHG³6WDWHRIWKH&DPSXV´

By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

In  a  break  from  the  weekly  Student   Association   (SA)   senate   meetings,   SA   RI¿FLDOVKRVWHGD³6WDWHRIWKH&DPSXV´ program  on  Wednesday,  April  9  at  7:30   p.m.  in  Lecture  Center  104.   The   event   was   sponsored   by   SA   and   the   Student   Concerns   Committee   (SCC),  headed  by  Senate  Chair  Carissa   Moore,   to   provide   an   open   forum   for   members   of   the   SUNY   New   Paltz   stu-­ dent  body  to  become  more  familiar  with   their   elected   senators   and   SA   E-­board   members. At   the   beginning   of   the   event,   Moore  said  the  SCC  and  SA  wanted  to   host   a   public   event   for   students   to   be-­ come   more   familiar   with   how   SA   and   senate  operate. ³7KLV LV DERXW ZKR ZH DUH ZKDW we   do,   and   we   ask   that   you   address   your  concerns.  This  is  a  program  for  us   to   hear   from   you   and   understand   what   \RXUFRQFHUQVDUH´0RRUHVDLG Though   not   technically   a   senate   meeting,   the   program   operated   in   a   similar   way   to   how   the   weekly   senate   meetings   run.   SA   E-­Board   members   began  the  meeting  by  introducing  them-­ selves,  explaining  what  their  individual   jobs   entail   and   discussing   the   areas   of   legislation  and  reform  they  are  currently   working  on.   Executive   Vice   President   Zachary   Rousseas   said   SUNY   New   Paltz   will  

PHOTO  BY  MAXWELL  REIDE

EH WKH ÂżUVW 681< VFKRRO WR DOORFDWH D VSHFLÂżF DPRXQW RI PRQH\ IRU JHQGHU DIÂżUPLQJSURFHGXUHV Âł(YHU\ IHZ \HDUV WKH VFKRRO UH assesses   the   healthcare   policy,   and   it   coincided   with   SA   and   Queer   Student   8QLRQÂśV DGYRFDF\´ 5RXVVHDV VDLG Âł7KLVLVDKXJHYLFWRU\IRUXV´ Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs   and  Governance  Jordan  Taylor  said  dis-­ cussions  concerning  the  Student  Activ-­ LW\)HHDUHRQJRLQJDQGÂżQDOGHWDLOVDUH still  being  ironed  out. Taylor   reminded   students   that   the   ÂżQDO GHFLVLRQ RQ WKH VWDWH RI WKH DFWLY ity  fee,  whether  it  increases,  remains  the   same,  or  does  not  pass,  is  theirs. Âł:HGRQÂśWLQFUHDVHWKHIHHVWXGHQWV LQFUHDVHWKHIHH´7D\ORUVDLGÂł:HKDYH been  trying  to  be  transparent  with  this,   WKH QXPEHUV DUH FRQVWDQWO\ Ă&#x20AC;XFWXDW ing.   The   increase   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   our   decision   to   PDNH´ After   introduction   by   SA   E-­board   and   senators   were   made,   outside   bod-­ ies   that   work   closely   with   SA,   includ-­ ing  Residence  Hall  Student  Association   (RHSA),  New  York  Public  Interest  Re-­ search  Group  (NYPIRG)  and  The  New   Paltz  Oracle  each  spoke  about  the  func-­ tions  of  their  respective  groups.   Discussion   then   turned   to   student   FRQFHUQV6$DQG6&&RSHQHGWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRU for  attending  students  not  involved  with   any  of  the  organizations  represented  at   the  event  to  ask  questions. Campus   Meal   Plans   and   Campus  

Auxiliary  Services  (CAS)  Board  activi-­ ties   were   brought   up,   with   one   student   voicing  concern  over  the  price  of  meal   plans  and  price  of  meals  on  campus. Senator   Osato   Okundaye,   who   serves  on  the  CAS  Board,  said  the  board   has  agreed  to  allow  a  non-­voting  student   food  service  employee  onto  the  board.   The  program  also  heard  concerns  of   sexual  assault  crimes  on  campus  and  is-­ sues  regarding  racial  issues  on  campus.   Taylor   said   he   and   other   senators   are   working  on  the  creation  of  a  new  com-­ mittee   that   would   focus   on   improving   racial  tensions  at  SUNY  New  Paltz. SA   President   Manuel   Tejada   said   the   progress   made   in   the   past   couple   years   has   been   encouraging,   despite   trouble  getting  off  the  ground. ³7KHUHZHUHVHWEDFNVLQWKHEHJLQ ning   and   resistance   from   administra-­ tion,  but  in  the  past  two  years  we  have   VHHQPXFKPRUHSURJUHVV´7HMDGDVDLG ³%XWZKHQZHFRPHWRJHWKHUWRZRUN on  these  issues  and  work  through  differ-­ HQWFKDQQHOV\RXZLOOVHHSURJUHVV´ Senator   and   SCC   member   James   Auer  said  he,  Moore  and  Taylor  saw  the   event  as  a  chance  for  SA  and  senators  to   get   a   better   pulse   on   student   concerns.   He  also  said  there  are  plans  for  the  pro-­ gram  to  continue  in  the  future. ³:H FROOHFWLYHO\ UHDOL]HG WKDW LW ZRXOG EH EHQH¿FLDO WR KDYH VRPHWKLQJ OLNH WKLV DQQXDOO\´$XHU VDLG ³(VVHQ tially  this  is  our  State  of  the  Union  Ad-­ GUHVV´

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

By  now  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  all  heard  about  the  16-­year-­ old  boy  who  allegedly  stabbed  21  students  and   an  adult  in  a  Pennsylvania  high  school. The  accused  teen,  Alex  Hribal,  went  to  the   Murrysville   school   early   Wednesday   morning   with  two  kitchen  knives.  Almost  all  of  the  vic-­ tims  who  were  stabbed  later  said  they  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  see   anyone  coming  at  them,  according  to  CNN.   As  far  as  the  media  coverage  of  this  stab-­ bing  is  concerned,  there  were  the  usual  suspects;Íž   changes  in  the  number  of  students  stabbed,  spec-­ ulation  quotes  from  teens  who  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  see  much   and  perpetuation  of  rumors  about  the  suspect.   That  being  said,  if  you  want  to  learn  more   about  the  details  of  the  story,  Google  it.  I  want   to  take  some  time  to  talk  about  how  all  of  this   media   attention   is   affecting   the   kids   involved,   and  really  any  student  who  goes  to  Franklin  Re-­ gional  Senior  High  School.   And  by  that,  I  mean  the  mental  health  im-­ pacts  they  will  be  facing  with  the  possible  de-­ velopment   of   Post-­Traumatic   Stress   Disorder   (PTSD).  The  estimated  risk  for  victims  of  shoot-­ ings  or  stabbings  developing  PTSD  is  15.4  per-­ cent,  according  to  the  PTSD  Alliance  website.   The  school  is  offering  counseling  services   for   the   entire   school   community,   but   the   high   school  is  only  closing  for  a  few  days.  The  mid-­ dle  and  elementary  schools  are  not  closing  at  all. I   think   a   few   days   is   not   enough   to   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;get   overâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  a  fellow  classmate,  described  as  shy  and   quiet,   stabbing   people.   This   is   perpetuated   by   the  fact  that  the  media  will  be  stalking  the  high   school  for  more  quotes  for  at  least  a  week.  At   least.   But  hopefully  there  will  be  something  good   that  will  come  out  of  this  attention. Think  for  a  second  about  the  tragic  New-­ town  shooting,  the  immense  journalistic  cover-­ DJH DQG KRZ LW LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHG OHJLVODWLRQ LQ &RQ QHFWLFXW SXWWLQJ OLPLWDWLRQV RQ ÂżUHDUPV DQG magazines.   But   in   this   Murrysville   stabbing   case,  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  exactly  put  limitations  on  kitch-­ en  knives.   This   media   attention   could   be   a   much   needed  wake-­up  call  for  increased  security  with-­ in  the  public  school  system,  or  more  awareness   of  mental  health  within  youth.  


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IDMH  Conference  To  Focus  On  Communication By  John  Tappen  News  Editor    |  John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   eleventh   annual   Institute   for   Disaster   Mental   Health   (IDMH)   con-­ ference   will   meet   Friday,   April   25   in   the  Lecture  Center  to  discuss  the  chal-­ lenges   of   disseminating   messages   dur-­ ing   complex   and   rapidly   changing   di-­ sasters.   IDMH   at   SUNY   New   Paltz   was   founded  to  “help  prepare  students,  com-­ munity  members,  paraprofessionals  and   SURIHVVLRQDOV LQ WKH KHOSLQJ ¿HOGV WR prevent,  prepare  for  and  care  for  others   following  a  disaster  via  evidence-­based   disaster   mental   health   interventions,”   according  to  their  website. The  title  of  this  year’s  conference:   “Why   Don’t   People   Listen?   —   The   Whole   Community   and   Communicat-­ ing   in   a   Crisis,”   will   focus   on   the   im-­ portance   of   communication   during   a   disaster.   Dr.   Karla   Vermeulen,   a   sociology  

professor   at   SUNY   New   Paltz   as   well   as  the  acting  director  for  the  IDMH  at   SUNY  New  Paltz,  said  the  target  audi-­ ence  for  the  conference  is  mental  health   H[SHUWVDVZHOODV¿UVWUHVSRQGHUV Vermeulen   said   experiencing   a   di-­ saster   is   traumatic   —   it   leaves   those   who  have  gone  through  it  with  numer-­ ous   questions,   such   as:  Are   my   things   safe?  When  can  I  go  home?   Vermeulen   said   these   common   questions   and   concerns   in   light   of   a   disaster   underscore   the   importance   of   communication   in   these   situations.   Vermeulen   made   reference   to   recent   events,  like  the  missing  airliner  in  Ma-­ laysia,  the  mudslide  in  Washington  and   Hurricane  Sandy,  that  she  said  reinforce   the  conference’s  importance. Eric   Klineberg,   a   sociology   pro-­ fessor  at  New  York  University  and  au-­ thor  of  the  book  “Heat  Wave:  A  Social   Autopsy   of   Disaster   in   Chicago,”   will   speak  on  the  topic  of  social  infrastruc-­

ture  and  disaster  that  takes  place  in  the   form   of   “super-­storms”   as   a   result   of   climate  change.   The   conference   will   include   other   presentations   and   workshops   that   will   DGGUHVV ³VSHFL¿F KD]DUGV DQG SRSXOD tions,  with  representatives  familiar  with   the   challenges   of   message   dissemina-­ tion,”  according  to  their  website. Wendy   Harman,   director   of   social   strategy   for   the   American   Red   Cross,   will   speak   on   the   strengths   as   well   as   the  limitations  of  social  media  and  how   helpful  new  technology  can  be  in  disas-­ terous  situations.     Vermeulen   said   strategies   on   how   to   disperse   warnings   prior   to   expected   disasters  and  why  people  do  not  always   adhere  to  warnings  they  receive  will  be   explored  during  the  conference. “We   must   understand   the   reasons   why  people  don’t  always  listen  to  warn-­ ings  —  why  they  don’t  evacuate,”  Ver-­ meulen  said.    

Vermeulen   said   a   level   of   “victim   blaming”   often   occurs   toward   those   who  choose  not  to  evacuate  when  con-­ fronted  with  a  natural  disaster. Instead   of   blaming   those   who   do   not  evacuate,  Vermeuelen  said  her  hope   is  to  explore  some  of  the  practical  rea-­ sons  why  some  do  not  leave  —  “What   are  the  barriers  to  that  action?”  —  and   what   people   can   do   to   better   convince   people  to  leave.   Those   who   have   gone   through   a   trauma   from   experiencing   a   disaster   will  likely  experience  depression,  grief,   an  inability  to  focus  and  an  inability  to   PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN maintain  employment  and  certain  rela-­ tionships,  Vermeulen  said.   Vermeulen   said   she   hopes   to   dis-­ pel  the  myth  that  a  person  will  “bounce   back”   from   an   incident   within   a   few   weeks   or   months.   She   said   those   ex-­ pectations  are  not  realistic  and  there  is   often   a   stigma   that   those   effected   feel   when  they  do  not  recover  immediately.

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HUGUENOT Story on page 2B

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Delectable Dishes For American Appetites NEW RESTAURANT SERVES UP FLAVORFUL LOCAL FARE

By  Cat  Tacopina   Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Ctacopina@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

An  Ohio-­native  turned  New  Yorker,   Chef  Nathan  Snow  has  been  immersed   in   Italian   cooking   for   more   than   a   de-­ cade.  And  while  New  Paltz  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Naples,   he  believes  the  Italian  approach  to  food   and  his  mission  for  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  newest   eatery  are  symbiotic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Italian   philosophy   is   the   re-­ gional   plate   to   your   area.   In   that   vein   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   been   my   philosophy   to   use   the  food  you  can  get  your  hands  on  re-­ gionally,â&#x20AC;?  Snow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  goal  is  to  get   food   like   vegetables   and   proteins   and   even  grains;Íž  our  goal  is  to  get  it  from  as   close  to  the  restaurant  as  we  can.â&#x20AC;? Having   opened   in   February   of   this   past   winter,   The   Huguenot   is   Main   Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   newest   restaurant   and   project   from  A  Tavola  founders  Snow  and  Bon-­ nie  Snow.  The  Huguenot  features  farm-­ to-­table   fare   sourced   from   Karl   Fam-­ ily  Farms  in  Modena,  N.Y.  Just  several   doors  down  from  A  Tavola,  the  restau-­ rant   features   American   cuisine   and   a   menu  that  evolves  based  on  the  seasons   and  availability  of  resources.     Snow,  who  came  to  New  York  after   ÂżQGLQJKLVORYHIRUIRRGGXULQJKLVXQ-­ dergraduate  studies  at  Ohio  University,   VDLG KH ZDV ÂżUVW DSSURDFKHG E\ .DUO Farms   about   opening   The   Huguenot.   After  Il  Gallo  Giallo  closed  in  2013,  he   and  his  wife  got  the  space  at  36  Main  St.   and  opened  on  Feb.  4.   Before   moving   to   the   Hudson  Val-­ ley  several  years  ago,  Snow  said  he  al-­ ZD\V ZDQWHG WR ÂżQG PRUH UHVWDXUDQWV that   supported   and   utilized   food   from   local  farms.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ten  years  ago  I  was  surprised  that   it   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   more   farm-­to-­table   stuff,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  lot  of  the  farms  go  to  the  city   to  see  their  wares,  but  not  in  restaurants   up  here.  I  think  New  Paltz  is,  maybe  not  

Chef  Nathan  Snow  opened  the  restauraunt  The  Huguenot  on  Feb.  4,  2014.

WKHÂżUVWFRPPXQLW\WRVWDUWLQYHVWLQJLQ IDUPWRWDEOH EXW LWÂśV GHÂżQLWHO\ LQ WKDW beginning  trend  of  support.â&#x20AC;? Snow   said   the   menu   evolves   and   rotates   throughout   the   year   based   on   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  seasonal,  with  some  supplements   because   of   the   winter   months.   Current   items   on   the   menu   include   a   plate   fea-­ turing  roasted  bone  marrow  with  garlic   FRQÂżW SHDU PRVWDUGD FRUQLFKRQV DQG house   brioce   points,   as   well   as   bacon-­ wrapped   pork   loin   with   curried   local   apples,  sweet  potato  puree  and  pan  jus.   Because  of  the  restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  focus  on   farm-­to-­table   American   cuisine,   Snow  

said  he  is  able  to  push  the  limits  of  his   culinary   creativity,   which   he   has   en-­ joyed  since  the  restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  opening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   great   thing   about   American   food  is  that  the  sky  really  is  the  limit  for   what  you  can  and  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do,â&#x20AC;?  Snow  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   room   for   creativity   in   food,   but   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   something   special   about  American  food  where  you  can  re-­ ally  create  whatever  you  feel  like  creat-­ ing.  There  are  many  more  rules  you  can   break.â&#x20AC;? Offering  specials  for  Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Day   and  college  graduation,  the  restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   philosophy   and   pricing   makes   for   an  

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

PHOTO  BY  MAXWELL  REIDE

attractive   option   for   SUNY   New   Paltz   students   looking   for   something   new   to   try. Along  with  this,  he  believes  his  own   family  and  culinary  values  are  a  perfect   ÂżWZLWKWKH+XGVRQ9DOOH\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything   is   fresh,   there   are   no   preserves   or   sprays   and   there   are   liter-­ ally  farmers  who  go  and  pick  things  and   bring   them   here,â&#x20AC;?   Snow   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   people   here   are   awesome   and   they   all   believe   in   supporting   local   farms   and   communities.   A   lot   of   the   people   who   come  here  have  become  our  friends,  and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  great  experience.â&#x20AC;?


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When The Stars Align To A Fault ODE AN AUTHOR: THE GRASS IS GREENER ON THE YOUNGER SIDE By  Madeline  Anthony &RS\(GLWRU|  N02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu , UHDG P\ ¿UVW -RKQ *UHHQ ERRN ZKHQ , ZDVDERXW,WZDV³/RRNLQJIRU$ODVND´DQG LW ZDV SHUIHFW ,W HQFRPSDVVHG HYHU\WKLQJ DQ DGROHVFHQW JLUO ZRXOG ZDQW WR UHDG DERXW ² UHODWLRQVKLSVIULHQGVKLSVORYHLIWKHUHUHDOO\ ZDVVXFKDWKLQJWKHQHYHUHQGLQJODE\ULQWKRI OLIHDQGRIFRXUVH7KH*UHDW3HUKDSV ,PPHGLDWHO\ DIWHU , VWDUWHG UHDGLQJ LW , ZDVLPPHUVHGLQWKHZRUOGRI0LOHV,IHOWOLNH ,ZDVULGLQJDORQJVLGHKLPDVKHGRYHLQWRD OLIH,ORQJHGWRH[SHULHQFH/LNHDQ\WHHQDJH JLUOJURZLQJXSLQDWLQ\WRZQ,ZDVDOZD\V WKLQNLQJ RI ZKDW P\ IXWXUH ZRXOG KROG FRO-­ OHJH UHODWLRQVKLSV WKH SHRSOH , ZRXOG PHHW WKDW ZRXOG VRPHKRZ FKDQJH P\ OLIH LQ XQ-­ LPDJLQDEOH ZD\V , NQRZ QRZ WKDW , GLGQ¶W NQRZDQ\WKLQJ²DQGWKHIDQWDV\ZRUOGWKDW ³/RRNLQJ IRU $ODVND´ SXOOHG PH LQWR PDGH PHEHOLHYHWKDWP\IXWXUHZRXOGEH¿OOHGZLWK DGYHQWXUH TXLUN\ \HW OR\DO IULHQGV DQG ER\V ZKRVLOHQWO\ZRUVKLSSHGPH1HHGOHVVWRVD\,

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Genetic Splice And Dice GMO CRITIC SPEAKS OUT ON INDUSTRY ISSUES AND DANGERS

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* 0 p o l i -­ cy   cre-­ a t i o n .     S m i t h   said   typi-­ FDO*02GLHWV â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   by   ex-­ tension,   include   the   typical   American   diet   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   are   associated   with   a   number  of  physical  and  mental   illnesses,   such   as   gastro-­intestinal   prob-­ lems   and  ADD,   that   have   subsided   when   individuals   VZLWFKWRQRQ*02GLHWVDFODLPWKDWPDQ\DXGLHQFH members   corroborated   when   asked   to   share   medical   V\PSWRPVWKH\H[SHULHQFHGSULRUWRKDYLQJ*02IUHH pantries.   Smith   said   animals,   both   domestic   and   live-­ stock,  experience  similar  change  upon  switching.   According  to  Smith,  scientists  have  come  up  with   27 2 &

If  you  believe  that  you  are  what  you  eat,  you  prob-­ ably  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  the  full  picture.   On  Monday,  April  7,  author  and  Director  of  the  In-­ stitute  for  Responsible  Technology  Jeffrey  Smith  spoke   to  a  crowded  and  diverse  Lecture  Center  audience  on   the  ecological  and  societal  health  dangers  of  genetical-­ O\PRGLÂżHGRUJDQLVPV *02V LQIRRGDQGIRRGSUR duction.   6PLWK D OHDGLQJ FULWLF RI *02 SUDFWLFHV LQ WKH ELRWHFKQRORJ\LQGXVWU\SUHVHQWHGÂżQGLQJVRIPXOWLSOH *02VWXGLHVGHWDLOLQJWKHLUGHWULPHQWDOHIIHFWVRQKX man,   animal   and   plant   physiology   and   discussed   the   various  ways  to  avoid  them  on  a  personal  level  and  in-­ VSLUH SROLF\ FKDQJH VXUURXQGLQJ *02V RQ D QDWLRQDO level.         Smith  began  by  providing  background  context  on   WKHLQWURGXFWLRQRI*02VLQIRRGSURGXFWLRQDQGZK\ they  dominate  the  food  market  today  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  albeit  purpose-­ fully   obscured   from   sight.  According   to   Smith,   chief-­ DWIDXOWIRUWKHSUHYDOHQFHRIJHQWLFDOO\PRGLÂżHG *0  food  is  Monsanto  chemical  and  agricultural  biotechnol-­ ogy  company.   0RQVDQWR&RPSDQ\VFLHQWLVWVZHUHWKHÂżUVWWRFRQ GXFW ÂżHOG WHVWV RI *0 FURSV LQ  ZKLFK WKURXJK the   use   and   enforcement   of   bio-­patents   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   exclusive   commercial-­rights  to  a  man-­made  genetic  sequence,  in   this  case  various  crop  seeds  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  helped  create  a  uniform   system  of  agricultural  of  which  Monsanto  became  the   largest  seed-­producing  company  by  early  2000.   The   system,   in   its   summary   of   plant   breedersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   rights,   prohibited   the   customary   practices   of   farmers   to   save,   reuse,   share   and   develop   plant   varieties   with   patent-­bound  seeds.  As  a  result,  organic  seed  farming   ZDV SKDVHG RXW DV SUHVVXUH WR XVH *0 VHHGV EHFDPH industry  standard.         Smith  said  much  of  this  was  due  to  Michael  R.  Tay-­ ORU DQ DWWRUQH\ IRUPHUO\ RI WKH ODZ ÂżUP UHSUHVHQWLQJ 0RQVDQWRLQWKHVZKRZDVHPSOR\HGDV'HSXW\ Commissioner  for  Policy  at  the  Food  and  Drug  Admin-­ LVWUDWLRQ )'$  XQGHU WKH +: %XVK DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ ZKLOH*0IRRGSURGXFWLRQSROLF\ZDVEHLQJGUDIWHGLQ  $FFRUGLQJWR6PLWK7D\ORUÂśVLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHLQWKH)'$ UHVXOWHGLQDSROLF\WKDWGLGQRWUHTXLUHODEHOLQJRI*0 food  because  the  FDA,  under  Taylor,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;did  not  see  any   VLJQLÂżFDQWGLIIHUHQFHϫEHWZHHQ*0IRRGDQGQRQ*0 food.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   reason   why   this   hands-­off   policy   was   cre-­ DWHGZDVEHFDXVHRIDVLPSOHVHQWHQFHLQWKHSROLF\´ Smith   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the   agency   is   not   aware   of   any   information  showing  that  foods  created  from  these  new  

methods  differ  from  other  foods  in  any  meaningful  or   XQLIRUPZD\Âś7KDWZDVDOLH´ ,QDODZVXLWEURXJKWDJDLQVWWKH)'$VWDWLQJ WKDW QRQPDQGDWHG ODEHOLQJ RI *0 IRRG YLRODWHG WKH IHGHUDOVWDWXWHWKDWÂżUVWFUHDWHGWKHDJHQF\KDGWKH)'$ release  internal  memos  dating  back  to  the   time  of   the  policyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  writing,  Smith  said.   According   to   him,   the   memos   revealed   that   the   agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   scientists   GLG LQ IDFW EHOLHYH *02V KHOG dangers   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;could   lead   to  allergies,  toxins,  new   diseases,   nutritional   SUREOHPV´ DQG needed   to   be   tested   care-­ fully   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   in-­ formation,   the   exis-­ tence   of   w h i c h   was   of-­ ficially   denied   by  the   F D A   d u r-­ i n g   the  

3+

By  Anthony  DeRosa Features  Editor  |  N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

7KXUVGD\$SULO

WKUHHSRWHQWLDOWKHRULHVDVWRZK\FRQVXPSWLRQRI*0 food  may  be  the  cause  of  these  negative  health  effects.   First,  the  process  of  genetically  modifying  cells  in   DQRUJDQLVPWR\LHOGDVSHFLÂżFJHQHWUDLWFDQLQWXUQ create   unexpected   changes   in   the   DNA   composition   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  mutations  that,  since  they  are  unaccounted  for,  may   unknowingly  be  harmful.  Cloning  the  spliced  cells  for   mass  production  gives  way  for  further  mutation,  two  to   four  percent  difference  between  cells,  Smith  said,  cre-­ DWLQJÂłPDVVLYHFROODWHUDOGDPDJH´RQWKHJHQHWLFVFDOH Second,  the  use  of  Bacillus  thuringiensis %W WR[ in,  a  naturally  occurring  insecticide  in  corn  and  cotton   which   is   harvested   as   a   spray,   has   since   been   gene-­ VSOLFHGLQWRRWKHUFURSV$FFRUGLQJWR6PLWK%WWR[LQ is  regarded  by  the  Environmental  Protection  Agency   (3$ DVKDYLQJDKLVWRU\RIVDIHXVH\HWZKHQXVHG LQJHQHWLFPRGLÂżFDWLRQRIIRRGWKHUHH[LVWVHYLGHQFH RIKDUP6PLWKVDLG%WWR[LQKDVVKRZQWRVXUYLYHWKH digestion  process  and  once  in  the  blood  stream,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;poke   KROHV´LQUHGEORRGFHOOV â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  experts  of  the  EPA  advised  [their  superiors]   VD\LQJ WKHUH ZHUH SUREOHPV >ZLWK *0 %W WR[LQ@´ Smith  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  look  at  the  mouse  studies  and  the   human  studies,  it  looks  like  an  allergen,  tastes  like  an   DOOHUJHQ FRXOG EH DQ DOOHUJHQ ² ÂżQG RXW7KH (3$ LJQRUHGLWVRZQH[SHUWVDQGDSSURYHG>%WWR[LQXVHLQ *0IRRG@EHFDXVHWKHELRWHFKLQGXVWU\WROGWKHPWR´ Third,  large  quantities  of  herbicide  residue  washed   off   crops   and   absorbed   into   the   soil   permeating   new   VHHGV URRWV 6PLWK VDLG WKDW ZLWKLQ WKH ÂżUVW  \HDUV RI*0DJULFXOWXUHWKHUHZDVDPLOOLRQSRXQGLQ crease  in  the  use  of  herbicides.  Monsantoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  own  herbi-­ cide,  Roundup  Ready  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  chemically  known  as  glypho-­ VDWH ² FRQWULEXWHV WR PLQHUDO GHÂżFLHQFLHV LQ SODQWV which  provides  poor  nutrition  to  the  livestock  that  eat   them.     Âł:H HDW WKHVH ZHDN DQG VLFN SODQWV ZH HDW WKH weak  and  sick  animals  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  we  eat  this  food  that  contains   the  Roundup  binds  to  our  minerals  making  us  weak  and   VLFN´6PLWKVDLG Despite  all  this  Smith  ended  his  lecture  on  a  high   QRWH$FFRUGLQJWRKLPVDOHVIRUIRRGSURGXFWVLQ $PHULFDPDUNHGDVFRQWDLQLQJQR*02VVDZDVSLNH representing   public   perception   opposing   the   use   of   *02VDQGDQLQFUHDVHGNQRZOHGJHRIWKHLUHIIHFWV² HYHQWKRXJKODEHOLQJRI*0IRRGVLVQRW)'$UHTXLUHG Smith   said   the   European   Union   has   imposed   re-­ VWULFWLRQVRQ*02VIRUQHDUO\DGHFDGHQRZ*LYHQWKH  VDOHV GDWD KH H[SHFWV D ÂłWLSSLQJ SRLQW´ IRU WKH QRQ*02PRYHPHQWWKLV\HDURUWKHQH[W â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right  now  is  the  most  important  window  of  op-­ SRUWXQLW\ WR LQVSLUH FKDQJH´ 6PLWK VDLG Âł>7KLV LV about]  protecting  the  genetic  integrity  of  humanity  and   DOOOLYLQJEHLQJV´


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Torn Tough With The Training Team RUGBY BROS REUNITE TO GET BIG AT NEW GYM

Wickler,   30   are   the   co-­ owners   and   coaches   of   CrossFit   299   in  Highland,  N.Y.     During  their  time  as  the  co-­captains  of  the  Men’s   Rugby   team   at   New   Paltz,   there   was   no   coach,   so   they   decided   how   the   team   trained.   Through   some   trial  and  error  they  started  learning  how  to  do  Cross-­ Fit,   a   weightlifting,   gymnastics   and   endurance   type   of  working  out  performed  at  a  high-­intensity,  and  af-­ ter  a  couple  of  years  they  started  getting  into  actual   CrossFit. After  graduating  from  New  Paltz,  they  moved  to   Australia  to  play  rugby.  Upon  returning  back  to  the   United  States,  Judge  worked  as  an  oil  broker  and  Van   Wickler   went   back   to   school   and   received   his   mas-­ ter’s  degree  in  physical  education  from  Canisius  Col-­ lege.   Although  they  parted  ways,  both  were  still  active   participants  in  the  CrossFit  community.    Van  Wickler   was  a  coach  at  CrossFit  Buffalo  and  Judge  was  train-­ ing  at  CrossFit  Westchester.     Van  Wickler  said  he  and  Judge  made  good  part-­ ners  as  co-­captains  of  the  rugby  team  and  were  both   into   CrossFit,   so   they   decided   on   the   idea   to   open   their  own  place.   “We   both   took   pretty   radical   turnarounds,”   Van   Wickler  said.  “Joe  was  brokering  oil,  I  was  going  to   start  teaching  full-­time  somewhere  else.    We  both  re-­ located  and  changed  careers  to  do  this.”   Judge  said  he  loves  CrossFit  because  of  how  it’s   constantly  changing  and  how  it  translates  to  his  other   hobbies,  rugby  and  snowboarding.

didn’t   have   space   they   ing  for.  What   instead   was   ing   that   used   the   County   of   Mental   in   High-­ —   it   was   what   they   l o o k i n g  

the   type   of   were   look-­ they   found   the   build-­ to   be   O f f i c e   Health   l a n d   exactly   w e r e   for.    

ELL  REIDE

SUNY  New  Paltz  graduates  Joe  Judge  (2008)  and   Keith  Van  Wickler  (2007)  had  no  idea  that  the  train-­ ing  regimen  they  decided  to  use  at  New  Paltz  while   on   the   rugby   team   would   ultimately   help   determine   their  careers,  as  well  as  take  them  around  the  world   and  back.     Now,   Judge,   28,   and   Van  

Van  Wickler  said  he  enjoys  CrossFit  because  of   the  community  aspect  it  fosters.     “It   really   builds   a   nice   community   and   cama-­ raderie   that   is   similar   to   what   you   get   playing   team   sports,”   Van   Wickler   said.   “You   come   in   and   start   working  out  with  the  same  people  everyday.  You  start   to   get   to   know   each   other,   you   start   looking   forward   to   being  here.” Judge   said   they   initially  wanted  to   open  a  gym  in  New   Paltz   because   of   their   familiarity   to   the   area,   but   New   Paltz  

PHOTO  BY  M AXW

By  Andrew  Lief Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

They  received  the  keys  to  the  building  on  July  3,   2013  and  immediately  began  knocking  down  walls,   painting  the  insides  and  renovating  the  lighting.  Van   Wickler   said   this   process   took   six   weeks,   and   then   DQRWKHU IRXU WR ¿YH ZHHNV ZDV VSHQW EX\LQJ HTXLS ment,   which   has   remained   a   continuous   process   for   them   since   opening   on   Sept.  1,  2013.   However,   J u d g e  

said   the   construc-­ tion   of   their   gym   was   not   the   hard   part   prior   to  opening.     “The   tough   part   was   generating   interest,   creat-­ ing  a  buzz  and  getting  people  to  be  here,  so  when  we   opened  the  doors  we  could  start  attempting  to  make   money  and  attempting  to  pay  our  bills,  dent  the  over-­ head  and  start  that  whole  process,”  Judge  said.       To  create  that  “buzz,”  Van  Wickler  said  they  used   Facebook  to  advertise.  Also,  the  people  they  knew  in   Facebook the  area  and  in  the  CrossFit  community  allowed  word   WRVSUHDGTXLFNO\DERXWWKHLUJ\P Judge   said   they   offer   basic   CrossFit   classes,   Olympic   weight   lifting   classes,   mobility   classes,   open  gym  hours  and  specialty  courses. There   are   also   three   additional   coaches,   Greg   Saso,   Malinda   Treglina   and   Tim   Taylor,   who   teach   one  to  two  classes  per  week,  all  of  whom  have  had   prior   CrossFit   experience   before   joining   CrossFit   299,  Van  Wickler  said. “A  big  part  of  what  we  do  is  not  only  coaching  our   members,  but  also  coaching  our  coaches  to  improve   their  skill-­set,  so  they  can  provide  a  better  product  for   our  members  when  we  aren’t  here,”  Judge  said.     Going   forward,   Judge   said   they   want   CrossFit   299  to  keep  growing  at  its  current  rate,  with  50  mem-­ bers   after   seven   months   and   to   continue   providing   FXVWRPHUVZLWKDTXDOLW\H[SHULHQFH In  addition  to  working  at  CrossFit  299,  Judge  is   currently   captain   of   the   USA   Rugby   Div.   1   Club   in   White   Plains,   N.Y.   and   Van   Wickler   is   a   substitute   teacher  in  the  Highland  and  New  Paltz  Central  school   districts.  


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Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Simulating A Social Class By  Maddie  Anthony   Copy  Editor  |  N02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

According   to   the   United   States   Census  Bureau,  there  were  46.5  mil-­ lion   Americans   living   in   poverty   in   2012,   and   the   number   has   only   in-­ creased   since.   On   the   evening   of   Wednesday,  April  2,  New  York  Public   Interest   Research   Group   (NYPIRG),   New   York   State’s   largest   student-­di-­ rected   research   and   advocacy   orga-­ nization,  hosted    “Poverty:  It’s  Not  a   Game”  to  call  attention  the  issue. Samantha   Spoto,   a   fourth-­year   creative  writing  and  sociology  double   major,   and   a   member   of   NYPIRG’s   hunger   and   homeless   committee,   helped   to   coordinate   the   event   and   said   the   goal   of   the   program   was   to   educate   the   public   on   the   increasing   poverty  issue  in  the  United  States.   “Each  year,  more  than  three  mil-­ lion  people  experience  homelessness,   and  each  night,  over  38,000  homeless   individuals   sleep   in   the   New   York   City   shelter   system.  As   long   as   pov-­ erty  exists,  groups  like  NYPIRG  must   work  to  facilitate  discussion  on  the  is-­ sue,”  Spoto  said.  “Educating  the  gen-­ HUDOSXEOLFRQSRYHUW\LVWKH¿UVWVWHS LQWKH¿JKWWRUHGXFHWKHVWHDG\LQÀX[ of   individuals   thrust   into   homeless-­ ness.”   The   interactive   event   had   the   at-­ tendees   metaphorically   incorporated   into   the   system.   Attendees   received   criteria  distinguishing  them  by  class,   housing,   education,   diet,   access   to   healthcare  and  so  on.  The  breakdown   of   how   many   people   received   what   social  class  status  —  two  upper-­class,   several   middle   class,   lower-­middle   and  below  the  poverty  line  and  three   people  homelessness  —  was  meant  to   coincide  roughly  with  the  actual  per-­ centages  of  population  based  on  class.   Spoto   gave   the   group   differ-­ ent   prompts   and   the   attendees,   who   were   lined   up   along   the   room,   took   steps   either   forwards   or   backwards    

accordingly.   For  example,  Spoto  instructed  the   audience   to   “take   two   steps   forward   if  you  received  a  college  degree,  take   one  step  backwards  if  you  received  a   college   degree   but   need   to   pay   back   student   loans,   take   two   steps   back   if   you  received  a  high  school  degree.” The  main  goal  of  this  activity  was   to  show  how  certain  class-­based  fac-­ tors  channel  certain  people  into  pov-­ erty  while  other  factors  help  to  enable   people  to  lead  successful  lives.   In   the   end,   the   people   who   had   been  given  “upper-­class”  status  stood   at  the  front  of  the  room,  while  those   who   had   been   given   the   simulated   “homeless”   status   remained   at   the   back.   This   “segregated”   the   room   based  on  perceived  class.   A  discussion  period  followed  the   event   and   students   talked   about   the   aspects   of   the   activity   they   learned   from  and  how  it  made  them  feel  when   they   had   to   either   take   a   step   for-­ wards,  or  back. “As   some   students   expressed,   it   gave  them  a  reality  check,  that  maybe   we  should  pay  more  attention  to.  We   have  such  a  stigma  of  homeless  peo-­ ple  and  fail  to  realize  that  it  could  be   us  in  that  position.  It’s  so  much  easier   to  fall  back  in  social  classes,  then  it  is   to  get  up,”  third-­year  Yvette  Ramirez,   who   also   helped   to   coordinate   the   event,  said. “I  felt  the  event  accomplished  its   goal   of   educating   the   public   on   the   factors   that   contribute   to   poverty;;   it   dispelled   common   stereotypes   of   homelessness,”  Spoto  said. NYPIRG   strives   to   educate   the   general   public   on   hunger   and   home-­ lessness   as   well   as   offers   direct   as-­ sistance   to   those   in   need.   If   students   are   passionate   and   seeking   involve-­ ment   in   local   volunteer   projects   that   aid  those  in  need,  NYPIRG’s  hunger   and  homeless  committee  meets  every   Wednesday  at  2  p.m.  in  SUB  426. NYPIRG  members  discuss  the  struggles  poverty  presents.    

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

PHOTO  BY  LIZZIE  NIMETZ

STUDENT ADVOCACY GROUP HOSTS EVENT TO COMBAT STIGMAS OF POVERTY


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

I Am Woman, Hear Me Warrior

DANCE TEAM GETS DOWN WITH WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RIGHTS PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  SARAH  GOLDBERG

Dancers  strut  their  stuff  at  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  Am  A  Womanâ&#x20AC;?  performance.  

By  Hannah  Nesich Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Hnesich@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Warriors  Dance  Team  will  be  taking  their  name  literally   as  they  battle  sexism  and  oppression  through  movement,  music,   poetry  and  comedy  during  their  annual  performance  showcase   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  Am  A  Woman.â&#x20AC;?   In   addition   to   original  Warriors   dance   numbers,   the   night   will   feature   performances   by   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   all-­female   a   capella   group   The   Sexy   Pitches,   dance   team   FOCUS,   musical   theater   group  Curtain  Call,  Urban  Lyrics  and  TBA  Improv.   The   Warriors   Dance   Team   Co-­President   and   fourth-­year   graphic   design   major   Mary-­Anne   Ramirez   said   during   the   showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   early   planning   stages,   the   eight-­member   team   decided   they  wanted  to  focus  on  the  positive  stories  told  about  women,   as  well  as  the  struggles  women  endure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  collaborated  on  dance,  poetry,  music,  acting  and  stories   of   women   in   history,â&#x20AC;?   Ramirez   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   looked   at   important   ÂżJXUHVDQGZDQWHGWRLQWURGXFHVWRULHVSHRSOHPD\QRWNQRZ´ This   year,   The   Warriors   will   perform   a   piece   on   victim   shaming,   using   choreography   and   song   lyrics   to   convey   the   struggles  victims  who  are  blamed  often  face. During  past  productions,  guest  groups  were  assigned  themes   to  convey  through  their  performances.  This  year,  however,  The  

Warriors  allowed  them  more  leniency,  letting  them  choose  their   own  messages.  The  Warriors  also  usually  connect  parts  of  their   performance  to  a  recent  news  story. This  year,  Urban  Lyrics  plan  to  perform  a  piece  about  Ma-­ lala  Yousafzai,  the  Pakistani  15-­year-­old  who,  in  2012,  was  shot   in  the  head  by  a  Taliban  gunman  for  speaking  out  about  girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   right   to   be   educated.   Post-­recovery,   Malala   is   now   an   educa-­ WLRQDFWLYLVWZHOONQRZQLQWHUQDWLRQDOO\E\KHUÂżUVWQDPHDORQH and  has  delivered  speeches  about  equality  from  United  Nations   headquarters,  according  to  BBC.   In  the  past,  The  Warriorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  performances  during  their  annual   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  Am  A  Womanâ&#x20AC;?  show  were  deeply  emotional  and  poignant  in   contrast  to  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  numbers,  fourth-­year  English  major  and   Warriorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Co-­President  Cristina  Battista  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  year  is  a  more  fun,  lighthearted  show,â&#x20AC;?  Ramirez  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  still  emotional  pieces,  but  not  as  intense.  You  want   everyone  to  leave  there  feeling  positive.â&#x20AC;? Ramirez  said  similar  to  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  show,  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  will  fea-­ ture  dramatic  entrances  of  modern-­day  women,  with  music  from   artists  like  Ke$ha  and  Lady  Gaga,  to  help  set  the  showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  tone.   Between  The  Warriorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  original  choreography  and  perfor-­ mances  from  guest  groups,  there  is  more  diversity  overall  at  this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  Am  A  Womanâ&#x20AC;?   showcase,   third-­year   public   relations   major  and  Warriorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Vice  President,  Alexa  Gold,  said.

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

 One  unifying  theme  that  spans  across  The  Warriorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  num-­ bers  is  sexual  liberation,  illustrated  with  a  burlesque-­style  twist,   Gold  said.   The  Warriors  said  they  exemplify  this  theme  with  a  number   WKDWLQYROYHVDOOHLJKWPHPEHUVFODGLQÂżVKQHWVVHTXLQVDQGFRU-­ sets,  slinking  and  shimmying  on  four  chairs. The  number  highlights  two  different  sides  or  levels  of  sexu-­ ality,   starting   with   a   more   modest,   broadway-­jazz   style,   and   eventually  evolving  into  modern-­day  hip-­hop  movements.   Gold   said   the   number,   which   begins   with   the   retro-­jazz   WLQJHG VRQJ Âł5LJKW 1RZ´ E\ 7KH 3XVV\FDW 'ROOV DQG ÂżQLVKHV with   the   syncopated   beats   of   BeyoncĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hit   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Partition,â&#x20AC;?   is   like   turning  moves  by  Bob  Fosse  into  ones  inpsired  by  BeyoncĂŠ,  cel-­ ebrating  all  types  of  sexuality.   Overall,  Gold  said  she  wants  the  audience  to  leave  with  an   awareness  for  certain  issues  and  different  perspectives,  with  an   â&#x20AC;&#x153;inspired  outlook.â&#x20AC;? Battista  agreed,  and  said  The  Warriors  want  audience  mem-­ bers  to  feel  uplifted  when  they  leave  through  the  doors  of  McK-­ enna  Theatre  again.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  them  to  feel  like  they  can  go  out  and  make  a  dif-­ ference,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  Am  A  Womanâ&#x20AC;?  will  run  on  Thursday,  April  10  at  7  p.m.   in  McKenna  Theatre.  


8B

Arts & Entertainment

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

McManus Makes Mad Men Moves

PROFESSOR PUTS SOCIAL PROBLEMS ON PRINTMAKING DISPLAY Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

At  times,  artwork  can  speak  messages  that   mere   words   cannot   convey.  Adjunct   Professor   Dylan  McManus  uses  his  artistic  practice  to  cri-­ tique  social  issues  prevalent  in  today’s  society.   McManus’   work   is   currently   a   part   of   an   exhibition   at   The   Printmaking   Center   of   New   Jersey   (PCNJ)     called   “Mad   Men,”   in   which   he  and  artist  Bob  Craig  create  prints  that  share   their  respective  political  commentaries  as  tools   for  social  change.   McManus   said   the   PCNJ   contacted   him   about   participating   in   a   two-­person   exhibition   and   were   interested   in   featuring   his   work   as   a   representation  of  a  “new  school”  way  of  mak-­ ing  prints.   He  said  the  current  Visiting  Professor  in  the   SUNY  Printmaking  Program  and  the  artistic  di-­ rector  of  the  PCNJ,  Sheila  Goloborotko,  thought   his  work  would  be  perfect  for  the  concept  of  the   two-­person  exhibition  the  center  had  slated;;  the  

exhibition  would  feature  two  male  artists  work-­ ing  with  political  subject  matter  who  also  hap-­ pen  to  have  an  obsessive  or  “mad”  process  they   utilize  for  creating  their  works.     “Each   series   looks   critically   at   various   social  issues  prevalent  in  our  society  today.  Is-­ sues  spanning  everything  from  diamond  wars  in   Africa  to  unemployment  within  our  local  com-­ munity  are  considered  within  the  series  featured   in   this   exhibition,”   McManus   said.   “The   thing   that  unites  all  of  the  works  is  not  only  the  social   commentary  but  the  fact  that  my  use  of  materi-­ als  and  process  directly  inform  the  content  con-­ tained  within  each  individual  piece.”  McManus’  work  featured  in  this  exhibition   contains   selections   from   three   separate   bodies   of  work  spanning  the  last  seven  years  of  his  ar-­ tistic  practice.  With  28  pieces  in  the  exhibition,   mostly   produced   in   2014,   “Mad   Men”   is   the   largest  collection  of  his  art  shown  in  the  United   States  since  2007.   In  “Portraits  of  Recession,”  one  of  the  se-­ ries   within   the   exhibition,   McManus   focuses  

Spotlight On Shawangunk Snaps Nestled  on  the  strip  of  shops  on  Water  Street  Market  is  G.  Steve  Jordan  Gallery.,   owned  by  photographer  Steve  Jordan.  The  gallery  has  been  thriving  for  upwards   of   10   years   and   Jordan   has   photographed   commercial   work   for   more   than   20   years,   and   has   been   featured   on   the   SUNY   New   Paltz   campus.  All   photos   displayed  in  the  gallery  have  been  taken  within  a  few  miles  of  New  Paltz.  Jordan   said  he  wants  this  gallery  to  represent  the  area  it’s  in.    

on  the  collapse  of  the  global  economy  in  2008   and  how  it  resulted  in  severe  unemployment  for   young,  recently-­graduated  Americans.  He  laser-­ engraved  the  portraits  of  both  unemployed  and   under-­employed  members  of  the  community  on   the   surface   of   dollar   bills   that   banks   refused,   turning  them  into  pieces  of  artwork.   In   another   series,   McManus   appropriated   SRUWUDLWVRIFKLOGVROGLHUVZKR¿JKWLQUHVRXUFH wars  in  Africa  and  printed  their  portraits  using   QDWXUDOGLDPRQGJURXQGLQWRD¿QHJUDQXOH “Material  is  really  important  to  me,  the  ma-­ terial  speaks  as  much  to  my  subject  as  does  the   image,”  McManus  said.  “In  the  case  of  the  gun-­ powder  portraits,  the  series  focuses  on  returning   veterans  from  the  War  on  Terror,  I  draw  portraits   of  them  in  gunpowder  and  I  light  the  powder  on   ¿UHWRFUHDWHWKH¿QDOSLHFH7KHUHVLGXHRIWKH burn  and  the  ashes  is  what  draws  the  portraits.” Linda   Helm   Krapf,   the   executive   director   at   the   PCNJ,   said   there   is   tension   and   breadth   within  the  exhibition,  between  McManus  using   the  newest,  most  cutting-­edge  printmaking  tech-­

nology  and  Craig  using  traditional  technology.   “The  materials  [McManus]  used  make  his   work  so  compelling,”  Helm  Krapf  said.  “With   the  prints  he  made  with  diamond  dust  and  gun-­ powder,  he’s  marrying  the  materials  with  the  is-­ sue  of  diamonds  and  child  soldiers.” McManus,   who   received   an   MFA   from   SUNY  New  Paltz,  has  taught  printmaking  and   foundations  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  on  and  off  as   an  adjunct  professor  since  2008.   He  said  the  opportunity  to  be  involved  in   the  show  came  at  the  end  of  a  very  transitional   period  in  his  life  when  he  found  himself  not  ex-­ hibiting  as  frequently  as  he  had  in  the  past.   “While   my   work   is   constantly   being   fea-­ tured   in   various   shows   around   the   world,   I   haven’t   had   an   opportunity   for   a   solo   space   where  I  can  exhibit  multiple  works  since  2008   so  needless  to  say,  I  am  very  happy  that  I  was   considered  for  this  exhibition,”  McManus  said.   “Mad   Men”   will   be   featured   at   the   PCNJ   from   Saturday,   March   15   through   Saturday,   April  19.

Summer

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By  Zameena  Mejia

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Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Review: Musicians Rock Out At Oasis

LOCAL APRIL FOOLS CONCERT PROVES THESE BANDS ARE NO JOKE By  Zach  Rausch Contributing  Writer  |  N02569346@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

CHOOSE FROM A VARIETY OF COURSES THAT FIT YOUR SCHEDULE AND YOUR BUDGET Now’s the perfect time to register for online summer courses at Adelphi. You can choose from a variety of diverse, engaging topics that are relevant to a career in today’s job market.

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  ALEXIS  POLOKOFF

Weather   Underground,   Earl   Boykins   and   Aircraft   played  their  souls  out  at  Oasis  on  Thursday,  April  1.     Thanks   to   Christoper   Daly,   another   amazing   concert   was   produced   for   New   Paltz.   Salvation   Records,   a   com-­ pany  run  by  Daly,  has  been  tearing  up  the  music  scene  all   over  town.   The  night  began  with  a  solo  act,  Weather  Underground.   Slightly  underwhelming,  he  had  a  hard  time  managing  his   sound  quality.  With  the  mic  at  a  shatteringly  high  level  and   the   guitar   screeching,   it   was   hard   to   appreciate   the   mu-­ sic.  However,  there  were  moments  during  his  set  when  he   played  a  brilliant  guitar  lick  and  moments  of  great  music.  I   highly  respect  his  bravery  and  soulful  attitude.     As  the  night  continued,  I  experienced  an  extremely  un-­ expected  turn. With  his  electric  rock  and  roll  stage  presence  and  ec-­ centric   hair   style,   Justin   John   Smith,   lead   guitarist   and   singer,   suddenly   took   control   of   the   crowd   and   set   us   all   on  a  journey  with  his  band,  Aircraft,  who  hail  from  Buf-­ falo,  N.Y.    Described  on  the  band’s  Facebook  page  as  “Psy-­ chedelic   Surf   Pop,”   they   combined   an   exceptional   broad  

range   of   music   into   one.   With   inspirations   varying   from   Beethoven  to  Black  Sabbath,  every  song  was  an  unpredict-­ able  joy.   Each  member  of  Aircraft  added  a  soulful  component  to   their  music  while  combining  to  form  a  beautifully  cohesive   and   synchronized   sound.   They   clearly   were   experienced   musicians   who   had   been   playing   together   for   some   time.     To  me,  they  stole  the  show.   After  this  shocking  and  unexpected  gem  of  a  concert,   the  next  band,  Earl  Boykins,  named  after  the  5-­foot-­5-­inch   basketball  player,  performed.   The  band  members,  hailing  from  SUNY  Purchase,  had   DJRZLWKWKHÀRZDWWLWXGH7KHLUSXQNPHQWDOLW\DQGKDUG hitting   vibes   led   to   an   intensely   crowd-­pleasing   concert.   They  performed  all  original  songs  and  made  a  huge  impact   on   the   crowd.   I   would   not   go   out   of   my   way   to   listen   to   this  type  of  music,  but  if  you  are  a  head  basher  and  want  to   get  some  anger  out,  I  highly  recommend  checking  out  Earl   Boykins’  music.   All   in   all,   these   rockers   put   up   a   great   show   and   de-­ serve  to  have  their  names  and  music  spread.  So  go  check   them  out.  Go  see  a  concert.  You  never  know  what  will  hap-­ pen.  

Noah  London,  member  of  Earl  Boykins.  

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Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Years Holding Steady Zamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ams Ten NEW ALBUM PROVES THAT WITH AGE COMES WISDOM TEETH

With summer music festivals and concerts coming up, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a look at Zameenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most anticipated albums of the season. Three   years   and   a   tour   later,   soul-­capturing   Coldplay   will   release   their   sixth   album   Ghost   Stories.  Though  the  elec-­ tronic,  Bon  Iver-­sounding   single  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midnightâ&#x20AC;?  and  the   ever-­so-­romantic   single   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Magicâ&#x20AC;?   veer   from   their   past   sound,   Coldplay   have   al-­ ways  added  a  twist  to  their  sweet  tunes.   Expected  release  date:  May  19 Back   with   their   gritty  rock  are  The  Black   Keys   with   Turn   Blue.   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  teased  the  public   with   a   few   creepy,   out-­ landish   Youtube   videos   and   the   psychedelic-­ish   single,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fever.â&#x20AC;?   It   has   a   bit  of  a  pop  feel  to  it,  but  very  well  could  have  been  any   song  off  an  older  album.   Expected  release  date:  May  13 Swedish   band   Little  Dragon  is  back   with   their   third   al-­ bum  N Nabuma   abuma  Rub-­ berband berband.   Their   promising   single   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Klapp   Klappâ&#x20AC;?   is   laden   with   jazzy,   cosmic   synthpop   vibes.  Yukimi  Na-­ gano   is  ,   as   usual,   on   point   with   her   vocals.   Expected  release  date:  May  13 Brace  yourself  for  the  rising  female  rapper   Iggy  Azaleaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  debut  album  The  New  Classic.  The   The  New  Classic.  The   The  New  Classic.  The   girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  got  bars  I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  an  Aussie  could  spit,   but  check  out  her  singles  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Work,â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Change  Your   Lifeâ&#x20AC;?  featuring  T.I.,  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fancyâ&#x20AC;?  featuring  Charli   XCX  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  all  great  to  bump  to  at  the  gym  or  before   a  night  out. Expected  release  date:  April  22

By  John  Tappen News  Editor  |  John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu News  Editor  

The Hold Steady Teeth Dreams

The   Hold   Steadyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   10th   anniversary   show   in   February   at   the  Abbey  Bar  in  Harrisburg,  Pa.  ended  abruptly  when  someone   jumped  onstage  and  tried  to  steal  the  microphone  from  lead  singer   Craig  Finn.  It  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  the  last  song  on  the  setlist,  but  the  band,  in   disarray,  walked  offstage.   It  was  a  crude,  kind  of  sad  ending  to  an  uplifting  night.  But   it  was  also  a  glimpse  into  an  authentic  rock  nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  roll  moment.  There   was   an   element   of   danger:   anything   could   happen.   The   show   could  end  at  any  moment.  And  it  did.   Like   audacious   guitarist  Tad   Kubler,   who   brings   substance   DEXVH7KLQ/L]]\JXLWDUVRORVDQGWKHZHOOIRUWLÂżHGIHDVLELOLW\RI DÂżJKWDIWHUWKHVKRZ)LQQKDVPDGHDFDOFXODWHGGHFLVLRQPD\EH LWÂśVEHWWHUWREHWKHEDQGWKDWGRHVQÂśWÂżQLVKWKHLUVHWHYHU\QLJKW The  bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  latest  record,  Teeth  Dreams,  sees  a  return  to  the   powerful,   risky   guitar-­driven   rock   they   are   so   well   known   for.   It   was   a   sound   missing   from   their   last   effort,   2010â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Heaven   is   Whenever.   7KH ÂżUVW IRXU +ROG 6WHDG\ UHFRUGV FDSWLYDWH EHFDXVH WKH\ sound  like  novels  on  tape.  There  are  crowded  descriptions  with   vivid  and  dramatic  characters.   These  characters  seep  through  to  every  record  and  create  a   lengthy  testimony  to  sin  and  salvation,  to  life  that  is  bigger  than   a  song,  album  or  the  band.  These  characters  are  familiar  friends   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  their  dispositions,  history  and  vices  Hold  Steady  die-­hards  are   well  acquainted  with. But   2010â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Heaven   is   Whenever   began   to   stray   from   the   unique  sound  they  had  carved  for  themselves  11  years  ago  in  the   1HZ<RUN&LW\LQGLHURFNVFHQH7KHVHWUDFNVIHOWOLNHĂ&#x20AC;LPV\DW tempts  at  pop  songs,  with  only  half  references  to  the  stories  fans   wanted  to  hear.  Gone  was  Finnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  patented  talk-­sing  aesthetic  of   dense  storytelling.   7KH ÂżUVW FXW RII Teeth   Dreams,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   Hope   This   Whole   Thing  Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Frighten  You,â&#x20AC;?  feels  like  a  return  to  their  per-­ manently  precarious  edge.  Even  the  lyrics  suggest  a  sort  of   comeback.       Finn   describes   bringing   a   girl   back   to   his   hometown   and   introducing   her   to   old   friends   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   punks,   Twin   Cities   tough   guys   and   seedy   types   that   permeate   Hold   Steady   songs  of  the  past.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;These  guys  I  know,  we  go  back  pretty   deepâ&#x20AC;Śmost  of  them  are  dead  and  some  of  them  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even   live  here  anymore.â&#x20AC;? Finn   has   refocused   his   thoughts   back   to   the   upper   Midwest,   which   has   always   been   crucial   to   the   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   charm.  Songs  written  for  mass  appeal  are  vague  and  trite.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  rather  listen  to  Finn  singing  about  his  hometown  and  

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

crossing  â&#x20AC;&#x153;that  grain  belt  bridge  into  bright  new  Minneapolis.â&#x20AC;?   The  appeal  of  The  Hold  Steady  is  their  unapologetic  faithful-­ ness  to  being  real,  made  obvious  by  the  way  Finn  writes  songs   about  the  people  he  knows,  from  the  places  he  comes  from. The   next   track   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spinners,â&#x20AC;?   is   catchy   but   haunting.   It   intro-­ duces   a   theme   of   devastation,   sadness   and   ultimately   persever-­ ance  that  carries  throughout  the  album:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;heartbreak  hurts,  but  you   can  dance  it  off.â&#x20AC;?  Finn  is  confronting  harsh  truths  of  adulthood   that  he  thought  might  never  come,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;nights  go  on  forever  now,  but   the  morning  comes  so  quick,â&#x20AC;?  the  sobering  truth  that  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be   17  forever,  massive  nights  end  and  little  hoodrat  friends  eventu-­ ally  grow  up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Only   Thingâ&#x20AC;?   looks   back   at   the   reckless   years,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;this   town  was  so  much  fun  when  there  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  so  much  police.  We   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  to  watch  our  speed.â&#x20AC;?  The  song  offers  closure  to  2008â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sequestered  in  Memphisâ&#x20AC;?  through  a  message  of  healing  and  rec-­ onciliation:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  trying  to  get  in  touch  with  her,  last  night   her  teeth  were  in  my  dreams.â&#x20AC;?   Having  dreams  about  teeth  falling  out  speaks  to  anxiety  and   stress  over  personal  appearance.  In  â&#x20AC;&#x153;On  With  The  Business,â&#x20AC;?  Finn   reveals  possible  reasons  for  those  dreams,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chemistry,  currency,   plastic  and  magic.  Everybody,  rise,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  an  American  business,â&#x20AC;?   Finn  whales  over  intricate  guitar  parts.  The  song  is  both  loud  and   somber.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great  expectations.  LA  Fitness.  So  many  choices,  deci-­ sions,  decisions.â&#x20AC;?  At  its  core,  the  song  is  a  critique  of  capitalism   and  the  ways  in  which  Finnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  uniquely  American  characters  are   ill  with  a  uniquely  American  sadness  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one  they  only  know  how   to  temporarily  cure  with  more  booze  and  more  stuff.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blood  on   the  carpet,  blood  on  the  mattress,  waking  up  with  that  American   sadness.â&#x20AC;? Midway   through   the   album,   despair   has   sunken   in   and   the   rest  is  left  for  advice,  self-­analysis  and  how  to  grieve.     With   Teeth   Dreams,   the   band   grapples   with   problems   that   mirror   those   in   their   personal   life:   Finnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   divorce   and   Kublerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drug  use  and  pancreatitis.   Partying  has  caught  up  to  both  the  band  and  the  characters   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  created.  This  album  is  a  logical  progression  for  the  band.   ,WÂśVGLIÂżFXOWWRPDNHHYHU\VRQJDSRVLWLYHMDPLQWKHIDFHRIGL saster,  tragedy  and  personal  shortcomings.   The  last  song  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oaksâ&#x20AC;?  is  the  longest  in  the  bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  catalogue.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  almost  a  synopsis  of  the  entire  album.  It  begins  bitterly  poi-­ gnant.  Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  eloquent  guitar  playing  from  Kubler  and  Steve  Al-­ dridge  who  trade  long,  down  tempo  solos  that  simmer  underneath   each  other.  Toward  the  middle,  Finn  sings  with  some  assurance   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  we  hopeâ&#x20AC;Śand  we  dreamâ&#x20AC;Ś.and  we  hope.â&#x20AC;?  The  end  trails  off   into  a  fading,  distorted  guitar  reminiscent  of  Dinosaur  Jr.   Even   on   an   album   where   all   signs   point   to   an   apocalyptic   HQGZHJHWVRPHDIÂżUPDWLRQWKDWLQGHHGWKLQJVZLOODOOEHRND\ â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  that  not  all  our  dreams  have  to  be  teeth  dreams. The   Hold   Steady   have   always   found   a   way   to   elevate   the   lives  of  those  that  most  people  deem  unimportant.  They  dignify   WKHORZHVWPRVWRUGLQDU\FODVVRISHRSOHWKDWPRVWRIXVÂżQGRXU selves  in.  Teeth  Dreams  shows  there  is  still  so  much  joy  in  what   they  do.


T

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

hesis alk

As   the   Art   Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   BFA/MFA   Thesis   Shows  get  ready  to  open  in  The  Dorsky,  we   take  an  inside  look  at  different  strokes   from  different  folks.   Opening  Reception:  Friday,  April  25  

   KELLY  NOVAK    

Relations

DANIELLE  STERNBERG    

Autism: A Constant Companion

Fourth-­year  BFA  photography

Fourth-­year  BFA  painting

0HGLXPPP¿OPSULQWHG chemically/shot  and  printed  digitally

Medium:  oil  paint,  ink,  oil  pastels

I  observe  and  document  the  everyday  inter-­ action  of  families.  I  draw  a  comparison  of   family  dynamics  among  the  families  photo-­ graphed,  depicting  those  dynamics  primarily   through  the  use  of  space  within  a  household   and  the  direction  and  intent  of  gaze.  I  would   like  viewers  to  allow  this  sampling  of  family   G\QDPLFVWRLQVSLUHUHÃ&#x20AC;HFWLRQRQ  their  own   GH¿QLWLRQRIIDPLO\

I  offer  a  visual  interpretation  of  how  I  make   sense  of  the  world.  As  an  individual  with   $VSHUJHU¶V6\QGURPH$WWHQWLRQ'H¿FLW+\ peractivity  Disorder  and  Generalized  Anxiety   'LVRUGHU,H[SHULHQFHGLI¿FXOW\SURFHVVLQJ signals  from  my  environment.  To  symbolize  the   resulting  feeling  of  alienation,  I  have   FUHDWHGWZRKXPDQRLG¿JXUHV,LQWHQGWR leave  the  viewer  with  an  understanding  of  the   lived  experience  of  an  individual  with   atypical  neurology.

oracle.newpaltz.edu

 11B

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: SARA SHAMEEM

YEAR: Second MAJOR: Public Relations HOMETOWN: Nanuet, N.Y.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? 0\YRLFH,¿JXUHGRXW,FRXOGVLQJZKHQ , ZDV LQ ¿IWK JUDGH :KHQHYHU , VLQJ LW PDNHVPHIHHOFRQ¿GHQW,¶PDOVRWU\LQJWR OHDUQWKHXNXOHOH WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? ,¶PLQ7KH6H[\3LWFKHVDQG,ZDVLQ ³8ULQHWRZQ´ ZLWK 7KH 0LDPL 7KHDWUH 3OD\HUV ,¶P DOVR LQ YRFDO FKDPEHU MD]] HQVHPEOH WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? -RVV 6WRQH &KULVWLQD $JXLOHUD $UHWKD )UDQNOLQ0DULDK&DUH\DQG%H\RQFp WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? $OOHQ 6WRQH ,JJ\ $]DOHD DQG $ULDQD *UDQGH WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? ,¶GOLNHWRZRUNLQDQDUWEDVHG3XEOLF5HOD WLRQV¿UPDQG,¶GOLNHWRNHHSVLQJLQJHLWKHU SURIHVVLRQDOO\RURQWKHVLGH ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? -XVW UHPHPEHU WKDW WKH UHDVRQ \RX ZRUN RQ PXVLFLVEHFDXVH\RXORYHLWDQGLWPDNHV\RX KDSS\'RQ¶WHYHUORVHVLJKWRIWKDWRWKHUZLVH LW¶V JRLQJ WR EH FRQVLGHUHG ZRUN DQG PXVLF VKRXOGQHYHUEHZRUN

CHECK  OUT   SARA  SHAMMEEM

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MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Suzy  Berkowitz  at  VDEEDVEHUNRZLW]#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX  

Thursday,  April  10,  2014


THE  DEEP  END

12B oracle.newpaltz.edu

The New Paltz Oracle

THIS WEEK IN

THE DEEP END ALEXA FLORESTA

Major: BFA Photography Year: Third Inspiration: Francis Bacon, Hieronymus Bosch, clementines, twinkly lights, crusty old men, crusty things in general, Sandy Kim, Malick Sidibé, Dan Hillier, Van Eyck, swedish trolls, Rod Serling, Boris Mikhailov, glitter and nipples.

“I take photos and I paint little creatures and I am still figuring out what it all means.” “I  take  photos  and  I  paint  little  creatures  and  I  am  still   ¿JXULQJRXWZKDWLWDOOPHDQV´

Photos courtesy of Alexa Floresta | Captions by Maxwell Reide


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

TIMES  A-­CHANGINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

CARTOON BY JULIE GUNDERSEN

Recently,   the   SUNY   New   Paltz   De-­ partment  of  Enrollment  Management  made   the   decision   to   extend   the   time   between   classes  from  10  minutes  to  15  minutes.  As   a  result,  the  start  time  of  classes,  excluding   DPFODVVHVZLOOEHJLQ¿YHPLQXWHVODWHU than  they  currently  do.   We   at   The   New   Paltz   Oracle EHOLHYH this  to  be  a  welcome  change  in  class-­time   VFKHGXOLQJ:LWKWKHLQFUHDVHGDYDLODELOLW\ of  classroom  space  as  academic  buildings   UHRSHQ DIWHU XQGHUJRLQJ UHQRYDWLRQ VWX-­ GHQWVIDFHJUHDWHUSRVVLELOLW\RIKDYLQJWR WUDYHOEHWZHHQPXOWLSOHEXLOGLQJVWKURXJK-­ out  the  day  to  attend  class.   $¿YHPLQXWHH[WHQVLRQEHWZHHQFODVV times   will   help   mitigate   this   problem   and   SURYLGH DPSOH RSSRUWXQLW\ IRU VWXGHQWV both   on   and   off   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   campus   to   reach   their   UHVSHFWLYH GHVWLQDWLRQV SULQW ODVW PLQXWH assignments  or  simply  drop  off  some  books  

that  are  no  longer  needed  for  the  day.   Professors  and  commuter  students  will   QRZKDYHDODUJHUWLPHJDSWR¿QGSDUNLQJ spaces   that   become   open   between   classes   or   to   compensate   for   inclement   weather   scenarios   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   both   on   the   road   and   walk-­ ZD\V3URIHVVRUVDOVRUHFHLYHWKHEHQH¿WRI being  able  to  address  student  concerns  and   questions  after  class  without  the  feeling  of   KDYLQJWRUXVKWRWKHQH[WFODVVURRP It  is  a  known  fact  that  scheduling  for   certain  class  sections  has  become  increas-­ ingly  limited,  making  for  schedule  options   ZLWK QDUURZ Ã&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\ LI VWXGHQWV SODQ WR graduate  on  time.  Many  studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  class  en-­ rollment  has  them  confronted  with  blocks   of  back-­to-­back  classes  that,  besides  being   mentally  exhausting,  can  be  physically  ex-­ hausting   when   a   student   is   forced   to   rush   to  classes  that  may  be  on  the  opposite  side   of   campus.  The   increased   time   allows   for  

a  more  leisurely  break,  which  students  can   XVHWRUHIUHVKWKHPVHOYHVZLWKIRRGGULQN and   hygienic   concerns   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   human   necessi-­ ties  that  may  or  may  not  be  ignored  when   caught  in  the  current  of  college  hysteria.         2QHQHJDWLYHKRZHYHULVWKDWWKHVXP of   the   time   extensions   between   classes   is   equal  to  one  potential  class  time  slot  which   will   be   lost   because   of   this   change.   The   loss  of  this  period  will  only  further  to  tight-­ HQ WKH RSSRUWXQLWLHV VWXGHQWV KDYH WR ¿W their  required  courses  into  their  schedules   and   progress   at   a   steady   pace   toward   de-­ gree  completion.  We  hope  that  Enrollment   Management   is   aware   of   this   issue   and   ZLOODFWLYHO\ZRUNWRDGGUHVVWKLVFRQFHUQ by  ensuring  there  are  little  to  no  schedule   FRQÃ&#x20AC;LFWVRIUHTXLUHGFODVVHVZLWKLQGHSDUW-­ ments.     7KHWLPHFKDQJHZLOOVHUYHDVDFRQYH-­ QLHQWEHQH¿WIRUWKRVHZKRVHGDLO\URXWLQHV

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

LQYROYHPRYLQJWRDQGIURPFODVVURRPVLQD SXQFWXDOIDVKLRQ7KH¿YHPLQXWHLQFUHDVH ZKLOH VHHPLQJO\ LQVLJQL¿FDQW DOORZV IRU a  wider  range  of  tasks  to  be  completed  in   short  duration  at  a  comfortable  pace.  Foot   WUDI¿F FRQJHVWLRQ RQ FDPSXV DURXQG WKH start  of  classes  will  decrease  as  a  result  and   VWXGHQWV FDQ UHVW HDV\ NQRZLQJ WKH\ KDYH an  extra  few  minutes  to  grab  a  cookie  and   a  coffee  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  something  that  no  one  could  be   opposed  to.     Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the   majority  of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,   op-­eds  and  letters,  excluding  editorials,   are  solely  those  of  the  writers  and  do  not   necessarily  represent  the  views  of  The   New  Paltz  Oracle,  its  staff  members,  the   campus  and  university  or  the  Town  or   Village  of  New  Paltz.


10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

JOHN  TAPPEN News  Editor  

     John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

 Friends,  I  have  a  story  for  you.  Years  ago,  I   remember  a  buddy  of  mine  returning  to  our  dorm   room   after   spending   the   better   part   of   24   hours   ZULWLQJ SDSHUV DQG ¿QLVKLQJ SURMHFWV LQ &R\NHQ GDOO6FLHQFH%XLOGLQJ+HZDONHGLQGURSSHGRII KLVERRNVDQGOHIWDJDLQ6HYHUDOPLQXWHVODWHUKH returned  with  M&M’s,  Fritos  and  a  bag  of  Keebler   IXGJHFRRNLHVLQKDQG “There’s   something   so   satisfying   about   a   YHQGLQJPDFKLQHPHDO´KHWROGPH 7KDWVDWLVIDFWLRQLVEDVHGHQWLUHO\RQFLUFXP VWDQFH$VVRUWHGMXQNIRRGVKRXOGQHYHUEHVDWLVI\ LQJ7KHH[FHSWLRQEHLQJZKHQDSHUVRQLVGHVSHU ate  and  starved. 7KRVH PRPHQWV FRPH DIWHU KRXUV RI KDUG ZRUNODWHLQWRWKHQLJKWZKHQWKHUH¶VQRWKLQJRQ your   mind   but   sleep   and   nothing   else   to   eat   but   Doritos.   9HQGLQJ PDFKLQH SXUFKDVHV PXVW VN\URFNHW VRPHWLPH DIWHU  DP 7KH RQO\ WLPH 0U *RRG EDUV DQG WKRVH UDVSEHUU\ FRRNLHV ORRN DSSHDOLQJ HQRXJKWRSXUFKDVH²ZKHQDSHUVRQLVLQHQRXJK RIDVWXSRUWRRYHUORRNHYHU\FRJHQWUHDVRQKHRU she  shouldn’t.  

ANDREWLIEF

Managing  Editor      N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

,HQMR\VQDFNLQJZHOO 7KLQNRIDOOWKHZD\V\RXVQDFN6RPHZD\V DUH PRUH HI¿FLHQW WKDQ RWKHUV REYLRXVO\ EXW WKH\ all   have   positives   and   negatives.     In   my   opinion,   WKHPRVWHI¿FLHQWZD\WRVQDFNLVYLDDYHQGLQJPD FKLQH 7KLQNDERXWLW<RXFDQJRWRDPDFKLQHDQG IRUFHQWVRU\RXFDQJHWDVQDFNWKDWVDWLV¿HV \RXUKXQJHUQHHGV7KLVLVDPRUHFRQYHQLHQWZD\ WRJHWDVQDFNWKDW\RXQHHGIRUMXVWRQHVQDFNLQJ VHVVLRQWKDQWRVFKOHS\RXUVHOIWRWKHVXSHUPDUNHW 1RZZKHQ\RXDUULYHDWWKHYHQGLQJPDFKLQH it  might  seem  daunting,  but  don’t  worry,  friends.    As   DOZD\V,KDYHDVROXWLRQWRKHOS\RXPDNHDGHOL FLRXVDQGVPDUWFKRLFH 8QOHVV\RXRQO\KDYHRUOHVVRQ\RXWKHUH¶V no  reason  for  you  to  not  getting  something  salty,  as   well  as  sweet.    Seriously,  what  are  you  doing  with   \RXU OLIH LI \RX GRQ¶W JHW VRPHWKLQJ IURP HDFK

OPINION

The New Paltz Oracle

COLUMN Sweet,Vender  Moments :KHQ,OLYHGRQFDPSXV,XVHGWRFRPSODLQD ORWDERXWWKHTXDOLW\RIFDPSXVIRRG%XWYHQGLQJ PDFKLQH PHDOV DUH D QHZ ORZ ² RQH , XQIRUWX QDWHO\FRQWLQXDOO\VWRRSWR %XW WKHUH DUH VRPH FUHYLFHV RI WKH YHQGLQJ PDFKLQH WKDW DUH VR GDUN HYHQ , QHYHU DSSURDFK WKHPOLNHWKH/LIHVDYHUVRUWKHGU\DQGGLVJXVWLQJ ZDIHUFULVSVWKDWOLQHWKHERWWRP ,UHPHPEHUEHLQJLQKLJKVFKRRODQGVFUDS SLQJ WRJHWKHU FKDQJH RII WKH VZHDWVWDLQHG ÀRRU RI RXU ORFNHU URRP DIWHU J\P FODVV MXVW WR EX\ D Gatorade.   $QG WKDW *DWRUDGH PDFKLQH ZLWK LWV QHRQ OLJKW ZDV D EHDFRQ RI VDOYDWLRQ WKDW LOOXPLQDWHG WKH JULP\ EDVHPHQW ORFNHU URRP DQG PDQDJHG WR RYHUSRZHU WKH VWHQFK RI MRFN VWUDSV DQG J\P shorts.   ,DOVRUHFDOOWKHEDFNRIWKHOXQFKURRPZKHUH NLGVZRXOGFDPSRXWZDLWLQJIRUVRPHRQHWRDS SURDFKVRWKH\FRXOGDVN³OHPPHJHWDGROODU"´ As  far  as  loans  go,  for  whatever  the  reason,   this  always  seemed  the  seediest  type.  That  moment   ZDV\RXUFKDQFHWRHLWKHUVKRZ\RXUJHQHURVLW\RU DQRSSRUWXQLW\WREHFUHDWLYHDQGGHFOLQHZLWKWKH

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John  Tappen  is  a  fourth-­year  student  of   journalism.  Find  him  by  the  vending  machine.  

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Thursday,  April  10,  2014

<RXPLJKWEHRYHUZKHOPHGZKHQPDNLQJ\RXU GHFLVLRQ EXW WKDW LV FHUWDLQO\ RND\   'HFLGLQJ RQ ZKDW WR VQDFN RQ LV DQ RYHUZKHOPLQJ SURFHVV DQG GH¿QLWHO\EULQJVRXWWKHZRUVWRISHRSOH0\DGYLFH ZRXOG EH WR MXVW WDNH WKUHH GHHS EUHDWKV DQG WKHQ SXUFKDVHZKDW\RXUWXPP\LVFUDYLQJEHFDXVHWKLV GHFLVLRQZLOOXOWLPDWHO\PDNHRUEUHDN\RXULGHDVR \RXKDYHWROLWHUDOO\JRZLWKZKDW\RXUJXWLVWHOO ing  you.     1RZLI,NQRZP\UHDGHUV,NQRZULJKWQRZ WKH\¶UH VD\LQJ ³$QGUHZ \RX¶YH MXVW LPSDUWHG DOO WKLV ZLVGRP RQWR XV DERXW VQDFNLQJ EXW ZKDW WKH KHOODP,VXSSRVHGWRGULQNZLWKP\VQDFNV"´ Well,  friends,  that’s  a  story  for  another  day.

Andrew  Lief  is  a  third-­year  journalism   major  and  constant  snacker.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

11

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

SUNYAC

SPLITS The  Lady  Hawks  aim  to  improve  their  2-­2  conference  record  when  they  take  on  SUNY  Oneonta  at  home  Friday.  

By  Melissa  Kramer Copy  Editor  |  Kramerm2@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  softball  team  began  SUNYAC  play  the   weekend  of  Saturday,  April  5  and  Sunday,  April    ZLWK D KRPH¿HOG DGYDQWDJH DW 0DU\ *UD\ Deane  Field. The  Lady  Hawks,  with  a  current  overall  re-­ cord  of  5-­11  and  2-­2  record  in  SUNYAC  play,   split  two  doubleheaders  against  SUNY  Cortland   and  SUNY  Oswego. On   April   5,   game   one   went   to   the   Lady   Hawks,   who   defeated   the   Lady   Red   Dragons   7KLV LV WKH ¿UVW WLPH WKH SURJUDP KDV GH feated  Cortland  since  April  27,  1996. Both  teams  traded  runs  in  the  early  innings.   New  Paltz  took  the  lead  once  again  in  the  bot-­ tom  of  the  third,  when  second-­year  catcher/in-­ ¿HOGHU -RUGDQ )LRUH GURYH LQ WKLUG\HDU SLQFK UXQQHU-XOLHWWH9HUVRZLWKDVLQJOHXSWKHPLGGOH  The  Lady  Hawks  added  two  unearned  in-­ VXUDQFH UXQV LQ WKH ERWWRP RI WKH ¿IWK 7KRVH runs   would   prove   as   vital   insurance,   as   Cort-­ land  scored  twice  in  the  sixth  and  left  the  bases   loaded  when  the  inning  ended  with  a  pop-­up  to   WKLUG\HDU&DSWDLQ0HJ%UHZHU   With   the   tying   run   on   third   base   for   the   Lady  Red  Dragons,  New  Paltz  got  out  of  a  jam   in  the  top  of  the  seventh  to  preserve  the  historic   victory. Second-­year   pitcher   Katie   Rutcofsky  

earned   the   win   in   the   circle   for   the   Hawks,   yielding  four  runs  (three  earned)  off  seven  hits,   three  walks  and  three  hit  by  pitches,  while  strik-­ ing  out  two. In  the  nightcap  portion  of  the  doublehead-­ er,   the   Lady   Hawks   were   defeated   6-­2   by   the   Lady  Red  Dragons.   Fourth-­year   Captain   Chelsea   Kull   singled   through  the  right  side  with  two  outs  and  drove  in   two  runs  to  pull  New  Paltz  within  one  at  3-­2  in   the  third.  That  score  would  hold  until  the  sixth,   when  Cortland  plated  a  run  off  an  RBI  single  to   OHIWÂżHOG The  Lady  Red  Dragons  added  insurance  in   the  seventh,  scoring  two  runs  off  three  hits  and   one  error  in  the  inning. Head   Coach   Brittany   Robinson   said   the   team  went  into  the  series  knowing  that  Cortland   ZRXOGEHDJRRGWHDPDQGZDVFRQÂżGHQWWKDWDV a  result  of  facing  good  competition  previously,   the  team  could  hang  with  their  opposition  and   beat  anybody. On  April  6,  the  Lady  Hawks  split  a  double-­ header  against  Oswego.   The  Lady  Hawks  took  game  one  4-­3. New  Paltz  held  a  4-­0  lead  in  the  third-­in-­ QLQJ7KH/DNHUVIRXJKWEDFNLQWKHÂżIWKVFRULQJ three  runs.   Oswego   stranded   the   tying   run   on   third   EDVHDVWKH\Ă&#x20AC;LHGRXWWRULJKWÂżHOG7KLVVHFXUHG

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN                

a  New  Paltz  victory. Pitching  was  the  key  in  game  one,  Robin-­ son  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  were  without  our  No.  1  pitcher  during   the  series,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  had  to  make  a  pitching   adjustment.  I  think  [fourth-­year  pitcher]  Amber   &DUR]]DGLGDUHDOO\JRRGMRELQWKHÂżUVWJDPH getting   them   to   hit   ground   balls   and   stepping   up  big  in  situations  when  we  needed  to  get  the   outs.â&#x20AC;? *DPHWZRRIWKHGRXEOHKHDGHUQHHGHGH[ tra  innings  to  be  decided,  with  Oswego  ending   WKHJDPHVFRULQJÂżYHUXQVLQWKHWRSKDOIRIWKH eigth  inning.   The  Lady  Hawks  answered  back  with  a  run   in   the   home   half   of   the   eighth,   but   it   was   not   enough  as  the  Lakers  sealed  the  victory  7-­3.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Third-­year   pitcher]   Erika   Traina   did   a   great  job  of  keeping  us  in  the  game.  After  giv-­ ing  up  two  runs  early,  she  really  shut  them  down   pretty  much  after  that,â&#x20AC;?  Robinson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   we   had   the   opportunities   to   win   the   game,   we   just  didn't  take  advantage  of  them,  and  Oswego   did.â&#x20AC;? Robinson   said   the   team   had   the   attitude   that  they  can  beat  any  team  at  any  time  after  the   game  one  victory  against  Cortland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After   we   beat   Cortland,   the   girls   didn't   say,  'we  hung  with  them  and  tweaked  out  a  win,'   she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  said,  'we're  a  better  team  than  

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

they  are.  We  can  be  better  than  anybody  in  this   FRQIHUHQFH *RLQJLQWRWKLVVHDVRQWKDWZDVP\ goal.  It  was  to  make  them  see  that  you  can't  just   say,  'oh,  we  can  hang  around  with  them,  we  can   come   close   to   beating   them.'   It's,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;we   have   to   believe  that  we  can  beat  any  team  at  any  time,   because  nobody's  going  to  be  that  much  better   than  we  are.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Brewer  said  the  team  must  work  in  posing   as  a  triple-­threat  to  prepare  for  their  upcoming   games. "We   have   strength   in   offense,   pitching   and  defense,  but  bringing  all  three  together  ev-­ ery  game  would  make  a  huge  difference  in  our   team's  success,"  she  said. On   Wednesday,   April   9   the   Lady   Hawks   dropped   both   games   of   a   road   doubleheader   against   Western   Connecticut   State   University.   Robinson  said  the  team  wants  to  work  on  some   things,  but  not  overwork  while  preparing  for  the   upcoming  stretch  of  10  games  in  seven  days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There's   not   much   practice   time   in-­be-­ tween,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   main   thing   is   getting   mentally  prepared  for  that  many  games  and  re-­ ally   trying   to   keep   it   up.   Figuring   out   how   to   keep   that   focus   up   during   a   doubleheader   is   key.â&#x20AC;? This   stretch   begins   with   a   doubleheader   against  SUNY  Oneonta  beginning  at  3  p.m.  at   0DU\*UD\'HDQH)LHOGRQ)ULGD\$SULO


SPORTS

12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Baseball  Aims  To  Spring  Back   By  John  Tappen News  Editor  |  John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   baseball   team   dropped   its   record   to   10-­15   overall   this   season   after   losing   two   out   of   three   confer-­ ence   games   at   home   against   SUNY   Oswego,   which   brought   the   Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   SUNYAC  record  to  2-­7.   Saturday,  the  team  split  a  double-­ KHDGHU JHWWLQJ VKXWRXW LQ WKH ÂżUVW game   4-­0,   and   winning   the   second   5-­4.  They  lost  the  Sunday  game  in  the   ninth-­inning  7-­6.   ,Q WKH ÂżUVW JDPH 6DWXUGD\ 2V ZHJRVFRUHGÂżUVWDQGRIWHQGULYLQJLQ a   single   run   in   the   second,   third   and   fourth  innings,  courtesy  of  RBIs  from   designated  hitter  Eric  Hamilton,  right-­   ÂżHOGHU-RKQ5DXVHRDQGWKLUGEDVHPDQ Tim   Smith.   The   Lakers   tacked   on   an   additional   run   in   the   bottom   of   the   HLJKW ZKHQ OHIWÂżHOGHU 'DQ 6DFFRFLR stole  home  on  a  double  steal  attempt. The   Hawks   struggled   against   Os-­ wego   starting   pitcher   Brendyn   Kar-­ inckak,   who   threw   a   complete   game  

shutout,  holding  the  Hawks  to  10  base   runners  through  nine  innings  of  work. 7KHVRXWKSDZVWUXFNRXWÂżYHDQG walked  just  one.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   pitched   well   inside,â&#x20AC;?   Head   Coach  Matt  Righter  said  of  Karinckak.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  kept  our  hitters  off-­balance  with  a   good  change-­up.â&#x20AC;? Two  bright  spots  in  the  New  Paltz   lineup   were   catcher   Tyler   Bell   and   WKLUGEDVHPDQ$QGUHZ'L1DUGRZKR were  both  2-­for-­4.   Third-­year  pitcher  Brian  Solomon   started   the   game   for   the   Hawks   and   took  the  loss,  giving  up  three  runs  and   VHYHQKLWVRYHUÂżYHLQQLQJV Second-­year   right-­handed   pitcher   Christian  Huertes  surrendered  one  un-­ earned  in  three  hitless  innings  of  relief.   New  Paltz  again  fell  behind  early   in  the  second  game  of  the  doublehead-­ er   when   Oswego   scored   two   runs   in   WKHLU KDOI RI WKH ÂżUVW LQQLQJ RII ÂżIWK year  Andrew   Grann,   after   he   allowed   two  hits  and  a  runner  reached  base  on   DQHUURUE\VKRUWVWRS'L1DUGR

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The   pitching   staff]   had   to   over-­ come  some  adversity,â&#x20AC;?  Righter  said  of   the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  eight  errors  in  the  game.   7KH+DZNVKDYHWKHORZHVWÂżHOG ing   percentage   in   the   conference   and   lead  the  SUNYAC  in  errors  with  52. Grann   settled   down   to   throw   a   complete  game,  striking  out  eight  and   walking  one.  Grann  allowed  four  runs,   only  two  of  which  were  earned.   Entering   the   seventh-­inning,   down   4-­1,   New   Paltz   rallied   begin-­ ning   with   three   consecutive   singles,   ÂżUVWIURPWKLUG\HDULQÂżHOGHU6WDQOH\ 'H/D&UX] )RXUWK\HDU &DSWDLQ 'D vid  Lostaglio  singled  to  right,  advanc-­ LQJ'H/D&UX]WRVHFRQG)RXUWK\HDU Captain  Steven  Morse  singled  to  left,   GULYLQJLQ'H/D&UX] After   a   series   of   hit   batters   and   wild  pitches,  third-­year  Captain  Rich-­ ard  Guido  drew  a  walk  on  a  wild  pitch,   allowing  Morse  to  score  the  tying  run.   Bell  earned  an  RBI,  driving  in  the  go-­ DKHDG UXQ ZLWK D VDFULÂżFH Ă&#x20AC;\ EDOO WR ULJKWÂżHOG

Introductory Anthropology Computer Graphics/Illustrator Photoshop Human Biology Essentials of Biology Biological Principles I & II Anatomy & Physiology I & II Human Genetics Conservation Natural Resources Basic Nutrition General Microbiology Principles Accounting I & II Principles of Business Principles of Management Marketing Human Resource Management Business Statistics Micro Application Software Foundations for College Success Criminal Law Juvenile Delinquency Laws of Evidence Criminology Foundations: Computer Science Personal Money Management Introduction to Economics I & II

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

To  start  the  Sunday  game,  Righter   VDLGKHGHFLGHGWRSXWÂżUVW\HDU5RE HUW)LW]SDWULFNLQWKHOHDGRIISRVLWLRQ a   move   that   paid   off   as   he   singled   to   VWDUW WKH JDPH )LW]SDWULFN ZDV SLQFK ran   for   by   Bret   Wisner   who   later   scored  on  an  error. After   two   RBIs   from   Bell,   the   Hawks  led  6-­4  coming  into  the  bottom   of  the  ninth.  But  the  Lakers  came  back   to   score   three   runs   in   the   last   inning,   including  a  two-­run  homerun.   Upcoming,  the  Hawks  have  a  six-­   JDPH VWUHWFK RYHU ÂżYH GD\V EHWZHHQ )ULGD\DQG7XHVGD\LQFOXGLQJGRXEOH KHDGHUV DJDLQVW 681< )UHGRQLD DQG SUNY  Oneonta.   If  there  is  any  team  that  can  handle   the  packed  schedule  of  the  next  week,   Righter   said   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   his,   who   have   expe-­ rience   playing   multiple   games   over   consecutive   days   this   season   at   both   the   Ripken   Experience   and   Snowbird   Classic  tournaments.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   in   every   game,â&#x20AC;?   Righter  said.

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Lacrosse  Looks  To  Stay  Positive  In  Conference  Play

The  Lady  Hawks  are  4-­4  overall  and  1-­2  in  conference  play  after  their  22-­19  loss  to  Farmingdale  State  College  April  8.  

By  Abbott  Brant Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   lacrosse   team   is   currently   .500   on   the   season   after   their   17-­5   loss   to   SUNY   Fredonia  April   5   and   22-­19   loss   to  Farmingdale  State  College  April  8. The   Lady   Hawks   could   not   come   back   from   the   Lady   Blue   Devil's   early   6   point   lead   at   the   start   of   the   game,   as   Fredonia  tallied  seven  points  to  the  Lady   Hawks'   one   at   the   midway   point   of   the   ¿UVWKDOI 7KLUG\HDU PLG¿HOGHU DQG GHIHQGHU Julia   Johnson   and   third-­year   attack   and   PLG¿HOGHU.HOVH\+HDO\IRXQGWKHEDFN of  the  net  to  bring  the  score  to  7-­3,  while   fourth-­year   Captain   Talia   Telser   ended   WKH ¿UVW KDOI ZLWK DQ XQDVVLVWHG JRDO DW 1:49   remaining,   but   the   Blue   Devils   maintained  a  strong  lead,  going  into  the   half  up  9-­4.   Fredonia's   38   shots   on   goal   com-­ pared   to   the   Lady   Hawks'   15   led   to   the   Lady  Blue  Devil's  scoring  eight  goals  in  

the  second  compared  to  the  Lady  Hawks'   lone   one,   scored   by   third-­year   Captain   Carisa  Citro  at  16:32. Head  Coach  Liz  Student  said  the  pro-­ gram,   which   has   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;very   team-­oriented   VW\OHRISOD\´FDPHRXWĂ&#x20AC;DWLQWKHJDPH against  the  Lady  Rams  and  dropped  the   ball  in  terms  of  remaining  positive  about   the  good  things  the  team  was  doing.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   weekend   we   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   play   like   us,â&#x20AC;?  Student  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  our  team  plays   together  and  they  celebrate  all  the  good   things,  we  play  very  well.  You  need  your   teammates   to   pick   you   up,   and   we   just   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  come  out  to  play.â&#x20AC;? Student  said  the  team  getting  excited   about  the  good  work  they  are  producing   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  transitioning  the  ball  well,  a  big  save  by   WKLUG\HDU &DSWDLQ -DFNLH 8ODQRII ÂżQG-­ ing   the   back   of   the   net   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   is   pertinent   to   the  success  of  the  team  moving  forward.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It's   important   to   recognize   those   things  because  they  fuel  everyone  else,â&#x20AC;?   she  said.  

But   the   Lady   Hawks   still   tallied   a   loss   against   non-­conference   opponent   Farmingdale  Tuesday  on  the  road,  drop-­ ping   a   close   game   in   a   match   up   with   strong   offensive   presence   from   both   sides.   The   impact   of   Tesler's   six   goals,   accompanied   by   Healy   and   third-­year   PLGÂżHOGHU/LDQQH9DOGLYLD VIRXUDSLHFH were   not   enough   with   3:04   left   in   the   game   as   the   Lady   Rams   tallied   two   straight  goals  to  end  the  contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lacrosse   is   a   game   of   runs   and   Farmingdale   was   able   to   pull   together   a   strong   comeback   in   the   second   half,â&#x20AC;?   third-­year   defenseman   Fatima   Ismail   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  game  was  very  close  and  both   WHDPVZHUHÂżJKWLQJIRUWKHZLQWRZDUGV the  end.â&#x20AC;? Ismail  said  the  Lady  Hawks'  sched-­ ule  is  designed  so  that  each  consecutive   match  is  more  challenging  than  the  pre-­ vious,   and   the   team   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;striving   to   el-­ evate  their  play  and  compete  throughout   these   games.â&#x20AC;?     For   the   rest   of   the   week  

Thursday,  April  10,  2014

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN                

WKHWHDPORRNVWRÂżQHWXQHWKHLUSOD\LQ preparation  for  Brockport  this  weekend,   she  said.     Student   said   as   a   coach   she   is   tak-­ ing   the   losses   of   the   last   few   games   as   a   bump   in   the   road   that   the   team   can   and   will   get   over   and   looks   forward   to   the   team   returning   to   SUNYAC   play   in   Saturday's   game   against   the   College   at   Brockport.   7KH /DG\ +DZNVÂś ÂżUVW FRQIHUHQFH game   against   Potsdam,   where   the   team   FDPHEDFNIURPDVHYHQSRLQWGHÂżFLWWR beat  the  Lady  Bears  15-­14,  will  provide   inspiration   as   the   Lady   Hawks   take   on   Brockport  and  the  remainder  of  their  SU-­ NYAC  competitors.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  proved  to  the  team  that  we  are   capable  of  great  things,  but  in  order  to  do   those   things   we   have   to   work   together   and  get  excited  about  little  things,â&#x20AC;?  Stu-­ dent   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   did   that   the   second   half   of  the  Potsdam  game,  so  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to   bring  that  into  the  rest  of  the    season.â&#x20AC;?


SPORTS

14 The  New  Paltz  Oracle ANALYSIS: ANDREW  LIEF Managing  Editor

N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

While  the  2013-­14  Div.  I  college  basketball   season  just  ended  on  Monday  night,  it’s  never  too   early  to  start  looking  at  what  to  expect  for  next   season. With   that   being   said,   here   are   my   top-­10   teams  for  the  2014-­15  season: No.  1  Arizona  Wildcats The  only  player  that  is  expected  to  leave  for   the   NBA   on   their   roster   is   forward  Aaron   Gor-­ don.    All-­American  guard  Nick  Johnson  should   UHWXUQ IRU KLV ¿QDO \HDU EHFDXVH KH¶V DQ XQGHU sized   two-­guard   and   doesn’t   have   the   skillset   to   play   the   point   in   the   pros.   Regardless,   with   guards  Gabe  York  and  T.J.  McConnell,  forward   Brandon  Ashley  returning  from  injury  and  cen-­ ter  Kaleb  Tarczewski,  to  go  along  with  incoming   forward  Stanley  Johnson,  the  Wildcats  should  be   the  favorites  heading  into  next  year.     No.  2  Duke  Blue  Devils I  don’t  think  Jabari  Parker  will  return,  but  if   he  does  the  Blue  Devils  will  surpass  the  Wildcats   for  the  No.  1  spot.    

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A  Look  At  Next  Season   Even   without   Parker,   Duke   will   be   one   of   the  best  teams  in  the  country  because  of  the  No.   1  recruiting  class  that  they  are  bringing  in,  made   up  of  center  Jahil  Okafor,  point  guard  Tyus  Jones,   forward  Justise  Winslow  and  guard  Grayson  Al-­ len.  These  players  along  with  their  returners  will   make   the   Blue   Devils   the   class   of   the  Atlantic   Coast  Conference  (ACC),  if  not  the  nation.     No.  3  Wisconsin  Badgers With   only   guard   Ben   Brust   not   returning,   the  Badgers  will  return  the  majority  of  their  Fi-­ nal  Four  team  from  last  season.    Forward  Frank   Kaminsky  showed  everyone  who  didn’t  already   know  that  he’s  a  star.    With  Kaminsky  and  for-­ ward  Sam  Dekker’s  return,  the  Badgers  will  have   two  NBA  players  who  will  lead  them  to  an  easy   Big  10  title.     No.  4  Kansas  Jayhawks Losing   guard   Andrew   Wiggins   and   center   Joel  Embiid  will  be  big  losses  for  the  Jayhawks,   but   at   this   point   it’s   nearly   impossible   to   doubt   that  Head  Coach  Bill  Self  won’t  have  a  winning   team.    With  guard  Wayne  Selden  Jr.  and  forward  

Perry   Ellis   returning,   to   go   with   incoming   for-­ ward   Cliff  Alexander,   who   will   be   an   absolute   beast,  the  Jayhawks  should  have  an  easy  path  to   a  Big  12  title.     No.  5  North  Carolina  Tar  Heels By  only  losing  guard  Leslie  McDonald  and   forward  James  Michael  McAdoo,  the  Tar  Heels   will  be  one  of  the  top  teams  in  the  country.    Point   guard   Marcus   Paige   will   be   even   better   in   his   third  year  in  Chapel  Hill.  The  three  top-­100  re-­ cruits  coming  in  will  give  the  Tar  Heels  the  depth   they  need  to  make  a  deep  run  in  March.     No.  6  Kentucky  Wildcats  With  most  of  their  2013-­14  roster  expected   to   turn   pro,   the  Wildcats   will   still   be   in   a   posi-­ tion  to  succeed  with  forward  Alex  Polythress  and   centers   Dakari   Johnson   and   center   Marcus   Lee   returning  as  well  as  the  No.    2  ranked  recruiting   class  coming  in.     No.  7  Wichita  State  Shockers After  their  battle  with  Kentucky,  the  Shock-­ ers  showed  they  were  legit  and  should  never  have   been   doubted   all   season.   The   loss   of   forward  

Cleanthony   Early   will   hurt   them   next   season,   but   with   guards   Fred   VanVleet   and   Ron   Baker   returning  they  will  win  the  Missouri  Valley  Con-­ ference  with  ease  and  be  near  the  top  of  the  rank-­ ings  all  season.   No.  8  Virginia  Cavaliers After  winning  the  ACC  regular  season  and   tournament   in   2013-­14,   the   Cavaliers   will   look   to  continue  their  success  in  2014-­15.    Losing  the   heart  and  soul  of  their  team,  guard  Joe  Harris  will   hurt,  but  they  are  so  well-­coached  and  disciplined   that  they  will  be  able  to  have  another  great  sea-­ son.     No.  9  San  Diego  State  Aztecs    Losing  Mountain  West  Player  of  the  Year   Xavier   Thames   will   hurt,   but   bringing   in   three   top-­100  recruits  will  help  them  stay  in  the  top-­10   all  season.     No.  10  Villanova  Wildcats With  all  of  their  rotation  players  returning,   except   guard   James   Bell,   and   two   top-­100   re-­ cruits  coming  in,  the  Wildcats  are  poised  to  have   a  great  2014-­15  campaign.    

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Join us for Summer at City! FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.ccny.cuny.edu/summer

Thursday,  April  10,  2014


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle HYTHM & LUESHIRTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

15

Past  Practice,  Future  Success

Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

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SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

Baseball Struggles In Conference Play PAGE 12

LOOKING Lacrosse Looks To Stay Positive PAGE 13

AHEAD

PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN  

SOFTBALL SPLITS AGAINST CORTLAND, OSWEGO : PAGE 11


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 85, Issue 20