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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  85,  Issue  I

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

West Takes Leave Village Mayor Takes Medical Leave of Absence While Still Suing Village Board

STORY ON PAGE 8

ALL PHOTOS BY ROBIN WEINSTEIN

PARK POINT PENDING

Tax Exemptions For Potential Housing Project Cause Controversy

STORY ON PAGE 3

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡9LOODJH,PSOHPHQWV6WUHHWVFDSH3DUNLQJ3ODQ3J‡681<&DPSXVHV*R6PRNH)UHH3J ‡1HZ3DOW]*UDGXDWLRQ5DWHV1HDU7RS3J‡6WLFNHU5HTXLUHPHQWV)RU%LNHV2Q&DPSXV3J


Cat  Tacopina   EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Katherine  Speller   MANAGING  EDITOR

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John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

April  Castillo   FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz  

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR

Andrew  Lief   SPORTS  EDITOR

FEATURES          PG.  3B A&E                        PG.    6B SPORTS                  PG.  13

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Dana  Schmerzler   Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

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Maddie  Anthony Abbott  Brant   Anthony  De  Rosa   Ben  Kindlon Roberto  LoBianco Sally  Moran   Jennifer  Newman COPY  EDITORS

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI 681<1HZ3DOW]2XUFLUFXODWLRQLVThe  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG E\WKHEXVLQHVVPDQDJHU&RPPXQLW\DQQRXQFHPHQWVDUHSXEOLVKHGJUDWXLWRXVO\EXWDUH subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH ID[OLQHLV

Volume  84 Issue  XIV

Nicole  Brinkley

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Maxwell  Reide

THE  GUNK  

WEB  CHIEF

MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

1B-­8B

THE  DEEP  END

Maya  Slouka

EDITORIAL  

Emily  Weiss  

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-­    JENNIFER  NEWMAN  &  ANDREW  LIEF

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Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

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University  Police  Blotter

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VISIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ORACLEâ&#x20AC;? ONLINE:

Incident:  Drugs   Date:  9/3/13 Location:  Pond  Area M/S  arrested  for  criminal  possession  of  mari-­ juana. Incident:  DMV Date:  9/3/13 Location:  South  Side  Loop/Gage  Hall M/S  arrested  for  a  suspended  driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  license.

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Five-­Day  Forecast Thursday,  Sept.  5 Partly  Cloudy High:  67  Low:  42

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Saturday,  Sept.  7 Partly  Cloudy High:  74  Low:  60

Sunday,  Sept.  8 Partly  Cloudy High:  74  Low:  54

Monday,  Sept.  9 Mostly  Cloudy   High:  71  Low:  58


 3 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Park  Point  PILOT  Agreement  Draws  Criticism By  Roberto  LoBianco Copy  Editor  |  Rlobianco83@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Wilmorite   could   move   forward   with   the   Park   Point   housing   complex   without   paying   any   taxes   on   the  project,  according  to  New  Paltz  Town  Supervisor   Susan  Zimet.   However,  in  February,  Wilmorite  applied  for  a  25-­ year  long  Payment  in  Lieu  of  Taxes,  or  PILOT,  agree-­ ment  with  the  Ulster  County  Industrial  Development   Agency.  If  approved  the  arrangement  would  have  the   FRPSDQ\SD\WKHÂżUVW\HDURIWKHSODQZLWK DJUDGXDOLQFUHDVHWRLQWKHÂżQDO\HDU The  town  assessor  estimates  that  Wilmorite  would   owe  $1.5  million  annually  if  Park  Point  were  taxed  at   the  same  level  as  other  properties  in  the  town,  accord-­ ing  to  Zimet.   Âł,W ZDV ORRNHG LQWR DQG LWÂśV EHHQ FRQÂżUPHG WKDW the  property  is  tax  exempt,â&#x20AC;?  Zimet  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because  the   mission  statement  of  the  foundation  did  get  changed  to   include   student   housing,   the   student   housing   portion   of  the  project  will  be  entirely  tax  exempt.â&#x20AC;? In   a   letter   to   faculty   and   staff,   President   Donald   Christian   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   is   unfortunate   that   many   people   have   not   understood   that   the   developer   will   pay   full   taxes  on  [the  faculty  and  staff]  units  to  support  K-­12   education,  recognizing  that  employees  are  more  likely   than  students  to  have  school-­aged  children.â&#x20AC;? According   to   Christianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   letter,   additional   hous-­ ing  Park  Point  will  provide  is  critical  to  maintaining   SUNY   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   enrollment   levels   in   an   increas-­ ingly  competitive  higher  education  environment.   Wilmorite  Inc.,  a  Rochester-­based  real  estate  de-­ YHORSPHQW ÂżUP LV SDUWQHULQJ ZLWK WKH 681< 1HZ Paltz  Foundation  to  construct  a  732-­bed,  $56  million   housing   complex   next   to   the   campus   on   Route   32   South. The   New   Paltz   Foundation,   the   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   non-­ SURÂżWIXQGUDLVLQJDUPSXUFKDVHGWKHDFUHSORWRI land  where  Wilmorite  will  construct  Park  Point  for  $2   million  in  2007  and  plans  to  lease  the  land  to  Wilm-­ orite  for  46  years. However,   Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   decision   to   pay   a   reduced   rate  on  the  student  housing  portion  of  the  project  has   drawn  criticism  from  some  residents  and  Town  Board   members.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  the  big  picture  that  the  foundation  is  miss-­ ing  is  that  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  seeing  tuition  increase,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  seeing   URRPDQGERDUGLQFUHDVHZHÂśUHVHHLQJLWWDNHÂżYHWR six   years   for   students   to   get   through   our   university   system,â&#x20AC;?   Town   Board   member   Kristin   Brown   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  state  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  enough  revenue  to  operate  its   university  system.  Why  not?  Because  the  state  grants   tax  exemptions  to  billion  dollar  corporations.â&#x20AC;?

Potential  costs  of  Park  Point  complex  continue  to  be  disputed.  

In  his  letter,  Christian  cites  data  from  the  Hudson   Valley  Pattern  for  Progress  that  shows  a  nearly  20  per-­ cent   decline   in   the   number   of   high   school   graduates   in  Ulster  County  between  1993  and  2020.  Similar  de-­ clines  are  happening  across  the  Hudson  Valley.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Colleges   and   universities   throughout   New  York   and  the  Northeast  view  the  same  statistics  that  we  do,   and  are  intensifying  their  recruitment  efforts  in  areas   of   traditional   recruitment   strength   for   New   Paltz,â&#x20AC;?   Christian  said  in  his  letter.   In  a  letter  to  the  Town  Board,  David  Dorsky,  chair   of   the   New   Paltz   Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Real   Estate   Commit-­ tee,   defended   Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   pending   PILOT   applica-­ tion  before  the  Ulster  County  Industrial  Development   Agency. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   proposed   PILOT   agreement   will   more  than  offset  any  expenses  incurred  by  the  Town   for  providing  additional  municipal  services,â&#x20AC;?  Dorsky   said. According  to  a  report  prepared  by  the  state  comp-­ WUROOHUÂśV RIÂżFH ,QGXVWULDO 'HYHORSPHQW $JHQFLHV were  created  in  1969  to  boost  economic  development.   There   are   114   active   IDAs   throughout   the   state   pro-­ viding  nearly  $500  million  in  tax  exemptions. 7KH FRPSWUROOHUÂśV RIÂżFH HVWLPDWHV WKDW  jobs  were  gained  as  a  result  of  such  projects  at  a  cost   of  $2,659  per  job  created,  while  local  taxpayers  had  to   PDNHXSPLOOLRQLQUHYHQXHVORVWWKURXJK3,/27 tax  exemptions  in  2010  alone.

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

The  Mid-­Hudson  region  offered  the  highest  level   of  net  exemptions  of  any  region  in  the  state,  according   to  the  report. A  fact-­sheet  prepared  by  Wilmorite  â&#x20AC;&#x153;minimal  im-­ SDFWV DUH DQWLFLSDWHG´ WR 7RZQ ÂżUH SROLFH DQG RWKHU services  â&#x20AC;&#x153;based  upon  previous  experience  with  similar   student  housing  projects  in  the  State.â&#x20AC;? However,   the   initial   cost   estimates   outlined   by   Wilmorite  were  based  on  the  assumption  that  SUNY   New   Paltz   University   Police   would   provide   police   services  to  Park  Point,  according  to  Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Draft   Environmental  Impact  Statement  on  the  project.   It  was  later  reported  that  University  Police  would   not   be   able   to   patrol   Park   Point.   Their   latest   union   FRQWUDFW SURKLELWV 83' RIÂżFHUV IURP VHUYLFLQJ DQ\ off-­campus   locations,   according   to   University   Police   Chief  David  Dugatkin. The  New  Paltz  Police  Commission  estimates  that   an   additional   $12.5   million   in   emergency   services   costs  over  25  years  would  result  from  the  construction   of  Park  Point,  while  Wilmorite  estimates  $300,000  in   additional  costs  over  the  same  period. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   tell   us,   never   having   been   in   New   Paltz,  what  we  need  and  what  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  need.  That  has   to  come  from  experts  who  have  been  living  here  for   years,â&#x20AC;?  Ira  Margolis,  member  of  the  New  Paltz  Police   Commission  said.


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

New  Paltz  Prepares  For  Possible  Smoking  Ban According  to  an  email  sent  out  by  Michael   G.   Malloy,   director   of   environmental   health   and   safety,   smoking   is   prohibited   in   all   cam-­ pus  buildings,  in  SUNY  motor  vehicles,  within   50   feet   of   building   entrances   with   or   without   signage   and   in   all   exterior   stairwells   and   any   building   roofs.  That   restriction   comes   from   a   New  York  state  public  health  law,  Malloy  said. The   current   smoking   policy   has   gained   momentum  and  support  this  year,  with  a  cam-­ pus   wide   email   pushing   students   to   adhere   to   the   50-­feet   rule.   In   terms   of   enforcement,   Malloy   said   new   employee   orientations,   face   to  face  discussions  and  pleading  to  other  com-­ munity   members   to   do   their   part   and   enforce   the  present  smoking  policy  are  strategies  that   work  best.     Fire   drills   are   also   an   important   part   of   on-­campus  smoking  awareness  and  policy  en-­ forcement,  however  SUNY  New  Paltz  has  had   its  share  of  real  incidents,  Malloy  said.     Âł7KHUH KDYH EHHQ D IHZ >ÂżUHV@ IURP P\ recollection   over   the   past   six   years,â&#x20AC;?   Malloy   VDLG Âł:H KDYH KDG PDQ\ PXOFK ÂżUHV IURP carelessly   discarded   butts,   especially   by   the   Lecture  Center.â&#x20AC;?     In   2012,   the   SUNY   Board   of   Trustees   passed   a   resolution   calling   on   all   64   SUNY   campuses   to   become   tobacco-­free   by   Janu-­ ary  of  2014,  according  to  the  SUNY  website.  

Some  individual  SUNY  schools  have  already   become  smoke-­free,  but  SUNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  system-­wide   ban  requires �� approval  by  the  state  legislature,   which  was  not  adopted  in  the  2013  legislative   session  in  either  the  State  Senate  or  Assembly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  some  campuses  that  have  de-­ clared   themselves   smoke-­free,   but   when   you   ask  them  how  they  are  enforcing  it,  they  throw   their   hands   up   in   the   air,â&#x20AC;?   SUNY   New   Paltz   President  Donald  Christian  said  in  a  previous   interview   with   The   New   Paltz   Oracle.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have  chosen  to  focus  our  efforts  elsewhere  in-­ stead  of  creating  another  regulation  that  people   defy.â&#x20AC;? However,   according   to   Malloy,   such   a   policy   could   mean   a   positive   environmental   impact.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  of  the  pros  of  a  ban  would  be  clean-­ liness  of  the  campus,â&#x20AC;?  said  Malloy.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  smoke-­ free  campus  with  proper  effective  enforcement   can  make  the  aesthetics  better  without  poorly   discarded  cigarette  butts  around  campus.â&#x20AC;? However   fourth-­year   student   Michelle   Handler   does   not   think   the   current   policy   is   practical,  let  alone  a  campus  wide  ban.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  one  to  come  and  check  if  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   VPRNLQJQRZ>RQFDPSXV@´+DQGOHUVDLGÂł$V far   as   banning   it,   I   know   they   did   it   at   other   SUNY  schools.  They  took  away  the  butt  dis-­ pensers,  but  people  did  it  anyway.  And  people   would   have   to   go   to   the   edge   of   campus   at   night,  which  is  dangerous.â&#x20AC;? Malloy   is   very   much   aware   of   the   prob-­

NUCLEAR  REACTIONS Russia  is  warning  that  a  U.S.  strike  on  Syriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   atomic  facilities  might  result  in  a  nuclear  catas-­ trophe  and  is  urging  the  U.N.  to  present  a  risk   analysis  of  such  a  scenario.The  warning  comes   By  Andrew  Leif   Sports  Editor|  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu from  Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Foreign  Ministry  spokesman,  Al-­ The  New  Paltz  Village  Board  has  begun   exander  Lukashevich.   implementing  a  Streetscape/Parking  Plan  that   includes   increasing   parking   meter   rates   to   POPE  CONDEMNS  WARFARE Pope  Francis  ramped  up  Vatican  opposition  to   50  cents  per  half  hour  with  a  one  hour  park-­ threatened   military   strikes   against   Syria.   He   ing   limit   in   the   Village   center,   among   other   urged   Catholics   and   non-­Catholics   to   partici-­ changes.     The  plan  started  last  year  with  the  idea  to   pate  in  his  planned  day  of  fasting  and  prayer  for   FORVH&KXUFK6WUHHWWRFDUWUDIÂżFIURP0DLQ peace  on  Saturday.   Street  to  Academy  Road,  to  create  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;pocket   parkâ&#x20AC;?  and  pedestrian  walkway.     OBAMA  ICY  OVER  SNOWDEN The   plan   was   drafted   last   year   by  Amy   President  Barack  Obama  is  in  St.  Petersburg,   Cohen   and   Julie   Robbins   from   the   Down-­ Russia,  for  meetings  with  world  leaders  at  the   town  Business   Asscoication,  Village  Trustees   Group   of   20   summit.   Obama   arrived   Thurs-­ Ariana   Basco   and   Sally   Rhoads,   and   Kathy   day   morning   from   Sweden.   The   Stockholm   Moniz  from  the  Building  Department. stop   was   added   after   Obama   canceled   plans   The   proposed   Streetscape/Parking   Plan   to  hold  talks  ahead  of  the  G-­20  with  Russian   was   endorsed   by   the   Bicycle   and   Pedestrian   President  Vladimir  Putin  in  Moscow  in  retali-­ Committee,   a  joint  Town  and  Village  commit-­ ation  for  Russia  granting  asylum  to  National   tee   that   works   to   improve   town   and   village   Security  Agency  leaker  Edward  Snowden. safety  conditions  for  cyclists  and  pedestrians.     However,   recent   changes   to   meter   rates   Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

and   times   were   inconsistent   with   the   plan   that  was  proposed  last  year,  but  the  error  was   caught  by  the  board  and  corrected,  Robbins,  a   business  owner  in  the  village  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  mistake  that  was  put  in  was  the  vil-­ lage  decided  to  help  the  business  owners  that   over   the   holiday   they   were   going   to   bag   the   meters,â&#x20AC;?  Robbins  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  that  wording  they   used  the  wording  â&#x20AC;&#x153;core  district,â&#x20AC;?  which  is  the   main  business  district  in  the  downtown  area,   and  somehow  that  wording  â&#x20AC;&#x153;core  districtâ&#x20AC;?  got   put   in   place   of   Main   Street   when   they   were   PDNLQJWKHRIÂżFLDOFKDQJHVIRUWKHPHWHU´ Robbins   said   this   mistake   is   being   cor-­ rected   and   a   meeting   was   held   last   week   to   inform  the  village.   The   purpose   of   the   plan   was   to   allow   people  to  enjoy  their  time  in  the  village  with-­ out  having  to  worry  about  their  parking  meter   expiring,  Robbins  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  idea  is  that  when  people  come  into   the  downtown  they  want  them  to  have  options   to  eat.  So  they  can  eat  lunch,  and  shop  and  it  

CAR  BOMB  IN  CAIRO Egyptâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  interior  minister  says  his  convoy  was   targeted  by  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;largeâ&#x20AC;?  explosive  device  that  was   likely  detonated  by  remote  control.  Speaking   on   state   television   after   Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   attack   in   an   eastern   Cairo   district,   a   clearly   shaken   but   unscathed   Mohammed   Ibrahim   said   the   explosion  targeted  his  own  car.  He  says  four   other  cars  in  the  convoy  were  damaged. MAALOULA  OCCUPIED Syrian   government   troops   battled   al-­Qaida-­ linked  rebels  over  a  regime-­held  Christian  vil-­ lage  in  western  Syria  for  the  second  day  Thurs-­ day,  as  world  leaders  gathered  in  Russia  for  an   economic  summit  expected  to  be  overshadowed   by   the   prospect   of   U.S.-­led   strikes   against   the   Damascus   regime.   Residents   of   Maaloula   said   the  militants  entered  the  village  late  Wednesday. MEETINGS  OVER  MISSILES  The  threat  of  missiles  over  the  Mediterranean  is   weighing  on  world  leaders  meeting  on  the  shores   of  the  Baltic  this  week  -­  and  eclipsing  economic   battles  that  usually  dominate  when  the  Group  of   20  leading  world  economies  convenes.  Men  at  the   forefront  of  the  geopolitical  standoff  over  Syriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   civil  war  will  be  in  the  same  room  for  meetings   Thursday  and  Friday  in  St.  Petersburg.

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

By  Jennifer  Newman Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

lems  with  such  a  policy.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   some   cons   in   that   smokers   would   be   forced   to   smoke   outside   the   well   lit   and   patrolled   campus,   especially   at   night,   where   the   safe   guards   such   as   our   blue   light   phones   will   not   be   accessible,â&#x20AC;?   Malloy   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   well   as   our   neighbors,   who   might   com-­ plain   of   carelessly   discarded   butts   on   their   property.   Smokers   might   also   now   have   to   KLGHLQURRPVWRVPRNHDQGPLJKWGHIHDWÂżUH V\VWHPVRUVHWRIIÂżUHDODUPVV\VWHPVPRUHIUH-­ quently.â&#x20AC;? In  March  2012,  three  Student  Association   senators  spearheaded  a  project  to  look  into  bet-­ ter   ways   of   enforcing   the   already   established   policy  at  SUNY  New  Paltz.  At  the  time,  many   students   expressed   interest   in   creating   desig-­ nated  smoking  areas  on  campus,  which  is  an-­ other  alternative  to  a  ban,  according  to  a  previ-­ ous  article  published  in  The  New  Paltz  Oracle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   also   need   to   recognize   there   are   smokers   who   adhere   to   the   policy   and   they   should  be  thanked  for  participating  as  commu-­ nity  members,â&#x20AC;?  Malloy  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  do  not  mean  to   vilify  all  smokers,  there  are  smokers  who  fol-­ low  the  rules  and  do  the  right  thing.â&#x20AC;? Malloy  has  been  campaigning  to  promote   â&#x20AC;&#x153;community   based   enforcementâ&#x20AC;?   and   it   has   been  â&#x20AC;&#x153;an  uphill  battle,â&#x20AC;?  but  thinks  momentum   is  shifting.  Complaints  regarding  smoking  by   students  in  a  given  area  should  be  referred  to   WKH2IÂżFHRI6WXGHQW$IIDLUVDQGZLOOEHKDQ-­ dled  through  the  student  judicial  process.

Village  Board  Implements  New  Parking  Plan

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

can  be  leisurely,â&#x20AC;?  Robbins  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  gives   people  a  longer  time  to  spend  downtown  with-­ out  having  to  go  back  and  forth  to  the  meters.â&#x20AC;?   Basco  said  that  this  plan  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  a  topic  of   discussion  by  the  board  initially  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  it  spurred   from  another  topic  during  a  meeting.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   were   really   meeting   about   putting   things   downtown   to   help   direct   people,   and   through   those   meetings   we   started   talking   about   parking,â&#x20AC;?   Basco   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   intention   was  not  to  organize  a  group  and  come  up  with   the  parking  plan.    The  group  was  existed  and   then  we  came  up  with  this  plan.â&#x20AC;? Robbins  said  she  sees  the  error  as  a  posi-­ tive  because  it  allowed  for  a  more  open  dis-­ cussion   between   the   board   and   the   business   owners,  she  said.     The   reaction   to   the   plan   has   been   â&#x20AC;&#x153;to   change  everything  back,â&#x20AC;?  Basco  said.    How-­ ever,   despite   their   differences   in   opinion,   Basco  said  that  the  board  and  town  have  been   able   to   work   together   to   try   and   come   to   an   agreement  on  the  matter.    


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

New  Paltz  Graduates  Above  SUNY  Average

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

By  John  Tappen News  Editor  |  John.Tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Seventy-­three  percent  of  SUNY  New   Paltz   students   graduate   within   six   years   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   third   best   of   any   SUNY   school   after   Cornell   New   York   State   Colleges   and   Binghamton  University,  according  to  a  re-­ cent  Times  Union  article  that  cited  SUNY   FHQWUDO DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ ÂżJXUHV WUDFNHG from  2006  to  2012.   SUNY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   largest   public   univer-­ sity  system  in  the  country  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  graduated  64   percent   of   students   in   the   last   six   years,   which   trumped   the   national   average   of   55.5  percent,  according  to  2009  data  from   the  National  Center  for  Higher  Education   Management  Systems.   Despite   above   average   numbers   for   681< UDWHV Ă&#x20AC;XFWXDWHG WKURXJKRXW WKH systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   64   campuses.  The   Binghamton,   New  Paltz,  Geneseo  and  Alfred  campuses   graduated   at   least   70   percent   of   students   between  2006  and  2012,  while  the  Canton,   Old  Westbury,  Maritime  and  Farmingdale   sites  were  all  at  less  than  45  percent.   According   to   Vice   President   of   En-­ rollment   David   Eaton,   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   loca-­ tion   and   extensive   major   options   help   to   make  the  school  a  popular,  and  ultimately   selective  destination. Additionally,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;good   graduation   rates   are  an  extension  of  good  retention  rates,â&#x20AC;?   Eaton  said.   Eaton   also   said   academically   moti-­ vated  students  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  stay  at  a  school  that   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   challenging.   Those   at   New   Paltz   have  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  desire  to  learn  a  lot  about  a  lot,â&#x20AC;?   Eaton  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;an  enlightened  characteristic   of  students  here.â&#x20AC;?   New   Paltz   has   continued   to   increase   its  access  to  courses  that  students  need  by   spreading  out  classes  through  the  evening   and  made  use  of  every  day  of  the  week  to   EHVWDYRLGVFKHGXOLQJFRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWVDFFRUGLQJ to  Eaton.   Expanded   access   to   classes   Eaton   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;high   demand   courses,â&#x20AC;?   often   ORZHU GLYLVLRQ FODVVHV WKDW IXOÂżOO D JHQ-­ eral  education  requirement,  have  become   available  online  during  summer  and  win-­ ter  sessions.     With   an   increase   in   high   demand   courses,   there   has   been   a   decrease   in   re-­ medial  education  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  classes  whose  mate-­ rial   should   have   been   taught   to   students   while  they  were  in  high  school.  Remedial   education  classes  are  only  given  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;sup-­ port  to  students  who  are  English  language  

DIVIDED  VOTE A   Senate   panelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   deep   divide   over   giving   President   Barack   Obama   the   authority   to   use   U.S.   military   force   against   Syria   underscores   the   com-­ mander   in   chiefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   challenge   in   per-­ suading  skeptical  lawmakers  and  wary   allies  to  back  greater  intervention  in  an   intractable  civil  war. ARIEL  CASTRO  SUICIDE Ohioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  prison  system  is  reviewing  how   Cleveland  kidnapper  Ariel  Castro  -­  per-­ KDSV WKH PRVW QRWRULRXV ÂżJXUH EHKLQG bars  in  the  state  -­  managed  to  hang  him-­ self  with  a  bedsheet  while  in  protective   custody. PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN SUNY  Chancellor  Nancy  Zimpher  giving  a  speech  at  New  Paltz.

learners   or   who   have   special   needs,â&#x20AC;?   In-­ terim   Dean   of   Liberal  Arts   and   Sciences   Stella  Deen  said. Expanded  online  learning  and  dimin-­ ished   remedial   teaching   were   central   in   SUNY  Chancellor  Nancy  Zimpherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  State   of   the   University   Address   in   January,   where  she  emphasized  raising  graduation   rates  and  reducing  the  time  to  completion.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   need   a   comprehensive   plan   to   get  more  students  into  college,  graduating   on  time  and  graduating  ready  for  success-­ ful  careers,â&#x20AC;?  Zimpher  said  at  her  State  of   the  Univeristy  Address. In   that   speech,   Zimpher   outlined   her   goals  for  the  SUNY  system: Â&#x2021; Expanded  access Â&#x2021; Increased  completion Â&#x2021; Assured  life  and  career  success She   also   mentioned   several   other   ÂłKLJK SURÂżOH FDOOV WR LQFUHDVH WKH QXP-­ ber  of  college  graduates  in  this  country,â&#x20AC;?   which   included   President   Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Col-­ lege  Completion  Goal  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  his  plan  to  grad-­ uate  an  additional  8  to  10  million  students   by  2020.   The   Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   plan   is   for   increased   funding   based   on   how   well   each   college   performs   on   a   rating   system   that   will   be   ÂżQLVKHGEHIRUHWKHVWDUWRIWKHVFKRRO year.  The   criteria   for   the   rating   is   as   fol-­ lows:

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTIEN

Â&#x2021;

Access,   percentage   of   students   receiving  Pell  grants Â&#x2021; Affordability,   average   tuition,   scholarships  and  loan  debt Â&#x2021; Graduate  earnings,  advanced  de-­ grees  of  college  graduates At   New   Paltz,   Eaton   said   that   he   recognizes   many   undergraduates   pursue   multiple   majors   and   minors   in   varied   ÂżHOGV +H VHHV WKLV HFOHFWLF HGXFDWLRQ DV an  advantage  for  an  era  where  a  person  is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;likely  to  change  professions  three  to  four   times.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;To   participate   in   meaningful   things   in   work   and   society,   you   need   a   broader   knowledge   base   than   you   did   40   years   ago,â&#x20AC;?  Eaton  said.   But   despite   the   merits   of   undertak-­ ing   that   knowledge,   according   to   Eaton,   there  are  costs:  additional  years  in  school   to  complete  requirements  and  a  loss  of  in-­ come  by  not  being  in  the  job  market.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Acquiring   knowledge   irrespective   RIHFRQRPLFEHQHÂżWVKDVWREHFRQVLGHUHG a   good   thing,   but   in   reality,   we   all   need   jobs,â&#x20AC;?  Eaton  said.   Eaton   said   he   measures   the   success   of  college  with  both  a  degree  that  proves   course   study   and   an   education   that   pro-­ YLGHVVHOIFRQÂżGHQFHLQWHUFRQQHFWHGQHVV a   love   of   learning,   leadership   skills   and   the  ability  to  listen.

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

TRIBE  LAUNCHING  AD A  tribe  in  upstate  New  York  said   Thursday  it  will  launch  a  radio  ad   campaign  pressing  for  the  Washing-­ ton  Redskins  to  get  rid  of  a  nickname   that  is  often  criticized  as  offensive.

STUDIES  LOOK  AT  HEALTH  lAW A  study  released  Thursday  by  the  non-­ SURÂżW.DLVHU)DPLO\)RXQGDWLRQIRXQG that   government   tax   credits   would   lower  the  sticker  price  on  a  benchmark   â&#x20AC;&#x153;silverâ&#x20AC;?   policy   to   a   little   over   $190   a   month  for  single  people  making  about   $29,000,  regardless  of  their  age. NADAL  TO  FACE  GASQUET Nadal  is  10-­0  against  Gasquet  heading   LQWR WKHLU 86 2SHQ VHPLÂżQDO 6DWXU-­ day. CONVICTED   RAPIST   COULD   FACE  MORE  PRISON  TIME A  former  Montana  high  school  teacher   sent  to  prison  for  30  days  over  the  rape   of  one  of  his  students  could  face  more   time   behind   bars   after   prosecutors   ap-­ pealed   the   case   to   the   state   Supreme   Court. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

 6

By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Town  of  New  Paltz  is  in  the  process  of  applying   to   the   Hudson   Valley   Greenway   for   a   $10,000   grant   to   examine   the   feasibility   of   building   a   bicycle   and   pedes-­ trian  trail. The  board  passed  a  resolution  at  their  Aug.  22  meet-­ ing  to  authorize  the  application  for  the  grant,  which  would   inspect  the  area  west  of  the  Carmine  Liberta  Bridge  and   down  Route  299.  The  path  would  connect  downtown  New   Paltz  to  the  Wallkill  View  Farm  Market.   The   town   created   a   committee   in   place   to   draft   the   proposal   for   the   grant,   which   includes  Town   Supervisor   Susan   Zimet,   Chris   Marx   from   the  Town   of   New   Paltz,   Bob   Anderberg   from   the   Open   Space   Institute,   Glenn   Hoagland  and  Eric  Roth  from  the  Mohonk  Preserve,  Chris   Bernabo   and   Christine   DeBoer   from   the  Wallkill  Valley   Land  Trust  and  Daniel  Lipson  of  the  New  Paltz  Bicycle/ Pedestrian  committee. Zimet   said   the   grant   money,   if   awarded,   would   be   used  to  hire  a  planner  who  would  further  examine  the  pos-­ sibilities  of  implementing  a  bike  path. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   currently   in   the   very   early   planning   phases   of   the   project,â&#x20AC;?   Zimet   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Should   we   get   the   grant,   we  would  be  bringing  in  a  consultant  to  discuss  what  we   would  be  able  to  build,  and  certain  things  we  would  have   WRGRLIZHGHFLGHGWRHYHQWXDOO\H[SDQGWKHÂżUVWSDWK´ Zimet  said  even  though  the  primary  focus  of  the  com-­ mittee   is   to   see   a   path   built   which   reaches   the   Wallkill   9LHZ)DUP0DUNHWWKDWLVRQO\WKHÂżUVWSKDVHRIDWKUHH

phase  project.  The  second  phase  of  the  project  would  take   bicyclists  and  pedestrians  to  the  Shawangunk  Mountains   and   the   third   phase   would   extend   the   path   to   the   Ulster   County  Fairgrounds.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   three   phases   are   something   I   hope   to   make   a   successful  reality,â&#x20AC;?  Zimet  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just  people  who   live  here  that  take  advantage  of  bike-­riding  opportunities   we  offer.  There  are  plenty  of  people  who  come  up  to  the   area  with  bicycles  strapped  to  the  back  of  their  cars,  and   I   can   only   see   this   bike   path   being   advantageous   to   the   community  in  the  future.â&#x20AC;? Zimet   said   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;paramountâ&#x20AC;?   concern   of   hers   is   safety   for  bicyclists,  due  to  narrow  shoulders  on  the  side  of  the   road.   She   said   she   believes   that   having   the   bicycle   path   put  in  place  would  help  to  keep  them  safe  from  auto  traf-­ ÂżF DeBoer  said  the  bicycle  path  would  be  built  so  that   the  shoulders  on  the  side  of  the  road  would  be  made  larger   or  the  path  would  be  built  10  to  20  feet  off  of  the  road.   She  also  said  while  she  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  sure  what  the  eventual  costs   would  be  should  the  path  be  approved  in  the  future,  but   VDLGVKHLVFRQÂżGHQWLWZLOOEHFRPHDUHDOLW\ Âł$VRIULJKWQRZWKHUHLVQÂśWPXFKRIDZD\WRÂżJXUH out  exactly  how  much  this  would  cost  us,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   I  do  believe  if  we  are  able  to  get  this  grant  and  The  Carmine   Liberta  Bridge  is  the  location  for  possible  bicycle  Path.then  be  able   to  move  forward  in  making  this  bicycle  path,  we  would  be   able  to  fundraise  enough  to  make  it  a  reality.â&#x20AC;? Lipson  said  if  the  project  were  to  be  approved  in  the   future,  it  could  be  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;huge  game-­changer.â&#x20AC;?  for  the  com-­

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

Town  Board  Applies  For  Bicycle  Path  Grant

munity  and  SUNY  New  Paltz  students,  and  that  commit-­ tee  members  are  anticipating  receiving  the  grant. Âł,GRQÂśWKDYHDVJUHDWRIDÂżQJHURQWKHSXOVHDVRWKHU committee  members  do,  but  I  do  know  that  other  commit-­ WHHPHPEHUVDUHYHU\FRQÂżGHQWWKDWWKLVZLOOKDSSHQDQG that  many  believe  it  is  just  a  matter  of  time,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.

6FKRRO5HTXLUHV6WLFNHU,GHQWL¿FDWLRQ)RU%LNHV Copy  Editor  |  N02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

All  bicycles  on  campus  are  now  required  to  be  regis-­ tered  with  the  school  and  have  a  sticker  with  the  ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   name  and  an  assigned  number  placed  onto  the  crossbar   area  near  the  handlebars.   The   use   of   bicycles   by   commuters   and   residents   as   a   means   for   transportation   is   widely   encouraged   on   the  SUNY  New  Paltz  campus.  However,  where  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been  parked  in  the  past  has  been  seen  as  a  problem,  ac-­ cording  to  Facilities  Operation  Manager  Gary  Buckman.   Obtaining  a  sticker  is  free  for  all  students;Íž  the  school   ZLOOQRWPDNHSURÂżWDQGUHJLVWUDWLRQLVVROHO\IRULGHQWL-­ ÂżFDWLRQSXUSRVHV%XFNPDQVDLG Buckman  said  he  feels  the  new  bike  policy  will  be  a   positive  change  to  the  aesthetic  of  the  SUNY  New  Paltz   campus.  After  so  much  renovation  and  work  to  beautify   the  campus,  he  says  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;unsightlyâ&#x20AC;?  to  have  bikes  latched   to  trees  and  lampposts  when  there  are  available  racks. If  bicycles  are  found  parked  somewhere  other  than   a  designated  zone  (i.e.  attached  to  a  tree),  a  staff  mem-­ EHU IURP WKH )DFLOLWLHV 2SHUDWLRQV RIÂżFH ZLOO FKHFN IRU DQ LGHQWLÂżFDWLRQ VWLFNHU DQG DWWHPSW WR FRQWDFW WKH bikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   owner   to   move   it   to   a   rack.   If   unable   to   contact  

the  owner,  a  staff  member  will  cut  the  lock,  relocate  the   bike  to  a  designated  parking  rack  and  lock  it  with  a  lock   WKDWEHORQJVWRWKHRIÂżFH7KHVWXGHQWZLOOWKHQEHDEOH WRFRQWDFWWKH)DFLOLWLHV2SHUDWLRQVRIÂżFHIRUDVVLVWDQFH with  unlocking  the  temporary  lock.     There  is  no  ticket  or  charge  for  parking  in  an  undes-­ ignated  zone.  According  to  Buckman,  cutting  the  lock  is   the  staffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;last  resort.â&#x20AC;?         Fourth-­year   accounting   student   Sam   Zuffante   said   he  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  see  a  problem  with  where  bikes  were  be-­ ing  parked  during  his  time  at  SUNY  New  Paltz.    He  said   he  felt  this  policy  would  never  have  to  be  implemented  if   WKHUHZHUHDVXIÂżFLHQWQXPEHURIUDFNVLQWKHÂżUVWSODFH Buckman   and   his   staff   are   working   to   solve   this   problem   to   give   cyclists   adequate   space   to   park   their   ELNHV%LNHUDFNVRIÂżYHQLQHDQGVSDFHVKDYHEHHQ added  in  front  of  dormitory  halls,  classrooms  and  other   buildings  around  campus.    If  there  are  regularly  an  inad-­ equate  number  of  spaces  in  a  particular  area,  the  Facili-­ ties  Operations  Staff  promise  to  put  more  in  where  they   bike  policy  will  depend  on  the  cooperation  between  the   are  needed,  Buckman  said. Facilities  Operations  staff  and  cyclists.    He  said  there  is  a   Students  must  register  their  bikes  to  park  on  campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  will  need  to  be  patient,â&#x20AC;?  he  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;but  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   â&#x20AC;&#x153;grace  periodâ&#x20AC;?  of  a  few  weeks  while  faculty  and  students   are   made   aware   and   familiarize   themselves   to   the   new   get  them  racks.â&#x20AC;?   Buckman  said  that  he  feels  the  success  of  the  new   bike  policy.     PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

By  Ben  Kindlon

Thursday,  September  5,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   7

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Student  Senate  Meets  For  First  Time  This  Semester

$//3+2726%<52%,1:(,167(,1

By  Anthony  DeRosa &RS\(GLWRU_N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  56th  student  senate  met  for  their   ¿UVWPHHWLQJRIWKHVHPHVWHURQ6HSW DWSPLQ6WXGHQW8QLRQ 68  6WXGHQW$VVRFLDWLRQ 6$ 3UHVLGHQW 0DQXHO7HMDGDRSHQHGWKHRI¿FLDOPHHW-­ LQJ DIWHU D EULHI LQWURGXFWLRQ GHWDLOLQJ his   role   and   responsibilities   to   his   new   (ERDUG DQG FRQFOXGLQJ ZLWK UHSRUWV WKDW 6$ ZDV JLYHQ D  JUDQW WR be  used  for  issues  related  to  campus  cli-­ PDWH

([HFXWLYH 9LFH 3UHVLGHQW RI $FD-­ demic   Affairs   Jordan   Taylor   discussed   KLV SODQV RQ IRFXVLQJ RQ UDFLDO LVVXHV ZLWKLQ WKH VWXGHQW ERG\ DQG WKH GHYHO-­ opment  of  Women  Studies  into  a  formal   GHSDUWPHQW %XVLQHVV 0DQDJHU RI 6$ /LQGD /HQGYD\ VWRRG LQ IRU ([HFXWLYH RI )L-­ nance   Youssouf   Kuoyo   to   report   that    ZDV DYDLODEOH IRU VXEVLGL]LQJ FRVWV RI FRQIHUHQFHV DQG  ZDV DYDLODEOHIRUJHQHUDOSURJUDPPLQJ /DVWRQWKHDJHQGDZDVWKHGLVFXV-­ sion   of   Women,   Sexuality,   and   Gender  

6WXGLHV :*6  WUDQVLWLRQ WR D IRUPDO DFDGHPLFGHSDUWPHQWLQWKH681<1HZ 3DOW] FXUULFXOXP 6$ KDG SURSRVHG WKH FUHDWLRQRIWKHGHSDUWPHQWODVWVHPHVWHU :KHQ WKH Ã&#x20AC;RRU ZDV RSHQHG WR GLV-­ FXVVLRQRQHVHQDWRUPRWLRQHGWRPRYH LQWR DQ 6$ H[HFXWLYH VHVVLRQ ZKLFK would  bar  all  non-­senate  members  from   KHDULQJWKHGLVFXVVLRQFLWLQJ³VHQVLWLYH GHWDLOV´WRRSUHPDWXUHWREHGLYXOJHGWR WKHJHQHUDOVWXGHQWERG\ 6$ $GYLVRU 0LNH 3DWWHUVRQ DG-­ dressed  the  senate  and  said  the  situation   GLG QRW PHHW WKH VSHFL¿F UHTXLUHPHQWV

Thursday,  September  5  2013

WRPRWLRQIRUDQH[HFXWLYHVHVVLRQ&RQ-­ VHQWLQJ VHQDWRUV WKHQ PRWLRQHG WR DG-­ MRXUQWKHPHHWLQJDQGPHHWIRUDQLQIRU-­ PDOGLVFXVVLRQLQWKH6$RI¿FH 6HQ-HVVH*LQVEHUJVDLGDQLQIRUPDO PHHWLQJZRXOGEHDQ³H[HFXWLYHVHVVLRQ LQDOOEXWQDPH´YRLFLQJFRQFHUQVWKDWD ODFNRIWUDQVSDUHQF\RQDSXEOLFO\VODW-­ HGGLVFXVVLRQZRXOGEHFRUUXSW After  a  few  more  minutes  of  debate,   WKH PHHWLQJ ZDV DGMRXUQHG ZLWK D PD-­ MRULW\YRWH6HQDWHWKHQOHIWWRUHFRQYHQH LQWKH6$RI¿FH


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

   8

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Mayor  West  Takes  Medical  Leave By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@awkmail.newpaltz.edu

In  the  midst  of  suing  the  New  Paltz  Village  Board,   Jason  West  has  decided  to  take  a  leave  of  absence  from   the  position  of  village  mayor. $IWHU¿OLQJDODZVXLWLQ$XJXVWFRQFHUQLQJDUHFHQW decrease  in  salary,  West  informed  Village  Trustees  and   friends  via  email  and  Facebook  that  he  is  taking  a  paid   one-­month   leave-­of-­absence   from   the   position   due   to   medical   reasons.   Deputy   Mayor   Rebecca   Rotzler   will   act  as  mayor  during  West’s  absence.   West’s   lawyer   Michael   Sussman   said   his   client   believes   the   village   trustees   docked   the   mayoral   salary   and   brought   down   the   position   from   full-­time   to   part-­time   as   a   reaction   to   West’s   lack   of   support   in   consolidating  both  town  and  village  governments.   “My   client   believes   that   the   trustees   acted   in   bad   faith   when   they   changed   his   salary,”   Sussman   said.   “We’re   anticipating   on   having   a   hearing   some   time   in   the  future  to  see  whether  the  courts  feel  the  same  as  we   do.” Village   Trustee   Ariana   Basco   said   the   decision   to   reduce   the   mayor’s   salary   had   “nothing   to   do   with   consolidation,”   but   instead   was   because   of   an   unwillingness   to   communicate   and   work   with   other   members  of  the  board,  along  with  not  meeting  the  same  

VWDQGDUGVKHKDGPHWGXULQJKLV¿UVW\HDUDVPD\RULQ 2011. “When  he  started  I  thought  he  was  a  true  leader  who   was   committed   to   getting   things   done   and   making   the   village  a  better  place,”  she  said.  “But  it  was  noticeable   last  year  that  his  lack  of  cooperation  was  hindering  his   ability  to  be  a  good  mayor.”   When   West’s   tenure   as   mayor   began   in   2011,   his   salary   was   pegged   at   $22,500.   That   salary   was   later   increased   to   $35,000   in   2012   after   4-­1   approval   from   the  board.  West  wanted  to  raise  his  salary  by  $13,000,   but  village  trustees  voted  4-­0  to  bring  the  mayoral  salary   down  to  the  original  2011  salary. At  the  end  of  budget  meetings  in  April,  West’s  salary   was  not  the  only  village  employee  to  receive  a  paycut.   The  positions  of  deputy  mayor  and  village  trustee  were   brought  down  along  with  the  mayor’s  salary.   Although  West  said  he  wanted  to  raise  his  salary  due   to  the  amount  of  hours  he  was  clocking  in,  Basco  said   WKDWWKHUHDUHQRVSHFL¿HGKRXUVQHHGHGIRUWKHSRVLWLRQ “The  pay  isn’t  about  being  full-­time  or  part-­time,”   Basco  said.  “It’s  about  getting  the  job  you  need  to  get   done  done.  There  are  a  lot  of  hours  that  need  to  be  put   into  these  positions,  but  that  isn’t  what  our  salaries  are   based   on.   It’s   about   working   together   as   a   team   to   do   what’s  best  for  the  village.”  

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oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  September  5,  2013

West   said   he   had   sent   an   email   to   village   trustees   proposing   a   salary   raise   to   $48,000   before   budget   meetings   began.   Sussman   said   one   of   the   mayor’s   FRQFHUQVLVD)2,/UHTXHVWKH :HVW KDG¿OOHGRXWLQ RUGHU WR ¿QG RXW ZKHWKHU RU QRW YLOODJH WUXVWHHV EURNH Open   Meeting   laws.   While   Sussman   said   he   and   his   client   have   not   yet   heard   anything,   Basco   said   that   village  trustees  had  sent  every  email  they  had  exchanged   with  one  another  to  the  village  clerk.   Basco   and   Sussman   both   said   that   the   mayor’s   GHSDUWXUH IURP RI¿FH LV IRU PHGLFDO UHDVRQV DQG KDV nothing   to   do   with   recent   disagreements   between   the   mayor  and  the  board.   Even  though  the  mayor  is  still  on  the  mend  to  better   health,  Sussman  said  he  believes  the  leave  will  not  result   in  a  permanent  departure  from  the  position.   “I   expect   him   to   be   back   when   he   said   he   will   be   back,”  Sussman  said.  “He’s  very  focused  on  taking  care   of  his  health  and  all  signs  point  to  him  coming  back.” Basco   said   she   hopes   the   mayor   will   make   a   full   recovery  but  that  once  he  comes  back  he  will  be  more   willing  to  work  with  other  members  of  the  board.   “He’s   recently   stood   as   an   obstacle   to   get   things   done,”  Basco  said.  “I’d  do  anything  to  get  things  done   the  way  they  used  to  be,  but  that  will  take  willingness  to   cooperate  from  everyone  on  the  board.”


The GUNK

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Thrifty Threads Inside

Hidden Harmony’s Closet Stories on page 2b PHOTO  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER


  2B

FEATURES

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Finding A Hidden Harmony SUNY NEW PALTZ STUDENT OPENS THRIFT BOUTIQUE

PHOTO  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER

Natalie  Skoblow  displays  the  selection  at  Hidden  Harmonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Closet. By  April  Castillo Features  Editor  |  acastillo@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Natalie   Skoblow   always   had   a   secret   plan  for  her  life,  and  now  the  secretâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  out.   The  third-­year  public  relations  major  is   the   founder   of   boutique   thrift   shop   Hidden   Harmonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Closet.  The  shop  will  open  Sept.   14  inside  The  Green  Palette,  a  furniture  store   specializing   in   eco-­friendly   furniture   and   home  decor,  located  at  215  Main  St.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  the  back  of  my  head,  I  really  wanted   to   open   something   of   my   own   someday,â&#x20AC;?   Skoblow  said.   As  a  passionate  thrifter  and  the  founder   of  SUNY  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Think  Thrift  club,  she   has   been   sifting   through   thrift   and   second-­ hand  stores  for  bargain  prices  for  more  than   four  years. Caitlyn   Maceli,   a   member   of   the   club   and  a  third-­year  environmental  geochemical   science   major,   said   Skoblowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   passion   for   sustainability   and   style   are   always   present  

ZKHQWKH\VFDQWKULIWVWRUHVIRUÂżQGV0DFHOL often  comes  with  Skoblow  on  thrifting  trips,   and   said   Skoblow   has   a   good   eye   for   what   can  sell.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   tries   to   look   for   nice   quality,â&#x20AC;?   Maceli   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   feels   it   and   looks   at   the   brand.â&#x20AC;? The  fashion-­conscious  Skoblowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  previ-­ ous   time   in   retail   helped   her   determine   the   need   for   her   expertise:   stylish   clothes   that   would   make   even   budget-­conscious   college   students   smile.   She   had   worked   at   Urban   2XWÂżWWHUVVXUURXQGHGE\DOOWKHPDNLQJVRI a  fashion-­forward  wardrobe,  but  with  prices   unrealistic  for  college  students.   Âł,ORYH8UEDQ2XWLÂżWWHUVFORWKLQJ´6NR blow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  their  stuff  is  mass-­produced   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  oh,  this  is  a  vintage  sweater,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  re-­ ally.â&#x20AC;? Thrift  and  consignment  stores  often  of-­ fer   similar   products   at   half   the   price.   Skob-­ low  recently  lost  20  pounds,  and  she  turned   to  thrifting  to  revamp  her  wardrobe.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know  the  market  and  audience  really   well  because  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  in  my  customer  base,â&#x20AC;?  Sko-­ blow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  put  so  much  time  and  effort   LQWR KDYLQJ SHRSOH EH DZDUH RI WKH EHQHÂżWV RI LW , ÂżJXUHG ZK\ QRW PDNH WKDW D FDUHHU for  me?â&#x20AC;?       Marc  Anthony,  the  owner  of  The  Green   Palette,   had   been   in   touch   with   the   Think   Thrift  club  and  offered  them  space  and  sup-­ plies.  When  he  heard  Skoblow  wanted  to  start   her   own   shop,   he   offered   space   within   The   Green  Palette  free  of  charge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   talked   to   so   many   people   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   said,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh,  I  need  to  go  shopping,  but  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have  any  money,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Skoblow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  price  the   items  the  way  that  I  would  buy  them.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  go-­ ing  to  be  honest  with  my  customers.â&#x20AC;? Skoblow   purchased   two   long,   vintage   dresses  the  day  before  she  began  selling  on-­ line.  Although   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   thought   about   opening   the  business  for  months,  those  dresses  came   at  a  time  when  she  knew  she  was  ready.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  like  the  way  they  looked  on  me,  

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

but   I   knew   I   could   sell   them.   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even   tell  anyone  about  it  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  family  or  friends.  It  was   a   very   spontaneous   thing,   a   typical   Natalie   move,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. $IWHUKHUÂżUVWVDOHYLDKHUVKRSÂśVFace-­ book,  Skoblow  told  her  parents.  They  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   surprised,   Skoblow   said.   She   personally   ZUDSSHG XS KHU ÂżUVW VDOH WKH YLQWDJH GUHVV and  delivered  it  to  her  customer  because  the   woman  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  to  the  village.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   a   middle   way,â&#x20AC;?   Skob-­ low  said.   (YHQWKHQDPLQJRIKHUVKRSUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWVKHU determination   and   dedication   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   the   phrase   ³¿QG\RXUKLGGHQKDUPRQ\´LVERWKKHUOLIH philosophy  and  a  tattoo  on  her  back.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   you   have   two   notes,   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   al-­ ZD\VDPLGGOHQRWHWKDWFDQÂżWLQWKDWÂśVJRLQJ to  sound  nice,â&#x20AC;?  Skoblow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  may  not   see  it  at  the  time,  or  hear  it,  but  if  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  pa-­ tient,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  able  to  see  that  middle  sound   RU PLGGOH ZD\ :KHQ \RX ÂżQG WKDW LWHP LQ WKULIWLQJLWÂśVOLNHÂżQGLQJDKLGGHQWUHDVXUH´


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3B

Wallkill Water Worries RIVER CONSISTENTLY FAILS EPA STANDARDS FOR SAFE SWIMMING By  Roberto  LoBianco Copy  Editor  |  rlobianco83@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

PHOTO BY DANA SCHMERZLER

The   Wallkill   River   begins   its   meandering   northward   path   to   the   Hudson   as   a   trickling   stream   draining   out   of   Lake  Mohawk  in  Sussex,  NJ.  The  nearly  ninety-­mile  jour-­ ney  takes  it  through  some  of  the  most  fertile  farmland  in   the  country  as  it  passes  through  the  Black  Dirt  region  in  Or-­ ange  County,  the  result  of  millennia  old  glacial  lake  depos-­ its  and  then  on  to  Ulster  County  and  through  our  backyards. However,   farms   and   towns   that   developed   along   the   banks   of   the   Wallkill   River   have   also   contributed   to   the   ULYHUÂśVWUDQVIRUPDWLRQIURPDWKULYLQJVRXUFHRIIUHVKÂżVK and  center  for  recreation  to  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Wallkill  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  river  much   in  need  of  cleanup,  according  to  recent  tests  run  by  clean   water  advocacy  group  Riverkeeper. Water  quality  testing  conducted  over  the  last  year  and   a  half  showed  that  the  Wallkill  River  consistently  failed  to   meet   Environmental   Protection   Agency   (EPA)   standards   for  safe  swimming,  according  to  Riverkeeper.  This  was  due   to  the  presence  of  the  Enterococcus  bacteria,  an  indication   of  fecal  contamination  from  sewage. Every  sample  taken  in  June  failed  federal  standards  at   21  different  sites  along  68  miles  of  the  river.  Test  sites  in   New  Paltz  included  the  boat  launches  at  Plains  Road  and   Springtown   Road   as   well   as   the   Sawmill   Brook,   part   of   ZKLFKĂ&#x20AC;RZVWKURXJKWKH681<1HZ3DOW]FDPSXV Data   shows   that   tributaries   like   the   Wallkill   tend   to   have   poorer   water   quality   than   the   Hudson,   Riverkeeper   Representative  Dan  Shapely  said.   Âł<RXZRXOGWKLQNWKDWWKH\ZRXOGEHFOHDQHUDQGVDIHU for  swimming,â&#x20AC;?  Shapely  said.   But  even  if  you  avoid  dipping  your  toes  in  the  Wallkill,   you  may  not  avoid  its  bacteria,  Shapely  said,  and  contami-­ QDWLRQYLDĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJLVDFRQFHUQIRUORFDOFRPPXQLWLHV Âł$JULFXOWXUDOÂżHOGVDORQJWKHULYHUDUHLQXQGDWHG´0L-­ chael  Edelstein,  professor  of  environmental  psychology  at   Ramapo  College,  said.  Edelstein  is  also  the  co-­president  of   2UDQJH(QYLURQPHQWDQRQSURÂżWHQYLURQPHQWDODGYRFDF\ group  based  in  Orange  County,  NJ.   On  Aug.  10,  at  the  height  of  the  late-­summer  harvest,   heavy  rains  caused  the  river  to  swell,  submerging  The  Gar-­ dens   for   Nutrition   and   its   more   than   130   plots   along   the   south  bank  of  the  Wallkill  in  the  contaminated  water,  ac-­ cording  to  the  Cornell  Cooperative  Extension.     Âł:KHQWKHJDUGHQĂ&#x20AC;RRGHGDOO,FRXOGWKLQNDERXWZDV that  report,â&#x20AC;?  Lisa  Weinstein,  one  of  the  gardens  said  one  of   the  gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  members.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  soil  is  fertile  there,  but  if  the   river  is  polluted,  it  might  not  be  such  a  great  place.â&#x20AC;?   The  latest  testing  for  contaminants  in  the  gardensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  soil   KDSSHQHGDIWHU+XUULFDQH,UHQH-DLPHH8KOHQEURFNSUHVL-­ dent  of  the  board  of  the  Gardens  for  Nutrition,  said.  

7KHĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJRIWKH:DOONLOO5LYHUPD\H[SRVHDJULFXOWXUHWRSROOXWHGZDWHUV Uhlenbrock  also  said  that  testing  results  declared  the   soil  safe. But  local  gardeners  still  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  so  sure.   Alice   Velky,   a   six-­year-­long   member   of   the   Gardens   for   Nutrition,   said   she   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   feel   comfortable   harvest-­ ing  the  vegetables  from  her  garden  plot  for  fear  of  possible   contamination.  She  said  she  will  probably  not  return  to  the   site  next  year. Âł(YHU\WLPH,JREDFNWRP\JDUGHQ,ZDQWWRFU\EH-­ FDXVH,SXWVRPXFKZRUNLQWRLW´9HON\VDLG 6KDSHO\ VDLG 5LYHUNHHSHU FDQQRW LGHQWLI\ VSHFLÂżF sources   of   the   pollution   based   on   data   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   gathered   so  far.  However,  evidence  suggests  excessive  storm  water   during  heavy  rains  causes  outdated  sewage  systems  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  some   EXLOW PRUH WKDQ  \HDUV DJR Âą WR RYHUĂ&#x20AC;RZ7KH V\VWHPV are   designed   to   spill   excess,   untreated   sewage   water   into   the  river. Development   along   the   river   displaces   wetlands   and   IRUHVWVWKDWRQFHVRDNHGXSH[FHVVUDLQZDWHU,QVWHDGZDWHU

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

runs  off  pavement  and  asphalt  into  sewage  pipes  of  com-­ munities  nestled  along  the  river,  Shapely  said.  That  water   HYHQWXDOO\PDNHVLWVZD\WRWKH:DOONLOODQGOHDGVWRĂ&#x20AC;RRG-­ ing. (GHOVWHLQVDLGKHEHOLHYHVWKDWWKHLPSDFWRIĂ&#x20AC;RRGLQJ can  be  reduced  by  removing  impervious  surfaces,  directing   and  catching  the  remaining  runoff,  restoring  trees  and  land-­ scapes  to  trap  water  and  restoring  wetlands  and  daylighting   streams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;An  enormous  amount  of  water  is  running  off  into  the   river  because  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  too  much  pavement,â&#x20AC;?  Edelstein  said.   The  Wallkill  River  Watershed  Conservation  and  Man-­ agement   Plan,   created   by   the   Orange   and   Ulster   County   Planning  Departments  in  2007,  found  that  in  some  areas,   surfaces  such  as  pavement  and  asphalt  make  up  10  percent   RIWKHULYHUÂśVZDWHUVKHG,IWKLVQXPEHUFRQWLQXHVWRJURZ the  pollution  may  increase  further. Âł,QDSHUIHFWZRUOGHYHU\WRZQDORQJWKHULYHUJHWVRQ the  ball  and  cleans  it  up,â&#x20AC;?  Velsky  said.


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ESK D Y P F: O F C O K COO â&#x20AC;&#x153;Start Your Day Off With Sweet, Sweet French Toastâ&#x20AC;? By  Sally  Moran n02668795@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Each week, one of the members of our Copy Desk will share their culinary chops with you. Bon appetit! Having   a   huge   sweet   tooth   severely   limits   (or   broadens,   depending   on   who   you   ask)  my  food  choices.  No  matter  the  time  of   day,   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   that   underlying   craving   for   some   type   of   food   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   sugared   down  and  more  than  likely,  overly  processed.   Which   leads   me   to   the   point:   French   toast. Yep,  French  toast  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  probably  one  of  the   most   popular   choices   of   breakfast.   Rightly   so. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   fairly   simple   to   make,   quick   and   to   the   point.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no   ornate   ceremony   or   preparation  for  this.   So  grab  a  few  slices  of  bread,  some  eggs,   milk   and   ground   cinnamon   for   some   added   Ă&#x20AC;DYRUDQGOHWÂśVJHWWRZRUN First,  you  have  to  mix  all  these  ingredients   together  into  a  bowl  until  you  get  some  form   of   oddly   colored   goo.   The   weirder   it   turns   out,  the  better  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  trust  me  on  this.   Make   sure   your   pan   has   some   form   of   grease   on   it   though;Íž   whether   it   be   butter,   olive   oil   or   non-­stick   pan   spray,   it   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really  matter. Completely  drown  the  slices  of  bread  in   this  strange  mixture  and  make  sure  it  soaks   it   all   up,   so   that   it   comes   out   all   soggy   and   gross.  Throw  it  onto  the  pan  and  let  the  rest   take  care  of  itself.  Make  sure  the  toast  (now   French,   apparently)   comes   out   golden   and   toasted.  Leave  it  on  for  too  long  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  turn   out  to  be  too  dry  and  crunchy.   Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  where  the  real  magic  happens. Grab   a   bottle   of   maple   syrup   and   just   pour  the  whole  thing  onto  your  French  toast,   until  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  practically  swimming  in  it.  This  is   literally   the   best   part   of   the   whole   process,   watching  your  French  toast  drown  in  maple   syrup.   Now,  eat.  Then  make  some  more.  Rinse   and  repeat.

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Going, Going, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gone Girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; NOVEL DELVES INTO LOVE WITH PSYCHOLOGICAL DEPTH By  April  Castillo Features  Editor  |  acastillo@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   a   long   time   since   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   read   a   book   cover   to   cover   in   48   hours.   But   Gillian   Flynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone   Girlâ&#x20AC;?   is  that  sort  of  novel  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  the  prose  is  exact,  intelligent  and   engrossing  enough  to  fascinate  you  with  the  marriage  of   Nick  and  Amy  Dunne,  even  as  you  know  everything  is   going  horribly  wrong  for  both  of  them. 7KH'XQQHÂśVUHODWLRQVKLSLVSLFWXUHVTXHDWÂżUVWEXW ZKHQ ÂżQDQFLDO DQG IDPLO\ PDWWHUV IRUFH WKHP EDFN WR Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hometown  of  North  Carthage,  Missouri,  resent-­ PHQW RQ ERWK VLGHV VHWV LQ 2Q WKH ÂżIWK DQQLYHUVDU\ RI their  marriage,  Amy  Dunne  goes  missing.  Her  husband,   RIFRXUVHLVWKHÂżUVWSHUVRQSROLFHVXVSHFW But   this   is   anything   but   an   ordinary   thriller.   The   QRYHOLVVSOLWLQWRWZRSDUWVWKHÂżUVWLVWROGIURP1LFNÂśV point  of  view  and  interspersed  with  Amyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  diary  entries.   In  the  second,  Amy  and  Nick  tell  their  stories  in  al-­ ternate  chapters.  Amyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  diary  entries  shine  with  romance   as  she  reveals  how  they  met  and  enjoined  in  the  relation-­ ship  of  her  dreams.  Nick  is  honest  and  blunt  to  the  point   where  he  starts  to  lose  sympathy.  He  deals  with  the  pres-­ ent,  with  the  aftermath  of  Amy  gone  missing  and  all  of   the  questions  left  unanswered.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone  Girlâ&#x20AC;?  is  not  what  I  thought  it  would  be.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   exactly  what  makes  it  a  disturbing,  beautiful  novel  about   relationships  and  the  psychological  implosions  that  can   cascade  and  elevate  through  even  years  of  a  seemingly   stable  relationship.   When  people  marry,  they  have  to  accept  that  the  per-­ son   they   marry   is   going   to   grow,   change   and   perhaps   become  someone  completely  different  from  the  person   they  started  the  relationship  with.   PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR This  is  the  story  of  the  extremes  in  how  everything   6DPDULWDQVDWWKHLUÂżQHVWEXWWKH\DUHKXPDQLQHYHU\ can  go  wrong  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  the  ultimate  how-­not-­to  book.  Far  from   sceneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  portrayal  of  love,  horror  and  catastrophe. clichĂŠ  and  bordering  on  the  line  between  disturbing  and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone  Girlâ&#x20AC;?  is  striking  in  the  way  that  an  avalanche   perverse,   the   complex   protagonists   may   not   be   good   LVWHUULI\LQJFDVFDGLQJDQGGLIÂżFXOWWRORRNDZD\IURP

Want to write for The Oracle? Email Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  September  5,  2013


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Dorsky Goes From Local to Global MUSEUM EXHIBITS BRING WORLD OF CULTURE TO NEW PALTZ

$UWZRUNRQGLVSOD\IURPWKHH[KLELWLRQV³6FUHHQ3OD\+XGVRQ9DOOH\$UWLVWV´DQG³$QRQ\PRXV&RQWHPSRUDU\7LEHWDQ$UW´

By  Shelby  Seipp &RQWULEXWLQJ:ULWHU_n02441330@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

This  semester,  the  Dorsky  is  going  global  with  art   not  only  from  the  Hudson  Valley,  but  from  around  the   world.   7KH¿UVWH[KLELWLRQ³6FUHHQ3OD\+XGVRQ9DOOH\ $UWLVWV ´ FXUDWHG E\ 'DQLHO %HODVFR RSHQHG DW the  museum  earlier  in  the  summer  and  will  remain  on   display  through  Sunday,  Nov.  10.  After  twenty  years,   WKLVGLVSOD\RIORFDODUWLVWVKDVJURZQLQWRRQHRIWKH Dorskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  signature  programs.   ³7KLVH[KLELWLRQLVDERXWGLVSOD\LQJWKHTXDOLW\RI WKHFRQWHPSRUDU\DUWLVWVULJKWKHUHLQWKH+XGVRQ9DO-­ OH\´%HODVFRVDLG³,WLQFOXGHVZRUNIURPGLIIHU-­ ent  artists  and  ranges  in  form  from  painting  and  draw-­ LQJWRSHUIRUPDQFHDQGYLGHR7KLV\HDUWKHRYHUDOO WKHPH IRU WKH H[KLELW IRFXVHG RQ LQFRUSRUDWLQJ WKH PRGHUQPHGLXPRIWKHVFUHHQLQWRWKHDUWSLHFH7KH VFUHHQ FDQ EH DQ\WKLQJIURP RXU PRGHUQ PRYLHDQG L3RGVFUHHQVWRWKHROGHUVLONVFUHHQV´ +LVKRSHZDVWKDWWKHFRQWHPSRUDU\WKHPHZRXOG DWWUDFWDYDULHW\RIDUWLVWVUDQJLQJLQDJHIURPDOORYHU the  Hudson  Valley.   /XFNLO\WKHUHZDVDUDQJHQRWRQO\LQWKHDJHRI WKHFRQWULEXWLQJDUWLVWVEXWWKHLQWHUSUHWDWLRQDQGPH-­ GLXPRIWKHVRPHSLHFHVVXEPLWWHGDVZHOO

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Thursday,  September  5,  2013

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SCHEDULE OF CURRENT DORSKY EXHIBITIONS: SCREEN PLAY: HUDSON VALLEY ARTISTS 2013 JUNE 22-NOVEMBER 10 ANONYMOUS: CONTEMPORARY TIBETAN ART JULY 20-DECEMBER 15


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Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

New Paltz Taking The Stage

THEATER DEPARTMENT OPENS CURTAIN ON NEW SEASON By  Suzy  Berkowitz   A&E  Editor  |  Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Beeâ&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tempestâ&#x20AC;?

The  Theater  Department  will  spell  out  their  fall  semester  very  clearly   DVWKH\NLFNRIIZLWKDKXPRURXVPXVLFDOIRUWKHLUÂżUVWSURGXFWLRQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  25th  Annual  Putnam  County  Spelling  Bee,â&#x20AC;?  directed  by  Profes-­ VRU-RH/DQJZRUWKZLOORSHQLQ3DUNHU7KHDWUHRQ7KXUVGD\6HSWDQG ZLOOUXQXQWLO6XQGD\2FW Âł,WÂśVDJUHDWPXVLFDO´/DQJZRUWKVDLGÂł,WH[SORUHVWKHRXWVLGHULQ HDFKRIXVDQGKRZZHFDQÂżQGFDPDUDGHULHLQUHFRJQL]LQJWKDWFRPPRQ WUDLWLQHDFKRWKHU,ÂśPH[FLWHGEHFDXVHZKHQPXVLFDOWKHDWHULVZHOOFRQ structed  and  well  conceived,  it  communicates  to  an  audience  differently   WKDQDQ\WKLQJ´ The  musical,  which  incorporates  audience  interaction,  will  be  held   LQ3DUNHU7KHDWUHLQDQDWWHPSWWRHQKDQFHWKDWIHHO3HUIRUPLQJDQRQ traditional  musical  in  a  non-­traditional  space  is  helpful,  and  holding  it  in   Parker  Theatre  where  the  audience  is  so  involved  is  even  more  conducive   to  the  play,  Associate  Chair  of  the  Theater  Department  and  the  produc-­ WLRQÂśVVHWGHVLJQHU.HQ*ROGVWHLQVDLG Each  seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  productions  are  chosen  through  a  department  Season   Selection  Committee  who  collect  possible  show  titles  from  the  faculty,   FRPPXQLW\DQGVWXGHQWV7KHGHSDUWPHQWVHOHFWVVKRZVWREHSHUIRUPHG EDVHGRQJHQUHURWDWLRQWRHQVXUHWKDWVWXGHQWVDUHH[SRVHGWRDYDULHW\ of  styles  from  the  Greek  Classics  to  contemporary  pieces,  Department   &KDLU-DFN:DGHVDLG /DQJZRUWKZKRKDVH[WHQVLYHH[SHULHQFHDVD%URDGZD\GDQFHUDQG FDVWLQJGLUHFWRULVÂłTXLWHVLPSO\WKHSHUIHFWÂżWIRUWKLVYHKLFOH´:DGH VDLG /DQJZRUWK KDG EHHQ LQYLWHG WR 1HZ 3DOW] ODVW VSULQJ VHPHVWHU WR choreograph  the  musical  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Producers,â&#x20AC;?  and  was  hired  as  a  full-­time   IDFXOW\PHPEHUZKRQRZWHDFKHVVHYHUDOFODVVHVLQWKHGHSDUWPHQW Langworthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  foreseeable  challenge  is  the  amount  of  time  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  or   ODFNWKHUHRI²WKDWKHDQGKLVFDVWZLOOKDYHEHIRUHWKHSURGXFWLRQRSHQV With  a  little  more  than  three  weeks  worth  of  rehearsal  time,  Langworth   VDLGKHVWUHVVHVWKHLPSRUWDQFHRIVWUDWHJLFWLPHPDQDJHPHQW 2WKHUZLVHKHVDLGKHLVQRWQHUYRXVDQGWKDWKHLVH[FLWHGIRUKLV VPDOOFDVWWREHDEOHWRGHOYHLQWRWKHLUFKDUDFWHUV Âł,WÂśVJRLQJWREHIXQ7KH\ÂśUHNLGVLQWKHVKRZDQGDOORIXVFDQLGHQ WLI\ZLWKWKHNLGWKDWGRHVQÂśWH[DFWO\ÂżWLQ´/DQJZRUWKVDLGÂł,ZDQWWKH DXGLHQFHWRH[SORUHWKDWDQGWRVHHDOLWWOHELWRIWKHPVHOYHVLQWKHFKDU DFWHUV,ZDQWWKHUHWREHVRPHRQHWKH\FDQURRWIRUDQGEHWRXFKHGE\´

In  an  attempt  to  contrast  the  lightness  of  the  fall  musical,  the  Theater   Department  has  chosen  Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Tempestâ&#x20AC;?  as  their  second  pro-­ GXFWLRQRIWKHVHPHVWHU'LUHFWHGE\$VVRFLDWH3URIHVVRU1DQF\6DNODGWKH VKRZZLOORSHQRQ7KXUVGD\1RYDQGZLOOUXQXQWLO6XQGD\1RYLQ 0F.HQQD7KHDWUH Âł,WÂśVDZRQGHUIXOSOD\´6DNODGVDLGÂł,ÂśPH[FLWHGDERXWGLJJLQJLQWR WKHSURFHVV,ÂśPH[FLWHGDERXWZRUNLQJZLWKWKLVJURXSRISHRSOH7KLVZDV 6KDNHVSHDUHÂśVODVWSOD\KHZURWHE\KLPVHOI´ The  play,  left  mainly  up  to  interpretation  by  its  cast  and  director,  is  one   6DNODGLVFRPPLWWHGWREULQJLQJDPRUHFRQFHSWXDOL]HGYHUVLRQWRDFFRUG ing  to  Associate  Chair  of  the  Theater  Department  and  the  productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  set   GHVLJQHU.HQ*ROGVWHLQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anytime  you  conceive  a  Shakespeare  production,  the  challenge  is  to   EHFRQVLVWHQWDQGXQLÂżHGLQDQHQJDJLQJZD\´*ROGVWHLQVDLGÂł7KHUHÂśVQR IRUPXOD\RXKDYHWRLQYHQWHYHU\WKLQJLQVXSSRUWRIWKHWH[W´ Sakladâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;broad   versionâ&#x20AC;?   of   the   play   includes   bold   set   and   costume   FKRLFHVVXFKDVWKHLQFRUSRUDWLRQRIVWHDPSXQNLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHGJDUPHQWVRQ WKH(OL]DEHWKDQDQG9LFWRULDQWKHPHGFRVWXPHV7KLVLQFRUSRUDWLRQZLOODO ORZWKHFDVWWRÂłUHIHUHQFHWKHFRQWHPSRUDU\PRUH´6DNODGVDLG 7KHGHSDUWPHQWÂśVYRLFHDQGVSHHFKVSHFLDOLVW6DNODGLVWKHÂłSHUIHFWÂżW for  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The  Tempest,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  where  language  and  delivery  are  crucial,â&#x20AC;?  Department   &KDLU-DFN:DGHVDLG Saklad,   who   earned   her   MFA   in   directing,   has   invited   three   English   SURIHVVRUV ZKR VSHFLDOL]H LQ LQWHUSUHWLQJ 6KDNHVSHDULDQ WH[W WR DVVLVW WKH cast   during   rehearsal   and   hold   a   pre-­show   panel   for   the   audience   before   HDFKSHUIRUPDQFH The  only  challenge  Saklad  foresees  overcoming  is  getting  her  cast  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a   PL[RIXSSHUFODVVPHQZLWKFUDIWRQWKHLUVLGHDQGXQGHUFODVVPHQZKRDUH HDJHUWROHDUQ²RQWKHVDPHSDJH Âł,WÂśVDQLFHO\EDODQFHGFDVWZLWKPDQ\QHZFRPHUV´6DNODGVDLGÂł%XW weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  all  doing  the  same  play,  and  we  all  need  to  have  the  same  amount  of   NQRZKRZZKLFKZLOOEHFKDOOHQJLQJ´ Apart  from  this  challenge,  Saklad  said  he  is  eager  to  begin  rehearsing,   DQGVDLGVKHLVNHHSLQJDQRSHQPLQGLQKHUFUHDWLYHYLVLRQ Âł7KHSOD\LVDERXWPDWHUQDOORYHDQGIRUJLYHQHVV´VKHVDLGÂł,WÂśVDOVR DERXWVHFRQGFKDQFHV7KHFDVWEHFRPHVDKXJHSDUWRIZKHUHP\YLVLRQ DVDGLUHFWRUJRHV$QGZKDWP\FDVWDQGGHVLJQHUZLOOGRWKH\ZLOOGRVR FRPSOHWHO\WKDW,FDQÂśWSUHGHWHUPLQHZKDWLWZLOOORRNOLNHXQWLO,VHHLW´

Thursday,  September  5,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Different Notes For Different Folks

JAM-PACKED SEMESTER SHOWCASES TALENT By  Sally  Moran Copy  Editor  |  n02668795@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Listen  up,  New  Paltz. Beginning   in   September,   the   fall   VHPHVWHUZLOOEH¿OOHGZLWKFRQ certs  and  showcases  that  highlight  the   musically   inclined   students   and   fac-­ ulty  members.   The   concert   series   begins   with   a   night  of  jazz  and  classical  music  per-­ formed  by  faculty  members  of  the  De-­ partment  of  Music,  with  several  shows   taking   place   until   early   December   all   over   campus   in   the   Dorsky,   Studley   Theatre  and  the  Shephard  Recital  Hall.   Faculty  members  are  not  the  only   people  eagerly  preparing  for  these  per-­ formances.   Students   are   also   hard   at   work,   as   participating   in   these   show-­ cases  provides  them  with  an  opportu-­ nity  to  demonstrate  their  musical  abili-­

ties.   Second-­year   music   performance   and  elementary  education  double-­ma-­ jor   Erica   Yu   said   the   large   audiences   attending   the   events   are   encouraging     from  the  “musically  inclined”  campus. “I  know  students  practice  hard  all   semester   to   prepare   for   these   perfor-­ mances,”   Yu   said.   “The   emotion   and   expression   put   into   the   concert   series   performances,  not  to  mention  the  cour-­ age  to  perform  onstage,  is  what  makes   the  music  come  alive.”   Carole   Cowan,   former   Chair   of   the   Music   Department   and   conductor   of   the   College-­Youth   Symphony   Or-­ chestra   said   students   in   the   Introduc-­ tion  to  Music  class  are  also  required  to   attend  a  showcase  every  Tuesday  night   to  view  their  fellow  peers  and  mentors   performances. “I  want  to  build  a  bridge  between   student  and  professor  outside  of  class,  

and  see  what  they’re  learning  about  in   the   classroom   put   on   stage,”   Cowan   said.   Cowan   said   the   easiest   way   to   bridge  that  gap  is  to  have  students  in-­ teract  with  the  perofrmers.   “It’s   one   thing   to   learn   about   the   subject  and  another  to  see  it  as  a  live   performance,”  Cowan  said.   Faculty  members  performing  have   been   working   together   for   years,  As-­ sistant   Music   Professor   Joel   Evans   said,  and  being  onstage  is  almost  sec-­ ond   nature,   an   integral   part   of   who   they  are  as  people. “There   is   such   a   wide   spectrum   of   different   kinds   of   music   and   that’s   really  what  makes  these  showcases  so   interesting   and   thought-­provoking,”   Evans   said.   “There   is   something   for   everyone.  This  also  gives  us  a  chance   to  show  what  we’re  about.”

Along for the Ride With Passenger MIKE ROSENBERG PERFORMS IN THEATER AND PARK By  Katherine  Speller Managing  Editor  |  katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Passenger Live at the Gramercy

Mike  Rosenberg  can  walk  down  the  busy   streets   of   New  York   City,   past   a   line   of   fans   waiting  outside  the  Gramercy  Theater  for  his   own  concert,  and  still  go  unnoticed. His  unassuming  presence  is  on  par  with   most   singer-­songwriter   archetypes.   He   still   takes  the  time  to  stop  and  speak  with  the  few   fans   who   do   notice   him   –   the   person   behind   the  stage  name  (Passenger)  they  came  to  see. Passenger,  as  a  project,  started  as  a  folk-­ rock   band   containing   Rosenberg   and   a   col-­ lection  of  other  members  from  2003  to  2009   when  the  group  broke  up.  Rosenberg,  the  pri-­ mary   songwriter   and   lead   singer,   maintained   the  stage  name  when  he  continued  on  solo.  

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Arts & Entertainment

After   gaining   notoriety   in   Europe   and   a   successful  run  as  opening  act  for  Ed  Sheeran,   Rosenberg   set   sights   on   the   United   States.   His  song  “Let  Her  Go”  eased  its  way  onto  the   summer   charts,   earning   enough   attention   to   ensure  his  Aug.  23  performance  was  sold  out. Rosenberg   prefaces   most   songs   with   a   story,  though  he  constantly  apologizes  for  do-­ ing  so.  He’ll  tell  the  crowd  about  the  people   and   places   that   inspired   the   writing   of   most   songs.  It  might  annoy  some  people,  but  I  like   the  chance  to  get  a  look  into  his  process  a  bit   more.   Though  he  didn’t  play  much  off  his  most   recent  album  All  The  Little  Lights,  the  crowd   appreciated  anything  they  could  sing  along  to.   When  he  played  “I  Hate,”  his  list-­like  anthem   of  things  he  cannot  stand,  the  sound  of  the  au-­ dience’s  off-­key  singing  was  deafening.   A   highlight   of   the   night   came   when   Rosenberg  played  one  of  his  newest,  yet-­un-­ released   songs   “Scare   Away   The   Dark.”   He   asked  the  crowd  to  put  away  their  cell  phones   and   cameras,   remarking   that   many   people  

view  events  like  concerts  through  the  lens  of   technology.   The  song  urges  audiences  to  choose  to  be   more  present,  and  hokey  as  it  sounds,  there’s   something   beautiful   about   a   truly   engaged   crowd  singing  along  to  that  sentiment.   Rosenberg   originally   made   a   name   for   himself  in  the  folk  and  busking  communities   around   the   U.K.   and   Australia,   making   the   money  he  could  from  charitable  donations  on   the   streets.   He   still   busks,   though   he   doesn’t   really   need   the   money,   trying   to   schedule   smaller-­scale  shows  a  few  hours  before  or  af-­ ter  his  tour  gigs.   On   Saturday,   Aug.   24,   he   performed   around   noon   to   a   decently-­sized   crowd   in   Washington  Square  Park.  He  played  a  shorter   version  of  his  night  setlist,  his  opening  act  Stu   Larson   collaborating   with   gorgeous   harmo-­ nies  on  his  song  “Hearts  On  Fire.” Both   performances   really   reminded   me   why  I  try  to  get  out  to  folk  shows  every  few   weeks.  There’s  nothing  like  a  night  of  insight-­ ful,  empathetic  songwriting.

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: TRAVIS SEWALK

YEAR: Fourth MAJOR:Marketing HOMETOWN: Nanuet, N.Y.

WHAT’S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? My  voice,  because  I’m  not  really  that  good   at  actual  instruments. WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? I   sing   in   a   hardcore/punk   band   called   Trenchfoot.   I   am   the   booking   manager   of   the  New  Paltz  Music  Collective  and  I  also   book  DIY  shows  outside  of  that.   WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? Black  Flag,  The  Minutemen,  Cro-­Mags  and  Converge. WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? Living   Laser,   Zeddmore   and   Recycled   Earth   are   all   great   local   Hudson   Valley   Hardcore  bands  I  think  deserve  more   attention.  Outside  of  that,  East  Beast,  Old   Wounds   and   Full   of   Hell   are   currently   what  I’m  listening  to.   WHAT’S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? I’ll  be  taking  my  studies  on  the  road  as  my   band  will  be  touring  Europe  a  large  chunk   of  October  and  we’ll  also  be  going  on   various  weekend  tours  before  and  after  that.   We  also  just  released  a  new  split  vinyl  7”   available   through   Melotov   Records,   who   are  based  in  Los  Angeles,  CA.   ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? Stop   networking,   just   make   friends.   Punk   is   whatever  you  make  it. CHECK  OUT   TRAVIS  SEWALK

PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE   WITH  ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Suzy  Berkowitz  at  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  


8B

THE  DEEP  END

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END SHAUN O’HANLON

Major: Painting Year: Third Inspirations: “Artists like Harry Ally and Mark Demsteader both feed into my style [as] their treatment of material is refined but still chaotic.”

“I am a figural painter but my art seems to be leaning more towards abstraction with every new piece. Recently I’ve been painting wildly colorful nude women, caught in very casual instances, with long, linear marks. “

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  SHAUN  O’HANLON.  CAPTION  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER


EDITORIAL  

The New Paltz Oracle

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

INVESTING   IN  OUR HUMANITY   &$57221%<-8/,(*81'(56(1

A  recent  article  published  in  the  Albany   Times  Union  said  more  than  half  of  students   enrolled   within   the   SUNY   system   graduate   within  six  years  of  matriculating,  giving  the   system   one   of   the   highest   graduation   rates   among  higher  public  education  institutions  in   the  country. SUNY   New   Paltz   alone   has   a   six-­year   maximum   graduation   rate   of   73   percent,   making  it  one  of  the  top  three  best  within  the   SUNY  system,  contending  with  schools  like   SUNY  Binghamton  and  SUNY  Geneseo.   While   the   numbers   for   some   SUNY   schools  and  for  the  entire  SUNY  system  are   promising,   there   are   other   schools   with   sig-­ QLÂżFDQWO\ ORZHU JUDGXDWLRQ UDWHV 7KH ORZHU rates   are   at   the   heart   of   President   Barack   Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  plan  to  help  improve  public  higher   education  by  2020. During   recent   appearances   at   SUNY   campuses   Binghamton   and   Buffalo,   Obama   discussed  increasing  funding  for  public  high-­ er  education  based  on  certain  criteria. We   at   The   New   Paltz   Oracle   applaud   SUNY,  and  especially  SUNY  New  Paltz,  for   current  success  in  graduation  rates.  However,   the  Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  criteria  for  increasing  funding  

leaves   us   troubled   and   concerned   that   there   will  be  an  eventual  decline  in  our  graduation   rates.   7RHODERUDWHWKHUHDUHIRXUSLHFHVRIFUL teria  the  President  has  for  public  universities   to  gain  increased  funding:  how  many  students   the  school  accepts,  locations  from  which  stu-­ dents   are   accepted,   how   quickly   those   stu-­ dents  graduate  and  how  monetarily  success-­ ful  they  are  after  graduation. Schools   like   Buffalo   and   Binghamton,   where   a   great   deal   of   students   go   into   pre-­ med  programs,  accounting,  business  and  oth-­ HU¿HOGVFRQVLGHUHG³WUDGLWLRQDOO\VWDEOH´ZLOO EHQH¿WIURPWKDW¿QDOELWRIFULWHULD6FKRROV like  New  Paltz,  with  a  wealth  of  students  in   the  humanities,  could  suffer.   We   can   concede   that   the   job   market   is   challenging  for  college  students  everywhere.   +RZHYHU  VWXGHQWV ZLWKLQ ³KDUG VFLHQFH´ programs,  and  in  turn,  the  schools  they  gradu-­ DWHIURPZLOOQRWKDYHDGLI¿FXOWWLPH¿QGLQJ monetary   success   when   they   join   the   work-­ IRUFHLQWKHLU¿HOGV For   students   studying   art,   sociology,   FRPPXQLFDWLRQV DQG (QJOLVK ² ¿HOGV VHO GRP UHJDUGHG DV ³VWDEOH´ ² PRQHWDU\ VXF

cess  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  something  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  guarantee. :HÂżUPO\EHOLHYHWKDWFROOHJHLVDERXWVR much  more  than  just  credits  and  an  eventual   career.   An   undergraduate   degree   shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   necessarily   be   about     assembly   line-­quality   job   training,   or   creating   the   perfectly   con-­ forming   workers,   but   instead   about   a   long-­ term  commitment  to  academics.   7KH OLEHUDO DUWV HGXFDWLRQ 1HZ 3DOW] prides   itself   on   providing   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   just   about   making   us   more   well-­rounded   intellectually,   but  as  members  of  society  as  well.  Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   the  funding  incentives  mirror  these  values? Putting   so   much   pressure   on   monetary   success   sends   an   overt   message   to   many   on   RXU FDPSXV WKDW WKHLU FUDIWV ÂżHOGV DQG SDV sions  hold  little  stake  in  the  eyes  of  our  gov-­ ernment.  We  fear  that  schools,  and  this  cultur-­ al  sensibility,  could  pressure  students  to  enter   ÂżHOGVWKH\DUHQÂśWVXLWHGIRUDQGDEDQGRQWKH things  that  matter  to  them.   College   is   about   more   than   securing   a   future  paycheck.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  about  providing  safe  ex-­ periences  in  safe  environments.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  about  stu-­ GHQWVÂżQGLQJWKHWKLQJVWKDWPDNHWKHLUKHDUWV beat  a  little  faster,  working  at  their  respective   crafts  in  an  intellectually  stimulating  commu-­

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nity  of  peers  and,  as  hokey  as  it  sounds,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   DERXWÂżJXULQJRXWKRZWRÂżWLQWRWKHJUHDWHU global  community.  We  have  no  romantic  de-­ lusions  that  money  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  matter,  but  we  tru-­ ly  believe  that  an  education  in  the  humanities   JLYHV VWXGHQWV ORQJODVWLQJ EHQHÂżWV WKRXJK WKH\DUHKDUGO\DVTXDQWLÂżDEOH While   these   changes   would   be   some   years   away,   we   hope   the   school   and   SUNY   as   a   whole   will   look   to   negotiate   with   the   President   on   his   criteria   and   keep   their   stu-­ dents  and  their  talents  in  mind  when  looking   to  increase  funding.  

Editorials  represent  the  views   of  the  majority  of  the  editorial   board.  Columns,  op-­eds  and   letters,  excluding  editorials,  are   solely  those  of  the  writers  and   do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,  its   staff  members,  the  campus  and   university  or  the  Town  or  Village   of  New  Paltz.


10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

OPINION

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS JENNIFER  NEWMAN Copy  Editor Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

ANDREW  LIEF Sports  Editor  

A  Chip  On  My  Shoulder

       N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Body  Politics Casually   browsing   Tumblr   I   stumbled   across   a   post  featuring  the  different  body  types  women  have.   You  know,  the  one  where  they  take  the  intricate  and   complicated   essence   of   the   female   anatomy   and   simplify   it   into   fruits.   According   to   this   post,   you   HLWKHUKDYHDEDQDQDDSSOHSHDURUKRXUJODVVÂżJXUH and  as  one  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;wittyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  commentator  suggested,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  also   the  watermelon  woman.   The  more  I  think  about  it,  the  more  messed  up  it   gets.  How  is  it  that  men  get  to  wear  baggy  Aeropostale   t-­shirts  that  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  show  their  beer  gut  in-­progress   without  a  second  glance,  yet  women  are  expected  to   not  only  have  a  perfect  body,  but  show  it  off  daily. :K\LVLWWKDWZRPHQKDYHWREHREMHFWLÂżHGWR SK\VLFDOVFUXWLQ\IRUSHUIHFWLRQ" Right   now   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   either   saying   â&#x20AC;&#x153;f-­yeah   go   IHPDOHHPSRZHUPHQWOHWÂśVQRWVKDYH´RU\RXWKLQN this   is   just   another   feminist   rant   bashing   men.  Well,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  neither.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  going  to  lie,  I  love  to  have  smooth  legs.   I  love  wearing  dresses  (sometimes)  and  makeup.  The   thing   to   remember   is   not   all   women   have   2   hours   every  morning  to  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;put  on  their  faceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  and  look  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;perfect.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Not  all  of  them  want  to,  and  frankly,none  of  them  need   to.  Men  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  it  and  I  sure  as  hell  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  today. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  also  not  bashing  men.  I  love  men.  I  love  their   arms  (donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  judge  me.)  But  until  I  see  a  man  get  ready   in  the  morning  with  more  than  a  toothbrush,  clothes   and   occasionally   a   comb,   then   a   woman   shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   expected   to   need   three   drawers   worth   of   beauty   products.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   point   coming   up   soon,   I   promise.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  all  hypocrites,  letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  be  real.  Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  gonna  judge   the  person  walking  around  campus  in  some  crazy  New   3DOW]KLSS\RXWÂżW7KDWÂśV\RXUSUHURJDWLYH+RZHYHU donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   ask   a   girl   if   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   tired   just   because   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   wearing  eye  liner.  Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  not  date  a  girl  just  because   her  hips  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  lie  and  most  importantly,  so  help  me,   if   you   ever   call   a   girl   a   watermelon   you   deserve   whatever  comes  to  you.   $QGJLUOV"<RXGR\RX Jennifer  Newman  is  a  third-­year  journalism   major.  She  is  the  News  Director  for  WFNP  as  well   as  a  Resident  Assistant.  She  enjoys  orange  juice,   watching  Spongebob  and  the  color  blue.  

Think   of   the   most   disappointing   event  that  happens  to  you  on  a  daily  ba-­ sis.    Maybe  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  failing  a  test  or  maybe   not  having  time  to  watch  your  favorite   TV  show.    Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  sure  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  terrible,  and  my   thoughts  are  with  you. As   disappointing   as   your   event   is   IRU\RX,ÂśPIDLUO\FRQÂżGHQWLWÂśVQRWDV disappointing   as   mine   is   for   me.     For   me,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  every  time  I  open  a  bag  of  chips   and  see  that  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  half  full.     Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  a  big  chips  guy.    There  are  few   things  in  life  I  enjoy  more  than  opening   a   nice   bag   of   Kettle   Cooked   Original   Layâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   to   compliment   my   wings   or   just   having  them  as  a  delicious  snack.     I  know  that  the  bags  need  the  extra   air  space  inside  to  make  sure  the  chips   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   crushed   and   to   keep   them   fresh,   but   come   on,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   2013.   Nobody   KDVÂżJXUHGRXWDEHWWHUVROXWLRQ\HW" Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  no  scientist,  but  there  has  to  be   a  better  way  of  packaging  chips  so  the   custumer  can  truly  get  the  best  bang  for   their  buck.    Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  going  to  stop  buying   chips,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ridiculous  that  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  paying   $3.45  for  a  bag  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  half  full. As  always  though,  I  have  a  plan  to   end  the  suffering.  

 So,  here  it  is: This  journalism  thing  is  going  to  go   according  to  plan.    I  will  become  a  suc-­ cessful  sports  writer,  who  makes  tons  of   money.    So  much  money,  that  I  will  be   able  to  retire  from  journalism  at  the  age   of  28.   Upon   retirement,   along   with   my   friend  Jordan  and  a  team  of  the  best  sci-­ entists  in  the  world,  we  will  open  up  a   QHZFKLSFRPSDQ\FDOOHGÂł)LYHÂżIWKV´ â&#x20AC;&#x201D;     cleverly   named   because   our   chip   FRQWDLQHUVZLOOEHÂżYHÂżIWKVIXOO We   will   create   the   ultimate   chip   container,   which   will   enable   the   chips   to   stay   fresh,   yet   avoid   being   crushed   at  the  same  time.    The  chips  will  come   in   original,   sour   cream   and   onion,   bar-­ beque,  sea  salt  and  vinegar  and  the  rest   RI$PHULFDÂśVIDYRULWHĂ&#x20AC;DYRUV Our   headquarters   will   be   located   in   the   beautiful   city   of   New   Orleans,   where   we   can   establish   our   company   as  not  only  the  best  chip  provider  in  the   southern  United  States,  but  in  the  entire   world.     2XU VORJDQ ZLOO EH Âł)LYHÂżIWKV   HQMR\PHQW´  &DWFK\ ULJKW"  , thought  of  it  myself.    The  creativity  of  

the  slogan  alone  will  attract  customers,   if  our  product  that  is  needed  by  any  true   American  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.     This  company  will  make  billions  of   dollars,  enabling  both  me  and  my  part-­ ner   to   purchase   pretty   much   anything   we  want.     Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  buy  something  awesome,  ob-­ viously.    Since  our  company  is  located   in  New  Orleans,  it  only  makes  sense  to   purchase  the  New  Orleans  Pelicans.     We   will   lead   the   Pelicans   to   mul-­ tiple   NBA   Championships,   which   will   not   only   establish   us   as   the   best   own-­ ers  in  basketball,  but  two  of  the  smartest   men  in  the  world.     So   friends,   next   time   you   open   a   bag  of  chips  and  are  disappointed  with   the  amount  of  chips  inside,  I  want  you   to  see  my  face  and  remember  that  hope   will  soon  be  on  the  way.    

Andrew  Lief  is  a  third-­year   student  of  journalism,  a  cheese-­ burger  lover  and  a  big  sports   fan.    He  enjoys  watching  televi-­ sion  in  his  free  time.

Do You Have Something To Say In The Oracle? Send Us A Letter Email Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  September  5,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

PORTS SSPORTS

SPORTS

 11

oracle.newpaltz.edu

HE EW ALTZ RACLE TT HE  N  N EW  P  P ALTZ  O  O RACLE

HITTING THEIR STRIDE

HIGH EXPECTATIONS

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By  Ben  Kindlon &RS\(GLWRU_N02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

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DQG ZLOO RQO\ FRQWLQXH WR LPSURYH E\ ZRUNLQJKDUGERWKRQDQGRIIWKH¿HOG %UXOH\VDLGWKHELJJHVWFKDOOHQJHWKH WHDP IDFHV ULJKW QRZ LV EXLOGLQJ XS DQ HI¿FLHQWFDSDEOHEDFNIRXUIRUWKHWHDP WRZRUNZLWK ³(YHU\WKLQJ EXLOGV IURP WKH EDFN´ VKHVDLG 'HVSLWH WKHVH HDUO\ VHDVRQ GLI¿FXO WLHVWKH/DG\+DZNVDUHNHHSLQJDSRVL WLYH RXWORRN DQG KLJK H[SHFWDWLRQV IRU WKHXSFRPLQJVHDVRQ ³:HKDYHRQHJRDOLQPLQGDQGWKDW¶V WR ZLQ WKH FRQIHUHQFH´ %UXOH\ VDLG ³, ZRXOGQ¶WVD\WKDWLI,GLGQ¶WEHOLHYHZH KDGWKHWDOHQWWRGRVR´ The Lady Hawks will have their next home game on Tuesday, September, 17 at 4 P.M. against Union College.


12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  Planning  For  Success By  Andrew  Lief Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After  going  8-­10-­1,  11-­8-­1,  and  win-­ ning   only   one   game   in   the   SUNYAC   7RXUQDPHQWLQKLVÂżUVWWZRVHDVRQVDVWKH Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  Head  Coach,  Gene  Ventri-­ glia   is   looking   to   see   a   major   improve-­ ment  from  his  team  in  his  third-­year.   The   Hawks   are   returning   almost   a   full   roster,   excluding   the   four   fourth-­ year  players  who  were  lost  to  graduation.     With  this  in  mind,  Ventriglia  sees  no  rea-­ son  why  his  team  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  one  of  the  best   teams  in  the  SUNYAC.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   returning   several   players   from  last  year,  so  we  expect  to  be  a  pretty   good  team,â&#x20AC;?  Ventriglia  said.   Chosen   to   lead   the   team   this   season   DV FRFDSWDLQV DUH WKLUG\HDU PLGÂżHOGHU Alec   Johnson   and   third-­year   defender   Brian  Spina.    Ventriglia  feels  his  team  is   in  good  hands  with  them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   hold   them   together,â&#x20AC;?   Ventriglia   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alec   and   Brian  are  two  of  the  most  committed  kids   \RXÂśOOHYHUÂżQG´ 6HFRQG\HDU IRUZDUG DQG PLGÂżHOGHU Joe   Hughes   echoed   his   coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   feelings   on  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  co-­captains.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   the   best,â&#x20AC;?   Hughes   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  really  holding  the  team  down.â&#x20AC;? One  major  focus  the  coaching  staff  is   emphasizing   during   practice   this   year   is   conditioning,  Spina  said.     Âł7KLV \HDU PRUH WKDQ P\ ÂżUVW WZR years,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  really  focusing  on  condition-­ ing  during  practice,â&#x20AC;?  Spina  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach   Jimmy   [Ventriglia]   and   Jamal   [Lis-­Sim-­ mons]   handle   the   conditioning   parts,   while  Gene  handles  the  tactical  aspects  of   the  game.â&#x20AC;?   The   biggest   decision   Ventriglia   will   have  to  make  is  who  will  get  minutes  in   goal  between  third-­years  Andres  Montoya   and   Steven   Domino.   Last   year   the   two   shared  time  and  Ventrgilia  said  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going   with  the  same  strategy  again  this  year.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last   year   early   on   we   split   them,â&#x20AC;?   Ventriglia  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right  now  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  neck   and   neck,   each   has   something   that   the   other  one  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have.    If  you  put  them   together  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  a  great  keeper.â&#x20AC;? Ventriglia   said   he   is   concerned   with     whether  or  not  the  team  will  have  enough   scoring.    Last  season  the  Hawks  averaged   1.65  goals  scored  per  game  and  they  are   looking  to  improve  this  season,  while  also  

replacing  their  three  leading  goal  scorers   from  last  year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  question  is  always,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Are  we  go-­ ing  to  have  enough  scoring?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Ventriglia   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   graduated   our   leading   scorer   [from  last  season],  who  tied  for  the  lead   in   the   conference   last   year.     I   think   we   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   a   big   scorer,   but   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   have   a  good  number  of  players  who  will  score   some  goals.â&#x20AC;?     Looking   to   step-­up   for   the   Hawks   in   the   scoring   department   is   Hughes,   the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  leading  returning  goal  scorer.     Right  now  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  struggling  with  a  shin  in-­ jury,  but  once  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  healthy,  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  looking   to  make  a  major  impact  to  help  his  team,   he  said.     Âł, GHÂżQLWHO\ KDYH D PRUH FRPIRUW-­ able  feeling  this  year,  I  had  more  nerves   last  year,â&#x20AC;?  Hughes  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  just  want  to   help  out  the  team  as  much  as  I  can.â&#x20AC;? Spina   is   focused   on   winning   the   SUNYAC   championship   this   season,   but   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   as   focused   on   continuing   to   build   the   friendships   he   has   with   his   teammates. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   want   to   continue   to   form   strong   relationships  with  my  teammates  on  and   RIIRIWKHÂżHOG´6SLQDVDLGÂł7KHJX\V on  the  team  are  my  best  friends.â&#x20AC;? A  major  reason  that  the  players  on  the   WHDPDUHEHVWIULHQGVÂżHOGLVEHFDXVHRID team  trip  they  took  to  Italy  last  spring.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;That   trip   brought   us   together,â&#x20AC;?   Hughes  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  made  us  a  family,  going   to  see  all  those  sites  with  the  whole  team.     Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nothing  like  it.â&#x20AC;? Overall,   Ventriglia   is   happy   with   the  team  he  has  this  season  and  his  goal   for   them   is   to   make   it   to   the   SUNYAC   Championship  game,  he  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  goal  is  to  get  to  the  champion-­ ship  game,  which  is  another  step,â&#x20AC;?  Ventri-­ glia  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  be  a  good   year.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  usually  this  optimistic.â&#x20AC;?   Hughes  has  one  goal  on  his  mind  for   the  team  this  season,  he  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   win   the   SUNYAC,â&#x20AC;?   Hughes  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  we  have  the  squad   to  do  it.â&#x20AC;? The  Hawks  opened  their  season  with   a   3-­1   loss   to   Vassar   College   in   a   hard-­ fought   game.   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   look   to   rebound   from   the   loss   in   the   Gary   Smith   Invita-­ tional  that  will  take  place  this  weekend  at   St.  Josephsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  College  (LI).  

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  team  has  their  sights  set  on  a  SUNYAC  championship.

Thursday,  September  5,  2013


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Father  and  Son,  Together  Again  

 

Gene  and  Jimmy  Ventriglia  have  their  eyes  set  on  a  conference  championship.                                                                                          

 By  Abbott  Brant  Copy  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Head   coach   Gene   Ventrigliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   coaching  staff  welcomed  a  new  name  to   Hawks  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer,  but  not  an  entirely   unfamiliar  face.   New  assistant  coach  Jimmy  Ventri-­ glia,  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  son,  is  no  stranger  to  coach-­ ing   under   his   father.   After   graduating   from  Colgate  University  in  2004,  where   he  competed  for  the  Raiders  from  2000-­ 01,  Jimmy  still  wanted  to  integrate  soc-­ cer  into  his  life.   From   2004-­08,   Jimmy   was   an   as-­ sistant   coach   at   West   Point   for   the   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   soccer   team,   the   same   team   his  father  was  the  head  coach  for  from   1985-­2009.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  last  season  he  coached  for  me,   we  won  the  Patriot  League  Conference,â&#x20AC;?   Gene  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  was  a  main  reason  we   did  so  well.â&#x20AC;?   Jimmy   views   the   time   he   spent  

coaching  under  his  father  at  West  Point   as  a  time  where  he  learned  what  it  takes   to  be  a  successful  soccer  coach,  he  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That   experience   taught   me   a   lot   about  managing  players,  preparing  prac-­ tices,   preparation   for   games,   and   the   logistics   of   operating   a   soccer   team,â&#x20AC;?   Jimmy  said. After  receiving  his  Master  of  Arts  in   teaching  from  New  Paltz  in  2008,  Jim-­ my  went  on  to  teach  history  at  Marlboro   High   School,   where   he   also   became   head  coach  of  the  boys  soccer  team  and   led   the   team   to   an   inaugural   Mid-­Hud-­ son  Athletic  League  title  in  2011. But  when  the  opportunity  presented   itself   to   once   again   to   assist   his   father,   Jimmy  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  twice.  The  fact  that   he   would   be   coaching   alongside   New   Paltz   graduate   and   former   Hawks   de-­ fender,   Jamal   Lis-­Simmons,   seemed   to   only  sweeten  the  deal.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jamal  and  I  have  known  each  other  

 

 

forever   and   have   been   playing   soccer   for   my   dad   since   we   were   kids,â&#x20AC;?   Jim-­ my   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   understand   how   he   runs   things,  and  also  what  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  like  to  be  one   of  his  players.â&#x20AC;?   Players   are   already   seeing   how   the   trioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   past   rapport   has   added   an   advan-­ tage  to  their  practices  and  play.   Âł, GHÂżQLWHO\ WKLQN LWÂśV EHQHÂżFLDO having  the  two  assistant  coaches,â&#x20AC;?  third-­ \HDU PLGÂżHOGHU 0LFKDHO /HYNR VDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   grew   up   together,   have   good   chemistry,   and   work   well   together.   They   know   more   about   how   the   game   is   played   today,   where   [Gene]   is   more   traditional.â&#x20AC;?   Gene  and  his  son  also  differ  in  terms   of   the   level   of   the   intensity   expect   of   their  players.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   want   my   players   to   portray   the   type  of  player  I  was,â&#x20AC;?  Jimmy  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   both   preach   intensity,   but   I   do   it   to   a   greater  degree.  When  I  played,  I  left  ev-­

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

 

                             PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN            

HU\WKLQJRQWKHÂżHOGDQGWKDWLVZKDW, demand.â&#x20AC;?   Both   coaches   agree   the   compari-­ sons   and   contrasts   of   their   father-­son   dynamic   are   only   going   to   strengthen   the  program.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   is   the   perfect   situation   for   suc-­ cess   in   terms   of   a   successful   coaching   staff,â&#x20AC;?  Gene  said,  who  believes  that  this   year,  the  Hawks  have  the  right  attitude   and  culture  as  a  team  to  compete  aggres-­ sively  against  any  team  in  their  regular   season   matchups   and   make   it   into   the   play-­offs.   After   dropping   their   home   opener   to  Vassar  3-­1,  the  Hawks  are  hitting  the   road  Sept.  7  -­  8  for  the  Gary  Smith  In-­ vitational   at   St.   Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   College   (LI),   where   they   will   compete   against   the   United   States   Coast   Guard   Academy   and   St.   Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   College   or   FDU-­Flor-­ ham.


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Will  the  King  Pass  the  Crown?

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Aced  the  Competition

The  tennis  team  opened  their  season  with  a  9-­0  victory  over  Oswego.  Fourth-­   \HDU 3DLJH 0XQURH DQG WKLUG\HDU 'HYLQ7UDF\ >DERYH@ ZRQ WKHLU ¿UVW GRXEOHV PDWFK  RYHU 2VZHJR¶V 2OLYD .QLHUPDQ DQG +DOH\ 0LOOHU7KH /DG\ +DZNV KDYHWKUHHPDWFKHVWKLVZHHNLQ3ODWWVEXUJK1<

Thursday,  September  5,  2013

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Fueling  Up  For  The  Jets  Season

N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

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SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

Men’s Soccer Looks To Take SUNYAC PAGE 12

TAKE Jimmy Ventriglia Joins Coaching Staff PAGE 13

OFF

PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN  

Women’s Soccer Opens Season 0-­1-­1: PAGE 11


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 85 Issue 1