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Thursday,  September  15,  2011 PHOTO  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ  

Volume  83,  Issue  II

NEW PALTZ

REMEMBERS &ROOHJH2IÀFLDOV+RVW)ODJ3ODQWLQJ Ceremony, Forum Commemorating 9/11

SEE STORIES ON PAGES 6, 7 EDITORIAL ON PAGE 9

INSIDE THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE ‡&KDQFHOORU&UHDWHV681<$OOLDQFHV3J ‡6WXGHQW$VVRFLDWLRQ6SUHDGLQJ$ZDUHQHVV3J ‡$OXPQL:HHNHQG$SSURDFKHVDW1HZ3DOW]3J

Local Farmers Still Reeling From Tropical Storm Flooding STORY ON PAGE 5


Julie  Mansmann EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Andrew  Wyrich   MANAGING  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF _________________

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

John  Brandi   NEWS  EDITOR

Rachel  Freeman   FEATURES  EDITOR

Zan  Strumfeld

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR

Cat  Tacopina   SPORTS  EDITOR _________________

Samantha  Schwartz   Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Sophie  Zhai   ASSISTANT  PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITOR

Josh  Kusaywa   CARTOONIST _________________

Jaleesa  Baulkman   Kate  Blessing   Maria  Jayne   Katherine  Speller COPY  EDITORS

Pete  Viola Katie  Kocijanski ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITORS _________________

Sara  Federbush   WEB  CHIEF

Patrick  Martz BUSINESS  MANAGER

Kathryn  Smith DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER  

FEATURES        PG.  6B A&E                    PG.  10B SPORTS                PG.  11 About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI681<1HZ3DOW] Our  circulation  is  2,500.  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  sponsored  by  the  Student  As-­ sociation  and  partially  funded  by  the  student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  Room  417.  Deadline   for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in  The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\ e-­mail  at  oracle@newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HGE\WKHEXVL ness  manager.  Community  announcements  are  published  gratuitously,  but  are  subject  to  restriction  due   to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents  of  this  paper  cannot  be  reproduced   without  the  written  permission  of  the  editor-­in-­chief. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  published  weekly  throughout  the  fall  and  spring  semesters  on  Thursdays.   It  is  available  in  all  residence  halls  and  academic  buildings,  in  the  New  Paltz  community  and  online  at   oracle.newpaltz.edu.  For  more  information,  call  845-­257-­3030.  The  fax  line  is  845-­257-­3031. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  holds  assignment  meetings  every  Sunday  at  7  p.m.  in  Student  Union  418.   Articles,  photographs  and  illustrations  are  assigned  to  the  pool  of  staff  and  contributors.

Volume  83 Issue  II

University  Police  Blotter

Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please   visit  the  University  Police  Department.

Index

NEWS THE  GUNK   THE  DEEP  END

3-­8 1B-­8B 8B

EDITORIAL  

9

COLUMNS

10

-­  ANDREW  WYRICH

SPORTS  

11-­16

FOLLOW  â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE  ORACLEâ&#x20AC;?

Felice  Bernabo,  Sunya  Bhutta,  Andrew  Carden,  Nick  Fodera,  Ken   Glauber,  Elexis  Goldberg,  Maeve  Halliday,  Ryan  Patrick  Hanrahan,   Ricardo  Hernandez,  Alec  Horowitz,  Samantha  Huertas,  Sarah  Hurd,   Mathew  John,  Brian  Kearney,  Jessica  Mingoia,  Danielle  Quitoni,   David  Spiegel,  Emily  Sussell,  Chris  Thurston,  Pete  Thompson,  Harris   Wichard,  Annie  Yu

STAFF

Incident:  Alcohol/Drugs Date:  09/10/11 Location:  LFH F/S  and  M/S  arrested  for;͞  an  open  container,   unlawful  possession  of  alcohol  and  unlawful   possession  of  marijuana.   Incident:  Drugs Date:  09/11/11 Location:  DYH F/S  arrested  for  unlawful  possesion  of   marijuana   Incident:  Drugs Date:  09/11/11 Location:  SOUTHSIDE  AVE

@NewPaltzOracle

Thursday,  September  15 Scattered  Thunderstorms   High:  67  Low:  44  

Friday,  September  16 Sunny High:  62  Low:  47  

Saturday,  September  17   Partly  Cloudy High:  64  Low:  48  

Sunday,  September  18 Sunny High:  67  Low:  50  

F/S  and  M/S  arrested  for  unlawful  posses-­ sion  of  marijuana SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Five  Day  Forecast

Monday,  September  19   Sunny High:68  Low:  50  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   3

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SUNY  Forms  Campus  Alliance  Network By  Jaleesa  Baulkman Copy  Editor  |  Jbaulkman75@newpaltz.edu

SUNY   Chancellor   Nancy   Zimpher   announced   last   month  that  SUNY  campus  presidents  and  System  Adminis-­ tration  will  collaboratively  develop  and  implement  region-­ al  SUNY  Campus  Alliance  Networks  to  expand  academic   resources  and  course  availability  to  students.    This  new  system  will  call  for  two  or  more  SUNY  col-­ leges   in   a   region   to   share   administrative   functions   in   an   effort  to  redirect  limited  funding  toward  academic  instruc-­ tion  and  other  student-­support  services. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   we   implement   a   rational   tuition   policy   that   re-­ TXLUHVVWXGHQWVDQGWKHLUIDPLOLHVWRPDNHDJUHDWHUÂżQDQ-­ cial   commitment   to   SUNY,   it   isâ&#x20AC;Ścrucial   that   we   make   good  on  their  investment  by  ensuring  that  their  education   experience   is   not   only   protected   but   also   enhancedâ&#x20AC;?   said   Zimpher.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Financial  constraints  in  recent  years  have  result-­ ed  in  less  course  availability  on  our  campuses.â&#x20AC;? According  to  a  press  release,  Zimpher  will  recommend   to   the   SUNY   Board   of   Trustees   that   President   of   SUNY   Institute   of   Technology   Bjong   Wolf   Yeigh   also   serve   as   president  of  Morrisville  State  College.  The  former  Morris-­ ville  President  Raymond  Cross  resigned  from  the  position   in  February.     In   a   similar   situation,   SUNY   Delhi   President   Can-­ GDFH 9DQFNR ZDV DSSRLQWHG WR VHUYH DV RIÂżFHULQFKDUJH at  SUNY  Cobleskill  following  the  retirement  of  Donald    P.   Zingale  who  stepped  down  Aug.  3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shared  leadership  between  these  campuses  will  best   serve  current  and  future  students  enabling  campuses  to  en-­ roll  more  students,  hire  more  full-­time  faculty  and  increase   course   offerings,â&#x20AC;?   said   Zimpher.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strategically   aligning   our  campuses  where  appropriate  and  implementing  a  ratio-­

nal  tuition  policy  across  the  system  puts  SUNY  in  a  stron-­ ger  position  to  reverse  this  trend  [of  less  course  availability   on  SUNY  campuses].â&#x20AC;? Zimpher  said  she  does  not  want  the  Campus  Alliance   Networks  to  be  confused  with  a  consolidation  or  merger.   All   64   SUNY   campuses   will   remain   open   and   they   each   will  retain  their  individual  identity  such  as  name,  academic   specialties   and   school   colors.  This   union   will   enable   stu-­ dents  to  gain  access  to  the  academic  resources  of  a  second   campus  in  the  region.   Andrew  Pletch,  chair  of  the  Computer  Science  Depart-­ ment,  thinks  that  the  SUNY  Campus  Alliance  Network  is   a  logical  solution  to  save  and  relocate  money  to  improve   public   higher   education   institutions   given   these   circum-­ stances.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   getting   less   and   less   money   from   the   state,â&#x20AC;?   said  Pletch.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  replaced  it  with  tuition  increases.â&#x20AC;? According  to  the  SUNY  website,  SUNY  campus  pres-­ idents   will   develop   plans   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;employ   available   resources   PRUH HIÂżFLHQWO\ E\ VKDULQJ VHUYLFHV RQ D VHFWRU UHJLRQDO or  mission  basis.â&#x20AC;?     The   SUNY   Board   of  Trustees   encouraged   presidents   to   promote   campus-­to-­campus   collaboration   and   carry-­ out  strategies  to  generate  cost  savings,  build  capacity  and   expand  student  services.  Students  will  have  access  to  aca-­ demic  resources,  courses  and  programs  at  additional  cam-­ puses  in  the  region. SUNY  Plattsburgh  will  be  linked  to  Albany  and  New   Paltz  in  this  cost  cutting  plan.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;SUNY   Campus  Alliance   Networks   will   expand   ac-­ cess   for   students   by   making   available   to   them   academic   resources,  courses,  and  programs  at  additional  campuses  in   the  region,â&#x20AC;?  said  Zimpher  in  a  press  release.

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR

Zimpher  helped  create  the  SUNY  Campus  Alliance  Network.

 The  Legislative  Gazette  Faces  Budget  Trouble By  Julie  Mansmann     Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Jmansmann60@newpaltz.edu

The  Legislative  Gazette,  a  staple  of  the  internship  program  of   the  communication  and  media  department  of  SUNY  New  Paltz,  has   recently  eliminated  stipend  offerings  for  interns  and  cut  the  intern-­ ship  coordinator  position  due  to  their  tightening  budget.   Joseph  Brill,  who  served  as  both  deputy  editor  and  internship   coordinator  since  2005  according  to  Editor  James  Gormley,  left  the   weekly  newspaper  on  Aug.  31.  Publisher  Alan  Chartock  said  the  de-­ cision  to  cut  the  position  from  the  budget,  in  addition  to  the  stipends   previously  afforded  to  student  interns,  resulted  from  the  lack  of  rev-­ enue  available  as  compared  to  the  costs  of  running  the  newspaper.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   is   not   a   newspaper   in   America,   from   The   New   York   Times   down,   that   has   not   experienced   a   terrible   need   to   conserve   based  on  everything  that  has  happened  with  the  Internet,â&#x20AC;?  Chartock   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  challenges  we  face  are  identical  to  those  faced  by  every   newspaper  in  the  country.â&#x20AC;?   Brill   said   Gormely   will   assume   his   newsroom   duties   for   the   publication  that  covers  state  politics  in  Albany,  N.Y.,  in  addition  to   becoming   the   student   recruiter.   Gormely,   who   said   he   will   be   re-­

cruiting  interns  for  the  publication  while  teaching  courses  like  Public   Affairs   Reporting   and   Journalism   1   on   the   SUNY   New   Paltz   and   Albany  campuses,  said  Brillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  presence  will  be  missed.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  personality  was  one  we  enjoyed  and  he  lightened  up  the   newsroom,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also,  while  I  was  on  different  campuses  teach-­ ing,  Joe  was  in  charge.  That  means  the  interns  will  be  working  by   themselves  a  little  more  than  in  the  past,  but  that  is  not  necessarily   a  bad  thing.â&#x20AC;?   Chartock  said  the  stipend  offered  to  the  staff  comprised  entirely   of  student  interns  was  also  eliminated  to  compensate  for  losses  in  an   â&#x20AC;&#x153;already  tight  budget.â&#x20AC;?  The  stipend  was  designed  to  help  the  student   interns  living  in  Albany  while  working  for  the  Legislative  Gazette   full-­time  pay  their  rent.   Internship   Coordinator   Robert   Miller   said   the   obligation   to   move  to  Albany  and  other  factors  deter  some  SUNY  New  Paltz  stu-­ dents  from  enrolling  in  what  he  described  as  an  excellent  journalism   program.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;While  this  is  an  excellent  internship  opportunity,  it  does  not   appeal  to  many  of  our  students,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Interns  must  spend  the   semester  in  Albany.  Also,  the  internship  is  focused  on  political  re-­

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

porting  which  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  of  interest  to  all  students.â&#x20AC;?   Gormely  agreed  that  the  idea  of  political  reporting  may  not  ap-­ peal  to  SUNY  New  Paltz  students  in  the  same  way  it  does  to  their   peers  in  Albany  who  he  said  have  shown  more  interest  in  interning   for  the  Legislative  Gazette  in  recent  years.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students  who  go  to  SUNY  Albany  are  in  the  state  capital,  so   they  have  more  exposure  to  government  and  politics,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   may  be  more  ingrained  in  their  thought  processes.  The  culture  of  [the   New  Paltz  campus]  may  inspire  more  artistic  writing  and  stuff  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not  necessarily  political.â&#x20AC;?   Gormely  and  Chartock  both  said  they  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  the  elimina-­ tion  of  the  stipend  will  have  a  great  effect  on  their  recruitment,  how-­ ever.  The   six   tuition   waivers   available   to   students   with   qualifying   grade  points  averages  will  still  be  offered.   In   spite   of   the   recent   â&#x20AC;&#x153;tightening   of   the   belt,â&#x20AC;?   Chartock   said   he  and  others  involved  in  managing  the  Legislative  Gazette  will  be   able  to  ride  through  a  rough  economic  patch  with  the  quality  of  the   internship  program  intact.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   long   as   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   prudent,   the   future   of   the   paper   is   not   in   danger,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Senate  Positions  Are  Filled   By  Jaleesa  Baulkman   &RS\(GLWRU_Jbaulkman75@newpaltz.edu

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NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Farm  Flooding  Foils  The  Season   By  Zan  Strumfeld   A&E  Editor  |  Sstrumfeld34@newpalt.edu

While   the   town,   village   and   campus   have   all   fo-­ cused  on  recovering  from  Tropical  Storm  Irene,  local   New  Paltz  farms  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  know  where  to  begin. As  of  Sept.  4,  local  farms  in  New  York  lost  a  total   of   140,000   acres   and   about   $45   million   in   damage,   according  to  The  New  York  Times. Farms  including  Huguenot  Street  Farm,  Taliaferro   Farms  and  Springtown  Sweetview  Farm  were  all  con-­ VLGHUDEO\KXUWIURPWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJUXLQLQJWKHLUVHDVRQ-­ al  and  yearly  crops.   Although   some   farmers   tried   to   prepare   for   the   storm,  they  had  no  idea  how  immensely  it  would  af-­ fect  them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   thought   there   would   be   high   winds,   so   we   pulled  down  some  of  the  greenhouse  plastic  and  dou-­ ble  tied  others,â&#x20AC;?  said  Ron  Khosla  of  Huguenot  Street   Farms.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;From   reading   the   weather   information,   it   GLGQÂśWVRXQGOLNHZHZRXOGKDYHWKDWPXFKĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJ´ However,   as   the   calm   Saturday   weather   disap-­ peared   and   it   began   to   storm   throughout   the   night,   things  changed  for  Khosla. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overnight,  the  water  level  in  New  Paltz  kept  rising   and  rising  and  rising.  Had  I  known  it  would  happen,   I  would  have  stayed  up  all  night  trying  to  save  more   things.  But  we  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know,â&#x20AC;?  said  Khosla.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;None  of   our  farmer  friends  knew  and  by  the  time  we  woke  up   on  Monday  we  were  wrecked.  Tens  of  thousands  of   dollars  more  damage.â&#x20AC;?        Huguenot  Street  Farm  lost  everything,  crop-­wise.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  already  started  replanting,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  just   DKXJHÂżQDQFLDOEORZLWÂśVDOVRDSV\FKRORJLFDOEORZ to  see  everything  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  worked  for  destroyed,â&#x20AC;?  said   Khosla. 2QWRSRIWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJDIHGHUDOJXLGHOLQHKDVEHHQ LVVXHGVWLSXODWLQJWKDWFURSVH[SRVHGWRWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRGZDWHU are   contaminated.    According   to   the   U.S.   Food   and  

Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Kkocijanski14@newpaltz.edu

A  fresh  face  has  come  to  Historic  Huguenot  Street   (HHS).    At  the  end  of  August,  Tracy  Doolittle  Mc-­ Nally  became  the  new  executive  director  of  the  or-­ ganization.   Former  president  of  the  Green  County  Chamber   of   Commerce   and   11th   generation   descendent   of   the  founders  of  Huguenot  Street,  McNally  sees  new   opportunity  for  growth  and  development  for  the  his-­ toric  landmark  district.   Originally  from  Scarsdale,  N.Y.,  McNally  built  a   weekend  home  in  High  Falls  after  meeting  her  hus-­ band  who  was  working  in  Kingston,  N.Y.   McNally  said  her  interest  in  Hudson  Valley  histo-­ ry  came  from  her  grandmother.  When  she  was  four-­ teen,  she  inherited  a  binder  full  of  newspaper  clip-­

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD  

ITALY  PROTESTS  BUDGET ,WDO\ÂśV3DUOLDPHQWJDYHÂżQDODSSURYDOWR Premier  Silvio  Berlusconiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   austerity  measures,  a  combination  of  higher   taxes,  pension  reform  and  slashed  spending   that  sparked  street  protests  in  Rome.

ALL  HANDS  ON  DECK

 

 

                       PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

7KHĂ&#x20AC;RRGZDWHUVKDYHFDUULHGSURGXFHIURPORFDOIDUPVGRZQVWUHDP 'UXJ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQĂ&#x20AC;RRGZDWHUFDQFDUU\FKHPLFDOV assess  each  farm  to  see  where  they  stand.  The  survey   VHZDJHDQGPRUH7KLVPDNHVIRRGXQÂżWIRUKXPDQ includes  how  many  acres  they  lost  or  potentially  can   consumption. lose,  whether  they  have  insurance,  etc.  FLOOD  Aid   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even  little  rays  of  hope  that  we  had  left,  for  ex-­ will  administer  the  money  collected  through  the  New   ample,   the   winter   squash   seemed   to   have   survived,   Paltz  Community  Foundation. were  smashed  from  us  because  so  much  disease  was   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  farms  lost  nothing,  some  lost  everything,â&#x20AC;?   carried  in  the  water  that  even  a  week  later  things  were   said  KT  Tobin  Flusser,  who  is  part  of  the  New  Paltz   still  dying,â&#x20AC;?  said  Khosla.   FLOOD  Aid. Luckily,   Huguenot   Street   Farm   is   a   Community   FLOOD  Aid  will  host  two  events  in  October.  There   Supported  Agriculture  (CSA)  farm  and  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  go  out   will  be  a  Kick  Off  Potluck  event  on  Sunday,  Oct.  2   RIEXVLQHVVGXHWRWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJ from   4   to   9   p.m.   at  Water   Street   Market.   Six   bands   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   could   never   survive   this   without   the   CSA,â&#x20AC;?   will   perform   including   Ratboy,   SnowBear   and   The   said   Khosla.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   am   much   more   worried   about   other   Love  Taps.  Local  chefs  will  also  prepare  local  food   local  farms  that  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  CSA  as  some  part  of  their   and  there  is  a  $20  suggested  donation. total.â&#x20AC;? 7KHDOOGD\EHQHÂżWFRQFHUWZLOOKHOSUDLVHPRQH\ As   farmers   try   to   recover,   community   members   WKURXJKDXFWLRQVJLIWFHUWLÂżFDWHVIRUORFDOEXVLQHVVHV have  organized  the  New  Paltz  FLOOD  Aid  in  order   and   more   on   Sunday,   Oct.   16   from   12   to   6   p.m.   at   WRUDLVHPRQH\IRUWKHIDUPHUVIDPLOLHVDQGÂżUVWUH-­ Hasbrouck  Park.    Musicians  include  The  Trapps,  Erik   VSRQGHUVPRVWDIIHFWHGE\WKHĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJ6LQFHIDUPV Lawrence  from  The  Levon  Helm  Band,  Randy  Ciar-­ were  affected  in  different  ways,  the  organization  will   lante  from  The  Band  and  Alexis  P.  Suter.

Historic  Huguenot  Street  Has  A  New  Face By  Katie  Kocijanksi

 5

pings  about  her  family  who  lived  in  the  area.  One  of   the  reasons  she  chose  to  apply  for  the  job  originally   was  to  further  develop  her  love  of  area  history. 2QHRIKHUÂżUVWSULRULWLHVLQKHUQHZSRVLWLRQLVWR â&#x20AC;&#x153;expose  the  public  more  to  their  collection.â&#x20AC;?   According  to  McNally,  HHS  has  many  more  his-­ torical  items  like  paintings,  furniture  and  diaries  in   storage  that  the  public  should  see.  She  said  what  is   holding  this  back  is  Huguenotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  limited  space.  If  this   collection  was  seen,  she  said  the  community  would   REVHUYHÂżUVWKDQGKRZPXFKKLVWRULFDOPHPRUDELOLD HHS  has  to  show. According  to  HHS  President  Mary  Etta  Schneider,   McNally  was  hired  because  of  her  extensive  experi-­ HQFHZRUNLQJZLWKQRQSURÂżWV â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   has   a   proven   track   record   of   running   non-­ SURÂżW RUJDQL]DWLRQV´ VDLG 6FKQHLGHU Âł6KH KDV D

strong   business   background,   which   is   now   critical   IRUQRQSURÂżWV´ Schneider  explained  that  McNally,  an  alumna  of   New  Paltz,  will  further  strengthen  the  ties  between   the  college  and  the  community.  In  addition,  increas-­ ing   fundraising   events   and   membership   is   another   one   of   her   goals.   McNally   would   like   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;broaden   membership  in  the  Hudson  Valley  area.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;McNally   also   has   a   track   record   in   building   a   strong  volunteer  network,  which  is  something  HHS   needs,â&#x20AC;?  said  Schneider. For   more   information   about   their   upcoming   events  please  visit  their  Calendar  of  Events  page  at   www.huguenotstreet.org.  Future  fundraisers  include   Art  on  the  Street  with  Kevin  Cook  on  Saturday,  Sept.   17    and  their  annual  haunted  Huguenot  Street  event   the  weekend  of  Oct.  28.  

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

 Armed  pirates  raided  a  tanker  off  the  West     African  coast  and  kidnapped  23  sailors   Wednesday,  taking  off  with  the  vessel  in  wa-­ ters  that  are  increasingly  at  risk  of  piracy,  an   international  monitoring  group  said.

PARTNERS  IN  CRIME The  wife  of  a  suicide  bomber  who  targeted   Christmas  shoppers  in  Stockholm  has  been  ar-­ rested  by  British  police  on  suspicion  of  helping   to  prepare  for  the  attack.

U.N.  TOLD  TO  LEAVE Protesters  calling  for  the  withdrawal  of  U.N.   peacekeepers  from  Haiti  clashed  with  police   Wednesday  outside  the  earthquake-­damaged   Haitian  National  Palace.

LIBYAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  LOOSE  LATCH The  potential  proliferation  of  both  convention-­ al  and  unconventional  weapons  in  Libya  after   six  months  of  civil  war  is  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;key  concernâ&#x20AC;?  for   WKH 8QLWHG 6WDWHV D VHQLRU $PHULFDQ RIÂżFLDO said  Wednesday.

PLANE  CRASH  KILLS  SCORES An   Angolan   air   force   plane   crashed   as   it   took   off   from   a   central   base   Wednesday,   killing  30  people  including  three  generals,   state  media  reported.

Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


 6 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

SHARING 9/11

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Campus  Commemorates  The  Fallen

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

2Q)ULGD\6HSW681<1HZ3DOW]KRVWHGDĂ&#x20AC;DJSODQWLQJFHUHPRQ\RQ2OG0DLQ4XDGIHDWXULQJYDULRXVVSHDNHUVLQUHPHPEUDQFHRIWKRVHNLOOHGLQWKHWHUURULVWDWWDFNVRI6HSWDGHFDGHDJR

By  Andrew  Wyrich 0DQDJLQJ(GLWRU_Andrew.wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

New  Paltz  Fire  Department  Chief  Kevin  McGuire  said  he  was  a  little   hesitant  to  step  up  to  the  podium  facing  Old  Main  Quad  on  Sept.  9,  2011.   +RZHYHUWKHÂżUHÂżJKWHUVDLGKHRYHUFDPHKLVIHDUVIRUWKHVDNHRIFRO-­ leagues,  friends  and  others  who  died  on  Sept.  11,  2001.     Âł,GRQÂśWOLNHSXEOLFVSHDNLQJ²,OLNHEHLQJDÂżUHÂżJKWHU´0F*XLUH VDLGÂł%XWZKHQ,ZDVWROG,ZRXOGEHUHSUHVHQWLQJDOORIWKHÂżUVWUHVSRQG-­ HUVIURPWKDWGD\,ZDVDEVROXWHO\KRQRUHG´ 2Q )ULGD\ 681< 1HZ 3DOW] KRVWHG D Ă&#x20AC;DJ SODQWLQJ FHUHPRQ\ RQ FDPSXVLQUHPHPEUDQFHRIWKRVHNLOOHGLQWKHWHUURULVWDWWDFNVRI6HSW DQGLQUHFRJQLWLRQRIDOORIWKHÂżUVWUHVSRQGHUVZKRULVNHGRUJDYH their  lives  in  pursuit  of  helping  others. Âł7RGD\ZHUHPHPEHUWKRVHZKRGLHG²DOPRVWLQGLYLGXDOV EXWZHDOVRUHFRJQL]HWKHVSHFLDOUROHRIÂżUVWUHVSRQGHUÂśVLQWKLVDQGRWKHU FULVLVZHIDFH´3UHVLGHQW'RQDOG&KULVWLDQVDLGLQKLVRSHQLQJVSHHFKRI WKHFHUHPRQ\Âł9HU\OLNHO\VRPHRIWKRVHZLWKXVWRGD\ZHUHSDUWRIWKDW HIIRUWDQGZHKRQRUWKHPWRGD\´ Students,  faculty,  staff  and  members  of  the  New  Paltz  community   gathered   with   members   of   the   New   Paltz   Fire   Department,   Police   De-­ partment  and  Rescue  Squad  on  Old  Main  Quad  and  were  invited  to  plant   PLQLDWXUH$PHULFDQĂ&#x20AC;DJVLQWKHRXWOLQHRIWZRWRZHUVHDFKRQHLQ UHPHPEUDQFHRIWKRVHZKRZHUHNLOOHGRQ6HSWDQGWKHERPELQJ of  the  World  Trade  Center.   Âł:HDVNHGSHRSOHWROHDYHWKHĂ&#x20AC;DJVXQWRXFKHGXQWLOWKHEHOOVRI9DQ

GHQ%HUJ+DOOULQJRQ6XQGD\PRUQLQJRIWKHH[DFWWLPHVRIWKHDWWDFNVRQ WKH3HQWDJRQWKH:RUOG7UDGH&HQWHUDQGWKHFUDVKRI)OLJKW´&KULV-­ WLDQVDLGÂł$IWHUWKRVHFKLPHVZHHQFRXUDJHGSHRSOHWRWDNHDĂ&#x20AC;DJDVD PHPHQWRRIWKHHYHQW´ %HIRUHĂ&#x20AC;DJVZHUHSODQWHG&KULVWLDQLQWURGXFHGWKUHHJXHVWVSHDNHUV for  the  ceremony  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  McGuire,  Director  of  the  Institute  for  Disaster  Mental   +HDOWK-DPHV+DOSHUQDQG5HY7RELDV$QGHUVRQDOORIZKRPRIIHUHGGLI-­ ferent  perspectives  on  the  aftermath  and  continued  progression  our  coun-­ try  has  gone  through  after  that  day.   During  his  speech,  McGuire  said  every  member  of  the  community,   whether  they  were  a  responder  or  a  citizen,  went  through  the  same  griev-­ LQJSURFHVV+HDOVRDVNHGWKHFURZGWRUHPHPEHUWKHSDWULRWLVPIHOWDIWHU WKHDWWDFNVRXWRIUHVSHFWIRUWKRVHZKRULVNHGWKHLUOLYHVWKDWGD\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   aware   that   people   were   out   there,   wanting   to   do   us   KDUP´ 0F*XLUH VDLG Âł:HOO ZHÂśUH DZDUH QRZ DQG ZLWK WKH LQFUHDVHG WKUHDWVIRUWKLVZHHNHQG,FDQDVVXUH\RXRQHWKLQJÂąZKHQDQGLILWKDS-­ SHQVDJDLQVPDOORUODUJHÂżUVWUHVSRQGHUVZLOOEHWKHUH´ McGuire   said   he   believes   the   perception   of   Sept.   11   has   changed   over  the  last  ten  years  and  he  believes  The  United  States  needs  to  remem-­ ber  and  return  to  the  feelings  shared  that  day.   Âł, WKLQN FRPSODFHQF\ LV VRPHZKDW UHWXUQLQJ WR RXU VRFLHW\´ 0F-­ *XLUHVDLGÂł$IWHUWKHDWWDFNVHYHU\RQHZDVVRSDWULRWLFDQGRXWJRLQJDQG now  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  slowly  returning  to  the  way  things  were  before  hand  which  was   FRPSODFHQF\,WKLQNWKDWÂśVJRLQJWROHDGWRDQRWKHUHYHQWDQGLWÂśVVDGWR VHHWKDW,WKLQNWKHĂ&#x20AC;DJVKHUHDUHZRQGHUIXOEXWWKHVHGD\V\RXÂśUHKDUG SUHVVHGWRÂżQGDĂ&#x20AC;DJĂ&#x20AC;\LQJDQ\ZKHUHLQWRZQDQGWKDWLVWUXO\VDG´

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

Halpern,  who  followed  McGuireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  speech,  stressed  that  people  are   VWLOODIIHFWHGE\WKHDWWDFNVWRGD\DQGGHVHUYHDWWHQWLRQDQGKHOS+HDOVR UHDGWHVWLPRQLDOVRIWKRVHZKRZHUHFKLOGUHQRQWKHGD\RIWKHDWWDFNV $FFRUGLQJWR+DOSHUQZKRZHQWWR*URXQG=HURIROORZLQJWKHDW-­ WDFNVWRRIIHUÂżUVWDLGDQGKHOSHGHYDFXDWHDQDVVLVWHGOLYLQJKRPHLWPD\ WDNHGHFDGHVEHIRUHZHNQRZWKHIXOOH[WHQWRIWKHHPRWLRQDODQGSK\VLFDO WUDXPDIRUZRUNHUVWKHLUIDPLOLHVUHVLGHQWVDQGRWKHUVH[SRVHG â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   ripple   effect   of   9/11   was   so   great   that   there   is   a   danger   that   VRPHRQH ZKR QHHGHG DQG VWLOO QHHGV FDUH FDQ EH RYHUORRNHG´ +DOSHUQ VDLGÂł7HQVRIWKRXVDQGVRIPHQDQGZRPHQZRUNHGZLWKWKHUHFRYHU\ HIIRUWVDW*URXQG=HURUHFRYHULQJPRUHWKDQWKRXVDQGERG\SDUWVDWDQ H[WUDRUGLQDU\SHUVRQDOFRVW´ $WWKHFRQFOXVLRQRIWKHFHUHPRQ\$QGHUVRQ RI5HGHHPHU(YDQ-­ JHOLFDO&KXUFKLQ1HZ3DOW] WRRNWKHSRGLXPDQGOHGWKRVHLQDWWHQGDQFH LQ D PRPHQW RI VLOHQFH DQG JHQHUDO SUD\HU EHIRUH LQYLWLQJ WKH ÂżUVW UH-­ VSRQGHUVWRSODQWĂ&#x20AC;DJVIROORZHGE\WKHSXEOLF 6ORZO\PHPEHUVRIWKHFDPSXVFRPPXQLW\TXLHWO\SODFHGĂ&#x20AC;DJVLQWR the  ground  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  some  closing  their  eyes  and  saying  a  few  words  while  others   paid  their  respects  and  departed.   $IWHUWKHFHUHPRQ\&KULVWLDQVDLGKHEHOLHYHGWKHZD\SHRSOHYLHZ 6HSWDIWHU\HDUVZDVÂłFRPSOH[´ Âł,WKLQN>SHRSOHKDYH@UHDOL]HGWKHFRPSOH[LW\RIWKHZD\ZHKDYH UHVSRQGHGDVDQDWLRQDQGWKHNLQGRILPSDFWLWKDGRQKRZZHYLHZRXU-­ VHOYHVLQWKHZRUOG´&KULVWLDQVDLGÂł,WKLQNWKDWFRPSOH[LW\RIWKHFRQ-­ VHTXHQFHVRIWKHDWWDFNVLVRQHWKDWVREHUVSHRSOHDQGSHRSOHFRQWLQXHWR JURZLQWKHLUDZDUHQHVVRIWKHLPSOLFDWLRQVLWKDGIRUDOORIXV´


NEWS

 7

EXPERIENCES

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

PHOTO  BY  ANDREW  WYRICH

oracle.newpaltz.edu

TOP  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN;͞  BOTTOM    BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ

3DQHO3DUWLFLSDQWV5HĂ&#x20AC;HFW2Q$QQLYHUVDU\ By  Katie  Kocijanski Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Kkocijanski14@newpaltz.edu

Faculty  members  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  held  a  panel  discus-­ VLRQRQ6HSWFDOOHGÂł7HQ<HDUVRQÂŤ5HĂ&#x20AC;HFWLRQVRQ´ At   the   Honors   Center,   Gerald   Benjamin,   associate   vice   president   for   regional   engagement   and   director   for   the   Cen-­ ter  for  Research,  Regional  Education  and  Outreach  (CRREO)   served  as  a  moderator  for  a  panel  of  four  professors  each  pre-­ VHQWLQJGLIIHUHQWSHUVSHFWLYHVRQWKHDIWHUPDWKRI Interim   Director   of   the   Honors   Program   Patricia   Sulli-­ van   introduced   Benjamin.   Each   of   the   four   professors   were   selected  because  they  had  â&#x20AC;&#x153;conducted  research  on  the  topics   they   are   addressing,   spoken   about   these   topics   or   addressed   WKHVHWRSLFVLQWKHLUFODVVHV´6XOOLYDQVDLG 7KH FDPSXV KHOG WZR HYHQWV WR FRPPHPRUDWH WKH  anniversary.  The  panel  in  the  Honors  Center  addressed  issues   associated   with   civil   liberties,   security,   memory   and   peda-­ gogy.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   panel,   from   different   perspectives,   addresses   FKDQJHLQDUDQJHRIFRQWH[WVVLQFH´VDLG6XOOLYDQ Professor   of   political   science   Lewis   Brownstein   spoke   RQÂł5HWKLQNLQJ$PHULFDQ6HFXULW\LQWKH$IWHUPDWKRI´ According  to  Brownstein,  America  has  faced  some  profound   FKDQJHV LQ ZDUIDUH DQG VHFXULW\ VLQFH WKH DWWDFNV RI 

Since  then,  the  American  military  has  moved  more  toward  co-­ vert  operations  in  times  of  war  and  crisis.   Brownstein  said  there  has  been  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;massive  expansion  in   FRYHUW IRUFHV´ 7KLV FRYHUW GHYHORSPHQW UHSUHVHQWHG D QHZ trend  in  modern  security  in  which  spy  satellites  and  droids  are   becoming  more  common. Brownstein  said  in  the  midst  of  the  loss,  pain  and  concern   we  need  more  engagement  in  improving  affairs.   Assistant   Professor   Hamilton   Stapell   of   the   history   de-­ partment  spoke  on  the  idea  of  historical  memory.    As  a  Euro-­ pean  historian,  Stapell  said  he  believes  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;historical  mem-­ RU\KDVWKHSRZHUWRVKDSHFXUUHQWHYHQWV´$FFRUGLQJWRWKH professor,  the  publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  memory  of  any  event  is  reshaped  over   time.    He  said  this  happens  in  the  physical  and  mental  sense    WKH SK\VLFDO RFFXUV LQ VXFK SODFHV DV ÂżFWLRQ GRFXPHQWDU\ ÂżOPV WKHDWUH SROLWLFDO GLVFRXUVH RIÂżFLDO DQG XQRIÂżFLDO PH-­ morials.    According  to  Stapell,  memory  is  constantly  being  recon-­ structed  and  it  can  be  biased  and  contested  by  people.  A  sense   of  national  unity  has  been  observed  by  Stapell,  as  a  result  of    7KHUH KDV DOVR EHHQ DQ RYHUDOO SRVLWLYH HPSKDVLV RQ LGHDV RI VDFULÂżFH KRQRU DQG FROOHFWLYH HIIRUWV  VRPH RI WKH JRRGIHHOLQJVZHUHPHPEHUDERXW â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whether  we  remember  something  as  primarily  a  success   >RXUZRQGHUIXOÂżUVWUHVSRQGHUV@RUDIDLOXUH>QDWLRQDOVHFXULW\

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

DQGDLUSRUWVHFXULW\@OHDGVWRDFHUWDLQFRXUVHRIDFWLRQLQWKH SUHVHQW´VDLG6WDSHOO Nancy  Kassop,  a  political  science  professor,  focused  on   the   political   and   constitutional   consequences   of   the   changes   in   law   following   the   attack.   Kassop   believes   that   the   Bush   $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ PDGH GHFLVLRQV GLIIHUHQWO\ SRVW DQG failed  to  properly  exercise  the  use  of  the  Constitution.   Kassop  spoke  of  the  constitutionality  of  changes  in  law     DIWHU$FFRUGLQJWR.DVVRS\RXFDQQRWDPHQGWKHZRUN of  the  Constitution  and  there  is  no  inherent  executive  power   embedded  in  the  document.  She  said  the  policy  responses  to   VHHPWREHDORQJWKRVHOLQHVRIDVRFDOOHGLGHDRILQKHU-­ ent  executive  power.   7KHÂżQDOVSHDNHURIWKHQLJKWZDV-HUU\3HUVDXGDVVLVWDQW professor  of  communication  and  media,  who  presented  on  the   LPSDFWRIWKHPHGLDRIWKHUHSHUFXVVLRQV+LVSLHFHHQ-­ titled,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pedagogy   vs.   Patriotism:  A   Decade   of  Teaching   and   /HDUQLQJ DERXW 0HGLD´ KLJKOLJKWHG KRZ WKH PHGLD FRYHUHG DQGZKDWLWPHDQWWRWKH$PHULFDQSXEOLF+HSUHVHQWHG a  series  of  questions  to  the  audience,  one  of  which  explored  a   VWXGHQWWHDFKHUUHODWLRQVKLSLQWHDFKLQJ,VLWDWHDFKHUÂśV UHVSRQVLELOLW\WRWHDFKWKHQH[WJHQHUDWLRQDERXW"  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fear  and  responsibility  of  open  discussions  of  facts  and   ÂżFWLRQVKDVFKDQJHGIRUWKHZRUVW´VDLG3HUVDXGÂł6LOHQFHLV YLUWXHRUYLUWXDOO\ZKDWVRPHSUHIHU´


 8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Student  Leaders  Spread  The  Word By  John  Brandi   News  Editor  |  Jbrandi02@newpaltz.edu

Knowing   is   half   the   battle   and   the   leadership   of   this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Student  Association  (SA)  said  they  have  a   ÂżJKWRQWKHLUKDQGV Last   semester   there   was   a   shortage   of   senators,   with  only  15  acting  members  sitting  on  the  legislative   body   out   of   25.   This   fall,   there   is   a   shortage   of   rep-­ resentation   on   committees   to   address   issues   ranging   from   the   SA   constitution   to   the   budget,   according   to   SA  President  Terrell  Coakley.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  all  of  these  committees  that  we  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   ÂżOOHGDQGZKHQDOOWKDWVWXIIKDSSHQHG>ODVWVHPHVWHU@ ZLWK WKH EXGJHW >VWXGHQW FRPSODLQWV ZHUH@ ZLWK QRW having  a  voice,  but  they  give  us  all  these  committees   WR DFWXDOO\ WDNH SDUW LQ >ZLWK@ ZKDW JRHV RQ ZLWK RXU school,â&#x20AC;?  said  Coakley.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  let  people   understand  what  we  do.â&#x20AC;?   Student   leaders   such   as   Coakley,   Vice   President   of  Academic  Affairs  and  Governance  Ayanna  Thomas   and  Senate  Chair  Alberto  Aquino  said  they  want  more   people   to   be   aware   of   SA   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   responsibilities   on   campus.   Thomas  said  she  wants  at  least  â&#x20AC;&#x153;85  percent  of  the   campusâ&#x20AC;?  to  know  what  SA  does.  She  said  the  trouble   with  presenting  to  classes  about  SA  and  her  position  is   that  students  had  no  prior  knowledge  that  her  position   even  existed.   In  addition  to  getting  to  word  out  on  SA  in  general,   Thomas   said   she   also   wants   to   increase   student   par-­ ticipation  on  committees.  Committees  such  as,  but  not   limited  to,    Academic  Affairs,  Education  and  Technol-­ ogy,   Liberal   Education  Ad   Hoc   and   Constitution   and  

Rules  Committee.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be   going   to   classes,   talking   about   joining   these   committees,â&#x20AC;?   said   Thomas.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   committees   are  under  facts  of  governance  and  are  open  to  anyone.   You  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  to  be  a  senator  to  join.â&#x20AC;?   0HDQZKLOH$TXLQRVDLGDMRLQWHIIRUWÂżUVWSULRULW\ ZRXOGEHWRÂżOODOORIWKHVHYDFDQWFRPPLWWHHVSRWV+H DOVRVDLGDWWHQWLRQZRXOGEHSDLGWRÂżOOLQJDQ\HPSW\

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

This  year  is  really  about  getting   ourselves  out  there,  and  letting   people  know  that  SA  offers  a  lot ALBERTO  AQUINO  

  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;this   includes   getting   involved   with   a   project   either   LQRURXWVLGHRIWKHRIÂżFH²DQGH[SORULQJKRZWKHFRO lege  can  create  a  network  with  other  campuses  in  the   region.   Aquino  was  inspired  to  create  this  network  in  the   DIWHUPDWKRI+XUULFDQH,UHQHDQGVXEVHTXHQWĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJ He   said   Marist   College   contacted   him   asking   if   they   could  help  with  the  repair  efforts  at  New  Paltz.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  want  our  senate  and  student  association  to  have   WKDWLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRQWKH+XGVRQ9DOOH\´VDLG$TXLQRÂł, ZDQWWREHSURXGRIOHDGLQJRUKHOSLQJ>ZLWK@681< New  Paltz.â&#x20AC;? Coakley  said  not  enough  information  regarding  SA   is  reaching  students.  One  of  his  top  priorities  includes   ensuring,  since  many  of  his  current  E-­board  members   are   graduating,   students   are   still   interested   in   SA   in-­ volvement.  He  said  that  SA  has  to  touch  upon  the    â&#x20AC;&#x153;stu-­ dent  experience,â&#x20AC;?  and    that  contributing  to  their  college   environment  mirrors  real  world  experience.   Meanwhile,   when   it   comes   to   the   student   senate,   Coakley  said  he  would  like  to  see  parties  come  back.  In   the  past,  senators  would  run  on  a  certain  party  line,  like   advocacy.  He  said  he  wants  people  to  challenge  them-­ selves  with  why  they  are  voting  a  certain  way  instead   of  making  senate  elections  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  popularity  contest.â&#x20AC;?   $OOVHQDWHVHDWVKDYHEHHQÂżOOHGDVRIWKHODVW Academic   Senate   meeting   on   Sept.   13.   Committee   seats  are  still  open  as  student  leaders  continue  to  rely   on  word-­of-­mouth  campaigns,  class  presentations  and   Ă&#x20AC;LHUV Âł7KLV>FXUUHQW@VHQDWHLVUHDOO\YHUVDWLOHZLWKDJH class   and   as   far   as   peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   majors,â&#x20AC;?   said   Coakley.   Âł>7KLVVHPHVWHU@KDVDORWRISRVLWLYHHQHUJ\´

student  leadership  positions  as  well.  Aquino  also  wants   to  create  a  more  effective  communication  network  be-­ tween  Resident  Hall  Student  Association  (RHSA)  and   with  club  leaders  and  every  organization  on  campus.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   year   is   really   about   getting   ourselves   out   there,   and   letting   people   know   that   SA   offers   a   lot,â&#x20AC;?   he  said.   Aquino  also  mentioned  other  priorities  in  his  new   role  which  include  pushing  senators  to  be  more  effec-­ tive  in  their  legislative  duties,  making  senate  meetings   shorter,     seeing   that   every   member   of   SA   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;activeâ&#x20AC;?  

Alumni  Return  to  New  Paltz  for  Class  Reunion By  Maria  Jayne Copy  Editor  |  N01864117@newpaltz.edu

SUNY   New   Paltz   is   hosting   an   Alumni   Reunion   weekend  from  Sept.  23  to  the  25  in  honor  of  classes  end-­ ing  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;oneâ&#x20AC;?  or  â&#x20AC;&#x153;six.â&#x20AC;?  This  event  is  only  a  week  away  and   LVH[SHFWHGWRKDYHDODUJHWXUQRXWDFFRUGLQJWRWKH2IÂżFH of  Alumni  Affairs.   Alumni  weekend  is  usually  held  in  October  with  350   to  400  people  in  attendance,  according  to  Special  Events   Coordinator   for   Alumni   Affairs   Diane   McCarthy.   This   year  the  festivities  will  take  place  a  month  earlier,  but  Mc-­ Carthy  said  the  tradition  is  still  there.   These  events  consist  of  the  All  Class  Dinners,  Heri-­ tage  Alumni  Lunch  and  the  Lantern  Society  Dinner.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  most  attended  event  on  the  weekend  is  the  Lan-­ tern  Society  Dinner,â&#x20AC;?  said  McCarthy. Class  members  from  1961  are  given  lanterns  and  re-­

enact  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  moving  up  ceremony  on  Friday  night   where  they  receive  50-­year  medallions.   The   campus   used   to   hold   Lantern   Night   every   year   starting  in  1929  until  1969,  according  to  McCarthy.  She   said  this  was  when  each  graduating  student  would  carry  a   lantern  onto  the  main  quad  where  they  then  would  arrange   themselves  in  a  circle  and  sing  songs  for  graduation.   The   corresponding   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   committee   decides   the   theme   for   each   reunion.   This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   theme   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Recon-­ nect,   Remember   &   Relive.â&#x20AC;?  Another   aspect   decided   by   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   committee   was   that   the   class   of   1961   gets   a   separate  reunion  in  order  to  reminisce  and  reconnect  with   each  other. The  Heritage  Alumni  Lunch  will  be  held  on  Friday,   Sept.  23  at  noon  and  the  speaker  for  this  year  will  be  Dr.   Heinz  Meng,  biology  professor  of  New  Paltz  from  1951   until  2002.  Meng  was  selected  to  talk  by  the  alumni  com-­

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

mittee  because  of  his  contribution  to  New  Paltz  and  the   community,  according  to  a  reunion  pamphlet.     One  different  program  the  Alumni  Affairs  department   is  trying  to  highlight  would  be  wine  tasting  with  Profes-­ sor  and  Chair  of  Wine  Studies  at  the  Culinary  Institute  of   America   Steven   Kolpan.   Kolpan   graduated   SUNY   New   Paltz  in  1971  and  this  will  be  his  40th  anniversary.    Ac-­ cording   to   Lisa   Sandick,   special   events   coordinator   for   alumni  affairs,  hopes  this  event  brings  a  lot  of  people  that   recognizes  Koplan  and  want  to  reconnect,  although  this  is   a  different  type  of  event  from  the  norm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  hoping  for  good  weather  and  a  good  turnout,   even  though  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  much  earlier  this  year,â&#x20AC;?  said  Sandick.   For  more  information  on  the  event,  members  of  the   campus  community  can  go  to  www.newpaltz.edu/alumni/ reunion/schedule   or   call   1-­877-­HAWK001,   and   choose   option  one.  


The GUNK

Thursday, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011

PLUS... FERAL PIGS Boars concern Upstate New York farmers

BACCHUS SHOWS Bar provides venue for local art and music

New Paltz professors recognized by the New York Foundation for the Arts for

artistic endeavors Story on page 7B

AND MORE! PHOTO  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


  2B oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

FEATURES

Love: Only A Click Away? COLLEGE-ONLY DATING SITE NOW AVAILABLE TO NEW PALTZ STUDENTS

By  Rachel  Freeman Features  Editor  |  5DFKHOIUHHPDQ#QHZSDOW]HGX

College   students   whose   priority   list   starts   with   schoolwork   and   ends   with   romance   have   had   their   prayers   answered   in   the   form   of   an   alternative   dating  website  designed  exclusively  for   those  enrolled  in  university.   DateMySchool   launched   at   SUNY   New  Paltz  this  summer  on  Aug.  18. Columbia   University   classmates   Balazs  Alexa  and  Jean  Meyer  founded   the   site   in   November   2010.   The   two   said  they  came  up  with  the  idea  for  the   site  after  a  student  in  the  nursing  school   complained   about   the   male   to   female   ratio   in   her   department,   which   was   90   percent  female.   Alexa   and   Meyer   faced   the   same   dilemma   -­   as   the   business   school   was   80   percent   male   -­   and   decided   to   do   something  about  it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  realized  that  there  was  a  bigger   market  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  lots  of  students  want  to  meet   across  departments  and  campuses.  And   VLQFHZHGLGQÂśWÂżQGDEHWWHUVROXWLRQRXW there,  we  thought  DateMySchool  might   be  a  good  idea,â&#x20AC;?  Alexa  said.   In   one   week,   1300   Columbia   stu-­ dents  registered.   When  developing  the  service,  they   wanted  safety  to  be  a  main  factor.  They   created   advanced   privacy   settings   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;were   unprecedented   on   any   social   platform,â&#x20AC;?   Alexa   said.   These   include   that  the  site  is  only  available  to  college   students  and  alumni  with  active  school   accounts,   members   are   unsearchable   on  Google  and  members  are  always  in   FRQWURORIZKRFDQVHHWKHLUSURÂżOHV Users   must   have   an   active   e-­mail   address,   which   essentially   acts   like   an   ID,   as   one   e-­mail   equals   one   person.   Members   can   regulate   access   to   their   SURÂżOHV E\ ÂżOWHULQJ FHUWDLQ VFKRROV ages,  departments  and  users  in  the  same   geographic   region.   While   they   can   re-­ strict   other   users,   they   can   search   for  

them   as   well.   They   can   look   for   po-­ tential   partners   based   on   academic,   geographic   and   personal   backgrounds.   DateMySchool   can   calculate   the   num-­ ber   of   people   that   match   your   criteria   and  can  even  save  the  search. The  site  also  boasts  communication   features  such  as  instant  messaging  and   inboxing  to  help  members  converse  and   get  to  know  each  other.  There  is  also  a   Q&A   function,   where   participants   can   answer   various   questions   and   compare   answers   to   others   to   see   what   inter-­ ests   and   values   they   share.   Members   can   make   sure   they   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   forget   who   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   interested   in   by   clicking   either   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Likeâ&#x20AC;?   or   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saveâ&#x20AC;?   button.   This   ac-­ tion  sends  subtly  playful  hints  to  those   who  strike  your  fancy. The   combination   of   these   features   is   what   led   Andres   Lalinde   to   meet   Michelle   Przybyski,   whom   he   married   on   April   29   after   meeting   on   Date-­ MySchool   in   late   January/early   Febru-­ ary.  Lalinde  passed  by  a  DateMySchool   Ă&#x20AC;\HUDQGÂżJXUHGKHZRXOGJLYHLWDVKRW â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  thought  to  myself,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;There  are  two   great  things  about  this  site.    One,  I  can   set  it  so  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  blind  to  the  girls  in  my  pro-­ gram,  so  I  can  avoid  awkward  looks  in   the  hallways,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Lalinde  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two,  this   is  seriously  an  untapped  market.â&#x20AC;? Lalinde   also   found   the   mere   fact   that   you   are   dealing   only   with   other   VWXGHQWVWREHLQFUHGLEO\EHQHÂżFLDO+H believes  that  there  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;an  implied  under-­ standing  that  the  person  you  communi-­ cate   with   is   going   to   be   busy   at   times   with   schoolâ&#x20AC;?   and   in   turn   they   will   un-­ derstand  that  you  too  are  busy.  Lalinde   noted   that   sometimes   when   you   date   someone   who   is   not   experiencing   the   same   school   related   pressures   as   you,   there  can  be  frustration  over  not  having   enough  time  for  the  relationship. Lalinde   met   Przybyski   only   a   few   weeks   after   signing   up   for   Date-­ MySchool +H FDPH DFURVV KHU SURÂżOH and   sent   her   a   message,   which   led   to  

continuous  talking,  meet-­ups,  dates  and   eventually  marriage,  which  he  says  has   been  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  best,  most  incredibleâ&#x20AC;?  time  in   both  of  their  lives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neither   one   of   us   would   change   anything  for  the  world,â&#x20AC;?  Lalinde  said. Lalinde   and   Przybyskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   fairy   tale   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   the   siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   triumph,   however.   According   to   Alexa,   the   site   has   been   extremely   successful   and   most   people   plan   a   meeting   within   30   minutes   of   chatting  with  others. Their  site  has  reeled  in  350  schools   and  has  reached  more  than  31,000  mem-­ bers  with  help  from  coverage  by  CNN,   The   New   York   Times,   7KH +XIÂżQJWRQ Post   and   Time   Out   New   York.     Alexa   also  credits  her  â&#x20AC;&#x153;enthusiastic  and  dedi-­ catedâ&#x20AC;?  team  with  spreading  the  word. While   the   founders   get   requests   from  campuses  nationwide  and  are  se-­ lective   about   where   they   launch,   they   knew  they  had  to  add  SUNY  New  Paltz   to  the  ever-­growing  list  of  participating   schools.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;With   a   diverse   community   of   8,000   students,   we   wanted   to   help   IUHVKPDQ ÂżQG IULHQGV RQ FDPSXV XS perclassman   branch   out   to   new   folks   and   alumni   meet   new   people   in   their   new   homes,â&#x20AC;?   Alexa   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   also   wanted  to  give  you  access  to  thousands   of  other  students  in  Upstate  New  York   schools  included  on  DateMySchool  for   those  who  want  to  discover  new  people   outside  of  New  Paltz. The  team  plans  to  recruit  marketing   interns  to  help  bring  more  awareness  to   the  site  and  peak  student  interest. Though   the   site   has   mainly   been   marketed   as   a   dating   platform,   they   hope  to  advertise  it  more  as  a  place  for   users  to  expand  their  friend  base. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  extending  usage  to  become   what   we   really   are:   a   platform   to   dis-­ cover   new   people   online,â&#x20AC;?  Alexa   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whether  for  dating,  relational  or  study   purposes,   DateMySchool   is   the   go-­to   place  to  discover  new  friends,  not  nec-­ essarily  to  connect  with  old  ones.â&#x20AC;?

   COURTESY  OF  DATEMYSCHOOL DateMySchool,  a  dating  site  for  university  students,  recently  launched  at  New  Paltz.                                                                                                                                    

Thursday,  September  15,  2011


  Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

3B

Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A Real Fathermucker

GREG OLEARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATEST NOVEL SHEDS LIGHT ON MODERN PARENTING By  Maria  Jayne Copy  Editor  |  N01864117@newpaltz.edu

New  Paltz  resident  Greg  Olear  said  he  hopes  to   give  insight  into  what  it  truly  means  to  be  a  dad  with   his  second  novel.   The   book,   entitled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fathermucker,â&#x20AC;?   is   set   to   come  out  on  Oct.  4  from  Harper  Paperback.  Colum-­ nist   Lenore   Skenazy   of   the   blog   Free   Range   Kids,   describes  it  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ulysses  on  a  playdate.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  writing  since  I  was  in  grade  school,â&#x20AC;?   2OHDUVDLGÂł,FRPSOHWHGP\ÂżUVWQRYHOZKLOHDVH-­ nior   at   Georgetown,   where   I   went   to   college,   and   wrote   several   more   in   my   twenties.   I   would   say   I   became  serious  about  it  around  age  22.â&#x20AC;?   Olear  is  the  senior  editor  of  the  literary  website,   The   Nervous   Breakdown,   author   of   Totally   Killer    DQGDSURIHVVRURIÂżFWLRQDW0DQKDWWDQYLOOH College.   He   draws   his   inspiration   from   the   village   and   uses  this  unique  setting  for  his  story.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  live  in  New  Paltz,  and  the  novel  is  set  here,   quite   explicitly   so,â&#x20AC;?   said   Olear.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   Paltz   is   the   only   place   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   lived   as   a   parent   and   its   parenting   community  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  its  communal,  inclusive,  crunchy,  lib-­ eral,  nurturing,  awesome  parenting  community  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  is   the  only  one  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  known.â&#x20AC;?   Olear  sheds  light  on  the  very  secretive  world  by   combining  witty  humor  and  popular  culture  to  cre-­ ate  an  interesting  storyline  about  one  hectic  day  in  

a  stay-­at-­home  fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  life  and  all  the  different   emotions  that  go  along  with  it.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parenting  can  be  a  lonely  line  of  work,  and   I   mostly   wanted   to   connect   with   and   entertain   other   parents,â&#x20AC;?   Olear   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   say   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   supposed  to  write  what  you  know,  and  I  did  that   LQP\ÂżUVWQRYHOZKLFKLVDERXWDSURIHVVLRQDO assassin.   This   time,   I   decided   to   tackle   some-­ thing  a  bit  further  from  home.  Oh,  wait,  I  think   I  got  that  backwards,â&#x20AC;?  Olear  joked. His  humor  plays  a  large  role  in  his  writing  as   well  as  in  his  daily  conversation.  He  wrote  this   novel  so  he  could  lend  a  helping  hand  to  other   parents   in   a   similar   situation.   He   wants   par-­ ents   to   know   how   to   handle   every   annoyance,   fear,  worry  and  obsession  that  may  arise  in  this   modern   age.   Olear   hopes   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fathermuckerâ&#x20AC;?   will   become  a  sort  of  stay-­at-­home  handbook  for  fa-­ thers  age  25-­60.     Olear  is  currently  working  on  a  new  novel   and  a  few  screenwriting  projects.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  I  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  had  much  time  to  write,  be-­ cause  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  summer,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  a  Fa-­ thermucker.â&#x20AC;? He   currently   runs   a   parenting   site   called   Fathermucker:  The  Blog  at  Fathermucker.com,   which  features  guest  essays  about  modern  par-­ enting   and   the   blurring   of   traditional   gender   roles.  

Fresh Paltz

FRESH PALTZâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to document what people are wearing in \PQ[[XMKQĂ&#x2026;KXTIKMM[XMKQITTaIZW]VL\PMKIUX][WN;=6A6M_8IT\b 6IUM"0DULR+DUULV5IRWZ"&RPPXQLFDWLRQDQG0HGLD )OM"  21                                                                                                              0WUM\W_V"  Woodstock,  N.Y. 0DULRDYRLGVORRNLQJOLNHDQRYHUGUHVVHGORVHUE\SDLULQJDVKRUWVOHHYHGFROODUHGVKLUWZLWKFXWRII shorts  and  worn-­in  loafers.    He  got  that  crispy  button  down  for  one  dollar  at  an  antiques  store,  which   LV VHULRXVO\ QRW IDLU7KH HOHPHQWV PLJKW EH EDVLF EXW HYHU\WKLQJ ÂżWV SHUIHFWO\ , GHÂżQLWHO\ VSHQW PRUHWLPHGURROLQJRYHU0DULRÂśVRXWÂżWWKDQKHVSHQWSLFNLQJLWRXWDQGWKDWÂśVZK\LWZRUNVVRZHOO By  Dean  Engle,  Dengle51@newpaltz.edu

16<-:-;<-,16;--16/57:-7.š.:-;08)4<B'º

CHECK  OUT                                                                                    T O  SEE  MORE  OF   .:-;08)4<B+75 WHAT  NEW  PALTZ  IS  WEARING!   Thursday,  September  15,  2011

COURTESY  OF    FATHERMUCKER.COM Author  Greg  Olear  writes  about  life  as  a  stay-­at-­home  father.


4B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Better Your Business

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR 2012 HALL OF FAME By  Katie  Kocijanski Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  kkocijanski14@newpaltz.edu

The  School  of  Business  is  currently  seeking  nomi-­ nations  for  it’s  2012  Hall  of  Fame.   This  year  will  be  the  11th  year  for  the  awards.  Cat-­ egories  include  “Student  Leader  of  the  Year,”  “Alum-­ nus   of   the  Year,”   “Business   Person   of   the  Year”   and   “Dean’s  Award  of  Excellence.”   Originally  established  in  2001,  Dean  Hadi  Salavi-­ tabar  said  he  thought  of  the  idea  when  he  made  a  trip  to   SUNY  Binghamton,  his  Alma  mater,  where  they  had  a   small-­scale  version  of  a  hall.   Salavitabar  said  he  asked  himself,  “how  can  I  do   that  and  meet  a  couple  of  goals  for  the  School  of  Busi-­ ness?”  He  wanted  to  recognize  the  outstanding  mem-­ bers  of  the  School  of  Business  family  along  with  “in-­ creasing  the  amount  of  attention  for  their  educational   activities.”   The  Hall  of  Fame  has  “had  more  success”  than  Sa-­ lavitabar  ever  thought  it  would.  According  to  the  dean,   it  is  a  useful  way  for  the  School  of  Business  to  build   a   great   reputation   with   the   community.  As   a   result   a   large   number   of   community   members   became   more   committed   to   educational   activities   and   student   pro-­ grams.   “It’s   been   a   pleasure   to   recognize   those   that   go   above  and  beyond  to  improve  the  programs,”  Salavi-­ tabar  said. 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV IRU WKH ³%XVLQHVV 3HUVRQ RI WKH Year”   include   being   successful   in   the   Hudson  Valley   region,  hiring  people  and  improving  the  work  environ-­ ment.  They   must   also   be   involved   in   the   educational   future   of   SUNY   New   Paltz     students   by   offering   in-­ ternships  and  possibly  future  employment  upon  gradu-­ ation.   “It’s  a  two  way  street.  If  businesses  are  involved   with   the   school   and   the   school   with   businesses,   the   businesses  will  feedback  what  they  need  to  be  success-­ ful  to  the  school,”    said  Vinnie  Cozzolino,  2011  busi-­ ness  person  of  the  year.  “Which  will  produce  students   with   those   skills   who   will   then   bring   those   solutions   back  to  the  businesses.    Everybody  wins.”  Cozzolino  founded  the  Solar  Energy  Consortium,   a  renewable  energy  business.   According  to  Salavitabar,  ”Student  Leader  of  the   Year,”  is  someone  who  goes  above  and  beyond  what   is  expected  of  them  as  a  student.  They  will  have  made   DVLJQL¿FDQWGLIIHUHQFHRQFDPSXVDQGKHOSHGWKHVWX-­ dent   population,   possibly   by   bringing   a   new   educa-­ tional  program  to  campus.  The  2011  award  was  given   to  graduate  and  management  major,  Armelle  Kessler.   The  third  award,  the  “Dean’s  Excellence  Award,”  

PHOTO  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ The  SUNY  New  Paltz  School  of  Business  is  looking  for  nominees  for  its  11th  annual  Hall  of  Fame  inductions  this  semester.                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

LVJLYHQWRWKRVHZKRPDNHDVLJQL¿FDQWFRQWULEXWLRQ to   improving   a   student’s   educational   experience   at   New   Paltz.   It   emphasizes   what   role   they   plan   within   the   School   of   Business   and   was   given   to   the   Ulster   County  Savings  Consortium  in  2011. Finally,   the   “Alumnus   Award”   is   given   to   those   ZKR KDYH VLJQL¿FDQWO\ LPSURYHG VWXGHQW¶V RYHUDOO experience   at   SUNY   New   Paltz.   Past   winners   gave   presentations  and  offered  internship  opportunities.The   2011   winner   was   Harold   King,   who   was   a   part-­time   student   from   2001-­2007   and   a   Business  Administra-­ tion   major.   Since   graduating,   he   has   served   on   the   School’s   advisory   board   and   on   that   board’s   student  

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

intern  committee  and  curriculum  committee.   “I   think   it   is   important   for   students   and   faculty   to  see  where  business  theory  meets  business  practice   and  for  local  businesses  to  learn  the  latest  theories  and   methods  of  leadership  and  management,”  King  said.   Nominations  are  due  on  Monday,  Oct.  3.  For  more   information  about  the  Hall  of  Fame  and  to  view  past   inductees   or   nominate   a   candidate,   visit   http://www. newpaltz.edu/schoolofbusiness/about_halloffame. html.   You   may   submit   your   nominations   online   or   contact  School  of  Business  Dean  Hadi  Salavitabar  at     845-­257-­2932  for  a  nomination  form.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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oracle.newpaltz.edu

Who Let the Boars Out?

5B

FERAL SWINE WREAK HAVOC ON UPSTATE FARMS AND CROPS By  Maria  Jayne Copy  Editor  |  N01864117@newpaltz.edu

Boar  hunter  in  the  northeast    can  rejoice:  feral  swine  are   invading  New  York.   “Feral  swine,  also  known  as  wild  boars,  wild  hogs,  razor-­ backs  and  Russian  boars,  are  not  native  to  New  York.  The  term   feral  swine  includes  the  Eurasian  wild  boars,  domestic  pigs  that   have   escaped   from   farms   and   ‘gone   wild’   and   hybrids   of   the   two,”  said  Kelly  Stang  of  the  New  York  State  Department  of   Environmental  Conservation  (DEC).   Feral  swine  reproduce  rapidly  when  they  hit  seven  or  eight   months  of  age  and  are  capable  of  adapting  to  nearly  any  envi-­ ronment.  The  swine  are  wreaking  havoc  on  farms  and  crops  be-­ cause  their  strong  appetites  are  never  satiated.  They  weigh  be-­ tween  400  and  700  pounds  and  their  size  makes  them  capable  of   destroying  wetlands  by  rolling  through  the  mud,  or  wallowing.   According  to  the  DEC,  feral  swine  directly  compete  with   deer,  bear,  turkey,  squirrel  and  waterfowl  for  food.  They  con-­ sume   the   nests   and   eggs   of   ground   nesting   birds   and   reptiles   and  kill  and  eat  fawns  and  young  domestic  livestock.  They  also   have  razor  sharp  tusks,  can  be  aggressive  toward  humans  and  

their  pets  and  can  transmit  serious  diseases  such  as  swine  bru-­ cellosis,  E.  coli,  trichinosis,  and  pseudorabies  to  livestock  and   humans.   Feral  swine  are  breeding  in  four  counties  in  central  New   York,  according  to  a  federal  study  done  last  year  with  funding   from  New  York’s  Invasive  Species  Council.   “There  are  feral  swine  in  New  York,  however,  most  of  the   reports   consist   of   one   or   two   animals   and   they   are   scattered   throughout  New  York.  The  largest  reported  concentration  of  fe-­ ral  swine  is  in  DEC  Region  7  Cortland,  Onondaga,  Cayuga  and   Tioga  Counties  in  central  New  York,”  Stang  said.   The  problem  with  having  a  few  wild  boars  in  one  area   is  that  it  leads  to  thousands  in  only  a  few  years  because   of  their  breeding  habits.   “The  DEC  is  working  to  eradicate  feral  swine   from  N.Y.  Therefore,  hunters  with  a  small  game   license  may  shoot  and  keep  feral  swine  at  any   time  and  in  any  number.  We  do  ask  hunters  to   report  any  feral  swine  sightings  or  shootings   to  the  DEC,”  Stang  said.   These   hunts   are   taking   place   so   the   problem   does  

not   get   as   serious   as   it   already   is   in   southern   states.  Accord-­ ing  to  biologists,  there  are  currently  over  2  million  feral  hogs   in  Texas  mainly  inhabiting  the  Eastern,  Southern  and  Central   parts  of  the  state.  According  to  Wildlife  Biologist  Rick  Taylor,   this  population  is  steadily  increasing  as  a  result  of  intentional   releases,   improved   habitat,   greater   wildlife   management   and   better  animal  husbandry.

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Thursday,  September  15,  2011


  6B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Undead Rise Again ROSENDALE HOSTS 2ND ANNUAL ZOMBIE FESTIVAL ON SEPT.17

By  Kenny  Satterlee Contributing  Writer  |  Ksatterlee43@newpaltz.edu

New  York   zombies   will   overrun   Rosendale   for   the  second  annual  Zombie  Festival  on  Sept.  17.   The  event  was  successful  last  year  and  accord-­ ing  to  founder  and  co-­organizer,  Elena  Brandhofer,   even  the  town  supervisor  dressed  for  the  event.  The   festival   includes   a   parade   through   town,   zombie-­   themed  events  and  some  â&#x20AC;&#x153;undeadâ&#x20AC;?  local  icons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   like   a   dream   [or]   nightmare   (you   choose)   come  true,  people  really  get  into  it.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  beyond  the   makeup  and  the  costumes,â&#x20AC;?  Brandhofer  said. The   event   will   be   stretched   over   the   afternoon   beginning  at  12:30  p.m.  and  ending  around  7:30  p.m.   The  parade  begins  in  Willow  Kiln  Park  and  will   march  through  Main  Street.  Zombies  will  be  judged  

on  their  costumes  for  a  chance  to  win  prizes  at  4  p.m.   Musicians   playing   at   the   event   include   Tiger   Piss,   The   High   Five   Revival,   The   Blind   Ambassadors,   Ratboy,  Crazy  Cat  Lady  and  DJ  Slambo.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   some   eerily   convincing   zombies   out   here,  judging  the  contest  is  a  tough  job.  Last  year  we   even  had  zombie  hunters  hiding  in  the  bushes  wait-­ ing  to  ambush  our  unsuspecting  undead  marchers,â&#x20AC;?   Brandhofer  said. 7KHVKRZLQJRIWKHÂżOPÂł:KLWH=RPELH´LVWKH ÂżQDOHYHQWRIWKHGD\DQGZLOOEHJLQDWSPLQWKH Rosendale  Theater.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;White   Zombieâ&#x20AC;?   is   one   of   the   earliest  zombie  movies  produced  and  was  originally   released  in  New  York.   A  local  celebrity  in  the  zombie  community  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cap-­ tain  Cruella  Moxhamâ&#x20AC;?  will  also  be  in  attendance. Moxham,  the  self  proclaimed  â&#x20AC;&#x153;undead  queen  of  

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

Saugerties,â&#x20AC;?  will  be  providing  makeup  assistance  to   SDUWLFLSDQWVZKRZDQWWRORRN³¿HQGLVKO\IDEIRUD very  nominal  fee.â&#x20AC;?    She  has  organized  zombie  events   around  the  area  including  the  Village  Invasion  Zom-­ bie  Crawl  and  Ghoulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Yule,  both  in  Saugerties. Linda   Zimmerman   author   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;HVZA:   Hudson   Valley   Zombie  Apocalypseâ&#x20AC;?   will   be   at   the   festival   looking  for  zombies  to  be  written  into  her  next  book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  love  to  see  some  crazy  costumes,  hear  some   VODPPLQJ PXVLF ZDWFK D FODVVLF Ă&#x20AC;LFN DQG SURYLGH people   with   a   uniquely   Rosendale   Festival   Experi-­ ence,â&#x20AC;?  Brandhofer  said. The   event   will   be   held   rain   or   shine.   Any-­ one   seeking   more   information   about   this   event   should   contact   co-­organizer   Lara   Hope   at   Redhopeproductions@yahoo.com.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

7B

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT oracle.newpaltz.edu

Artistic Wishes Granted

SUNY NEW PALTZ PROFESSORS RECOGNIZED BY NYFA By  Katherine  Speller Copy  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@newpaltz.edu

Three   faculty   members   of   the   School   of   Fine   &   Performing   Arts   have   received   grants   from   The   New   York  Foundation  for  the  Arts  (NYFA).   Adjunct   Professor   Barb   Smith,     Pro-­ fessor   Jamie   Bennett   and   Associ-­ ate   Professor   Emily   Puthoff   secured   $7,000  each  from  the  foundation. This  year  105  NYFA  Fellows  and    ÂżQDOLVWV ZHUH FKRVHQ IURP RYHU  DSSOLFDQWV LQ ÂżYH FDWHJRULHV including   Crafts/Sculpture,   Digital/ (OHFWURQLF :RUN 1RQÂżFWLRQ /LWHUD ture,  Printmaking/Drawing/Book  Arts   and  Poetry.  The  Fellows  were  select-­ ed  by  panels  of  their  peers  assembled   with  representatives  from  each  disci-­ pline.   NYFA   awards   grants   are   given   to   artists   who   apply   online   in   mid-­ October.   The   Fellowship   jury   views   WKHDUWLVWÂśVLPDJHVÂżUVWHLJKWLQWRWDO without   any   identifying   information   DWWDFKHG$IWHUWKHÂżUVWVHOHFWLRQVKDYH been  made,  the  jury  reads  the  artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   personal  statement  and  resume.  

 Smith,  who  received  the  fellow-­ ship  in  Crafts/Sculpture,  said  she  was   honored  to  receive  the  fellowship.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having  my  work  recognized  by   NYFA   provides   support   and   gener-­ ates  a  great  deal  of  momentum,â&#x20AC;?  said   Smith.â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  experience  has  been  both   wonderful  and  unbelievable.â&#x20AC;?   Puthoff,   who   received   the   grant   in  Digital  and  Electronic  Arts  said  she   is  deeply  honored  to  be  recognized  as   a  female  artist.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   am   also   very   pleased   to   be   recognized   in   a   creative   category   in   which  women  have  been  traditionally   underrepresented,â&#x20AC;?  said  Puthoff.   Both   artists   said   the   monetary   gain  from  the  awards  will  be  an  asset   to  their  future  work  as  the  fellowship   affords   them   the   freedom   to   pursue   larger  projects,  travel  and  experiment   and  purchase  the  equipment  they  need   for  future  endeavors. Recent   graduate   of   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   MFA   program,   Smith   said   the   grant   will   give   her   an   advantage   most   young  artists  do  not  have,  offering  her   the   space   and   means   to   create   things   she   otherwise   would   not   have   been  

able  to  realize.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  can  be  very  easy  to  quit  work-­ ingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you  leave  the  familiar  structure   of  school,  your  graduate  school  com-­ PXQLW\GLVSHUVHVDQGLWFDQEHÂżQDQ FLDOO\ GLIÂżFXOW WR PDLQWDLQ DQ DFWLYH studio  practice,â&#x20AC;?  said  Smith.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having   a  dedicated  workspace  means  a  great   deal.     I   am   utilizing   a   portion   of   the   award   to   set   up   a   studio,   which   will   have   a   considerable   impact   on   both   my  thinking  and  making.â&#x20AC;?     Smith  said  that  her  success  is  due   in   part   to   the   inspirational   environ-­ ment  of  New  Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  compelled  to  apply  to  New   Paltz  because  of  the  quality  of  work  I   saw  coming  out  of  the  Metal  Program.     I  was  inspired  by  the  level  of  rigor  and   thoughtfulness,   the   passion   for   mak-­ ing   and   the   professional   accomplish-­ ments   of   prominent   faculty   Myra   Mimlitsch-­Gray   and   Jamie   Bennett,   as  well  as  many  alumni  from  the  pro-­ gram,â&#x20AC;?    said  Smith.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  can  only  hope   that  my  successes  could  inspire  others   in  the  way  that  these  individuals  have   inspired  me.â&#x20AC;?

A  sculpture  by  Adjunct  Professor  Barb  Smith.                                                                                                                                                      PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  BARB  SMITH From  top  to  bottom:  Associate  Professor  Emily  Puthoff,  Professor  Jamie  Bennett  and  Adjunct  Professor  Barb  Smith.

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

   PHOTOS  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


  8B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Peace, Love and Cinema

WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL KICKS OFF ITS 12TH YEAR WITH FILM, MUSIC AND PANELS

By  Zan  Strumfeld $ ((GLWRU_6VWUXPIHOG#QHZSDOW]HGX

As  autumn  slowly  approaches,  an  array  of   DFWRUVÂżOPPDNHUVPXVLFLDQVDQGPRYLHORYHUV ZLOO VRRQ Ă&#x20AC;RRG WKH +XGVRQ 9DOOH\ )URP 6HSW WKH:RRGVWRFN)LOP)HVWLYDO :)) ZLOO HQWHULWVWK\HDUIRUÂżYHGD\VFHOHEUDWLQJLQGH SHQGHQWÂżOPV 7KLV \HDUÂśV OLQHXS FRQVLVWV RI QHDUO\  VKRUWDQGIHDWXUHOHQJWKÂżOPVSDQHOVDQGPXVLF 6FUHHQLQJV DQG HYHQWV ZLOO EH KHOG WKURXJKRXW :RRGVWRFN 5KLQHEHFN 5RVHQGDOH DQG .LQJV WRQ 2QHWKLQJWKH:))VSHFLDOL]HVLQLVWKHLQ FUHGLEOH GLYHUVLW\ RI QHZ DQG YHWHUDQ ÂżOPPDN HUV7KLV\HDUGLUHFWRU%UXFH%HUHVIRUG Âł'ULY

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Adam Markowitz is a piano dealer and tuner in New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hudson Valley. After Hurricane Katrina, he felt he had to do something. So he loaded his truck ZLWK DOO WKH SLDQRV WKDW ZRXOG Ă&#x20AC;W +H and his dog, Walter, drove them to New Orleans to give them away for free to clubs, schools, churches and the musicians who keep New Orleans and its music alive.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paper Birdsâ&#x20AC;? GLUHFWHGE\(PLOLR$UDJy VWDUULQJ ,PDQRO $ULDV /OXLV +RPDU5RJHU3ULQFHS  

Bruce Beresford directs this Woodstock-based comedy about an uptight New York City lawyer who takes her two spirited teenagers to her hippie motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s farmhouse in the countryside for a family vacation. What was meant to be a weekend getaway quickly turns into a summer adventure of romance, music, family secrets, and self-discovery.

Excitable, emotional Lynn is at the center of a whirlwind of a family reunion, on the eve of her estranged sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wedding. Family dynamics have never been more intense as this roller-coaster drama careens between Lynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on-going warfare with her ex-husband and his wife, the alarming behavior of Lynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other three children, and her motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and sistersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; derision and reproach.

When entertainer Jorge del Pino loses his wife and son in the dying days of the Spanish Civil War, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not much left to fear. Jobs are scarce and hunger plentiful. Jorge, his vaudeville partner Enrique and their band of traveling artists oppose the brutal repression of the Franco regime. Miguel, a precocious child, joins the troupe, challenging the embittered Jorge to once again embrace life. The story meanders from its dreamy opening through the darkest post war days, ultimately spanning the centuries.

7KHWK:RRGVWRFN)LOP)HVWLYDOZLOOEHIURP6HSW%,26$1'3+2726&2857(6<2)WOODSTOCKFILMFESTIVAL.COM

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

Slam Gets Sexy

GRIMALDIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOSTS POETRY SHOW EMBRACING SENSUALITY By  Katherine  Speller Copy  Editor  |  Katerine.speller79@newpaltz.edu

Things   were   getting   hot   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n   heavy   at   Grimaldiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   this   0RQGD\ 6HSW  1HZ 3DOW]ÂśV ÂżQHVW SRHWV VWRUPHG WKH stage  of  the  small  Italian  restaurant  on  119  Main  St.  to  de-­ liver  their  most  sensual  syntax  for  the  second  Rock  Hawk   Poetry   Slam   christened   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Erotic   Rock   Hawk   Poetry   Slam.â&#x20AC;? The   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   burlesque   troop,   Alpha   Psi   Ecdysia,   kicked  off  the  night  with  a  study  in  body  language.  They   called  up  some  volunteers  to  assist  with  their  poetry  read-­ ing,   slowly   but   surely   revealing   tongue-­in-­cheek   written   word  on  different  parts  of  their  bodies,  accentuating  the  po-­ etic  form  and  the  female  form.  The  sexy  personas  stopped   MXVWVKRUWRIDIXOOIURQWDOĂ&#x20AC;DVKEHIRUHLWZDVGHFLGHGWKDW the  crowd  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  handle  the  heatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not  yet,  anyway. ,QWKHÂżUVWURXQGRIWKHVODPMXGJHVZHUHVHOHFWHGDQG given   their   white   boards   to   score.  Though   the   dim   lights   PDGHLWGLIÂżFXOWWRUHDGWKHFURZGVZHUHXUJHGWRÂłFODSIRU the  poets  and  not  the  scores.â&#x20AC;?   One   poet   stood   before   the   giggling   crowd   and   an-­ nounced,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;None  of  you  are  having  any  sex!â&#x20AC;?  before  ending  

his  poem  by  slyly  announcing  his  phone  number. The  crowds  hooted  and  hollered  as  the  poetry  was  per-­ formed,  the  room  surging  with  hormones.  Though,  not  ev-­ eryone  in  attendance  embraced  the  public  display  of  sexual   aggression.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Expressing   your   sexuality   is   important,   but   once   it   starts   to   enter   a   very   uncomfortable   stage   where   your   words  actually  make  people  feel  awkward  then  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not   so   good,â&#x20AC;?   said   Manny   Robertson,   a   second-­year   unde-­ clared  student.   There  was  very  little  tension  in  the  room,  as  the  heated   poetry   cooled   down.  The   members   of  Alpha   Psi   Ecdysia   soon  came  back  on  stage  calling  up  two  more  volunteers   for   a   bit   of   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;grind   off,â&#x20AC;?   encouraging   the   dancers   to   go   eighth-­grade-­dance-­style  on  two  of  the  troop  members.   Rachel   Simons,   a   creative   writing   major   who   is   also   a  poet  and  a  member  of  the  burlesque  troupe  said  she  ap-­ preciated  the  eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  openness  to  sexuality.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  nice  to  see  people  exalt  in  sexuality  and  make   fun  of  it,â&#x20AC;?  said  Simons,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most  times  sex  is  either  a  big  ta-­ boo  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  talk  about  or  a  tool  used  to  sell  something.   Here  we  could  be  open  and  honest  about  how  real  people   experience  it.â&#x20AC;?

Mischa  Savage  at  The  Erotic  Rock  Hawk  Poetry  Slam  at  Grimaldiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.                                                                                                                  PHOTO  BY  JIMMY  CORRAO

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

oracle.newpaltz.edu

9B

THE DOCTOR IS IN: KATIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x153;DOCTOR WHOâ&#x20AC;? CONFIDENTIAL

By  Katherine  Speller Copy  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@newpaltz.edu

Hey there Whovians! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doctor Whoâ&#x20AC;? has picked up in the last few weeks, returning from a lengthy summer hiatus. The Tumblr communities DUH UHMRLFLQJ DV WKH VFLHQFH Ă&#x20AC;FWLRQ QHUGHU\ is restored. True to form, show runner Steven Moffat has made a violent splash on the Who-niverse in only a few episodes. As always, there are spoilers to come. Before the summer break, we found out River Song was actually Amy and Roryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter, but we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get much about her childhood. In the half-season opener â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kill Hitler, â&#x20AC;? we get just that. We start with a little back story on Rory and Amy and their friend Mels. Yeah, the friend theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never mentioned before but named their daughter (Melody) after? That one. We got to see Rory, Amy and Mels as a childhood trio getting into all sorts of shenanigans and it was cute. Soon we discover Mels is an earlier regeneration of River (who can regenerate because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a TARDIS baby). Long story short, Mels regenerates and is suddenly super-hot Alex Kingston who gives this hilarious promiscuous performance as she gets used to her new regenerated form, steals clothes from German aristocrats and tries to kill the Doctor. In terms of the major arc, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about all we get. The next two episodes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night Terrorsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl Who Waitedâ&#x20AC;? both offer a bit of character development (some amazing emotional scenes for Amy (Karen Gillan) in the latter), but since they were originally supposed to air earlier in the season. They offer little to no plot advancement. Next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The God Complexâ&#x20AC;? looks to be another episode where Moffat plays on the childhood fears of his fans. If you need me Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be curled up behind the couch.


  10B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Billiards, Bands and Art

BACCHUS BAR SHOWCASES LOCAL NEW PALTZ ARTISTS AND MUSICIANS EVERY MONTH By  Zan  Strumfeld A&E  Editor  |  Sstrumfeld34@newpaltz.edu

Music   and   art   are   integral   parts   of   1HZ3DOW]EXWÂżQGLQJDYHQXHWRVXFFHVV-­ fully  display  these  two  mediums  together   LVQÂśW DOZD\V WKH HDVLHVW WKLQJ WR GR (Y-­ ery  month  since  February,  Bacchus  Res-­ WDXUDQW %DUKDYHEHHQVKRZFDVLQJWKH local   talent   of   the   many   musicians   and   artists   harboring   in   our   small,   mountain   town. Bacchus  bar  manager  and  New  Paltz   alumnus   Jason   Synan   had   the   resources   to   make   the     space   one   of   the   newest   KRWVSRWVIRUWKHHYHUULVLQJDUWFRPPXQL-­ ty.  With  60  feet  of  wall  space  in  the  pool   room   and   the   right   lighting   and   equip-­ ment,  the  legitimacy  of  a  bar/gallery  was   created. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artists   need   to   be   encouraged   to   show   their   work,â&#x20AC;?   said   Synan.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some-­ times   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   either   unaware   of   the   op-­ portunities   around   them   or   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   pursue   them.â&#x20AC;? +DYLQJVRPXFKJDOOHU\VSDFHPDNHV it   possible   to   showcase   multiple   art-­ ists,   something   Synan   said   they   really    

encourage. Âł$WWKLVSRLQWZHKDYHPRUHVXEPLV-­ sions   than   we   know   what   to   do   with,â&#x20AC;?   said  Synan.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  we  try  to  incorporate  as   many  people  as  we  can.â&#x20AC;? Each   month,   Bacchus   calls   for   sub-­ missions   through   Facebook.   Artists   can   DOVRSXWWKHLUZRUNXSIRUVDOHDQGKDYH been  successful  at  selling  at  past  shows. Âł$IWHU UHFHLYLQJ VXEPLVVLRQV ZH pick  the  work  we  like  the  best,  trying  to   UHSUHVHQW D EURDG YDULHW\ RI JHQUHV DQG styles,â&#x20AC;?  said  New  Paltz  alumna  and  Bac-­ chus  waitress  Valerie  Werder.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  would   like  to  start  doing  themed  shows  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   GLIÂżFXOWWRUHMHFWJRRGZRUNEDVHGRQWKH-­ PDWLFUHVWULFWLRQV0RVWRIWKHVKRZVKDYH been  multi-­dimensional  group  shows.â&#x20AC;? The   most   recent   show   on   Saturday,   Sept.   10   was   put   together   by   Route   32   3UHVHQWV D ORFDO FROOHFWLYH RUJDQL]DWLRQ working   to   help   promote   local   bands.   PORCHES,   Year   on   a   Mountain,   Nel-­ VRQYLOODLQV DQG 7RP &KULVWLH SHUIRUPHG WKURXJKRXWWKHQLJKWZKLOHYLHZHUVZHQW in  and  out  of  the  pool  room,  checking  out   work  by  artists  including  Katie  Berka,  Ian  

Gallagher  and  Claire  DellaRocco. This   particular   show   was   18   and   RYHU$OWKRXJK LWÂśV QRW D XVXDO WKLQJ IRU WKHEDUVFHQHEHFDXVHLWSUHVHQWVGLIÂżFXO-­ ties,  Route  32  Presents  requested  the  age   drop  in  order  to  not  limit  their  fan  base. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Route  32  Presents  is  about  bringing   good   music   to   New   Paltz   and   to   elimi-­ QDWH MD]] TXDUWHWV DQG MDP EDQGV´ VDLG -DNH +DUPV PHPEHU RI 1HOVRQYLOODLQV and  Route  32  Presents.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  to  open   up  the  town  with  New  Paltz  as  a  cultural   spot.â&#x20AC;? Other   musicians,   like   second-­year   undeclared   John   Morisi   from   Year   on   a   Mountain,  thought  the  Sept.  10  show  was   a  great  experience.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  atmosphere  and  acoustics  were   screaming  for  music/art  to  be  displayed  for   WKHSXEOLF3HRSOHZKRDUHQÂśWLQYROYHGLQ the  arts  will  still  go  out  to  the  bars  to  hang   RXWKDYLQJPXVLFDUWLQYROYHGLQVXFKD place  lets  these  people  become  more  eas-­ LO\ LQYROYHG´ VDLG 0RULVL Âł7KH DUWV DUH parts  of  human  nature,  if  a  place  like  Bac-­ FKXVFRXOGFRQVLVWHQWO\KDYHVXFKHYHQWV this  small  college  town  could  grow  to  be  

something  much  bigger.â&#x20AC;? DellaRocco   had   her   prints   from   her   thesis  on  display  at  a  Bacchus  show  last   spring.  Werder  asked  DellaRocco  to  con-­ tribute  them  again. Âł, ZDV YHU\ H[FLWHG WR H[KLELW WKLV ZRUNDJDLQDQGZDVĂ&#x20AC;DWWHUHGVKH>:HUGHU@ thought  of  me  when  setting  up  the  show,â&#x20AC;?   DellaRocco   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   makes   so   much   VHQVHWRKDYHVKRZVOLNHWKLVRIIFDPSXV because  our  peers,  who  typically  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  at-­ WHQGDUWHYHQWVDWVFKRROEXWGRHQMR\WKH EDUVFHQHDQGOLYHPXVLFFDQYLHZZKDW ORFDODUWLVWVKDYHWRRIIHU´ $OWKRXJK WKH\ KDYH UHFHLYHG VXE-­ missions  from  outside  New  Paltz,  Synan   wants  to  focus  on  more  New  Paltz-­based   artists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  feel  a  certain  allegiance  to  people   WKDWOLYHLQWKLVWRZQEHFDXVH,OLYHLQWKLV town   and   Bacchus   is   in   this   town,â&#x20AC;?   said   Synan.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   be   about   the   com-­ munity.â&#x20AC;? If   you   are   interested   in   submitting   artwork   or   performing   at   any   upcom-­ ing   Bacchus   shows,   e-­mail   Synan   at     jnsynan@gmail.com.

SUNY  New  Paltz  student  Katie  Berka  with  her  paintings  and  Year  on  a  Mountain  performing  at  Bacchus  on  Saturday,  Sept  10.                                                                                                                                                                                                    PHOTOS  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ

Thursday,  September  15,  2011


Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Barn Owl Still Soaring DUO TO RELEASE EXCITING, NEW EXPERIMENTAL ALBUM By  Ross  Hamilton Contributing  Writer  |  N01955992@newpaltz.edu

Barn Owl Lost in the Glare

On   Sept.   13,   San   Francisco   duo   Barn   Owl   will   re-­ lease   their   sixth   album   (and   second   full-­length   release   this  year  following  the  excellent  Shadowland)  titled  Lost   in   the   Glare.   Since   2006,   Jon   Porras   and   Evan   Caminiti   have   been   playing   their   own   mix   of   drone,   psychedelic   and  folk  music  with  a  gritty  western  feel.  On  this  release,   WKHWZRPDLQO\XVHHOHFWULFJXLWDUDQG)DUÂżVDRUJDQZLWK DGGLWLRQDO NH\ERDUGV ÂżHOG UHFRUGLQJV DQG PDQLSXODWHG cassette  tapes.  As  with  previous  Barn  Owl  records  the  at-­ mosphere  is  rich  and  vibrant,  joining  the  celestial  guitars   with  the  calming  hum  of  the  organ.  On  occasion  the  two   branch  out  into  more  a  intense,  distorted  sound,  breaking   up  the  record  and  giving  the  listener  some  breathing  space   before  ejecting  them  into  a  grand  and  inquisitive  vacuum   of  sound.   The   structure   of   Lost   in   the   Glare   is   reminiscent   of   other  Barn  Owl  releases,  with  the  earlier  tracks  easing  into   the  more  spacey  exploration  of  the  later  songs.  The  album   kicks   off   with   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pale   Star,â&#x20AC;?   an   entrancing   mix   of   reverb  

drenched   lead   guitar   and   industrial   keyboard   and   reso-­ nant  guitar  tones.  The  second    track,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turiya,â&#x20AC;?  introduces   drums   into   the   dusty   landscapes   with   a   serious   western   twang.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Devotion   Iâ&#x20AC;?   plays   up   the   genre   in   an   incredibly   detailed  atmosphere,  contrasting  the  heavy  riffage  on  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Darkest  Night  Since  1683.â&#x20AC;?  After  this  dark  crescendo,  the   impressive   guitar   work   and   writing   shine   on   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Temple   of   the  Winds,â&#x20AC;?  with  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midnight  Tideâ&#x20AC;?  reintroducing  a  percus-­ sive  pulse  back  into  the  sound.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light  Echoesâ&#x20AC;?  begins  with   a  beautiful  solo  guitar  as  others  slowly  emerge  with  the  ra-­ GLDQWRUJDQXQWLOSLHUFLQJJXLWDUWRQHVWDNHRYHU7KHÂżQDO track,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Devotion  II,â&#x20AC;?  features  relatively  robust  drumming   slowly  evolving  into  the  last  dirty  cries  of  distorted  guitar   and  feedback. The  later  tracks  are  where  Barn  Owl  really  shines,  not   only  showing  Porrasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  and  Caminitiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  great  guitar  work,  but   expanding   and   morphing   the   atmosphere   of   sound   with   each   track.  The   heavily   distorted   doom   on   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Darkest   Night  Since  1683â&#x20AC;?  allows  the  subsequent  songs  to  open  up,   as  the  hollowness  of  the  sound  is  subtly  probed  by  acoustic   JXLWDUVDQGDKHDOWK\GRVHRI)DUÂżVDRUJDQ UHSODFLQJWKH harmonium  found  on  many  previous  releases).  Addition-­ ally,  these  songs  diverge  a  bit  more  from  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;alone-­in-­the-­ desertâ&#x20AC;?  feeling  earlier  in  the  album.   If  there  is  anything  disappointing  on  Lost  in  the  Glare,   it  is  the  groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  resignation  to  let  songs  fade  into  ambient   drone  passages.  At  times  it  can  be  an  elegant  transition,  but   after  a  few  listens  it  can  become  too  much  deceleration  for   DQ DOEXP ÂżOOHG ZLWK VR PXFK GHOLFDWH ZRQGHU 6WLOO WKLV should  not  stop  people  from  checking  out  what  may  be  the   best  album  of  2011.  Lost  in  the  Glare  has  more  originality   and  experimentation  than  some  bands  have  in  their  entire   discographyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just  sit  back  and  let  the  music  guide  you.  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

11B

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: OLIVER KAMMERMAN

YEAR: Fourth MAJOR: History HOMETOWN: Binghamton, N.Y.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE?  WHY? I  play  guitar  most  and  best.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  easiest  to   learn  other  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  tunes  that  I  enjoy.  I  love   singing  and  percussion  as  well  though,  both   are  very  organic  and  primal,  goofy  and  more   naturally  expressive  to  me.  Less  in  the  way.

WHO  ARE  YOU  CURRENTLY  LISTENING  TO? The  Beatles,  Seu  Jorge,  Parliament  Funkadel-­ ic,  The  Specials,  Jack  Black,  RHCP,  Sublime

WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? Iron  and  Wine  on  NPR  Tiny  Desk,  Yemen   Blues,  Paul  Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Graceland

WHAT  DO  YOU  DO  WITH  MUSIC  ON/OFF  CAMPUS? Godchilla  is  on  the  outs  at  least  until  next  semester   if  not  longer,  so  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  sure  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  hap-­ pen  with  that.  Gettinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  it  on  with  a  new  group  called   Upstate  Rubdown.  Super  talented  girls  singing   and  playing,  bringing  great  styles  to  the  table  and   awesome  voices  and  they  have  a  stage  presence   that  make  me  wanna  work  on  my  game.  Acoustic   performance  at  least  for  a  while,  up  the  sensitiv-­ ity  and  dynamics  and  hopefully  still  be  able  to  get   people  dancing.  Anyone  wanna  play  some  percus-­ sion  for  us?  Super  sensitive?  Maybe  some  african   or  alternative  types  of  drums,  shakers  bongos,   tamborines?  We  could  use  your  rhythms.

ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS?

UPCOMING SHOWS

You  can  do  it.  No  shame.  Be  someone  else.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   about  the  sound  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  making,  not  you  and  your   image.  Steal  from  everyone,  just  admit  that  you   did  it. CHECK  OUT   OLIVER  KAMMERMAN PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE   WITH  ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

Mike Doughty LarkFest Albany Saturday, Sept. 17

Fleet Foxes Williamsburg Waterfront Brooklyn Saturday, Sept. 24

Andrew Bird Bardavon Opera House Poughkeepsie Monday, Oct. 17 PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR.COM

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Zan  Stumfeld  at  sstrumfeld34@newpaltz.edu  .


12B oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  DEEP  END

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END KATIE TRUISI

Major: BFA  Photography Year: Third

,QÀXHQFHV  Alphonse  Mucha,  Ellen  Rogers, Francesca  Woodman,  Ralph  Eugene  Meat-­ yard,  Ryan  McGinley

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  KATIE  TRUISI  CAPTION  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


 9 oracle.newpaltz.edu

EDITORIAL

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

GRAPPLING   WITH  OUR SEPT.  11   CARTOON  BY  JOSH  KUSAYWA  

GRIEF

On  Sunday,  there  was  one  phrase  that  dom-­ inated  headlines,  Facebook  statuses  and  hand-­ made  signs  hung  in  windows  across  New  York   City,   the   state   and   the   country:   never   forget.   Even  a  decade  later,  it  is  hard  to  imagine  that   anyone   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   remember   where   they   were   on   that  clear  September  morning  when  they  heard   WKHÂżUVWRIWZRKLMDFNHGDLUSODQHVVODPPHGLQWR the  North  Tower  of  the  World  Trade  Center  at   8:46   a.m.   But   we   must   also   never   forget   that   one   ugly   feeling   which   motivated   terrorists   to   take  the  lives  of  thousands  of  others  -­  the  simi-­ lar  emotion  that  sometimes  we,  as  Americans,   still   direct   at   people   of   different   cultures   in   spite  of  what  we  should  have  learned  on  Sept.   11,  2001.   Hate.   7KH DO4DLGD KLMDFNHUV ZHUH D KDWHIXO group  of  people.  Articles  and  bloggers  cite  that   these  people  hated  Americans  for  a  slew  of  rea-­ sons:  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  support  of  an  Israeli  nation,   the  American   military   presence   in   Saudi  Ara-­ bia,   sanctions   made   in   Iraq   and   so   on   and   so   forth.  What  they  did  was  malicious  and  wrong,   DQG QR GHFHQW KXPDQ EHLQJ FDQ MXVWLI\ WKHLU slaughter  of  thousands.   Has  our  nation  proven  to  be  upstanding  all   of  the  time,  though?   The   answer,   unfortunately,   is   no.   Since  

Sept.   11,   2001,   we   have   engaged   in   multiple   ZDUV RU ÂłFRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWV´ DQG ÂłRSHUDWLRQV´ DV WKH invisible   hand   of   public   relations   calls Â�� them   to   somehow   soften   the   ideas   about   what   the   military  is  doing  in  the  minds  of  the  American   people.   But   make   no   mistake:   the   deaths   of   scores  of  innocent  civilians  in  the  Middle  East   and  elsewhere  were  the  result  of  war,  a  war  on   a  different  way  of  life  than  good  old  fashioned   American  democracy.   Each   year   when  we  come   upon  the  anni-­ versary  of  the  attacks  on  the  World  Trade  Cen-­ ter  and  the  Pentagon,  many  say  that  we  should   HPEUDFHÂłWKHZD\ZHZHUH´WKHZHHNDIWHUWKH attacks.  We  at  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  feel  that  is   only  partially  true.  We  feel  that  we  should  not   let  our  sadness  become  bitterness  in  the  way  it   did  for  some  wondering  why  their  aunt  or  their   neighbor   or   their   friend   was   taken   from   them   XQMXVWO\ We   understand   that   everyone   grieves   in   different   ways:   some   of   us   attend   memorials   each  year  on  9/11,  some  of  us  pray  and  some  of   us  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  be  reminded  of  the  attacks  at   all.  That  being  said,  it  is  only  natural  that  those   of   us   who   lost   loved   ones   feel   hurt   and   frus-­ trated   when   thinking   about   9/11.  Things   were   taken  from  us  -­  people  were  taken  from  us.   Werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  many  of  us  calling  for  retaliation  

at   that   time?   Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   headlines   with   the   word   ÂłEDVWDUG´UXQRQWKHIURQWSDJHRIQHZVSDSHUV around  the  country  in  reference  to  the  supposed   mastermind  of  the  attacks,  Osama  bin  Laden?   Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   some   cheer   when   the   bombs   began   to   fall   in  Afghanistan   a   few   weeks   later,   hoping   WKDWZHZRXOGÂłJHWWKHPEDFN´IRUÂłZKDWWKH\ GLG"´ We   saw   this   kind   of   upsetting   behavior   at   SUNY   New   Paltz   a   few   short   months   ago.   When   it   was   been   announced   that   Osama   bin   Laden   had   been   killed,   students   cheered   on   quads   and   concourses   across   campus.   Some   HYHQ VHW RII ÂżUHZRUNVWR FHOHEUDWH D GHDWK Osama  bin  Laden  was  a  terrorist,  a  killer  and  a   horrible  person  -­  but  taking  one  life  for  the  sake   of   another   is   wrong.  There   is   a   reason   that   in   WKLVJUHDWFRXQWU\ZHKDYHDMXVWLFHV\VWHPDQG GRQRWRSHUDWHXQGHUWKHÂłH\HIRUDQH\H´HWKLF When   people   let   grief   become   anger,   it   controls   them,   consumes   them   and   can   cause   them   to   say   hateful   things   or   act   in   a   hurtful   way.  During  this  dark  time  of  year,  we  urge  you   to  not  let  that  grief  twist  and  turn  into  an  ugly   feeling  that  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  ease  your  pain  anyway.   There  are  better  ways  to  make  peace  with   an   event   with   consequences   that   we   as   New   Yorkers   need   to   live   with   everyday.   Attend-­ LQJEHDXWLIXOFHUHPRQLHVOLNHWKHĂ&#x20AC;DJSODQWLQJ

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

KRVWHGE\RXUFROOHJHLVMXVWRQHRIWKHP:H DSSODXG 681< 1HZ 3DOW] RIÂżFLDOV IRU EULQJ ing  together  members  diverse  members  of  our   community.   Those   in   attendance   came   from   different  places,  different  families  and  different   lifestyles,  but  they  all  shared  similar  feelings.   One  was  indeed  sadness.  Some  may  have   shared   understandable   frustration.   But   most   importantly,   as   shown   by   their   willingness   to   come  together  and  support  one  another  on  this   dreadful  day,  those  in  attendance  at  the  memo-­ rial  shared  a  desire  to  heal.  Healing  is  what  we   should  be  focusing  on  in  the  second  and  third   and  all  of  the  decades  after  Sept.  11,  2001.   So   yes,   we   should   embrace   â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   way   we   ZHUH´DIWHU:HVKRXOGHPEUDFHWKHXUJH we  had  to  comfort  the  grieving,  to  come  togeth-­ HUDQGWRÂżQGSHDFH Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the   majority  of  the  editorial  board.  Col-­ umns,  op-­eds  and  letters,  excluding   editorials,  are  solely  those  of  the  writ-­ ers  and  do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,  its  staff   members,  the  campus  and  university  or   the  Town  or  Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

10oracle.newpaltz.edu

COLUMN ANDREW  WYRICH Managing  Editor  

Andrew.Wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

I  really  hate  the  fact  that  I  have  a  Facebook.   I   hate   it   even   more   that   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   seem   to   pry   myself  away  from  the  damn  thing.   For  years  now,  I  have  logged  on  to  that  blue   and   white   login   page,   which   I   have   seen   undergo   many   different   incarnations,   and   honestly   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   ÂżQGPDQ\SRVLWLYHUHDVRQVWRKDYHDQDFFRXQW Sure,  Facebook  allows  people  to  connect  from   around  the  world  and  can  be  a  powerful  tool  to  pro-­ mote   your   product,   but   letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   face   it   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   most   of   the   website  is  a  cesspool  for  gossip  and  pictures  from   the  bar  last  night.   Unfortunately,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  sad  reality  that  Facebook   has  become  a  necessary  evil  in  everyday  life.  If  you   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   one   you   are   instantly   judged   and   the   stigma  of  being  â&#x20AC;&#x153;weirdâ&#x20AC;?  for  not  hopping  aboard  the   social  network  train  is  almost  unshakable  too.    But   why?   :K\ LV KDYLQJ DQ DUWLÂżFLDOO\ FXVWRPL]DEOH SURÂżOH RQ WKH LQWHUQHW VR LPSRUWDQW" ,VQÂśW WKHUH more  to  me  than  what  those  little  grey  words  have   under  â&#x20AC;&#x153;About  Me?â&#x20AC;?    Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  you  still  be  able  to   interact  with  me  even  if  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  â&#x20AC;&#x153;likeâ&#x20AC;?  every  damn   status  you  have?   Facebook   is   destroying   the   idea   of   personal   relationships   and   friendships   in   this   generation.   How  many  times  have  you  met  someone,  become   their  â&#x20AC;&#x153;friendâ&#x20AC;?  on  Facebook  and  instantly  known  ev-­ erything  about  them?  It  used  to  be  that  you  had  to   get  to  know  someone  -­  and,  you  know,  talk  to  them   -­  to  learn  that  kind  of  information.    When  you  think   about  it,  how  many  people  out  there  check  out  your   page  and  know  everything  about  you?  The  number   would  probably  be  unsettling.   Besides  that,  there  are  other  unforeseen  conse-­ quences  of  Facebook  and  social  media  in  general.   In   fact,   there   have   been   studies   that   suggest  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

OP-­ED

that   teenagers   actually   become   depressed   when   they  look  at  photos  their  friends  post  online.  By   looking  at  the  parties  and  all  the  super-­fun  times   their  friends  are  having,  studies  show  that  those   not  involved  become  depressed  because  they  feel   DVLIWKHLUOLIHLVQRWDVIXOÂżOOLQJDVWKHLUIULHQGV´ are.   Just   by   postulation   here,   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   that   mean   kids  might  act  more  brashly  at  a  younger  age  to   KHOSÂłIXOÂżOO´WKHLUOLIH" Communication  as  we  know  it  is  changing   because  of  this  website.  Remember  when  e-­mail   was   revolutionary?   Now   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   becoming   increas-­ ingly   passĂŠ   as   Facebook   has   really   become   the   primary  way  of  communication  on  the  Internet.   Not  only  is  it  easier,  as  you  only  have  to  send  a   message  to  one  place,  it  is  a  place  that  you  know   your  receiver  will  check  multiple  times  a  day.  I   can   vouch   for   this,   as   it   has   become   much   eas-­ ier  for  me  to  contact  sources  for  stories  through   Facebookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   messenger   than   through   my   Gmail   account.   Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even   get   me   started   on   Facebook   becoming   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;news   source.â&#x20AC;?   How   horrifying   is   that?  If  someone  said  their  primary  source  for  ab-­ sorbing  the  news  of  the  day  was  from  what  their   pages  on  Facebook  say,  I  would  want  to  vomit.   ,VLWUHDOO\WKDWGLIÂżFXOWWRFKLVHO\RXUVHOIDZD\ from  the  screen  for  three  seconds  and  type  in  an-­ other  address  to  BBC  or  The  New  York  Times  or   something?   0D\EH ,ÂśP FUD]\ KHUH RU PD\EH ,ÂśP MXVW bitter  because  the  Internet  destroys  a  lot  of  things   I  love  and  Facebook  is  the  perfect  poster  child  for   it.  But  think  about  it  next  time  you  sit  down  on   your  computer,  are  you  logging  into  Facebook  or   is  Facebook  logging  into  you?  

Andrew  is  a  third-­year  journalism  major   who  hopes  to  be  as  badass  of  a  journalist  as   Spider  Jeruselum  is  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transmetropolitianâ&#x20AC;?   one  day.    If  he  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  that,  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  ok  with   just  being  Batman.  

By  Kyle  Moore

It  has  been  10  years  since  one  of  the   most  catastrophic  events  in  American  his-­ tory   and   much   has   happened   since   then.   This   tragedy   has   incited   a   greater   sense   of   nationalism   in  America   and   a   sense   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;unityâ&#x20AC;?   among   its   people.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   troubling   to  me  that  it  takes  such  a  horrible  event  to   bring   a   group   of   people   together,   but   that   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  the  point.  Since  9/11,  there  have  been   over   66,000   civilian   deaths   in   Iraq   (some   sources   claim   over   100,000).   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one   9/11  every  four  months  for  the  past  seven   years.   Why   does   this   go   unnoticed?   Are   ,UDTLFLYLOLDQVOHVVVLJQLÂżFDQWWKDQ$PHUL cans?   Sure   the   tragedy   on   9/11   touched   many  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lives  and  may  have  person-­ ally  affected  a  good  number  of  Americans,   but  the  terrorism  of  the  U.S.  government  is   equally  as  bad  as  any  terrorism  in  the  world   right  now  -­  terrorism.   7HUURULVPLVFRPPRQO\GHÂżQHGDVWKH killing   of   civilians,   or   more   commonly,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   use   of   violence   and   intimidation   in   the   pursuit   of   political   aims.â&#x20AC;?  The   United   Statesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   involvement   in   Iraq   over   the   past   ten  years  is  the  epitome  of  terrorism.  This   nation  has  decended  upon  the  Middle  East   and  wreaked  havoc  in  countries  like  Paki-­ stan,  Afghanistan,   and   Iraq.   This   nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   failed  pursuit  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;weapons  of  mass  destruc-­ tionâ&#x20AC;?   is   the   cause   of   the   utter   embarrass-­ ment   I   have   felt   as   an  American   over   the   past  decade.  Over  $900  billion  of  taxpayer   money  has  gone  to  waste  over  the  past  ten   years  trying  to  maintain  our  alpha  status  in   international  affairs.   7RPHZDULVQHYHUMXVWLÂżDEOH&LYLO ian  deaths  will  inevitably  occur  and  outside  

countries   will   get   involved,   pouring   more   IXHORQWKHÂżUH7KHSLQQDFOHRIHPEDUUDVVLQJ nationalism  we  have  felt  in  the  United  States   rose   with   the   assassination   of   Osama   Bin   Laden.  Bin  Laden  was  indeed  responsible  for   many  terrorist  activities  in  the  world,  includ-­ ing   9/11,   but   was   our   assassination   of   him     just?   This   man   was   an   unarmed   victim   and   deserved   a   fair   trial,   just   as   with   all   people   in  the  American  legal  system.  What  kind  of   democratic  principle  is  it  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;shoot  on  sight?â&#x20AC;?   No   matter   what   any   human   being   did,   it   is   ratherold-­fashioned  to  kill  a  man  on  sight  if   he  is  unarmed.   Another   troubling   aspect   of   the   situa-­ tion  is  that  we  just  dumped  his  body  into  the   Atlantic  Ocean.  This  is  just  absurd  and  com-­ pletely  bloodthirsty  to  me.  If  the  Iraqis  came   to  the  U.S.  and  assassinated  George  Bush  and   dumped  his  body  in  the  ocean,  many  people   would   probably   be   enraged.  And   no,   this   is   not  a  different  scenario  because  George  Bush   is   responsible   for   far   more   civilian   deaths   than   Osama   Bin   Laden   could   have   ever   dreamed   of.   They   are   essentially   opposite   sides  of  the  same  coin.  So  while  I  will  always   remember   the   tragic   and   horrifying   events   that   happened   miles   away   from   me   in   New   York  City  in  2001,  I  will  equally  remember   the   tens   of   thousands   of   civilians   who   were   massacred  at  the  hands  of  the  United  States   over  the  past  ten  years.   Citation: http://usliberals.about.com/od/ homelandsecurit1/a/IraqNumbers.htm

LETTERS To  the  midnight  pedestrian  who  took  my  mums: I  am  truly  touched  that  you  found  the  display  of  orange  mums  hanging   from  my  arbor  so  moving  that  you  needed  to  help  yourself  to  a  basket.    I   FDUHIXOO\VHOHFWHGĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVWKDWPDWFKHGP\RUDQJHKRXVHZKLFK\RXPD\QRW have  even  noticed  as  you  wandered  by  in  the  deep  dark  hours  of  the  night  of   Sept.  10. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  planted  grapes  on  the  arbor  as  well,  so  in  two  or  three  years  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   EHDEOHWRHQMR\WKHPWRR,SLFNHGWDVW\RQHVEHFDXVH,ÂżJXUHGSDVVHUVE\V PD\ZLVKWRKHOSWKHPVHOYHVDV\RXGLGZLWKWKDWKDQJLQJEDVNHWRIĂ&#x20AC;RZHUV Grape  vines  take  several  years  to  reach  maturity,  so  even  if  you  pick  the   grapes,  please  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  dig  up  the  vines.    I  would  like  to  be  able  to  offer  grapes   in  this  way  for  many  years  to  come. $VIRUWKHĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVZHOO,GLGKRSHWRSODQWWKHPLQDIHZZHHNVDQG watch  them  bloom  again  next  year,  but  hopefully  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  your  intent,  and  I   will  smile  fondly  in  twelve  months  as  I  think  of  you  enjoying  your  mums  as   I  enjoy  mine. Could  you  bring  back  the  basket,  though?    Those  are  more  expensive   WKDQWKHĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVDQG,UHDOO\GLGOLNHWKDWRQH -­  Terrance  Ward,  Village  of  New  Paltz

 Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  almost  been  a  year  since  we  learned  that  Ulster  County  Resource  Re-­ FRYHU\$JHQF\ÂśVFKLHIH[HFXWLYHZDVÂżUHGIROORZLQJHPSOR\HHVÂśFRPSODLQWVDERXW EXOO\LQJVH[XDOKDUDVVPHQWGRFXPHQWVEHLQJIDOVLÂżHGLPSURSHUVWRUDJHRIZDVWH materials  and  unsafe  work  conditions.     Apparently  some  of  those  concerns  were  investigated  by  the  Ulster  County   'LVWULFW$WWRUQH\ÂśV2IÂżFHZKLFKVXSSRVHGO\IRXQGQRLPPHGLDWHHYLGHQFHRIFULPL QDOZURQJGRLQJEXWVDLGWKHVWDWH$WWRUQH\*HQHUDOÂśV2IÂżFHVKRXOGEHEURXJKWLQWR investigate.  The  trail  goes  cold  here.  Am  I  the  only  one  wondering  what  happened? Add  this  to  the  non-­investigation  of  the  Ulster  County  Jail  cost  overrun   GHEDFOHDQG\RXJHWDSLFWXUHRIDORFDO'LVWULFW$WWRUQH\ÂśV2IÂżFHWKDWLVHLWKHU distracted  or  dismissive  of  serious  crimes  that  affect  taxpayer  pocketbooks  in  a  big   way.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  time  for  a  change. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  candidate  for  District  Attorney  this  fall  who  combines  a  strong  track   record  of  being  tough  on  crime  with  non-­membership  in  the  good  olâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  boys  club.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  voting  for  Jon  Sennett  for  DA  on  Nov.  8.  Jon  has  a  17  year  track   record  of  being  tough  on  crime,  and  has  overseen  a  staff  of  20  in  the  Bronx  District   $WWRUQH\ÂśV2IÂżFH+HÂśVPDGH8OVWHU&RXQW\KLVKRPH,WÂśVWLPHZHJLYHKLPD FKDQFHDQGWRSXWLQWRRIÂżFHDÂżJKWHUIRUWD[SD\HUV -­  Linda  R.  Sakai,    Town  of  Esopus

Thursday,  September  8,  2011

I  was  elated  to  hear  that  Jon  Sennett  is  running  for  Ulster  County  District   $WWRUQH\,DPDSDUWQHULQDODUJH0LG+XGVRQODZ¿UPEXW\HDUVDJRDV$V sistant  DA  in  the  Bronx,  it  was  Sennett  who  trained  me  on-­the-­job  in  one  of  the   WRXJKHVWFULPH¿JKWLQJMXULVGLFWLRQVLQWKHFRXQWU\ -RQ6HQQHWWWUDLQHGPHKRZWRLQWHUDFWZLWKGHWHFWLYHVXQLQIRUPHGRI¿FHUV and  onlookers  at  homicide  scenes,  to  protect  evidence  and  witnesses,  to  assist  in   ¿QGLQJFULPLQDOVDQGWRLQVXUHVXFFHVVIXOSURVHFXWLRQIRUWKHNLOOLQJV+HWUDLQHG me  to  turn  every  stone,  follow  every  lead  and  to  build  a  powerful  case  backed  by   PHWLFXORXVO\SLHFHGSX]]OHVRIHYLGHQFHDQGWRPDNHVXUHWHVWLPRQ\ZDVWLJKW and  facts  were  accurate.    Moreover,  he  trained  me  how  to  break  down  the  defense   in  the  court  room  with  decisive  cross-­examination  of  defendants  and  defense   witnesses. I  see  what  is  happening  in  our  region  as  cities  like  Newburgh  and  Kingston   experience  violent  crime  in  our  streets  and  our  schools.    The  people  of  Ulster   &RXQW\KDYHDJUHDWRSSRUWXQLW\WRKDYH-RQ6HQQHWW¿JKWLQJFULPHDQGFRUUXSWLRQ +HLVH[SHULHQFHGYHU\VPDUWDQGGHGLFDWHGWR¿JKWLQJFULPHDWDOOOHYHOV+HLV well  prepared  and  ready  to  be  the  Ulster  County  DA.    Jon  Sennett  will  be  an  effec-­ tive,  decisive,  passionate  and  ethical  Ulster  County  District  Attorney. -­  Paul  S.  Ernenwein,  Newburgh  N.Y.


SPORTS

 11

SPORTS oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

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TH w New OR E Pa Y O H lt z N AW Got PA K GE

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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FLYING HAWKS 7RPP\*DUDIRODIHQGVRIIDQRSSRQHQWGXULQJWKHWHDPÂśVJDPHDJDLQVW%DUG&ROOHJHWKLVSDVWZHHNHQG3+272&2857(6<2)672&.7213+272 was,  as  Ventriglia  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;probably  the  biggest  win  in  the  pro-­ Also   leading   the   offense   with   Garafola   is   fourth-­year   By  Cat  Tacopina Sports  Editor  |  Ctacopina97@newpaltz.edu  

For  the  2011  season,  the  New  Paltz  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  team   already  knows  they  are  capable  of  defeating  opponents  who   higher-­ranked  than  they  are.  A  win  against  nationally-­ranked   Stevens   Institute   of   Technology   on   Sept.   4   proved   to   the   Hawks  that  they  are  capable  of  much  more  than  what  their   opponents  expect  of  them.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;At  our  lowest  we  struggle  to  score  or  get  that  last  pass   LQ WKH ÂżQDO WKLUG´ VDLG IRXUWK\HDU PLGÂżHOGHUIRUZDUG DQG Captain  Tommy  Garafola.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;At  our  highest,  we  can  play  with   WKHEHVWWHDPVLQWKHFRXQWU\´ This   season,   the   Hawks   welcomed   Gene   Ventriglia   as   the  new  Head  Coach  of  the  program.  Ventrglia,  an  alumnus   of  SUNY  New  Paltz  and  a  U.S.  Olympian  during  the  1968   summer   games,   came   out   of   retirement   to   coach   the   team.   Ventriglia  had  previously  been  the  Head  Coach  at  the  United   States  Military  Academy  at  West  Point  for  the  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  team.   Âł,UHWLUHGIURPDQRWKHUSRVLWLRQDZKLOHDJR´VDLG9HQ triglia.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  kind  of  got  lured  back  into  coaching...New  Paltz  is   my  alma  mater  and  I  always  wanted  to  come  back  here.  As  a   coach,  I  really  enjoy  watching  their  games,  the  quality  of  the   WHDPLVJUHDW´ Ventriglia  was  not  yet  the  head  coach  when  the  schedule   for   the   team   was   made   and   said   that   the   schedule   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;very,   YHU\ GLIÂżFXOW´ 7KH WHDP VWDUWHG RII WKHLU VHDVRQ E\ IDFLQJ two  nationally-­ranked  teams,  Stevens  and  Montclair  Univer-­ sity.  The  team  lost  to  Montclair,  but  the  win  against  Stevens  

JUDPÂśVKLVWRU\LQDORQJWLPH´ Âł%XW\RXFDQJRDWWKHRWKHUWHDPÂśVÂżHOGDQGEHDWWKHP at  home  especially  when  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  short-­handed  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  big   ZLQ´ 9HQWULJOLD VDLG Âł7KH JDPH ZDV YHU\ FRQWHVWHG DQG very  physical  and  they  (Stevens)  were  mad  because  I  think   Stevens  knew  that  we  were  going  to  beat  them.  So  every  little   WDFNOHWKDWZDVELJ´ The  win  at  Stevens  was  important  not  just  because  the   team  beat  a  top  team  while  short-­handed  ,  but  because  Ven-­ triglia  believes  that  one  of  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  biggest  weaknesses  is   WKHLUGLIÂżFXOW\ZLQQLQJDZD\JDPHV9HQWULJOLDEHOLHYHVWKLV LVEHFDXVHWKHJURXSKDVGLIÂżFXOW\DGMXVWLQJWRGLIIHUHQWÂżHOGV and  are  in  a  different  mindset  when  they  are  not  at  home.   The  team  will  combat  this  weakness  by  putting  forward   DÂłYHU\VNLOOHGYHU\ELJDQGYHU\JUDFHIXO´WHDP$FFRUGLQJ to  Garafola,  second-­year  goalkeeper  Conor  Power  is  second   to  none  in  the  SUNYAC.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   key   strength   that   keeps   this   team   running   is   our   EDFNWKLUG´*DUDIRODVDLGÂł&RQRU3RZHULVWRSLQWKHFRQ ference,  is  protected  by  a  veteran  back  four,  Brendan  Ujvary,   Jamal  Lis-­Simmons,  Robbie  Wexler,  and  Nicky  DiPaola,  as   JRRGDVDQ\EDFNIRXULQWKHUHJLRQDQGLVÂżQLVKHGRIIZLWK 'HIHQVLYH&HQWHU0LG-RH\(PEHUJHU´ *DUDIRODZLOOEHOHDGLQJWKH+DZNVÂśRIIHQVHLQKLVÂżQDO year  with  the  Hawks.  As  Ventriglia  described  him,  Garafola   â&#x20AC;&#x153;could  play  on  the  next  level,  he  is  that  good.  He  is  a  self-­ motivating  guy.  He  works  all  the  time  and  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  made  himself   DWUHPHQGRXVSOD\HU´

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

forward  Jimmy  Altadonna.  Altadonna,  who  scored  the  game-­ winning     goal   in   the   game   against   Stevens,   is   expected   to   KDYHDÂłWUHPHQGRXV´ÂżQDO\HDUZLWKWKH+DZNV7KH+DZNVÂś IURQW OLQH DOVR FRQVLVWV RI ÂżUVW\HDU PLGÂżHOGHU %ULDQ 6SLQD DQG WKLUG\HDU PLGÂżHOGHUIRUZDUG 6KDQVKH .KRVURVKYLOL .KRVURVKYLOL RULJLQDOO\ IURP WKH 5HSXEOLF RI *HRUJLD LV ZKR9HQWULJOLDVD\VZLOOEHWKHÂł;IDFWRU´GXULQJWKH+DZNVÂś games  this  season. Ventriglia  said  that  with  a  team  full  of  fourth-­year  stu-­ dents,  their  goal  has  to  be  to  win  the  SUNYAC  Tournament   at  the  end  of  the  season.   Âł7KLVWHDPQHHGVWRPDNHWKHSRVWVHDVRQWRXUQDPHQW´ said   Ventriglia.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   given.   We   have   to.   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   good   enough  to  do  that.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  senior-­laden  team  and  they  only  have   one  more  shot.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  it.  And  I  think  they  will  really  do  be-­ lieve  that  they  can  do  it.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  to  tournaments  many  times   DQGDQ\WKLQJFDQKDSSHQRQFH\RXJHWWKHUH´ Garafola   not   only   wants   to   get   a   home   game   for   the   team,   but     because   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   another   group   of   people   that   he   and  the  rest  of  the  team  are  looking  to  please  if  they  make   the  tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  aspire  to  win  our  SUNYAC  games  during  the  sea-­ son   so   we   can   host   the   playoffs   and   have   our   fans,   which   DUHWKHEHVWLQWKHZRUOGURRWXVRQRQRXUKRPHWXUI´VDLG Garafola. The   next   game   the   Hawks   will   play   at   home   will   be   against  Union  College  on  Sept.  17  at  1  p.m.


12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

A  New  Suit  for  an  Old  Bird

By  Kate  Blessing

Copy  Editor  |  Kblessing34@newpaltz.edu

Every   institution   has   their   traditions   and   leg-­ ends;Íž  and  SUNY  New  Paltz  has  Hugo  the  Hawk.     The  tradition  began  many  years  ago  with  profes-­ sor  and  falconry  expert  Heinz  Meng,  who  served  on   the  faculty  for  50  years.    According  to  SUNY  New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  website,  the  hawk  represents  the  academics,   athletic   and   personal   attitudes   associated   with   the   college.    While   the   hawk   is   a   celebrated   tradition,   including   participation   in   commencement,   our   be-­ loved  mascot  has  not  always  been  so  lucky. â&#x20AC;&#x153;About   5   years   ago   I   saw   the   old   mascot   cos-­ WXPH VLWWLQJ RQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;RRU LQ DQ HTXLSPHQW URRP´ VDLG %DVHEDOO +HDG &RDFK 0DWW *ULIÂżWKV Âł,W ZDV worn  and  ragged  and  hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  been  used  in  a  while.   At  that  time  more  students  were  starting  to  come  to   basketball   games   and   other   events   so   I   thought   it   would  be  neat  to  have  someone  to  wear  the  costume   again  to  add  to  the  growing  atmosphere  at  games.â&#x20AC;? *ULIÂżWKV LV DWWULEXWHG ZLWK WKH UHELUWK RI RXU mascot  and  is  therefore  responsible  for  the  on-­court   entertainment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   mascot   at   New   Paltz   was   resurrected,â&#x20AC;?   said  former  mascot  Ben  Quick,  adding  that  all  the   FUHGLWVKRXOGJRWR*ULIÂżWKV 4XLFN ÂżOOHG WKH KDZN VXLW XQWLO KH WUDQVIHUUHG

VFKRROVVSULQJZDVKLVÂżQDOVHPHVWHUDV+XJR The   hawkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   web   page   explains   that   because   hawks  soar  high  above  the  ground  in  search  of  prey,   they  embody  the  core  mission  the  school  has  for  its   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to  continually  challenge  themselves  and   descend   upon   knowledge   and   opportunity   like   a   hawk  would  its  prey.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   mascot   is   a   symbol   of   our   school   spirit,   RXUKLVWRU\DQGWUDGLWLRQV´VDLG*ULIÂżWKVÂł+DYLQJ Hugo  present  at  athletic  contests  and  campus  events   adds  a  level  of  excitement  to  the  venue.â&#x20AC;? According   to   Quick,   when   Hugo   was   awarded   DQHZKLVWRULFDOO\VLJQLÂżFDQWQDPHKLVSXUSRVHRQ campus  changed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   initially   was   an   athletics   department   thing   and  the  administration,  when  they   redid  their   logo   and  everything,  kind  of  adopted  Hugo,â&#x20AC;?  said  Quick.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Around   the   time   they   gave   him   the   name,   they   started  using  him  as  the  face  of  the  school.â&#x20AC;? Now,  with  a  fresh  costume  and  Huguenot  name,   our  mascot  is  all  over  the  school,  brochures,  and  ad-­ vertisements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  used  it  for  a  lot  of  PR  stuff,  like  move-­ in   day   as   a   visible   icon,   and   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   what   Hugo   is  supposed  to  embody  for  me,â&#x20AC;?  said  Quick.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   scope   of   what   you   can   do   is   certainly   reduced   if   you  have  to  shake  hands  and  kiss  babies  the  whole  

time.â&#x20AC;? While   the   purpose   and   mission   of   the   mascot   can  be  debated,  the  school  felt  that  Hugoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  presence   was  important  enough  to  maintain  that  they  bought  a   QHZFXVWRPFRVWXPH7RJHWKHU4XLFNDQG*ULIÂżWKV EURXJKWDGDQFLQJĂ&#x20AC;DLOLQJGLYLQJKDZNEDFNWROLIH *ULIÂżWKV H[SODLQHG WKDW 4XLFN ZDV DQ REYLRXV choice  to  don  the  hawk  suit  because  he  was  creative   and  energetic.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything   is   funny   in   a   hawk   suit,â&#x20AC;?   said   Quick.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  law  of  nature.â&#x20AC;? Though   he   lacked   a   theatrical   background,   Quick  literally  threw  himself  into  the  position  boast-­ ing  that  bruises  were  just  part  of  the  job. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ben   brought   it   back   to   life   -­   he   totally   ex-­ FHHGHGZKDWDQ\RQHH[SHFWHG´VDLG*ULIÂżWKVÂł$W times,   fans   would   be   missing   large   chunks   of   the   game  because  they  were  watching  him!  Since  then,   Dave  Lostaglio,  a  baseball  player  has  been  doing  a   great  job  with  it.â&#x20AC;? 7KRXJK4XLFNFDQQRORQJHUGDQFH RUĂ&#x20AC;DLO LQ a  hawk  suit,  he  hopes  that  his  tradition  will  live  on. Current   mascot   Dave   Lostaglio,   a   second-­year   EXVLQHVVPDMRUDJUHHVZLWK4XLFNDQG*ULIÂżWKV+H feels   that   the   purpose   of   Hugo   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;to   pump   every-­ body   up,   pump   up   the   fans,   to   have   fun   with   the   crowd  and  give  them  a  show.â&#x20AC;?

 Post-­Season  Baseball  Predictions

By  Zach  Higgins Contributing  Writer  |  N02492353@newpaltz.edu

Baseballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  regular  season  is  unfortunately  coming  to  an   end,  but  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  post-­season  has  the  potential  to  be  some-­ thing  extraordinary.   In  the  AL  East,  the  Yankees  are  slowly  distancing  them-­ selves  from  the  second  place  Red  Sox.  As  of  Sept.  14  the   Bronx  Bombers  have  a  3.5  game  lead  over  their  arch  rivals.   Other  divisions  like  the  AL  Central  and  the  NL  East  seem  to   be  foregone  conclusions  barring  any  monumental  collapse. (Ahem.  2007  Mets,  which  I  still  have  not  gotten  over).   The  Tigers  have  a  commanding  12  game  lead  and  look  to   be  a  formidable  opponent  in  the  playoffs,  with  MVP  candi-­ date  and  American  League  Cy  Young  Award  favorite  Justin   Verlander  commanding  their  rotation.   The  Phillies  (who  have  the  best  record  in  baseball  as  of   Sept.  14  at  a  cool  94-­50)  have  a  10  game  edge  over  the  Wild   Card  leading  Braves  and  continue  to  show  that  they  are  as   good  as  they  were  advertised  at  the  seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  commencement. One  of  my  favorite  aspects  of  sports  is  the  speculation.  

Last  year,  I  accurately  predicted  that  the  San  Francisco  Giants   were  going  to  win  the  World  Series.  I  hope  for  the  same  luck   this  time  around.  As  of  right  now,  the  playoff  outlooks  is  as   follows:  The  American  League  playoff  teams  would  be  the   Yankees,  Tigers,  Rangers,  and  the  Red  Sox  (wild  card).  The   National  League  teams  are  the  Phillies,  Brewers,  Diamond-­ backs,  and  Braves  (wild  card).   Out  of  the  American  League,  the  Tigers  will  win  the   pennant,  and  this  is  why:  Justin  Verlander.  I  believe  that  a   Verlander  start  every  three  games  will  be  enough  to  push  them   through  the  post-­season.  Their  offense  is  not  something  to   overlook,  considering  they  have  big  bats  like  Miguel  Cabrera   and  other  solid  role-­players  like  Jhonny  Peralta  and  Ryan  Ra-­ burn.  You  may  ask:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why  not  the  Yankees  or  the  Red  Sox?â&#x20AC;?   This  is  my  case.   The  Yankees  have  the  high-­powered  offense,  sure,  but   their  pitching  is  always  going  to  be  a  question  mark  in  my   mind.  After  C.C.  Sabathia,  I  do  not  believe  that  other  rotation   pitchers  like  Bartolo  Colon  and  Ivan  Nova  will  get  the  job   done.  We  all  know  for  sure  that  A.J.  Burnett  cannot  be  trusted.  

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

I  pick  the  Tigers  simply  because  Verlander  is  a  work-­horse   and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  gut  feeling. 2QWKHRWKHUKDQG,DPYHU\FRQÂżGHQWWKDWWKH%UHZHUV can  take  the  National  League.  The  off-­season  acquisition  of   Zack  Greinke  and  the  mid-­season  trade  to  acquire  Francisco   â&#x20AC;&#x153;K-­Rodâ&#x20AC;?  Rodriguez  were  important  in  shoring  up  their  pitch-­ ing  staff.  Their  closer  John  Axford  has  been  a  stud  in  the  bull-­ pen  converting  42  of  44  saves  (as  of  9.12.11).  Their  offense  is   (to  put  it  quite  ineloquently)  bananas.  Ryan  Braun  and  Prince   Fielder  are  the  best  3-­4  combination  in  the  league,  bar  none.   Other  players  important  to  their  success  are  All-­Star  Rickie   Weeks  and  Corey  Hart. The  Brewers  will  win  the  Fall  Classic  in  six  games.  Bold   prediction,  indeed,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  Brew  Crewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  time  to  shine.   Yovani  Gallardo  and  Zack  Greinke  will  prove  to  be  a  tough   task  for  opposing  lineups.  In  addition,  Braun,  Fielder  and  the   rest  of  the  offense  will  be  overpowering  and  the  long  ball  and   extra-­base  hits  will  be  imperative  to  their  success.   The  beauty  of  the  game  is  its  unpredictable  nature.  Octo-­ EHUZLOOGHÂżQLWHO\SURYHWREHDFUD]\PRQWK


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Rejniak  Leads  Basketball  Team

By  Kate  Blessing

were  its  strengths,  what  were  its  challenges,   he  really  took  the  time  to  do  that.”   Rejniak  has  led  teams  to  championships   After  struggling  for  an  impressive  re-­ and  helped  them  gain  national  recognition  as   cord  the  past  few  seasons,  Men’s  Basketball   an  Assistant  Coach.    By  working  under  leg-­ is  under  new  leadership.    Head  Coach  Mike   endary  coaches  and  with  reputable  teams,  he   Rejniak  has  worked  with  teams  at  Amherst   has  gained  the  experience  it  takes  to  elevate   College,  Plymouth  State  University  and  The   the  standard  and  reputation  of  the  New  Paltz   College  of  New   Men’s  Basketball  program. Jersey,  bringing   “I  had  the  opportunity  in  my  career  to   with  him  seven   move  up  to  Div.  1  and  do  that  route,  but   years  of  Div.  III   I’m  a  D.  III  guy,”  said  Rejniak.    “At  D.  III   coaching  experi-­ we  get  really  blue  collar  type  of  kids  that   ence. have  other  aspects—  they’re  not  so  focused    “He  was  by   where  basketball  has  to  become  a  job.” far  the  most  pre-­ Rejniak  is  excited  to  help  the  team  and   pared  person  for   program  to  succeed  and  promises  to  work   this  process  that   the  players  as  hard  as  it  takes  to  ensure  suc-­ we’ve  encountered   cess. MIKE REJNIAK in  any  search  that   “This  school  is  such  an  unbelievable   we’ve  done,”  said   sleeping  giant,”  said  Rejniak.    “–and  a  place   Athletic  Director  Stuart  Robinson.  “He  had   where  I  can  make  my  mark.” taken  the  time  to  really  know  this  campus.   Men’s  Basketball  has  been  let  down   He  really  understood  where  the  college  was,   in  the  past  by  a  promising  beginning  that   where  the  college  wanted  to  go  athletically,   waned  down  to  an  average  season  by  spring   where  it  wanted  to  go  academically,  what   Copy  Editor  |  Kblessing34@newpaltz.edu

and  upperclassmen  are  hoping  they  can   come  out  on  top  this  year. “It’s  a  great  sort  of  challenge  because   I  think  here  they  have  all  the  tools,  they’ve   just  never  been  implemented  before,”  said   Rejniak. Rejniak  came  to  SUNY  New  Paltz   to  build  a  program.    Though  he  has  been   offered  opportunities  elsewhere,  he  intends   to  stay  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  and  awake  this   sleeping  giant. “Some  coaches  think  short  term  and  I   WKLQN&RDFK5HMQLDNGH¿QLWHO\ZDQWVWRZLQ this  year,”  said  fourth-­year  guard  and  Cap-­ tain  Harris  Wichard.    “But  by  hiring  coach   Rejniak,  I  think  it’s  setting  New  Paltz  up  for   success  for  a  long,  extended  period  of  time.” Third-­year  Guard  and  Forward  Matt   Devine  said  Rejniak  is  building  a  team   based  upon  discipline  and  chemistry.     Devine  also  said  that  the  combination  will   hopefully  help  New  Paltz  see  a  winning  sea-­ son  this  year  and  grow  an  impressive  reputa-­ tion  both  athletically  and  academically. “The  winning  spark  is  in  the  pre-­season  

Thursday,  September  15,  2011

now  so  I  think  he’s  a  real  help  already  from   just  only  being  here  for  a  couple  weeks,”   said  Devine. The  ambition  is  obvious  as  the  team   has  come  together  and  weathered  a  stricter,   more  intense  pre-­season  to  hopefully  be-­ come  the  best  the  school  has  seen  in  a  while. “I  think  we’re  just  being  held  to  our   highest  standard,”  said  fourth-­year  guard   Jermaine  Wallace.    “This  year  if  you’re   coming  a  minute  late,  he’s  holding  you  ac-­ countable  for  it.”   The  dedication  Coach  Rejniak  requires   of  his  players  is  demanding.    The  team  is   boasting  an  average  of  six  training  sessions   per  week  including  lifting  and  basic  skills.     They  come  together  two  or  three  times  per   week  to  play  together  as  a  team. ���Everyone’s  really  impressed  by  his   no-­crap  attitude,”  said  Wichard.  “He’s  very   strict,  very  old  fashioned  and  he  doesn’t  re-­ ally  take  any  excuses.  I’ve  been  really  happy   and  impressed  by  his  attitude  and  I’m  really   looking  forward  to  playing  under  him.”  


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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

 Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  Gets  Defensive By  Cat  Tacopina

a  couple  of  key  players  that  we  needed   WRJHWEDFNLQWRJDPHVKDSHDQGWKH\ÂśUH JHWWLQJWKHUH2XUELJJHVWFKDOOHQJHLV With  the  dawn  of  a  new  season,  Col-­ leen  Bruley  already  knows  the  New  Paltz   WRFRQWLQXHWRVFRUHJRDOV'HIHQVLYHO\ :RPHQÂśV6RFFHUWHDPZLOOEHÂżJKWLQJIRU ZHÂśUHUHDOO\VWURQJÂŤ:HMXVWQHHGWRFRQ-­ WLQXHWRVFRUHJRDOV´ the  SUNYAC  Championship.     The  Hawks  offense  is  headed  by  Kon-­ Bruley,  who  has  been  Head  Coach   GHONDZKRKDVVFRUHGJRDOVLQWKUHHRI of  the  team  for  15  seasons,  said  that  with   WKHÂżYHJDPHVWKH+DZNVKDYHSOD\HGVR QHZSOD\HUVFRPLQJLQDQGEHLQJDEOHWR far.  Offense,  as  Bruley  said,  was  an  area   close  the  holes  the  team  had  last  season,   with  open  positions  and  she  and  the  team   New  Paltz  has  produced  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  complete   KDYHEHHQUHO\LQJRQÂżUVW\HDUPLGÂżHOG-­ SDFNDJH´7KHWHDPFXUUHQWO\KROGVD ers  Eleni  Anselmi,  Rebecca  Rothman  and   UHFRUGRIOHDYLQJWKLUG\HDUJRDO-­ forward  Sarah  Painter  to  help  make  New   NHHSHU6WHSKDQLH9HJDLPSUHVVHGZLWK 3DOW]DV%UXOH\SXWLWDÂłFRPSOHWH´WHDP what  she  has  seen  so  far. 2QGHIHQVH&REELVKHDGLQJWKH Âł7KHWHDPÂśVSOD\WKLVVHDVRQLVJHW-­ FKDUJHZLWK9HJDDOUHDG\SXWWLQJIRUWKDQ WLQJEHWWHUDQGVWURQJHUHDFKGD\DVZH FRQWLQXHWRSUDFWLFHDQGSOD\DJDLQVWPRUH LPSUHVVLYHVHDVRQ9HJDZDVRQHRIWKH four  players  named  to  the  All-­Tournament   FKDOOHQJLQJWHDPV´VDLG9HJDÂł,DP WHDPWKLVZHHNHQGDW5XWJHUV impressed  by  our  work  ethic  and  how  ev-­ Âł9HJDKDVUHDOO\VWHSSHGLWXSWKLV HU\RQHDVDWHDPZDQWVWRSHUIRUPEHWWHU´ \HDUVRZHGHÂżQLWHO\QHHGKHUWRFRQWLQXH Fourth-­year  defender  and  Captain   KHUVWURQJOHYHORISOD\´VDLG%UXOH\ Shannon  Cobb  said  that  while  the  team   /LNH%UXOH\9HJDVDLGWKDWGHIHQVH did  not  start  off  the  way  they  wanted,   LVWKHWHDPÂśVVWURQJHVWDVSHFWDJDLQVWWKHLU WKH\ÂśUHQRZRQWKHULJKWWUDFNWRZDUGV FRPSHWLQJDWDKLJKHUOHYHOWKDQWKH\ZHUH competitors. Âł7KHWHDPÂśVNH\VWUHQJWKLVRXUFRP-­ last  season. mitment  and  determination  to  improve   Âł:HJRWRIIWRDURFN\VWDUWZLWKRXU GD\E\GD\´VDLG9HJDÂł2XUGHIHQVH ÂżUVWIHZJDPHV´VDLG&REEÂł+RZHYHU LVRXUVWURQJHVWDVSHFWWKH\FRQWUROWKH ZHDUHFRPLQJRIIDJUHDWZHHNHQGDQG ÂżHOGLQZD\VVRPHPD\QRWWKLQNRI:H ZHDUHSOD\LQJOLNHZHNQHZZHFRXOG´ are  a  team  that  can  win  or  lose  and  still   7KHWHDPKDVUHFHQWO\JRWWHQEDFN KDYHWKHXUJHWRZDQWWRNHHSJRLQJ2XU from  the  Scarlet  Raider  Soccer  Classic  at   WHDPLVFRPIRUWDEOHRQDQGRIIWKHÂżHOG 5XWJHUV1HZDUNZKHUHWKH\ZHUHDEOH WRJHWKHUDOORZLQJXVWRRYHUFRPHDQ\ to  secure  the  Tournament  title  after  a  4-­1   ZLQRYHU&DUWKDJH&ROOHJH7KHZLQRYHU REVWDFOH´ Bruley  and  Cobb  also  said  the  bond   &DUWKDJHOHDGWKHWHDPWRWKH7RXUQDPHQW the  2011  Hawks  share  is  key  to  their   Title  and  placed  four  of  its  members  on   success  and  one  of  the  reasons  why  they   the  All-­Tournament  team.  Third-­year  for-­ FRXOGJRDOOWKHZD\WKLVVHDVRQ ward  Shelby  Kondelka  was  named  Tour-­ Âł:HKDYHDJUHDWWHDPRQDQGRIIWKH QDPHQW093,Q%UXOH\ÂśVH\HV6DWXUGD\ ÂżHOGWKLV\HDUDQG,WKLQNWKDWWKHFORVH was  an  important  day  for  the  Hawks. UHODWLRQVKLSVWKDWDUHEXLOWWKURXJKRXWWKLV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday  it  really  started  to  click   WHDPWKLV\HDUZLOOEHWKHGHFLGLQJIDFWRU and  they  started  to  feel  and  they  started   LQKRZZHOOZHGR´VDLG&REE to  understand  that  this  is  how  we  need  to   ,QKHU\HDUV%UXOH\VDLGZLWKRXW SOD\DQGDUHQRZEHFRPLQJPRUHFRP-­ hesitation  that  this  is  the  best  team  she  has   IRUWDEOHZLWKRQHDQRWKHU´VDLG%UXOH\ SXWRQWKHÂżHOG ³'HIHQVLYHO\ZHSOD\HGRXWVWDQGLQJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  family  and  we  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   DQGZHVFRUHGJRDOVVRZHÂśUHSXWWLQJLWDOO UHDOO\KDYHWKDWODVW\HDU´VDLG%UXOH\ WRJHWKHU´ Âł:HÂśYHEHHQORRNLQJIRUD\HDUZKHUH +RZHYHU%UXOH\VDLGWKHEHJLQQLQJ they  combine  the  skill  and  the  closeness   RIDQHZVHDVRQKDVEURXJKWLWVFKDOOHQJ-­ of  a  family  unit  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  it.  This  is,  by   es.  Fitness  levels  and  offensive  play,  she   far  the  best  team  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  ever  had.  They   said,  have  slowed  the  team  down. Âł2XUÂżWQHVVOHYHOKDVGHÂżQLWHO\EHHQ FDQZLQDQGEHDWDQ\RQHÂŤ7KH\MXVWQHHG WREHOLHYHWKDW´ DFKDOOHQJH´%UXOH\VDLGÂł0RVWSOD\HUV FDPHEDFNLQJRRGVKDSHEXWWKHUHÂśVEHHQ Sports  Editor    |  Ctacopina97@newpaltz.edu

   

7KLUG\HDU0LGÂżHOGHU(PLO\5RNLWRZVNLJRHVWRSOD\WKHEDOOGXULQJSUDFWLFH3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

Thursday,  September  15,  2011


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The  Future  For  Pelfrey   WHITE SOX

MANAGING  EDITOR   With  the  Mets’  season  coming  to  an  end   this  month,  the  fan  base  has  already  begun   speculating   the   potential   personnel   moves   General   Manager   Sandy   Alderson   might   add  to  his  vision  of  the  Mets’  future.     Besides   the   obvious   concerns   of   Jose   Reyes’   potential   departure   and   the   uncer-­ tainty  in  the  bullpen,  many  fans  are  wonder-­ ing  what  the  future  has  in  store  for  once-­ace   Mike  Pelfrey.   Pelfrey’s  season  has  been  a  disappoint-­ ment  thus  far,  highlighted  by  his  7-­11  record   and  subpar  4.66  ERA,  in  what  was  supposed   to  be  a  year  where  he  showed  maturity  and   poise  on  the  mound.    His  stellar  2010  season,   where  he  won  15  games  and  held  together  a   Mets  staff,  seems  like  a  distant  memory  as   the  inconsistency  we  once  thought  plagued   the  right-­hander  has  returned.   After  being  anointed  the  ace  of  the  ro-­ tation   by   Manager   Terry   Collins   in   Spring   Training,   Pelfrey   has   not   built   on   his   pre-­ vious  season’s  dominance  and  his  lack  of   consistency  has  led  many  to  question  his   place   in   Alderson’s   grand   scheme   for   the   Mets’  future.   One  report  in  The  New  York  Post  cited    cited   a  source  who  speculated  that  the  Mets  might   look  to  re-­build  the  team  by  trading  current   core  pieces  of  the  roster  and  gearing  up  for  a   pennant  run  by  the  time  prospects  Matt  Har-­ vey,  Zach  Wheeler  and  others  are  ready  for   the  big  leagues.   If  this  were  the  case,  it  would  certainly   spell  the  end  for  a  commodity  such  as  Pel-­ frey.  Though  he  is  inconsistent,  teams  will   not  forget  the  brilliance  the  hurler  showed   in   2010.   His   age   is   prime   for   a   pitcher   –   which   is   a   reason   the   Mets   will   certainly   have  in  mind  if  and  when  this  decision  oc-­ curs.   If   the   Mets   were   to   trade   Pelfrey   this   winter,  there  are  a  few  different  possibilities   I  see  occurring:    

PIRATES

The  other  ‘Sox  are  an  option  as   the  team  might  be  looking  for   another  right-­handed  starter  to   add  to  their  rotation.  The  Mets   might  be  able  to  pry  a  few   of  the  White  Soxs’  mid-­level   prospects  such  as  Tyler  Flow-­ HUVDQG¿OODQHHGDOHJLWLPDWH starting  catcher.  

METS  GET:    C  Tyler    Flowers  

REDS

The  Pirates  are  an  intriguing  trade  option  for  any  team.   With  their  current  surge  in  the  standings,  the  team  and   recently-­extended  GM  Neil  Huntington  might  be  look-­ ing  to  build  upon  their  newfound  success.  Coupled  with   the  fact  they  have  stockpiled  prospects  over  their  years   of  dismay,  the  Mets  might  be  able  to  snag  a  strong  pros-­ pect  due  to  the  dilution  the  Pirates  system  might  have.

METS  GET:  P  Colton  Cain  

YANKEES

The  Reds  could  have  interest  in  adding  Big  Pelf  to  their  start-­ LQJ¿YHDQGPLJKWEHZLOOLQJWRGRDVZDSRIXQGHUDFKLHYLQJ hurlers.  Despite  his  injury-­riddled  few  seasons  Edinson  Volquez   could  be  someone  the  Mets  target  in  a  deal  with  the  Reds.   When  healthy,  Volquez  is  one  of  the  games  premier  pitchers  -­   much  like  Pelfrey  when  he  is  consistent.

METS  GET:  P  Edinson  Volquez  

The  Yankees  will  certainly  be  on   the  prowl  for  starting  pitchers  this   offseason,  as  they  currently  boast   C.C.  Sabathia  and  a  bunch  of   question  marks  in  their  rotation.   With  the  upcoming  Free  Agent   starting  pitching  pool  as  thin  as  it   is,  it  is  not  out  of  the  question  that   the  Yankees  might  take  a  gamble  on   someone  like  Pelfrey  and  his  obvi-­ ous  upside.  The  Yanks  also  have   depth  in  their  catching  prospects   which  matches  them  well  with  the   Mets. METS  GET:  C  Austin  Romine

RED SOX The  ‘Sox  should  be  searching  for  pitching  depth  as  the  winter  rolls  around  since   much  of  their  rotation  has  been  inconsistant  throughout  this  season.  The  Mets   would  be  wise  to  target  current  set-­up  man  Daniel  Bard  in  a  package  for  Pelfrey,  as   %DUGFRXOGVORWLQDVWKHWHDP¶VFORVHUDQGZRXOGLQVWDQWO\¿OODJODULQJQHHG7KH two  teams  would  be  swapping  young  arms,  the  only  question  would  be  weather   the  Red  Sox  would  be  willing  to  send  the  hard  throwing  right-­hander.  

METS  GET:  P  Daniel  Bard  

Thursday,  Sepember  15,  2011


SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

       

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PR gue ED  Bas Pa IC eball ge TI  Po 12 ON stse S aso n

 

WHAT’S INSIDE

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New Paltz Says Hello to Mike Rejniak PAGE 13

Women’s Soccer Kicks Into High Gear PAGE 14

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  STOCKTON  PHOTOS SIDE  PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

MEN’S SOCCER KICKS INTO NEW SEASON WITH CONFIDENCE: PAGE 11


The New Paltz Oracle, Volume 83, Issue 2