The New Paltz Oracle, Volume 82, Issue 19

Page 1

NEW Â PALTZ Â ORACLE THE

Volume  82,  Issue  XIX

oracle.newpaltz.edu

   Thursday,  April  14,  2011

TALKING POLITICS Village Candidates Come Together To Debate Local Issues, Interests STORY ON PAGE 6 PHOTO Â BY Â MAXIM Â ALTER

BEHIND CLOSED

DOORS

Students Petition For Nas Concert To Be Held Outside PHOTO Â COURTESY Â FLICKR..COM

SEE STORY ON PAGE 3

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S EDITION OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE ‡ 6FKRRO 'LVWULFW 0DNHV 6DODU\ &RQFHVVLRQV 3J ‡ 5HDFFUHGLWDWLRQ 3URFHVV &RQWLQXHV RQ &DPSXV 3J ‡ )LUVW 6XVWDLQDELOLW\ :HHN $SSURDFKHV 3J ‡ 8QXVHG 'LQLQJ 'ROODUV *R WR 6FKRODUVKLS )XQG 3J


University Police Blotter

Julie Mansmann EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Maxim Alter MANAGING EDITOR WEB CHIEF _________________

Pamela Vivanco NEWS EDITOR

Jaleesa Baulkman

Disclaimer: This is only a partial listing. For all incidents, please visit the University Police Department. Incident: NONE Date: 04/12/11

board was stolen when he left in the area of Lot No. 24.

No criminal incidents for this date.

Incident: DMV Suspension Date: 04/10/11 Location: SOUTH R / CHILDRENS’ CENTER

Incident: Petit Larceny Date: 04/11/11 Location: GROUNDS M/S reported that his unattended skate-­

Male subject arrested for a suspended New York State driver’s license.

FEATURES EDITOR

Zan Strumfeld ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Andrew Wyrich SPORTS EDITOR SOCIAL MEDIA CHIEF _________________

Laura Luengas PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Derek Zimmermann CARTOONIST _________________

John Brandi Rachel Freeman Katherine Speller Cat Tacopina Pete Viola COPY EDITORS

Maeve Halliday ASSISTANT FACT CHECKER _________________

Patrick Martz BUSINESS MANAGER _________________

Kathryn Smith DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Felice Bernabo, Sunya Bhutta, Andrew Carden, Sarah Fine, Nick Fodera, Ken Glauber, Elexis Goldberg, Ryan Patrick Hanrahan, Alec Horowitz, Samantha Huertas, Sarah Hurd, Mathew John, Brian Kearney, Katie Kocijanski, Chelsea LaDue, Justin McCarthy, Jessica Mingoia, Devon Pope, Danielle Quitoni, David Spiegel, Emily Sussell, Chris Thurston, Pete Thompson, Nekaiya Trotman, Jennifer Von Willer, Harris Wichard, Kelly Young, Annie Yu

STAFF

About The New Paltz Oracle The New Paltz Oracle LV WKH RI¿ FLDO student newspaper of SUNY New Paltz. Our circulation is 2,500. The New Paltz Oracle is sponsored by the Student Association and par-­ tially funded by the student activity fee. The New Paltz Oracle is located in the Student Union Room 417. Deadline for all submissions is 5 p.m. on Sundays in The New Paltz Oracle RI¿ FH DQG E\ H PDLO DW oracle@ newpaltz.edu. All advertisements must be turned in by 5 p.m. on Fridays, unless RWKHUZLVH VSHFL¿ HG E\ WKH EXVLQHVV manager. Community announcements are published gratuitously, but are subject to restriction due to space limitations.There is no guarantee of publication. Contents of this paper cannot be reproduced without the written permission of the editor-­in-­ chief. The New Paltz Oracle is pub-­ lished weekly throughout the fall and spring semesters on Thursdays. It is available in all residence halls and academic buildings, in the New Paltz community and online at oracle. newpaltz.edu. For more information, call 845-­257-­3030. The fax line is 845-­257-­3031. The New Paltz Oracle holds as-­ signment meetings every Sunday at 7 p.m. in Student Union 418. Ar-­ ticles, photographs and illustrations are assigned to the pool of staff and contributors.

Volume 82 Issue XIX

Incident: Drugs Date: 04/10/11 Location: DYH RA reported an odor of marijuana;; call unfounded. SUNY New Paltz University Police Department Emergencies: 845-­257-­2222

Five Day Forecast Friday, April 15

Index News.............................................. 3-­10 The Gunk...................................1B-­16B The Deep End..................................16B Editorial..............................................11 Column...............................................12 John Brandi...........................12 Letters.................................................13 Op-­eds.................................................13 Sports.............................................15-­20

Mostly Sunny High: 59 Low: 40 Saturday, April 16

Showers High: 51 Low: 50 Sunday, April 17

Partly Cloudy High: 63 Low: 48 Monday, April 18

Partly Cloudy High: 65 Low: 51 Tuesday, April 9

Partly Cloudy High: 68 Low: 57


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

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Nas  Concert  to  be  Held  Indoors Organizers  Gathering  Signatures  to  Petition  the  Venue

By  Julie  Mansmann Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Jmansmann60@newpaltz.edu

About  one  month  ago,  Student  Association  (SA)  Vice  President  of  Programming  Anthony  Lino  and  NORML/SSDP  President  Marc  Pottak  anticipated  that  up  to  4,000  students  would  at-­ tend  a  May  concert  featuring  the  rapper  Nas,  to  be  hosted  by  Pottak’s  organization,  SA  Productions  and  sponsored  by  dozens  of  other  groups.  Now  the  pair  said  they  are  dismayed  to  learn  that  only  1,500  may  see  the  artist,  since  this  is  the  capacity  of  the  location  named  for  the  event:  Elting  Gym.  â€œThat’s  less  than  the  size  of  the  freshmen  class,â€?  Pottak  said.  â€œWe  wanted  more  students  to  EHQHÂżW IURP WKLV NLQG RI HYHQW ´ After  security  concerns  were  raised  and  dis-­ FXVVHG E\ DGPLQLVWUDWRUV DQG RWKHU RIÂżFLDOV VWX-­ dent  organizers  are  now  collecting  signatures  for  a  petition  to  have  the  event   held  on  Old  Main  Quad  instead  of  Elting  Gym.   Lino  said  SA  Productions  members  decid-­ ed  to  collaborate  with  NORML/SSDP  for  Rock  Against  Racism  because  the  idea  behind  of  their  yearly  outdoor  event  supported  those  promoted  by  Nas,  an  artist  SA  Productions  pursued  to  bring  to  the  campus  last  semester.  â€œThe  artist  speaks  of  social  issues  that  pro-­ mote  critical  thinking  and  progressive  thinking  and  unifying  concepts  and  themes,â€?  he  said.  â€œSo  it  made  logical  sense  to  merge  the  two  to  provide  a  more  progressive  event  where  we  get  the  most  participation  we  can  from  students.â€? The  event  is  being  paid  for  through  funding  provided  for  the  organizations.  In  the  2010-­2011  budget,  SA  Productions  was  granted  an  $80,000  line  item  fund,  and  NORML/SSDP  was  approved  for  $20,000.  Lino  said  this  year’s  concert  head-­ liner  cost  approximately  $50,000.  Pottak  said  organizers  and  sponsors  from  80  different  student  organizations  had  planned  to  hold  the  â€œlarge-­scaleâ€?  event  on  Old  Main  Quad,  where  Rock  Against  Racism  has  been  held  in  the  past.  He  said  Director  of  Student  Activities  and  Union  Services  Mike  Patterson  -­  who  said  the  idea  to  hold  the  concert  outdoors  was  presented  in   the  â€œlate   fall  semesterâ€?  -­  did  discuss  the  event   or  it’s  location  with  other  administrators  until  last  month.  This  was  when  Lino  and  Pottak  said  Vice  President  of  Student  Affairs  L.  David  Rooney,  University  Police  Chief  Ray  Bryant  and  other  RIÂżFLDOV H[SUHVVHG FRQFHUQV WKH\ KDG DERXW ZKR

they  deemed  to  be  a  major  artist  performing  out-­ side.   According  to  Patterson,  the  college  has  not  hosted  major  artist  events  outdoors.   He  said  when  major  artists  are  coming  to  campus,  the  school  has  set  a  standard  to  put  those  artists  in  indoor  facili-­ ties.   â€œMajor  entertainers  tend  to  draw  major  FURZGV 0DQDJLQJ D VLJQLÂżFDQW FURZG RXWGRRUV EHFRPHV YHU\ GLIÂżFXOW EHFDXVH WKH ERXQGDULHV RI the  event  are  limitless,â€?  he  said.  â€œBeing  able  to  protect  and  secure  an  event  of  that  magnitude  can  be  impossible.â€? Bryant  said  controlling  what  goes  on  at  the  concert  was  the  main  concern  of  security  person-­ nel,  and  that  the  indoor  venue  would  allow  for  po-­ lice  to  better  mange  the  event.  Advance  ticketing  for  the  free  event  will  al-­ low  security  personnel  to  know  how  many  people  are  in  the  venue,  Bryant  said.  â€œWe  need  to  have  security  for  individuals  entering  the  venue,â€?  he  said.  â€œWe  have  multiple  concerns  about  controlling  individuals  and  what  outsiders  are  coming  in.â€?  %U\DQW VDLG DSSUR[LPDWHO\ ÂżYH RIÂżFHUV ZLOO be  on  hand  at  the  concert,  if  not  more.  An  outside  security  agency  will  also  be  hired,  according  to  Patterson.  Procedures  will  include  checking  of  SKRWR LGHQWLÂżFDWLRQ ZDQGLQJ DQG SDW GRZQV RI attendees,  restrictions  of  backpacks,  weapons,  bottles  and  more.  the  University  Police  chief  said  these  processes  have  been  carried  out  at  all  con-­ certs  on  campus  in  the  past.  But  Lino  and  Pottak  feel  that  Bryant’s  and  RWKHU RIÂżFLDOVÂś FRQFHUQV DERXW VDIHW\ VKRXOG QRW deter  them  from  considering  the  permission  of  an  outdoor  event,  saying  they  cited  examples  and  re-­ searched  successful  events  held  at  other  schools  in  meetings  with  administrators.   â€œIt  came  down  to  the  fact  that  even  though  we  had  solutions  to  all  of  their  little  problems,  the  list  kept  going,â€?  Pottak  said.  â€œEvery  time  we  had  a  VROXWLRQ WKHUH ZDV DQRWKHU UHG Ă€DJ DQG WKH\ ZHUH MXVW DIUDLG RI WKH QXPEHU RI UHG Ă€DJV WKH\ KDG ´ $QRWKHU FRQFHUQ RI RIÂżFLDOV ZDV LQ UHJDUGV to  costs,  and  how  an  outdoor  event  would  increase  expenses. Patterson  said  the  SA  insurance  provider  also  said  they  would  not  insure  an  major  concert  held  outdoors.  SA  would  have  needed  to  purchase  a  separate  insurance  coverage  for  the  single  event  which  could  cost  up  to  $10,000.   â€œWith  the  added  security  requirements  that Â

would  have  been  required,  I  believe  that  the  host-­ ing  groups  would  have  run  out  of  funds  to  support  the  event,â€?  he  said.  Lino  said  organizers  have  recognized  these  concerns  and  have  tried  to  have  discourse  about  the  location  of  the  event.  2UJDQL]HUV VDLG WKH\ IHOW RIÂżFLDOV VKRXOG keep  the  message  of  the  event  in  mind  when  mak-­ ing  venue  decisions  in  spite  of  their  fears.  â€œThis  is  about  all  unity,â€?  he  said.  â€œIsolating  and  separating  the  event  would  be  counterpro-­ ductive  to  having  a  progressive  event  that  will  be  EHQHÂżFLDO WR DOO SHRSOH ´ Pottak  and  Lino  are  currently  seeking  to  schedule  a  meeting  with  Interim  President  Don-­

ald  Christian  to  present  their  petition  and  appeal  to  have  the  concert  held  outside.  Pottak,  who  said  over  500  signatures  have  al-­ ready  been  collected  for  the  petition,  will  continue  to  table  with  others  and  make  students  aware  of  the  situation  surrounding  the  concert’s  location.   â€œThe  idea  behind  this  is  really  just  to  moti-­ vate  students.  Administrators  and  bureaucrats  in  general  aren’t  generally  impressed  with  petitions,â€?  he  said.  â€œThis  is  just  a  motivating  tool  for  getting  people  involved  and  caring  about  this  event. As  of  press  time,  Nas  will  be  performing  in  Elting  Gym  while  what  Patterson  called  â€œtradi-­ tional  Rock  Against  Racism  programmingâ€?  will  take  place  on  Old  Main  Quad. Â

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NEWS

News Briefs

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Budget  Brought  to  Senate Â

National  Forcefully  rejecting  Republican  budget-­cutting  plans,  President  Barack  Obama  on  Wednesday  proposed  lower-­ LQJ WKH QDWLRQÂśV IXWXUH GHÂżFLWV E\ trillion  over  a  dozen  years  and  vowed  KH ZRXOG QRW DOORZ EHQHÂżW FXWV IRU the  poor  and  the  elderly  to  pay  for  tax  breaks  for  the  rich. ***** Montana  Gov.  Brian  Schweitzer  has  vetoed  a  bill  that  would  have  repealed  the  state’s  voter-­approved  medical  marijuana  law. Schweitzer,  a  Democrat,  vetoed  the  Republican-­backed  measure  Wednes-­ day  along  with  several  others  he  called  â€œfrivolous,  unconstitutional  or  in  direct  contradiction  to  the  expressed  will  of  the  people  of  Montana.â€? Montana  voters  in  2004  overwhelm-­ ingly  approved  the  use  of  medical  marijuana  by  the  very  sick.  There  are  now  more  than  28,000  registered  medi-­ cal  pot  users. ***** The  suspect  in  an  explosion  at  a  Cali-­ fornia  synagogue  has  agreed  to  return  from  Ohio  to  face  charges. Sixty-­year-­old  Ron  Hirsch  waived  a  detention  hearing  Wednesday  after-­ noon.  He  told  a  federal  magistrate  judge  in  Cleveland  that  he  is  ready  to  be  returned  to  face  charges  in  the  Santa  Monica  blast.  No  plea  was  entered  on  a  federal  fugitive  count. International  Briefs  on  Page  5

Vice  President  of  Finance  Youssouf  Kouyo  presented  the  budget  to  the  legislative  body  on  Tuesday.                            PHOTO  BY  LAURA  LUENGAS By  John  Brandi  Copy  Editor  |  Jbrandi02@newpaltz.edu

The  2011-­12  proposed  budget  for  student  orga-­ nizations  was  discussed  by  the  51st  student  senate  at  their  last  general  meeting  on  Tuesday,  April  12,  in  addition  to  Constitution  and  Rules  Committee  (CRC)  proposals.  Vice  President  of  Finance  Youssouf  Kouyo  pre-­ sented  the  budget  to  the  legislative  body  and  went  through  each  line  change.   Stipulations  were  at-­ tached  to  some  clubs  detailing  where  they  could  allocate  money  for  certain  resources.  For  example,  Recycling  Club  could  not  provide  food  for  their  members  at  every  meeting.  Clubs  could  challenge  these  stipulations  if  they  applied  for  funds  through  General  Programming.  The  legislative  body  learned  that  some  clubs  never  touch  their  funds  throughout  the  semester.  According  to  Senate  Chair  Terrell  Coakley,  this  in-­ formation  usually  does  not  come  to  light  until  the  new  budget  is  reviewed  at  the  end  of  the  spring  semester.  Disbursin  Agent  Linda  Lendvay  urged  senators  to  review  the  budget  periodically.  She  compared  it  to  a  â€œliving  documentâ€?  and  said  some  examples  for  greater  scrutiny  were  the  Fencing  Club  and  the  VRODU FDU OLQH LQ ZKLFK IXQGV ZHUH JRLQJ unused.  Some  changes  to  the  budget  include  WNPC-­TV  SXUFKDVLQJ WZR QHZ +' FDPHUDV IRU HDFK DQG EULQJLQJ WKHLU WRWDO IXQGLQJ WR  Fahari Â

Libertad EHLQJ FXW IURP WR DQG DQ imposed  stipulation  that  they  couldn’t  use  money  requested  for  a  dinner  to  re-­allocate  that  for  print-­ ing  more  issues.  7KH 3URIHVVLRQDO 6DODULHV IXQG LQFUHDVHG E\ percent,  the  Senate  Discretionary  fund  increased  IURP WR DQG WKH (TXLSPHQW IXQG LQ-­ FUHDVHG IURP WR EHFDXVH D FRS\ machine  will  be  installed  outside  Student  Union  100,  near  the  ATM,  and  additional  funding  will  go  to  buying  paper  and  maintenance.  The  budget  also  included  a  Budget  and  Finance  Committee  Unappropriated  fund.  Money  will  be  placed  in  the  fund  upon  club  requests,  and  these  FDQ EH DSSHDOHG ([DFWO\ H[LVWV LQ WKDW fund.  Kouyo  also  said  that  two  general  stipulations  will  be  in  place  for  all  clubs  for  fall  2011,  with  the  ¿UVW EHLQJ D PD[ RI IRU YLGHRJUDSKHU SKR-­ tographer  of  an  event  is  in  place.  Any  additional  amount  request  must  be  generated  by  sale  of  DVD  created.  The  second  is  tht  all  outside  vendors  sponsored  by  a  Student  Association  organization  will  pay  20  percent  of  the  gross  sales  generated.  5DWLÂżFDWLRQ IRU WKLV EXGJHW ZLOO WDNH SODFH DW WKH last  senate  meeting  after  appeals  have  been  made.  Sen.  Jonathan  Espinosa  presented  to  the  legis-­ lative  body  his  idea  for  greater  transparency  and  open  communication  between  the  SUNY  schools.  He  proposed  creating  a  new  E-­board  position Â

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

called  the  vice  president  of  communication  and  said  that  all  senators  could  be  involved,  through  e-­ mail  and  Facebook,  to  contact  other  students  and  to  present  any  updates.  ³.HHSLQJ WKDW FRQWDFW ZRXOG EHQHÂżW XV DOO ´ VDLG Sen.  Megan  Grieco.  The  legislative  body  recommended  turning  this  proposal  into  a  committee  and  giving  it  a  test-­run  before  it  is  drafted  into  the  constitution.   The  senate  ZDQWV WR LQWURGXFH LW RIÂżFLDOO\ LQ D ELOO WR EH YRWHG RQ LQ VSULQJ Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs  and  Gover-­ nance  Caitlin  Ryan  presented  constitutional  bylaw  amendments  on  behalf  of  Council  Chair  Shayna  Bentley.  The  aim  is  to  amend  the  agenda  of  Council  of  Organizations  and  review  and  possibly  limit  the  number  of  permitted  absences  a  club  is  allowed.  Bentley  also  brought  up  amending  travel  roster  re-­ quirements  and  coach  registration  contracts.  The  decision  to  act  on  these  changes  was  post-­ poned.  Senators  will  have  a  meeting  to  discuss  and  ¿QDOL]H D E\ODZ DPHQGPHQW Sen.  Connor  McElwaine  presented  his  idea  to  the  legislative  body  to  have  senators  hold  special-­ ized  positions,  like  a  senator  for  budgetary  affairs,  among  other  issues.  â€œ[It’s]  less  about  a  popularity  contest,  and  more  real  debate,â€?  he  said.  The  decision  is  still  being  considered.  The  next  general  student  senate  meeting  is  on  7XHVGD\ $SULO


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

District  Faces  Wage  Decreases By  John  Brandi Copy  Editor  |  Jbrandi02@newpaltz.edu

New  Paltz  School  District  (NPSD)  chose  salary  concessions  over  downsizing  its  administrative  team  for  the  upcoming  2011-­12  budget,  according  to  Superinten-­ dent  of  Schools  Maria  Rice.   According  to  Rice,  this  represented  an   attempt  to  offset  statewide  budgetary  short-­ falls.  ³:KHQ , ZDV JRLQJ WR DVN GLVWULFW RI-­ ÂżFH HPSOR\HHV DOO WKH FOHULFDO ZRUNHUV >IRU VDODU\ FRQFHVVLRQV LW@ ZDV LQ KRSHV QRW WR downsize,â€?  said  Rice.  â€œA  lot  of  effort  was  to  not  have  to  downsize,  no  strings  attached.â€?  Principals  have  signed  a  new  contract  with  Rice  giving  up  their  right  to  a  raise  for  the  2011-­12  academic  year,  while  the  bus  monitor  and  bus  driver  unions,  technology  staff,  the  clerical  staff,  directors  and  many  more  have  all  made  salary  concessions  in  hopes  to  save  the  district  money.  School  Board  President  Donald  Kerr  said  that  unions  usually  don’t  sign  conces-­ sions  without  getting  something  in  return.  The  principal  union  will  get  a  2  percent  in-­ crease  in  2013  and  2014  and  are  guaranteed  job  security  detailed  in  one  â€œcaveatâ€?  of  the  contract  re-­negotiations.  Rice  said  three  caveats  exist,  two  on  the  basis  of  language  change  and  the  other,  deemed  as  â€œobviousâ€?  pertains  to  the  salary  concessions.  7KH ÂżUVW FDYHDW GHWDLOV KRZ WKH %RDUG of  Education  (BOE)  will  not  reduce  the  number  of  administrators  in  the  three  years Â

of  this  extended  contract.  â€œThe  coordinator  of  student  services,  LQVWHDG RI HOLPLQDWLQJ >WKDW SRVLWLRQ@ QRW ÂżOOLQJ LW LQ KRSHV WKDW VRPHGD\ WKH\ ZLOO EH DEOH WR DIIRUG WR ÂżOO LW DJDLQ ´ VDLG 5LFH The  second  caveat  changed  the  amount  of  contribution  from  the  school  district  to-­ ZDUGV KHDOWKFDUH 7KHUHÂśV D EHQHÂżW WUXVW which  covers  vision  and  dental.  Rice  said  there  will  be  a  â€œperformer  kind  of  increaseâ€?  and  a  contribution  of  $75  per  person  for  WKUHH \HDUV ZLOO FRQWLQXH WKHVH EHQHÂżWV The  third  caveat  details  salary  conces-­ sions.  Rice  said  that  the  salary  amount  from  this  year  will  carry  over,  in  the  exact  same  amount,  for  2011-­12.  However,  Rice  said  BOE  will  end  performance  pay  because  â€œthe  board  doesn’t  feel  they  can  afford  to  pay  people  for  that  performance  pay  price.â€?  She  called  this  unfortunate.  Those  that  have  given  a  â€œzero  percent  increaseâ€?  in  salary  include:  Â‡ The  bus  monitor’s  union  Â‡ Another  union  associated  with  bus  drivers ‡ Three  LPN/Aides  Â‡ A  behavioral  specialist  Â‡ 7KH &HQWUDO 2IÂżFH $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ which  include  the  assistant  superintendent,  Superintendent  Rice  and  the  coordinators  for  Special  Education ‡ The  technology  department  Â‡ $OO RI WKH GLVWULFW RIÂżFH FOHULFDO VWDII ‡ Three  directors,  director  of  transporta-­ tion,  director  of  food  service  and  director  of  facilities  and  operation Â

‡ One  assistant  director  in  transporta-­ tion ‡ A  dispatcher Not  including  teachers,  the  above  con-­ cessions  could  save  the  district  $132,710.  Meanwhile,  some  contracts  are  still  being  negotiated  as  of  April  11.  Teacher’s  aides  as  part  of  the  New  Paltz  educational  support  staff  have  not  given  anything  yet.  Custodial  workers  have  not  given  any  con-­ cessions,  but  according  to  Rice,  are  consid-­ ering  it.  The  CWA  Food  Service  was  in  talks  for  salary  concessions  and  contract  re-­negotia-­ tions  but  this  has  been  abandoned.  â€œTheir  salaries  have  nothing  to  do  with  the  budget  and  it’s  a  self-­sustaining  pro-­ gram  that  wouldn’t  have  an  effect,â€?  said  5LFH Âł>7KH\ DUH@ WKH ORZHVW SDLG SHRSOH LQ the  system.â€?  An  unresolved  issue  that  persists  is  lower  salaries  for  teacher’s  unions.  Accord-­ ing  to  Rice,  50  percent  of  costs  come  from  WHDFKHUÂśV VDODULHV DQG EHQHÂżWV $ FRQFHVVLRQ is  â€œon  the  tableâ€?  that  will  consider  a  retire-­ ment  incentive  and  the  breakage  from  that.  ,W FRXOG VDYH WKH GLVWULFW ÂłKDOI D PLOOLRQ IRU next  year  alone.â€?  Teacher  concessions  were  stalled  until  the  next  board  meeting.  Rice  said  there  was  some  opposition  to  salary  concessions,  like  in  the  secretarial  unit,  but  those  that  said  â€˜no’  didn’t  get  it.  According  to  The  Hudson  Valley  Times,  despite  those  objections,  a  majority  of  the  school  board  signed  off  on  the  new  contract,  voting  5-­2  to  accept  it. Â

Council  of  Orgs  Re-­Elects  Chair By  Katherine  Speller Copy  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@newpaltz.edu

At  this  week’s  Council  of  Organizations  meeting  on  Monday,   April  11,  the  body  held  its  elections. Before  elections,  it  was  announced  that  he  â€œGreen  Thinkingâ€?  page  on  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  web-­ site  will  be  redone  soon,  including  a  calendar  that  will  hold  a  list  of  green-­initiative  events.  The  Environmen-­ tal  Task  Force  will  be  making  a  list  of  events  that  have  taken  place  in  the  past  and  those  that  will  take  place  in  the  future.  Vice  President  of  Programming  Anthony  Lino  spoke  of  the  Rock  Against  Racism  event  which  has  garnered  controversy  over  the  last  few  weeks.  He  con-­ ÂżUPHG WKDW 1DV ZLOO EH FRPLQJ EXW QRW ZLWKRXW D IHZ concessions  being  made. Âł:LWK WKH VROLGLÂżFDWLRQ >RI ERRNLQJ 1DV@ , KDYH

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dealt  with  some  issues.â€?  said  Lino. With  the  booking  of  Nas  as  the  entertainment,  the  event  cannot  be  held  on  Old  Main  Quad  as  it  has  been  in  the  past  due  to  security  concerns.  Lino  urged  students  to  sign  the  petition  to  have  it  on  the  quad,  citing  a  similar  circumstance  at  the  University  of  Ne-­ braska  that  hosted  Lupe  Fiasco  without  any  security  issues.  He  hopes  the  petition  will  move  the  admin-­ istration  to  appeal  their  decision  and  allow  the  event  to  take  place  outside  where  more  than  1,500  people  can  attend  the  event  designed  to  promote  the  theme  of  unity. Vice  President  of  Finance  Youssouf  Kouyo  spoke  about  the  outcomes  of  the  Buudget  and  Finance  Committee  (BFC)  weekend.  Kouyo  said  that  decisions  were  already  made  and  students  who  are  not  happy  with  their  decisions  should  see  him.   Organizations  not Â

named  on  the  list  should  go  to  General  Programming. Before  elections,  Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs  and  Governance  Caitlin  Ryan  reported  that  the  total  amount  of  funds  offered  to  students  attending  FRQIHUHQFHV KDV EHHQ LQFUHDVHG ,I D VWXGHQW LV SUHVHQW-­ ing  at  a  conference  he  or  she  can  receive  up  to  $600,  if  they  are  attending  they  can  receive  up  to  $400  and  the  maximum  amount  for  groups  of  students  to  attend  conferences  has  been  increased  to  $2,200.   Elections  were  also  held  this  week.  Council  Chair  Shayna  Bentley  was  the  only  person  nominat-­ ed  for  her  current  position  and  regained  the  council  chair  seat  through  unanimous  vote.   After  her  election,  Bentley  said  it  would  be  her  goal  to  make  council  and  the  Student  Association  as  a  whole  more  effective.  7KH QH[W DQG ¿QDO FRXQFLO PHHWLQJ RI WKH VHPHV-­ ter  will  be  held  on  Monday,  April  25.

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

News Briefs World Mexican  investigators  have  found  a  total  of  116  bodies  in  pits  near  the  U.S.  border,  28  more  than  previously  reported,  Attorney  General  Marisela  Morales  said  Tuesday. Morales  said  a  total  of  17  suspects  tied  to  the  brutal  Zetas  drug  gang  have  been  detained  in  relation  to  the  killings  in  the  northern  state  of  Tamaulipas,  some  of  whom  have  purportedly  con-­ fessed  to  abducting  passengers  from  buses  and  killing  them. ***** Small  business  owners  and  laborers  forced  to  leave  their  homes  and  jobs  because  of  radiation  leaking  from  -DSDQÂśV WVXQDPL Ă€RRGHG QXFOHDU SODQW rode  a  bus  all  the  way  to  Tokyo  on  Wednesday  to  demand  compensation  from  the  plant’s  operator. ***** Ousted  President  Hosni  Mubarak  and  his  two  sons  were  detained  Wednesday  for  investigation  of  corruption,  abuse  of  power  and  killings  of  protesters,  bringing  cheers  of  victory  from  activ-­ ists  who  hoped  it  marked  a  turning  point  in  Egypt’s  turbulent  transition  to  democracy.

Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Candidates  Debate  Village  Issues By  Maxim  Alter Managing  Editor  |  Malter42@newpaltz.edu

Thirteen  candidates  for  New  Paltz’s  village  board  gathered  Monday,  ready  to  combat  what  some  called  the  lowest  volunteer  rates  the  areas  has  faced  in  decades. “If  you  don’t  have  people  that  are  willing  to  volunteer  their  time  in  a  village  of  5,000  to  7,000  people,  it’s  disgusting,â€?  said  mayoral  candidate  Jonathan  Cohen  to  a  room  of  about  100  people.  â€œI  believe  in  volunteerism.  I  believe  that  is  what’s  go-­ ing  to  save  our  village.â€? Dwindling  volunteerism  was  one  of  several  topics  discussed  at  the  Woodland  Pond  Candidates’  )RUXP WKH ÂżUVW RI VHYHUDO YLOODJH PD\RUDO DQG WUXVW-­ ee  debates  planned  before  Election  Day  on  May  3.  Panelists  included  mayoral  candidates  Jona-­ than  Cohen,  Jean  Galucci,  Pete  Healey  and  Jason  West,  as  well  as  trustee  candidates  Ariana  Basco,  Rick  Bunt,  Amy  Cohen,  Emily  Crocetti,  Stewart  Glenn,  Sally  Rhoads,  Kip  Ruger,  Martin  Sherow  and  Shari  Osborn. ,I HOHFWHG PD\RU &RKHQ VDLG KH SODQV WR Âż[ poor  relationships  made  between  the  current  village  board  and  members  of  volunteer  groups  such  as  the  New  Paltz  Fire  Department.  To  avoid  issues  caused  by  spending,  he  said  he  would  not  accept  a  single  penny  of  the  mayor’s  salary. “I  am  not  a  career  politician,â€?  Cohen  said.  â€œI  have  a  business  and  believe  being  mayor  is  a  part-­ time  position.  Why  should  I  take  $40,000  of  the  vil-­ lage’s  money?â€? However,  other  candidates  said  a  part-­time  mayor  would  not  be  able  to  serve  the  community  adequately. Former  mayor  West  said,  if  elected,  he  would  treat  the  position  as  nothing  less  than  a  full-­time  job. “It  requires  that  much  work  to  not  only  get  the  basics  done‌but  to  do  the  research,  have  the  meet-­ ings  and  build  the  organizations  and  networks  to Â

Dwindling  volunteerism  was  one  of  the  topics  discussed  at  the  forum  at  Woodland  Pond.                                     PHOTO  BY  MAXIM  ALTER meet  the  challenges  that  we’re  going  to  face  in  the  years  ahead,â€?  West  said. Amos  Sunshine,  a  village  resident  for  56  years,  said  who  he  votes  for  will  hinge  on  which  candidate  can  bring  about  the  unity  that  the  village  and  town  have  been  sorely  lacking. Rather  than  dealing  with  serious  issues  faced  by  the  community,  Sunshine  said  he  has  noticed  power  struggles  between  members  of  government. When  mayoral  candidate  Healey  arrived  in  New  Paltz  30  years  ago  to  attend  SUNY  New  Paltz,  he  said  he  didn’t  differentiate  between  the  town  and  village  because  it  wasn’t  something  he  thought  had  any  effect  on  him.  But  with  bickering  now  crippling  the  working  relationship  between  board  members,  Healey  said  the  issue  has  reached  a  breaking  point.

“The  requirements  of  the  new  period  we’re  coming  into  are  to  rationalize  and  simplify  govern-­ ment  and  thereby  make  it  more  effective  and  make  it  closer  to  the  people,â€?  Healey  said.  â€œAt  one  table  with  one  government,  maybe  there  will  be  twice  as  PDQ\ ÂżJKWV %XW DW WKH HQG RI WKH QLJKW WKHUH ZLOO EH a  resolution.â€?  Trustee  candidate  Bunt  said  over  the  past  de-­ FDGH WD[HV LQ WKH YLOODJH KDYH GRXEOHG DQG KRXVLQJ values  have  dropped.  He  said  this  has  made  living  in  New  Paltz  unaffordable  for  longtime  members  of  the  community. Bunt  said  his  platform  focuses  on  bringing  po-­ OLWLFDO EDODQFH WR WKH YLOODJH ERDUG DV ZHOO DV ÂżQGLQJ ZD\V WR VROYH WKH ÂżQDQFLDO XQUHVW “For  too  long  the  political  pendulum  has  swung  either  too  far  to  the  right  or  too  far  to  the  left,â€?  Bunt Â

said.  â€œWe  must  look  to  have  balance  on  the  board  and  strive  to  develop  a  sustainable  future  for  our  entire  community.  We  need  to  seek  out  intelligent  VROXWLRQV WR RXU SUREOHPV UDWKHU WKDQ H[SHQVLYH UH-­ actionary  laws.â€? 7KH QH[W GHEDWH EHWZHHQ FDQGLGDWHV ZLOO EH held  on  Friday,  April  15  from  7  to  10  p.m.  at  Slash-­ Root  and  will  be  moderated  by  SUNY  New  Paltz  alumnus  Justin  Holmes. Scan  this  QR  code  with  a  free  QR  code  reader  or  barcode  scanner  on  any  smartphone  to  see  exclusive  footage  of  the  debate! Â

The  Fall  2011  New  Paltz  Oracle Â

Editorial  Board   Elections will  be  held  on  May  1  at  7:30  p.m.  in  SU  403!  E-­mail  us  at  oracle@newpaltz.edu  for  more  information  about  how  you  can  become  a  member  of  an  award-­winning  news  publication! Thursday,  April  14,  2011


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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 Community  Prepares  for  First  Sustainable  Action  Week  Sustainable  Action  Week April  25  to  May  1 Monday:  Educate  Yourself 6XVWDLQDELOLW\ )DLU 2XWVLGH RI +XPDQLWLHV D P WR S P .H\QRWH VSHDNHU 'HHQD :DGH LQ /HFWXUH &HQWHU D P WR S P http://sensiblebliss.com/ Tuesday:  Food/Compost ³([SORULQJ /RFDO )RRG´ 6WXGHQW 8QLRQ S P WR S P 6SHDNHU .DWK\ /DZUHQFH IRXQGHU RI -XVW )RRG &6% $XGLWRULXP WR S P www.justfood.org/ 'RFXPHQWDU\ VKRZLQJ RI ³)UHVK´ LQ +RQRUV &HQWHU S P www.freshthemovie.com

7KH HYHQWV IRU WKH ZHHN DUH EHLQJ SXW WRJHWKHU E\ WKH 6XVWDLQDEOH /LYLQJ &ROOHFWLYH D JURXS RI DFWLYLVWV             3+272 %< 0$(9( +$//,'$< By  Maeve  Halliday $VVW )DFW &KHFNHU _ Mhalliday74@newpaltz.edu

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NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Reaccreditation  Commission  Visits  Cam-­ By  Andrew  Wyrich Sports  Editor  |  Andrew.wyrich63@newpaltz.edu

Armed  with  white  notepads  and  pens,  a  team  of  reviewers  from  the  Middle  States  Commission  on  Higher  Education  (MSCHE)  gauged  students’  involvement  and  feeling  to-­ wards  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  campus  commu-­ nity  during  a  question  and  answer  session  on  Tuesday,  April  12. The  team,  which  consisted  of  eight  members  from  various  institutions  and  uni-­ versities  in  the  northeast,  asked  students  a  series  of  questions  ranging  from  the  general  feeling  on  campus  to  what  students  feel  needs  to  be  changed.  The  visiting  team  toured  campus  and  met  with  multiple  campus  contingencies  over  the  week  with  hopes  of  collecting  data  to  contrib-­ ute  to  a  report  that  will  be  sent  to  the  MSCHE  and  decide  whether  SUNY  New  Paltz  will  be  reaccredited.  While  the  reaccreditation  process  is  vol-­ untary  and  non-­governmental,  the  United  States  Department  of  Education  only  sends  IHGHUDO ÂżQDQFLDO DLG PRQH\ WR LQVWLWXWLRQV LW believes  are  of  strong  academic  quality  or  ac-­ credited.  â€œWe’re  not  here  to  say  â€˜gotcha’  or  criti-­ cize,â€?  Middle  States  Site  Team  Chairperson  William  Ruud  said.  â€œWe’re  here  to  hear  what  you  have  to  say.â€?  The  session,  which  attracted  over  30  students,  met  in  Coykendall  Science  Build-­ ing’s  auditorium  and  was  used  by  the  visit-­ ing  team  to  ask  members  of  the  student  body  about  their  experiences  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  and  their  opinions  on  what  could  make  the Â

campus  better.  Ruud  said  his  team  has  been  touring  campus  and  asking  questions  to  various  orga-­ nizations  and  departments  across  campus.  He  said  the  goal  of  his  visiting  team  is  to  make  a  recommendation  to  the  MSCHE,  who  will  either  accredit  or  deny  SUNY  New  Paltz  in  June.  â€œOur  trip  has  been  wonderful,  we  have  been  able  to  move  across  the  campus  commu-­ nity  and  get  a  very  good  idea  about  what  New  Paltz  is  doing,  what  their  aspirations  are  and  what  they  think  could  be  improved  upon,â€?  Ruud  said.  7KH ÂżUVW TXHVWLRQ SRVHG WR WKH DXGLHQFH inspired  a  discussion  on  the  importance  and  value  of  general  education  requirements.  One  by  one,  students  told  the  committee  experi-­ ences  they  have  had  taking  classes  that  may  QRW QHFHVVDULO\ ÂżW LQ WKHLU PDMRU SODQV EXW still  offered  value  â€“  such  as  prompting  them  WR VZLWFK WKHLU PDMRU “A  lot  of  the  courses  double  dip,â€?  third-­ \HDU VHFRQGDU\ HGXFDWLRQ PDMRU )UDQFLV 5R-­ driguez  said.  â€œI  had  the  opportunity  to  ex-­ plore  something  while  not  being  held  back.â€? Rodriguez  said  he  attended  the  session  because  he  was  curious  as  to  how  the  team  could  impact  the  future  of  SUNY  New  Paltz  community  and  wanted  to  represent  the  EOP  program.  â€œAs  a  student,  you  should  be  informed,â€?  Rodriguez  said.  Students  in  attendance  also  told  the  com-­ mittee  reasons  why  they  felt  New  Paltz  was  the  university  they  decided  to  attend  when  exploring  colleges  in  high  school.   The  com-­

PHOTO Â BY Â ANDREW Â WYRICH

The  site  team  consisted  of  eight  members  from  various  institutions  in  the  northeast.  PLWWHH ZDV VSHFLÂżFDOO\ LQWHUHVWHG LQ KRZ 1HZ Paltz’s  growing  reputation  could  spread  far-­ ther  than  Long  Island  and  lower  New  York,  where  students  said  the  school’s  prestige  is  most  well-­known  while  many  students  cited  a  sense  of  community  and  family  they  believe  are  campus-­wide. The  discussion’s  most  participated  mo-­ ment  came  when  Ruud  asked  the  audience  what  they  would  like  to  see  improved  upon  by  New  Paltz.  Students’  answers  ranged  from  top-­ ics  including  a  possible  implementation  of Â

D GLVDVWHU VWXGLHV PDMRU 681< 1HZ 3DOW] reinstating  the  nursing  program,  improving  parking  availability  on  campus,  having  a  spe-­ FLÂżF IDFLOLW\ WR KHOS /*%74 VWXGHQWV EHWWHU integration  of  minority  students,  attention  to  RWKHU UHOLJLRXV KROLGD\V ZKHQ ÂżQDOL]LQJ WKH academic  schedule,  food  options  on  campus  and  transfer  students  not  being  offered  hous-­ ing  by  the  school  upon  arriving  to  New  Paltz.  Ruud  concluded  his  visit  by  inviting  members  of  the  campus  community  to  a  closed  meeting  for  faculty,  staff  and  students  on  Wednesday. Â

CAS  Dishes  Dining  Dollars  Back  to  Students By  Pamela  Vivanco News  Editor  |  Pvivanco57@newpaltz.edu

The  fate  of  dining  dollars  remaining  in  students’  accounts  at  the  end  of  each  semester  has  been  a  common  concern  for  many  at  SUNY  New  Paltz,  accord-­ ing  to  Student  Association  (SA)  Execu-­ tive  Vice  President  Eve  Stern.  During  a  student  senate  meeting  on  Tuesday,  April  15,  Stern  said  that  Cam-­ pus  Auxiliary  Services  (CAS)  uses  the  remaining  dining  dollars  toward  schol-­ arship  funds.  CAS  Executive  Director  Steve  Deutsch  said  that  at  the  end  of  each  aca-­

demic  year,  $20,000  to  $80,000  dining  dollars  remain  unused.  While  half  of  the  amount  goes  to  Sodexo,  as  part  of  their  contract,  the  rest  goes  to  the  Career  Resource  Center  (CRC)  which  uses  the  money  toward  an  applicable  scholarship  that  facilitates  internship  opportunities.  â€œLet’s  say  you’re  doing  an  intern-­ ship  in  New  York  City  and  you  can’t  afford  the  rent  while  you’re  doing  your  internship  because  your  internship  is  ei-­ ther  low-­paying  or  non-­paying,  you  can  give  an  application  for  the  scholarship  and  then  a  panel  reviews  it,  and  if  your  application  is  accepted,  they’ll  fund Â

your  internship  up  to  a  certain  dollar  level,â€?  said  Deutsch.  Beth  Anne  King,  the  internship  co-­ ordinator  at  the  CRC,  said  the  CAS  In-­ ternship  Stipend  has  been   available  to  students  since  spring  2006.  Since  then,  a  total  of  $163,300  has  been  awarded  among  159  students.  King  also  said  any  student  doing  an  internship  for  academ-­ ic  credit  is  eligible  for  the  scholarship.  In  addition,   students  who  apply  must  DOVR VKRZ VRPH ÂżQDQFLDO QHHG Because  a  lot  of  students  feel  like  they  are  being  â€œripped  offâ€?  at  the  end  of  each  semester,  Stern  said  she  was  happy Â

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

to  hear  that  dining  dollars  were  being  given  back  to  students  in  some  way.   Deutsch  agreed  with  Stern  and  said  that  the  scholarship  is  a  direct  way  to  give  money  back  to  students.   ³&$6 LVQÂśW KHUH WR PDNH D SURÂżW ´ he  said.  â€œCAS  is  here  to  return  whatever  SURÂżWV ZH GR KDYH GLUHFWO\ WR WKH VWX-­ dents  so  this  is  a  very  direct  way  to  take  the  money  that  is  left  over  that  students  don’t  use  and  give  it  right  back  to  stu-­ dents  who  really  need  it.â€? For  more  information  about  the  CAS  Internship  stipend,  students  can   contact  the  CRC.


The New Paltz Oracle

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The New Paltz Oracle

ATTENTION STUDENTS Your Fall 2011 Residence Awaits You!

SOUTHSIDE TERRACE APARTMENTS OFFERS SEMESTER LEASES Studio, one & two bedroom apartments Heat and Hot water included All apartments are furnished Walking distance to the college and town Ask about our great rates for the summer too! SOUTHSIDE TERRACE APARTMENTS 4 SOUTHSIDE AVENUE NEW PALTZ, NY 12561 (845) 255-­7205


The GUNK

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Project spreads hugs through campus thanks to student artist,

DANIEL sangIACOMO Story on page 7B

PLUS... AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH Student organizations host program to spread knowledge about disorder Art therapy documentary screened locally

JAM ASIA Proceeds from annual fashion show donated to Japan

DUMBLEDORE’S ARMY Club donates books to library in Brooklyn

AND MORE!

PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIEL SANGIACOMO

‘CHANGING IDENTITIES’

Sangiacomo


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

2B Â | Â FEATURES

FEATURES

CLUB FEATURE

Fashion All Day and Night

JAM ASIA HOSTS CULTURE AND PERFORMANCE SHOW FOR JAPANESE RELIEF

Jam  Asia’s  annual  â€œCulture  and  Fashion  Showâ€?  celebrates  Asian  culture  in  the  areas  of  fashion,  dance  and  performances.                                                                                                   3+2726 %< ),21$ /(( By  Amanda  Grappone Contributing  Writer  |  Agrappone25@newpaltz.edu

A  swarm  of  people  occupied  the  halls  of  the  Student  Union  patiently  waiting  for  the  multipurpose  room  doors  to  open.  Beyond  those  doors  ZHUH WKH PHPEHUV RI -DP $VLD ÂżQDO-­ izing  the  setup  for  their  annual  â€œCul-­ ture  and  Fashion  Showâ€?  on  Friday,  April  8.  â€œ[The  event]  is  essentially  a  week-­ long  celebration  of  the  Asian  culture,  through  the  talents  of  our  students  in  the  areas  of  fashion,  dance  and  other  performances,â€?  said  Kristine  Rose,  the  SXEOLF UHODWLRQV RIÂżFHU IRU WKH RUJDQL-­ zation.  This  year’s  show  aimed  to  help  rebuild  communities  in  Japan  affected  by  the  tragic  events  that  took  place  last  month. The  show  began  promptly  at  8  p.m.  with  a  brief  greeting  from  the  two  copresidents,  both  of  whom  be-­ gan  throwing  out  free  giveaways;Íž  in-­ cluding  customized  water  containers, Â

silicon  wrist  bands  and  â€œI  <3  JAâ€?  T-­ shirts  into  the  audience.  By  the  end  of  the  night,  the  250  pre-­set  chairs  were  exceeded. “We  were  so  happy  with  the  num-­ ber  of  people  that  came,â€?  said  Carmen  Siu,  Jam  Asia’s  fashion  coordina-­ tor.  â€œWhen  [the  show]  started,  I  was  so  nervous  because  the  seats  weren’t  ¿OOHG EXW D PLQXWH ODWHU WKH\ ZHUH ´ The  same  giveaway  items  were  available  for  purchase  outside  of  the  multipurpose  room.  All  proceeds  went  to  the  Japan  Society  to  help  rebuild  the  communities  suffering  from  the  recent  devestation  caused  by  earthquakes.  Boxes  were  also  distributed  among  the  crowd  during  the  performances  for  donations.  According  to  Siu,  over  $300  was  donated  by  the  end  of  Friday’s  show.  A  total  of  $4,000  was  raised  by  the  Jam  Asia  organization   within  a  time  span  of  a  couple  of  weeks.  The  â€œAsian  Cityâ€?  themed  program  was  divided  into  two  different  acts, Â

WLWOHG Âł'D\´ DQG Âł1LJKW ´ 7KH ÂżUVW half  of  performances  were  traditional,  slower-­paced  and  casual,  whereas  the  second  â€œNightâ€?  half  was  meant  to  be  more  upbeat  and  energy-­based,  ac-­ cording  to  Angela  Tso,  the  copresident  of  Jam  Asia.  In  addition  to  the  acts  performed  by  Jam  Asia  members,  other  orga-­ nizations  and  teams  made  guest  ap-­ pearances.  Among  the  wide  range  of  performers,  Male  Call,  The  Warriors,  Nachle  New  Paltz,  Breakdance  and  Anime  Club  participated  in  Friday’s  event.  â€œWe  were  really  going  for  diver-­ sity,â€?  said  Rose.  â€œWe  wanted  to  incor-­ porate  as  many  people  as  we  could.â€? A  great  attraction  to  the  event  were  the  student-­made  designs  and  modeling. In  addition  to  the  student-­designed  fashion  lines,  Jam  Asia  was  sponsored  ZRUWK RI JLIW FHUWLÂżFDWHV WR <HV-­ Style,  an  online-­based  Japanese  fash-­ ion  line  with  modern  designs. Â

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

Eva  Hernandez,  a  third-­year  psy-­ chology  major  who  attended  the  â€œCul-­ ture  and  Fashion  Show,â€?  said  she  was  mostly  intrigued  by  all  of  the  clothing  that  was  displayed. “I  have  such  a  knack  for  fashion,â€?  said  Hernandez.  â€œIt’s  so  amazing  to  know  that  students  my  age  are  making  >FORWKLQJ@ VR ZHOO 7KH $VLDQ LQĂ€X-­ ence  was  a  cool  thing  to  see.â€? With  the  show  over  and  the  intri-­ FDWH SODQQLQJ SURFHVV ÂżQDOO\ DW DQ HQG the  Jam  Asia  executive  board  intends  to  continue  to  support  other  campus  organizations  and  participate  in  other  programs  whenever  asked.  Ultimately,  members  of  Jam  Asia  ZHUH VDWLVÂżHG ZLWK WKH WXUQRXW DQG WKH great  talent  exhibited  at  the  event,  said  Tso. “The  minor  glitches  here  and  there  GLGQÂśW PDWWHU EHFDXVH WKH ÂżQDO SURG-­ uct  was  amazing,â€?  said  Tso.  â€œWe  are  so  proud  of  our  dedicated  members.  Now,  we  don’t  know  what  to  do  with  our  free  time.â€?


                     FEATURES  |  3B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle COMMUNITY FEATURE

Youths Helped by City Year Program NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION OFFERS STUDENTS JOB OPPORTUNITIES

By  Jaleesa  Baulkman )HDWXUHV (GLWRU _ Jbaulkman75@newpaltz.edu

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 4B  |  FEATURES

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

CLUB FEATURE

Rethinking Autism

WHO’S WHO

...with  Annie  Yu

STUDENT ORGS FIGHT PERCEPTIONS OF DISORDER

Zhen Lin

By  Carolyn  Candela

Second-­Year Major in TV/Radio Production, Video Editor for Jam Asia

Contributing  Writer  |  Car.candela31@newpaltz.edu

On  Monday,  April  4,  students  wore  blue  to  kick  off  Autism  Awareness  Month.  Men  of  All  Nations  United  (MANU)  and  the  Black  Student  Union  (BSU)  worked  to-­ JHWKHU DQG KHOG WKHLU Âż UVW DXWLVP UHODWHG SUR gram  â€œAutism  in  the  Black  and  African  Com-­ munity.â€?  The  program  was  set  up  to  educate  peers  about  autism  and  how  it  is  handled  in  the  Black  Community. “Society  always  perceives  autism  as  some-­ WKLQJ WKDW QHHGV WR EH GHDOW ZLWK DQG Âż [HG ´ said  Jay  Espinosa,  President  of  MANU  and  Historian  of  BSU.  The  program  opened  with  a  brief  skit  dem-­ onstrating  one  of  the  common  ways  children  with  autism  respond  to  social  cues.  One  orga-­ nization  member  acted  as  a  child  diagnosed  with  autism,  while  another  member  acted  as  her  mother.  When  the  mother  tried  speak-­ ing  to  the  child,  the  child  grew  angry  and  refused  to  respond. Several  similar  skits  took  place  throughout  the  program  to  show  how  parents  and  peers  typically  handle  children  with  autism.  While  there  is  no  cure  for  autism,  there  are  ways  for  children  and  their  fami-­ lies  to  cope.  Many  children  receive  speech  and  occu-­ pational  therapy  to  enhance  their  social  abilities  and  communica-­ tion  skills. “They’re  loving  peo-­ ple,  and  I’ve  been  around  a  lot  of  children  diagnosed  with  autism,â€?  said  BSU  president  Charisma  Wright.  â€œJust  be  patient.â€? Since  the  1960s,  the  rate  of  children  diag-­ nosed  with  autism  has  increased.  According  to  the  organization  Autism  Speaks,  one  in  110  children  are  diagnosed  with  autism  today.  In  the  United  States,  organizations  such  as  Au-­ tism  Speaks  have  helped  raise  awareness  to-­ ward  the  developmental  disorder.  Most  states  have  passed,  or  are  in  the  process  of  passing,  laws  which  prevent  insurance  companies  from  discriminating  against  patients  diagnosed  with Â

autism.  In  South  Africa,  autism  is  kept  away  from  the  public  eye.  This  issue  carries  over  to  the  United  States,  where  there  is  a  lack  of  aware-­ ness  in  the  African-­American  community.  Factors  such  as  the  inability  to  see  high-­end  physicians,  distrust  in  the  medical  community  and  stereotypes  have  contributed  to  this  lack  of  awareness.  In  the  black  community,  autism  is  looked  at  in  a  different  way.  Black  children  are  usual-­ ly  diagnosed  with  autism  18  months  later  than  white  children,  according  to  Autism  Speaks.  While  scientists  have  tried  to  put  a  face  to  the  disorder  by  associating  it  with  the  ways  that  patients  connect  with  words  and  respond  to  emotions,  many  people  have  created  stereo-­ types  for  the  autistic  commu-­ nity. “The  biggest  disor-­ der  isn’t  autism,  it’s  ignorance,â€?  said  Es-­ pinosa.  â€œThat’s  the  worst  disease  in  our  culture.â€? Espinosa’s  young-­ er  brother  has  autism.  He  says  having  a  fam-­ ily  member  with  autism  has  inspired  him  to  educate  the  public  about  the  cause.  Es-­ pinosa,  a  second-­year  Black  Stud-­ ies  and  sociology  major,  hopes  to  become  a  social  worker  and  help  families  who  have  children  with  developmental  disorders  such  as  autism.  The  program  wrapped  up  with  an  open  dis-­ cussion  led  by  Wright  and  several  other  club  members  of  MANU  and  BSU.  Along  with  causes  and  treatments,  the  way  that  society  views  the  autistic  community  was  discussed. “We  need  to  start  engaging  these  young  people  who  are  diagnosed  and  we’ll  realize  that  they’re  geniuses,â€?  said  Black  Studies  Ad-­ junct  Professor,  Kaba  Kamene. In  the  future,  MANU  and  BSU  will  hold  events  to  promote  awareness  for  other  causes,  said  Espinosa  and  Wright.  The  annual  Walk  Now  for  Autism  Speaks  will  be  held  in  New  York  City  on  June  5.  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF   UCP.ORG

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

Annie  Yu:  What  made  you  decide  to  come  to  New  Paltz? Zhen  Lin:  I’m  originally  from  Staten  Island,  N.Y.  My  mom  found  this  school  in  the  Kaplan’s  Top  25  Hottest  Small  State  Schools.  $W Âż UVW , ZDV UHOXFWDQW WR FRPH EXW ZKHQ , FDPH KHUH IRU DQ 2SHQ House,  I  instantly  fell  in  love  with  the  atmosphere.  The  scenery  is  really  nice  because  we’re  surrounded  by  forests,  trees  and  moun-­ tains. AY:  What’s  your  favorite  thing  about  New  Paltz? ZL:  My  favorite  thing  about  New  Paltz  is  just  the  fact  that  I  get  to  dorm  and  meet  new  people  and  interact  and  live  with  them.  There’s  QR RWKHU SODFH OLNH FROOHJH ZKHUH \RX FDQ H[SHULHQFH WKLV 7KHVH people  come  from  all  over,  different  states  and  different  regions  of  New  York,  and  I  get  to  learn  about  their  lifestyle  and  tell  them  my  own  story. AY:  Where’s  your  favorite  place  to  go  to  in  town? ZL:  The  Cocoon.  They  have  all  these  cute  little  accessories  that  you  can  buy  for  your  house  or  your  dorm.  It’s  everyday  necessities  that  The  Cocoon  makes  more  cute  and  fun.  They  make  very  unique  and  FUHDWLYH VKRW JODVVHV 2QH VSHFLÂż F VKRW JODVV KDG LQJUHGLHQWV RQ KRZ to  make  different  drinks.  I  haven’t  bought  anything  yet  but  I  like  to  just  keep  looking.  AY:  What’s  your  favorite  animal  and  why? ZL:  I  like  puppies  because  they’re  very  adorable  and  there’s  just  so  many  of  them.  They  are  there  to  cheer  you  up  when  you’re  feeling  down.  I  don’t  have  any,  but  I  would  like  some.  I  would  get  a  baby  corgi  and  name  it  Fluffy. AY:  Since  you’re  in  Jam  Asia,  are  you  the  guy  who  walks  around  in  the  panda  suit? ZL:  What  do  you  think?  Yup,  I’ve  been  in  the  panda  suit  from  time  to  time  but  recently,  I’ve  been  the  guy  who’s  been  recording  the  panda  around  campus.  Lynton  or  Kristine  are  usually  wearing  the  suit  now.  I  like  wearing  the  panda  suit  because  you  get  to  be  goofy  and  childish  and  just  have  fun.  The  only  downfall  of  the  suit  is  that  you  cannot  see  where  you’re  going. AY:  Let’s  say  you  graduate  in  2013,  which  is  in  two  years.  What  are  you  looking  forward  to  the  most  within  your  next  two  years? ZL: , KRSH WR H[SDQG P\ VRFLDO DQG SURIHVVLRQDO QHWZRUNV VR , FDQ get  more  internships.  I’m  hoping  to  work  behind  the  camera  at  an  HQWHUWDLQPHQW RU Âż OP 79 VWDWLRQ LQ 1HZ <RUN &LW\ , ZDQW WR PDNH PRUH YLGHRV RQ FDPSXV VR WKH\ FDQ EH SXW RQ WKH :13& 79 &KDQ nel:  comedies,  music  videos,  all  sorts  of  variety.


FEATURES | 5B

The New Paltz Oracle CLUB FEATURE

Club Donates to Literacy

HARRY POTTER THEMED ADVOCACY GROUP DUMBLEDORE’S ARMY COLLECTS BOOKS FOR A CAUSE By Debra Haimer Contributing Writer | Dhaimer92@newpaltz.edu

Dumbledore’s Army, SUNY New Paltz’s chapter of the international advocacy group, The Harry Potter Alliance, has begun work-­ ing on a fundraiser called Accio books in order to donate to the Bedford-­Stuyvesant New Beginnings Charter School in Brooklyn, N.Y., which opened in September without a library. “Harry Potter Alliance takes themes IURP +DUU\ 3RWWHU DQG XVHV WKHP WR ¿ JKW IRU themes such as literacy, which is why we are doing the book drive,” said Chapter Organiz-­ er Beverly Schreiber. Although Dumbledore’s Army set up boxes across campus, they will be going around to the residence halls until April 22 to collect books that didn’t make it into the boxes designed by club members to look like each of the Hogwarts houses. To publicize this

event, the club had a screening of the fan-­ made musical “A Very Potter Sequel,” a play by a theatre group from the University of Michigan based on the plot and characters of the Harry Potter books and movies. In ex-­ change for free pizza, students were encour-­ aged to bring a book to donate. Everyone at the screening shared a pas-­ sion for Harry Potter, but Schreiber takes the cake for being the most enthusiastic Harry Potter fan. She brought a complete Harry Pot-­ ter collection to New Paltz, including every book, movie and poster in the series that was displayed proudly on her side of the room. ³, UHDG WKH ¿ UVW +DUU\ 3RWWHU ERRN ZKHQ , was nine. For the next three years, I read one a year,” said Schreiber. Schreiber was inspired to create the chapter after entering a contest to win an autographed copy of the books on the Harry Potter Alliance website. Their overall mis-­ sion of “literacy, equality and human rights worldwide” moved her, and since then the club has been going strong. The club is not only for Harry Potter

fans but for people who want to make a dif-­ ference. “You don’t have to be a huge Harry Pot-­ ter fan to enjoy it,” said Nicole Brinkley, one RI WKH FOXE¶V SXEOLF UHODWLRQV RI¿ FHUV Brinkley originally was not going to join, but was introduced to it by her room-­ mate, Julia Fell, the club’s secretary. Although the Harry Potter Alliance is not widely known on campus, Dumbledore’s Army is attempting to change this. They have worked with Accio books as well as other clubs on campus like Fresh Water for De-­ veloping Nations and even created their own team for “Relay For Life.” “I didn’t know about the Harry Potter Al-­ liance until I came here…They do awe-­ some things, help people and incorporate Harry Potter into it,” said Jenna Ferremi, D ¿ UVW \HDU VWXGHQW Jimmy Farnworth, the Council of Orgs representa-­ tive for the club, said that although he was originally

drawn to the club for the Harry Potter part and the book discussions, he enjoyed getting involved around campus. “We were taking part in different events and doing things to help people,” said Farn-­ worth. “We start off the meetings with orga-­ nizing charity events and stuff, but there’s always fun things to do…It doesn’t have to be Harry Potter, clubs like this can happen with any common interest. Once you band together, you can create friendships and do good things.” Those interested in joining can bring their wizard hats, real or imagined, to Stu-­ dent Union 401/405 every Thursday from 8 to 9 p.m.

Photo courtesy of Flickr.com

Thursday, April 14, 2011


6B | FEATURES

The New Paltz Oracle

WORLD FEATURE

Radiation from Another Nation

LEAKED CHEMICALS FROM JAPAN’S DAMAGED REACTORS ARE DISCOVERED IN SEVERAL AREAS OF THE U.S. By Ryan McCormack Contributing Writer | Rmccormack62@newpaltz.edu

There may be a new danger in the United States as a result of the earthquake and ensuing tsunami that struck Japan on March 11. The events that devastated the country caused a severe ra-­ dioactive leak from the nuclear power plants in Japan. Small amounts of radiation have spread to the United States from Japan. According to the Associ-­ ated Press, trace amounts of radiation have been discovered in some parts of the United States including Washington, Massachusetts, Idaho, Nevada, California, Florida, Alaska, Ha-­ waii and Pennsylvania. While the small amount of radiation found in the United States is not considered “dangerous,” many wonder if the spread of nuclear materials can be contained. Iodine and Cesium radia-­ tion were discovered in Massa-­ chusetts. The radioisotope Io-­ GLQH ZDV ¿UVW GHWHFWHG RQ the West Coast and has moved East with the rain. Megan Ferguson, an as-­ sistant professor of chemistry, does not think exposure to these chemicals will be harm-­ ful. “Within a couple of months, danger from 131-­I exposure is completely minimal, and it’s getting smaller all the time,” said Ferguson. “This radioac-­ tive isotope was the primary compound released.” Iodine-­131 has a very short half-­life and is used in medical treatments here in the United States, according to the Associ-­ ated Press. Ferguson said she believes the real danger is Cesium-­137. “There has been some talk of Cesium-­137, which has a

much, much longer half life, around 30 years,” she said. “So it stays dangerous for a long time, and if it were to get spread around then the danger would be much more relevant.” Very low amounts of Ce-­ sium-­137 have been found in milk from Vermont, according to the Environmental Protec-­ tion Agency (EPA). The EPA does not believe that the Cesium-­137 is related to the Japan disaster. Even if it was, the amount is so small that it will not affect humans. Pamela St. John, an asso-­ ciate professor of chemistry, said that in order to prevent the radiation from spreading they need to isolate the reaction. “I believe they have had GLI¿FXOW\ GRLQJ WKLV EHFDXVH the containers are leaking from damage from the earthquake and because there is an enor-­ mous amount of heat being generated in the reactors,” said St. John. St. John does not expect harmful amounts of radiation to reach the United States. “There are the used fuel rods that contain products of the nuclear reaction. So, I don’t know if it’s possible to stop the reaction however, if the reac-­ tion is contained, it will no lon-­ ger be threatening,” she said. The extent of the Japanese radiation that made its way DFURVV WKH 3DFL¿F LV MXVW D SRU-­ tion of the amount of radiation Americans are exposed to ev-­ ery day, according to the Asso-­ ciated Press. While many wait to see what the crisis in Japan could have in store for the health of the planet, St. John believes the greatest effect this will have on Americans “will probably be the grief and sorrow felt for all of those suffering in Japan.”

Thursday, April 14, 2011


                    FEATURES  |  7B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle CAMPUS FEATURE

Settle Your Credit Score

FINANCIAL AID OFFICE AND HESC REPRESENTATIVE HOSTS DEBT WORKSHOP By  Jenna  Harris Contributing  Writer  |  Jharris34@newpaltz.edu

7KH )LQDQFLDO $LG 2I¿FH )$2 of  SUNY  New  Paltz  hosted  a  program  Wednesday,  April  6,  to  help  students  bal-­ DQFH WKHLU ¿QDQFHV The  program  focused  on  effective  budgeting,  the  ins  and  outs  of  student  loans,  how  to  avoid  identity  theft  and  the  GDQJHUV RI FUHGLW FDUGV 7KH )$2 HQOLVWHG the  help  of  Mary  Turner,  a  representative  from  the  Higher  Education  Services  Cor-­ SRUDWLRQ +(6& WR OHDG WKH SUHVHQWDWLRQ During  the  workshop,  students  re-­ ceived  their  own  one-­on-­one  session  with  7XUQHU DFFRUGLQJ WR &DPLOOH 6XFNLH D ¿-­ QDQFLDO DLG DGYLVRU DW 1HZ 3DOW] Turner  provided  tips  that  she  hoped  ZRXOG VDYH VWXGHQWV PRQH\ LQ WKH HQG Turner  began  by  stressing  the  ben-­ H¿WV RI EXGJHWLQJ PRQH\ )RU LQVWDQFH she  suggested  that  students  record  their  VSHQGLQJ LQ EODFN DQG ZKLWH 7KLV FDQ HLWKHU EH GRQH GDLO\ ZHHNO\ RU PRQWKO\

However,  Turner  said  the  more  often  VRPHRQH GRHV LW WKH PRUH EHQHÂżFLDO LW EHFRPHV “When  you  start  knowing  where  your  money  goes,  that’ll  make  a  difference,â€?  7XUQHU VDLG Turner  warned  heavily  against  using  credit  cards  as  well,  only  using  them  in  HPHUJHQF\ VLWXDWLRQV “If  you  can’t  pay  it  monthly,  is  that  [insert  object  of  interest  here]  really  ZRUWK LW"´ 7XUQHU VDLG Every  credit  card  has  an  interest  rate  DQG WKDW LQWHUHVW DGGV XS LQ WKH HQG 7XUQHU presented  a  scenario  where  an  individual  charged  $2,500  on  a  credit  card  that  had  D \HDUO\ LQWHUHVW UDWH RI SHUFHQW 6KH said  if  they  paid  $100  a  month,  it  would  take  them  nine  years  and  one  month  to  SD\ LW RII 7KDW RQH FKDUJH FRXOG IROORZ WKHP VKH VDLG Missing  the  monthly  payments  on  these  cards  could  do  some  damage  on  FUHGLW VFRUH &UHGLW VFRUHV FDQ UDQJH IURP

WR DFFRUGLQJ WR 7XUQHU $ JRRG credit  score  is  considered  anything  from  RU PRUH (YHU\ WLPH D SD\PHQW LV PLVVHG FUHGLW VFRUH FDQ GHFUHDVH 6KH advocated  those  wanting  to  check  their  credit  score  at  least  once  a  year  visit  www. annualcreditreport.com. Turner  informed  the  students  that  car  insurance  companies,  health  insurance  companies  and  many  other  agencies  use  a  person’s  credit  score  to  help  determine  WKHLU UDWH 7KH EHWWHU WKH FUHGLW VFRUH WKH more  money  a  person  can  save  overall,  VKH VDLG She  said  checking  credit  score  could  KHOS DYRLG LGHQWLW\ WKHIW DV ZHOO “You  can  check  if  anyone  is  signing  up  for  credit  cards,  or  loans  in  your  name  [when  you  check  your  score],â€?  Turner  VDLG Âł7KLV FDQ NHHS \RX RQ WRS RI IUDXG-­ ulent  claims  while  protecting  your  credit  VFRUH ´ In  addition,  Turner  touched  upon  re-­ SD\LQJ VWXGHQW ORDQV

“Pay  the  interest  while  you  are  in  VFKRRO ´ VKH VDLG Âł7KLV ZLOO VDYH \RX D tremendous  amount  of  money  in  the  long  UXQ <RX ZLOO DYRLG SD\LQJ LQWHUHVW RQ WRS RI \RXU LQWHUHVW ´ $V D ÂżQDQFLDO DLG DGYLVRU KHUH DW New  Paltz,  Suckie  deals  with  students  DQG WKHLU ORDQ LVVXHV IUHTXHQWO\ 6KH VHHV a  lot  of  students  borrow  money  without  knowing  the  difference  between  the  types  RI ORDQV 6KH EHOLHYHV WKDW WKLV ZRUNVKRS SURYLGHG WKH VWXGHQWV ZLWK WKH ÂżQDQFLDO VPDUWV WKH\ QHHG WR EH VXFFHVVIXO Âł'HÂżQLWHO\ LI \RX DUH WDNLQJ RQ DQ\ GHEW NQRZ WKH FRQGLWLRQV ´ 6XFNLH VDLG “A  lot  of  students  borrow  loans  and  do  QRW NQRZ WKH FRQGLWLRQV ´ Suckie  plans  on  continuing  this  ZRUNVKRS DW 1HZ 3DOW] QH[W IDOO 6KH VDLG she  hopes  more  students  will  attend  these  workshops  so  they  can  learn  about  these  WLSV LQ RUGHU IRU WKHP WR EH LQ JRRG ÂżQDQ-­ cial  standing  by  the  time  they  graduate  IURP FROOHJH

CLUB FEATURE

Get Educated or Get Confined STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS HOLD PROGRAM TO INFORM YOUNG MEN OF PRISON By  Kasey  Caminiti  Contributing  Writer  |  Kcaminiti@newpaltz.edu

La  Unidad  Latina  Lambda  Up-­ VLORQ /DPEGD IUDWHUQLW\ LQF /8/ cosponsored  with  Men  of  All  Na-­ WLRQV 8QLWHG 0$18 WR KRVW D program  in  the  Student  Union  titled  â€œYou  Chooseâ€?  on  April  6,  which  fo-­ cused  on  the  prison  systems  in  the  United  States  and  how  they  are  op-­ HUDWHG The  focus  of  this  program  was  on   younger  boys  from  a  group  home  and  emphasizing  the  importance  of  an  education  and  how  it  can  save  OLYHV At  â€œYou  Choose,â€?  fraternity Â

PHPEHUV VSRNH ZLWK D URRP ¿OOHG with  more  than  50  students  from  SUNY  New  Paltz  and  a  handful  of   boys  from  a  nearby  group  home  from  Kingston  about  how  education  FDQ WUXO\ WXUQ OLIH LQ D QHZ GLUHFWLRQ The  programs  guest  speaker,   Lawrence  Hayes,  an  ex-­Black  Pan-­ ther  who  was  convicted  and  sen-­ tenced  to  death  row,  came  to  speak  ZLWK WKH DGROHVFHQWV Hayes  shared  the  story  of  how  he  was  convicted  and  sentenced  to  the  death  penalty  but  was  let  out  after  having  served  20  years  because  the  death  sentence  in  New  York  was  out-­ ODZHG +D\HV VSHQW WZR DQG D KDOI

\HDUV LQ VROLWDU\ FRQÂżQHPHQW ZLWK no  human  contact  except  for  one  VLQJOH KDQG VKDNH In  order  to  demonstrate  how  part  of  his  experience  in  prison  was,  one  student  attending  the  program  was  sent  to  a  separate  room  for  15  min-­ XWHV +H FDPH RXW DQG VDLG KH KDG wished  he  could  have  been  out  of  the  URRP DV VRRQ DV KH ZDV SXW LQ LW One  of  the  topics  discussed  at  the  program  was  about  how  prison  VHQWHQFHV IRU PLQRULWLHV VSHFLÂżFDOO\ African  Americans,  are  10  percent  longer  than  sentences  for  people  of  D GLIIHUHQW UDFH This  is  a  reality  minorities  face Â

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

every  day  when  convicted  of  a  FULPH VDLG D 0$18 UHSUHVHQWDWLYH They  reiterated  in  many  ways  that  it  was  ultimately  up  to  the  individual  to  determine,  at  the  end  of  the  day,  whether  or  not  they  want  to  acquire  an  education  to  have  a  better  life-­ VW\OH Jose  Mohr,  president  of  the  LUL  fraternity,  said  it  is  up  to  the  indi-­ vidual   to  make  the  choice  to  be  the  better  person  and  not  succumb  to  YLROHQFH “They’re  not  killing  us,  we  are  NLOOLQJ HDFK RWKHU ´ 0RKU VDLG Âł:H get  thrown  against  the  wall,  but  at  the  HQG RI WKH GD\ ZH PDNH WKH FKRLFH ´


 8B  |  FEATURES

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

CLUB FEATURE

Bolstering Battery Sustainability

RECYCLING CLUB TRADES DONUTS FOR ELECTRONIC DISPOSAL EDUCATION By  Katie  Kocijanski Staff  Writer  |  Kkocijanski14@newpaltz.edu

Situated  outside  the  Humanities  build-­ ing,  the  Recycling  Club  continued  their  sustainability  mission  last  Thursday,  April  7.   After  the  success  of  RecycleMania,  they  are  moving  onto  educating  the  student  body  about  a  largely  unknown  issue:  how  to  recycle  electronics.  They  began  their  mission  with  â€œDonuts  for  Batteries.â€?  According  to  Dana  Moss,  public  rela-­ WLRQV RIÂżFHU IRU WKH 5HF\FOLQJ &OXE UHF\-­ cling  electronics  is  an  issue  most  people  are  unaware  of.  According  to  Moss,  most  people  do  not  know  how  to  recycle  their  old  cell  phone  or  car  batteries.  â€œIt’s  important  to  become  aware  of  where  you  can  recycle  these  batteries,â€?  said  Moss.  Â

Members  of  the  club  were  offering  free  Dunkin  Donuts  to  anyone  on  campus  who  would  sign  the  recycling  electronics  sustainability  pledge.  After  signing  the  re-­ cycling  electronics  sustainability  pledge,  students  were  asked  to  take  pictures  with  their  pledge  in  hand.  Lauren  Brois,  president  and  recycling  coordinator  of  the  Recycling  Club,  said  that  the  club  decided  to  hand  out  donuts  because  they  were  â€œmore  appealing  and  the  table  was  set  up  right  next  to  Jazzman’s.â€?  According  to  Brois,  a  lot  of  people  stopped  by  their  table  in  between  classes.  Most  people  were  not  aware  of  how  to  re-­ cycle  batteries  and  how  big  of  an  issue  it  was.  By  the  end  of  the  day,  more  than  100  people  had  signed  their  pledge. These  photos  will  be  posted  on  the  New  Paltz  Recycles  Facebook  page.

Informational  material  was  available  for  all  students  at  the  table  as  well.  Accord-­ ing  to  the  material  provided  by  the  club,  â€œBatteries  are  easily  recycled,  and  it  is  im-­ portant  to  recycle  them  because  they  con-­ tain  heavy  metals  and  toxic  chemicals.â€?  Car  batteries  can  be  grinded,  have  their  acid  neutralized  and  have  polymers  sepa-­ rated  from  the  lead  in  them.  The  Recycling  Club  informational  material  provides  stu-­ dents  with  places  that  provide  these  servic-­ es  for  free  such  as  Autozone  and  Advanced  Auto  Parts  in  New  Paltz.  Regular  dry  cell  batteries  can  be  recycled  in  stores  such  as  %HVW %X\ DQG 2IÂżFH 'HSRW Martin  Duffy,  a  Recyling  Club  mem-­ ber,  said  regular  batteries  are  permanently  dead  because  of  the  electrochemical  reac-­ tion  that  takes  place. There  was  also  a  pamphlet  distributed Â

by  the  Recycling  Club  that  educated  stu-­ dents  about  the  composition  of  the  typical  consumer  electric  battery.  Duffy  said  students  were  not  aware  of  the  amount  of  material  in  the  batteries.  For  example,  in  all  Energizer  and  Duracell  batteries,  the  electrodes  are  made  of  man-­ ganese-­oxide  with  an  alkaline  electrode.  Mercury  is  also  present  in  many  types  of  batteries.  â€œWe  have  set  up  bins  to  recycle  batter-­ ies  in  all  the  residence  halls  in  the  RA’s  of-­ ÂżFH ´ VDLG .HOO\ 'UXPPRQG YLFH SUHVLGHQW of  the  Recycling  Club.  The  Recycling  Club  will  be  collecting  batteries  again  at  the  Earth  Day  Carnival  on  Friday,  April  22.  They  meet  every  Monday  at  7  p.m.  in  Student  Union  402.  For  more  information  please  visit  their  blog  at:  http:// greenthinking.newpaltz.edu. Â

Crocetti  hopes  to  strengthen  the  bond  between  the  community  and  students.      PHOTO  BY  MAXIM  ALTER

'RADUATEüSOONERüWITHü&,## Sü SUMMERüCLASSES Take a step toward your future. Did you know that you can get ahead on your degree with a class or two at FLCC this summer? While you’re home for the summer, get a few electives out of the way! FLCC summer classes start May 31. Learn more about financial aid options and check out the class schedule by visiting www.flcc.edu/summer, or call 585.785.1000.

Thursday,  April  14,  2011


ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT Â | Â 9B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

STUDENT FEATURE

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Little Monsters and Free Hugs

STUDENT DANIEL SANGIACOMO MAKES CERAMIC SCULPTURES TO CREATE SOCIAL CHANGE by  a  stranger  is  a  unique  experience  on  its  own.  There  is  noth-­ ing  ordinary  about  being  given  a  ceramic  monster  and  For  his  class  Ceramic  Objects  as  Multiples,  second-­year  getting  a  warm  embrace  from  someone  who’s  name  transfer  BFA  student  Daniel  Sangiacomo  and  his  classmates  were  you  don’t  even  know.â€? Sangiacomo  said  a  lot  of  his  inspiration  assigned  to  create  100  small  ceramic  objects  and  install  them  in  a  for  the  project  came  from  MFA  student  Ruth  space.  Burket,  who  is  working  on  her  senior  thesis  Sangiacomo  chose  to  install  the  art  of  hugging.  After  deciding  to  make  100  â€œhug  monsters,â€?  representational  DQG XVLQJ FHUDPLFV LQ DQ HIIRUW WR LQĂ€ XHQFH FHUDPLF Âż JXUHV RI SHRSOH ZLWK WKHLU DUPV RXW 6DQJLDFRPR GLVWULE some  type  of  social  change.  For  his  next  project,  Sangiacomo  will  XWHG RI WKH SHUVRQLÂż HG ÂłPRQVWHUV´ LQ WKH OREE\ RI WKH 6RMRXUQHU be  using  action  ceramics  to  spread  aware-­ Truth  Library  and  67  in  the  Atrium.  Inspired  by  the  â€œsmall  word  experiment,â€?  Sangiacomo  attached  a  note  to  the  hug  monster,  which  ness  of  the  herpes  virus.  With  a  ceramic  DVNHG VWUDQJHUV WR JLYH HDFK Âż JXUH WR D SHUVRQ Âł ZLWK D KXJ ´ PRVW rendition  of  the  herpes  virus,  Sangiacomo  likely  to  know  somebody  in  the  Ceramic  Objects  as  Multiples  class  aims  to  interact  with  people  and  destroy  the  negative  connotations  with  herpes  by  â€œhanding  by  March  17,  the  day  of  the  installation.  â€œThe  art  was  the  passing  and  the  interaction  between  people,â€?  out  the  herpes  virus.â€?  â€œGenital  herpes,  the  virus  affects  the  same  way  said  Sangiacomo.  â€œThe  object  was  required  but  it  wasn’t  the  focus.  and  is  more  than  half  similar  to  oral  herpes  or  cold  sores  or  So  by  installing  in  the  social  space,  the  objective  of  the  project  was  fever  blisters  which  I  guess  in  today’s  society,  there’s  not  as  much  to  create  ceramic  objects  as  a  tool  for  positive  social  change.â€?   Out  of  100  hug  monsters,  17  hug  monsters  made  it  back  to  as  a  stigma  attached  to  cold  sores.  But  genital  herpes,  there  is  a  lot,â€?  he  said. home  base  on  March  17.  The  objective  of  his  next  project  is  to  deconstruct  the  social  â€œIf  you  think  about  it,  most  people  that  I  spoke  to,  the  hug  mon-­ stigma  and  misconceptions  attached  to  genital  herpes,  something  he  ster  passed  through  about  three  people.  So,  I’m  responsible  for  like  45  hugs,â€?  said  Sangiacomo.  â€œI  really  wanted  the  project  to  be  fun  believes  is  just  â€œa  manageable  skin  rash.â€? “I  am  going  to  be  giving  out  ceramic  necklaces  that  are  ex-­ so  that  people  would  interact  with  it  so  that  people  could  commit  to  tremely  beautiful,â€?  he  said.  â€œI  am  going  to  encourage  them  to  wear  the  project  or  involve  themselves  in  the  project.  The  objective  was  to  put  more  hugs  in  the  world,  to  be  the  reason  that  people  hugged  the  necklace  because  herpes  is  not  something  to  be  ashamed  of.  It’s  something  that  you  can  wear,  you  can  have,  you  can  tell  people  and  each  other  that  day.â€?  it’s  not  a  problem.â€? Second-­year  student  Alexis  Tellefsen,  who  is  in  the  Aside  from  encouraging  people  to  wear  the  â€œher-­ class,  said  a  stranger  gave  her  a  hug  monster  while  SHV´ QHFNODFH 6DQJLDFRPR DOVR KRSHV WR LQĂ€ XHQFH she  was  installing  her  own  piece  in  front  of  the  dialogue  a nd  i nteract  w ith  t he  p eople  t hat  p artici-­ library.  When  the  stranger  asked  her  if  she  was  pate  in  his  project. a  ceramics  student,  she  thought  he  was  going  to  â€œI  hope  to  draw  [people]  in  with  this  ask  her  about  the  ceramic  levels  she  was  plac-­ beautiful  object  and  through  this  beauti-­ ing  in  the  grass.  Instead  he  presented  her  with  ful  object,  I  can  educate  them  and  de-­ a  hug  monster.  construct  the  social  stigma  attached  â€œI  couldn’t  help  but  giggle  because  I  to  herpes  and  include  education-­ didn’t  have  much  faith  in  the  general  pub-­ al  material  in  a  very  cohesive  lic  to  take  the  effort  to  return  the  monsters  way,â€?  he  said.  to  ceramics  students  and  he  seemed  to  be  Sangiacomo  will  equally  happy  to  participate  in  Dani’s  begin  his  next  proj-­ piece,â€?  she  said.  â€œSo  I  took  the  hug  ect  at  the  end  of  this  monster  and  he  offered  me  a  hug  semester  in  front  of  â€˜to  make  it  legit’  and  went  on  his  the  Lecture  Center.  way.â€? For  more  information  Tellefsen  said  she  was  re-­ about  Sangiacomo’s  ally  excited  about  being  given  a  art,  go  to  danielsangi-­ hug  monster.  acomo.blogspot.com.                  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  DANIEL  SANGIACOMO “I  think  that  being  hugged  News  Editor  |  Pvivanco57@newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

RUTH BURKET Â Â MFA Â GRADUATE Â STUDENT

After  a  year  of  research  for  her  senior  thesis,  MFA  graduate  student  Ruth  Burket  found  that  feelings  of  LQVLJQLÂż FDQFH DQG VKRFN OHDG people  to  refrain  from  social  action.  Using  pollination  as  the  metaphor,  Burket  aims  to  depict  how  people’s  actions  can  LQĂ€ XHQFH JURZWK “I  started  to  think,  how  could  we  DGGUHVV GLIÂż FXOW VRFLDO LVVXHV LQ D SRVLWLYH way,  in  a  way  that  doesn’t  necessarily  shock  people?  Because  at  least  in  my  case  when  I’m  shocked  or  overwhelmed,  it  just  makes  me  want  to  walk  away  and  feel  like  I  can’t  do  anything,â€?  she  said.  â€œSo  I  was  like  what  is  it  that  motivates  people  to  do  action,  to  do  something  about  the  problems  in  the  world?â€? Burket  will  begin  the  installation  of  her  thesis  on  April  25  by  giving  tiles  she  created  to  a  few  of  her  friends.  Inside  will  be  a  word  of  encouragement  and  LQVWUXFWLRQV RQ ZKDW WR GR QH[W 7KH WLOHVÂś Âż QDO GHVWL nation  will  be  in  front  of  the  Sojourner  Truth  Library  ZKHUH %XUNHW ZLOO EH GXULQJ VSHFLÂż F KRXUV HYHU\ GD\ until  May  20.  After  500  tiles,  Burket  said  the  individual  tiles  will  function  like  pixels  to  form  a  larger  image  so  WKDW LQGLYLGXDOV FDQ YLVXDOO\ VHH WKH VLJQLÂż FDQFH RI their  actions. “Each  one  of  these  tiles  for  me  represents  that  it’s  kind  of  small  and  it  doesn’t  seem  like  much  when  LWÂśV E\ LWVHOI 7KH LGHD LV WKDW LW VHHPV LQVLJQLÂż FDQW EXW WKH FXPXODWLYH HIIHFW RI DOO RI RXU LQVLJQLÂż FDQW DFWLRQV and  words  is  actually  monumental,â€?  she  said.  â€œOur  words  are  kind  of  like  this  pollination  that  is  encourag-­ ing  growth  and  the  spreading  of  something  good  and  beautiful.â€? By  the  end  of  the  installation,  Burket  said  she  hopes  to  inspire  dialogues  about  issues  and  what  moti-­ vates  people  to  engage  in  action  or  activism.  The  social  art  project  relies  on  the  people’s  involvement  for  its  success.  In  order  to  get  involved,  participants  must  get  in  contact  with  Burket  or  go  to  cumulousprojects.com WR Âż QG RXW ZKDW WR GR QH[W

                 PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  RUTH  BURKET

By  Pamela  Vivanco


10B Â | Â ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

CAMPUS FEATURE

Collaborative Ceramics SUCCESSFUL DUO, KLEINREID, COME TO SUNY NEW PALTZ CAMPUS TO PRESENT TO ART STUDENTS

By  Molly  Hoarty Contributing  Writer  |  Molly.hoarty07@newpaltz.edu

In  1993,  two  high  school  friends  turned  college  art  majors  made  the  move  after  graduate  school  from  their  hometown  of  Ak-­ ron,  Ohio  to  the  Big  Apple.  The  pair  decided  to  make  ceramic  piec-­ es  at  night  in  their  small,  low-­tech  studio  using  a  borrowed  wheel  and  an  olive  barrel  as  a  makeshift  slip  cast  vat.  They  were  broke,  but  they  said  they  chose  to  do  it  anyway.  Eighteen  years  later,  the  duo  of  James  Klein  and  David  Reid  DUH WU\LQJ WR ZRUN WKHLU ZD\ LQWR WKH ÂżHOG RI FRQWHPSRUDU\ VWXGLR SRWWHU\ ZLWK WKHLU ÂżUP .OHLQ5HLG 7KHLU ZRUN LV KLJKO\ VRXJKW DI-­ WHU DQG LQĂ€XHQWLDO RQ KRPH GpFRU Despite  the  success  of  their  business,  Klein  and  Reid  have  only  one  desire:  To  create  pieces  they  love.   And  that’s  exactly  what  they  hoped  SUNY  New  Paltz  art  stu-­ dents  would  take  away  from  their  presentation  of  their  work  during  the  Art  Seminar  Course  on  Wednesday,  April  6.  â€œThe  most  meaningful  aspect  of  what  we  do  is  coming  up  with  an  idea  and  making  it  into  art,â€?  Klein  said.  â€œBusiness  is  just  necessary.â€? Klein  and  Reid  showed  their  collections  from  as  early  as  graduate  work  from  New  York  State  College  of  Ceramics  at  Al-­ fred  University  in  Alfred,  N.Y.,  and  Cranbrook  Academy  of  Art  in  %ORRPÂżHOG +LOOV 0LFK UHVSHFWLYHO\ WR WKHLU PRVW UHFHQW FROOHF-­ tions,  a  line  of  Japanese  Kokeshi  dolls  and  rustic  relief  tiles.   Their  presentation  also  showcased  their  works  for  prestigious  GHVLJQ ÂżUPV VXFK DV +HUPDQ 0LOOHU DQG 'DQVN DQG WKHLU FROODER-­

ration  with  ceramics  legend  Eva  Zeisel,  who  Klein  and  Reid  idol-­ ize.   The  pair  approached  Zeisel  in  1999  to  ask  to  collaborate  with  her,  and  a  friendship  and  working  relationship  was  born.  The  day  DIWHU WKHLU ÂżUVW PHHWLQJ WKH\ VDW RQ KHU SRUFK DW KHU XSVWDWH FRXQWU\ KRPH DQG FXW SDSHU VLOKRXHWWHV DQG VKDSHV IRU LQVSLUDWLRQ 7KH\ ÂżW and  stacked  these  shapes  together  to  create  whole  new  shapes  for  their  16  piece  â€œEvaâ€?  collection,  which  is  still  one  of  KleinReid’s  most  popular  lines  in  production.   2WKHU VKRZFDVHG FROOHFWLRQV LQFOXGHG Âł+\EULG ´ LQGXVWULDO meets  an  aquatic  set  of  wares  comprised  of  cylindrical  tubes.  The  Oscar  Wilde-­inspired  â€œStill  Lifeâ€?  collection  of  slip  cast  objects  in-­ cluding  apples,  vases  and  books,  is  a  marriage  of  vintage  shapes  ZLWK D PRGHUQ IHHO 7KH FROOHFWLRQ RI YDVHV ZLWK KHDY\ Ă€RZHU GH-­ WDLOLQJ ZDV EDVHG RII RI :LOGHÂśV VWRU\ Âł7KH 6HOÂżVK *LDQW ´ KleinReid  also  creates  jewelry  and  silk-­screen  prints. Students  were  able  to  ask  questions  after  the  presentation  and  inquired  about  the  duo’s  collaboration  process.   â€œI’m  more  of  a  shape  person,  while  David  comes  up  with  ideas  and  concepts,â€?  said  Klein.  â€œIndividually  we’re  half  interest-­ ed,  but  together  we  make  one  very  interested  person.â€? This  combined  approach  is  what  struck  Jessica  Shada,  a  trans-­ fer  student  majoring  in  photography.  She  said  she  feels  it’s  helpful  for  artists  to  work  with  someone  else  in  order  to  receive  criticisms.   Shada  said  she  also  loved  the  old  meets  new  vibe  of  the  â€œStill  OLIH´ FROOHFWLRQ EHFDXVH LW UHĂ€HFWV KHU RZQ DUWLVWLF VW\OH 6KH WRRN away  an  important  message  from  the  lecture. “I  liked  that  they  believed  in  not  marketing  for  anyone,  but  in Â

3+272 &2857(6< 2) PATCHNYC.COM

Some  of  KleinReid’s  ceramics.

just  making  great  art,â€?  said  Shada. KleinReid  has  been  featured  in  many  design  and  home  maga-­ zines,  including  Elle  DĂŠcor  and  Wallpaper  Magazine.  Their  work  has  been  shown  in  many  gallery  and  museum  exhibitions,  and  has  even  been  featured  on  movie  and  television  sets,  including  The  To-­ night  Show  with  Jay  Leno.   But  press  is  just  part  of  the  business  for  KleinReid.  â€œIt’s  much  more  meaningful  when  someone  comes  up  to  us  and  tells  us  they  love  and  collect  our  work,â€?  said  Reid.  â€œIt’s  those  personal  moments  that  are  the  most  rewarding.â€? Â

STUDENT FEATURE

Behind the Curtain with Cayla Morganstern

STUDENT ARTIST PREPARES FOR SENIOR SHOW USING VOYEURISTIC APPROACH WITH PHOTOGRAPHY

By  John  Brandi

Copy  Editor  |  Jbrandi02@newpaltz.edu

You’re  walking  down  the  street  at  night  and  you  see  a  shadow  glide  across  some-­ RQHÂśV ÂżIWK VWRU\ DSDUWPHQW ZLQGRZ 7KHUHÂśV an  intriguing  and  mysterious  element  asso-­ ciated  with  that  faceless,  nameless  shadow  and  fourth-­year  photography  major  Cayla  0RUJDQVWHUQ LV WU\LQJ WR LQFRUSRUDWH WKDW into  her  artistic  work.  0RUJDQVWHUQ LV FXUUHQWO\ ZRUNLQJ RQ her  senior  art  show.  She  wants  the  viewer  to  feel  like  a  â€œvoyeur,â€?  peering  into  the  daily  and  sometimes  mundane  tasks  performed  LQ SHRSOHÂśV OLYHV 0RUJDQVWHUQ LV XVLQJ SKR-­ tographic  stills  and  video,  both  two  very  different  mediums  in  terms  of  motion,  and  reconciling  them  with  â€œelectronic  logistics.â€?  Â

)RU KHU SURMHFW VKH LV WDNLQJ SKRWR VWLOOV of  apartment  buildings  at  night  with  lights  on,  appearing  to  have  a  glow,  and  printing  them  out.  She  then  cuts  them  into  four  and  they  ultimately  resemble  white  windows.  6KH FRQWLQXHV E\ ÂżOPLQJ SHRSOHÂśV VKDGRZV behind  a  curtain  doing  certain  tasks,  like  IROGLQJ ODXQGU\ RU VLSSLQJ ZLQH )LQDOO\ WKH two  pieces  will  be  put  together  by  projecting  video  onto  the  photographs,  where  the  white  SKRWRJUDSKLF ZLQGRZV ZLOO EH ÂżOOHG ZLWK WKHVH VKDGRZ\ ÂżJXUHV “[It’s]  not  a  play,  it’ll  be  like  walking  down  the  street  and  this  is  what  I  would  see,â€?  she  said.  She  said  people  have  compared  it  to  the  movie  â€œRear  Windowâ€?  but  â€œstaying  away  from  the  dramatic  Jimmy  Stewart  scenes.â€? Â

Two  of  her  favorites  in  her  collection  include  one  of  a  couple  slow  dancing,  which  she  calls  precious,  and  the  other  is  a  shadow  of  a  woman  holding  a  wine  glass.  She  drew  from  its  meaning  that  the  person  looks  lone-­ ly  and  is  waiting  for  someone,  describing  it  as  a  â€œhidden  story.â€?  She  said  she  is  ready  to  graduate  but  as  for  being  prepared,  that’s  another  story.  She  hopes  to  attend  graduate  school  for  her  masters  in  art  education,  and  she  has  a  few  interviews  lined  up  for  that.  â€œ[I’m  a]  bad  artist  in  a  sense  that  I  QHHG VHFXULW\ QHHG VRPHWKLQJ ´ VDLG 0RU-­ ganstern.  0RUJDQVWHUQÂśV DUW VKRZ VWDUWV 0D\ DQG UXQV XQWLO 0D\ 7KH RSHQLQJ QLJKW reception  is  from  5  to  7  p.m. Â

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

3+272 %< &$</$ 025*$167(51


ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT Â | Â 11B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle THEATRE FEATURE

Stage Set for New and Old Playwrights

NEW PALTZ PLAY FESTIVAL DISPLAYS EIGHT TO 10-MINUTE PLAYS AND THREE ONE ACTS IN PARKER THEATRE Copy  Editor  |  Rachel.freeman17@newpaltz.edu

Students  and  local  playwrights  joined  forces  this  past  weekend  on  April  8,  9  and  10  when  they  put  on  the  New  Play  Festival  in  Parker  Theater.  The  festival  was  comprised  of  11  performances,  eight  10  minute  plays  and  three  one  acts,  written  by  students  and  locals  and  completely  student  run. Members  of  the  Department  of  Theatre  Arts  decided  to  hold  the  festival  because  they  wanted  to  introduce  the  idea  of  new  plays  and  their  importance  to  theater,  said  Assistant  Theatre  Arts  professor  Nancy  Saklad. Saklad  was  the  chair  of  the  committee  working  on  the  festival,  which  also  included  head  of  playwriting  Larry  Carr,  artistic  director  Robert  Miller,  John  Bray  -­  who  led  the  talk  backs  after  the  plays  -­  and  stage  manager  Gail  Rice.  The  committee  solicited  for  plays  last  fall  and  met  over  winter  break  to  discuss  which  plays  they  would  choose. The  committee  received  about  70  submissions  from  playwrights  located  between  Albany  and  Westchester.  While  some  plays  came  from  prior  playwriting  classes  with  Carr,  others  were  sent  by  playwrights  in  the  area.  Before  the  com-­ mittee  read  through  the  submissions,  Carr  weeded  out  a  few.  If  he  hadn’t,  they  â€œwould  still  be  reading  plays,â€?  Saklad  said. The  competitive  decision  process  involved  ratings  and  discussions  from  the  committee. “We  sat  down  and  we  rated  the  plays  and  we  talked  to  one  another  about  them,â€?  Saklad  said.  â€œWe  looked  at  the  overall  ratings  and  said  what  can  we  do  if  we  have  this  se-­ lection  of  plays.â€? Luckily,  the  committee  tended  to  agree  on  which  plays  deserved  to  be  chosen  and  which  still  needed  work. “It’s  interesting,  plays  kind  of  rise  to  the  surface  if  they’re  worth  their  weight  in  salt,â€?  Saklad  said.  â€œThere  were  a  couple  of  them  that  we  all  went  â€˜these  are  really  good,’  and  then  there  were  a  whole  bunch  that  we  said  â€˜these  have  some  promise,’  and  there  were  others  that  we  said  â€˜these  are  abstract  ideas,  not  yet  drama.’â€? When  the  committee  concluded  the  selection  pro-­ cess,  they  ended  up  with  an  evening  of  eight  to  10  minute  plays  on  Friday,  a  matinee  of  the  same  plays  and  a  night  performance  of  the  one  acts  on  Saturday  and  another Â

evening  of  the  one  acts  on  Sunday. According  to  Saklad,   the  selection  of  plays  was  ex-­ tremely  varied,  with  some  being  very  serious  and  others  very  funny. “They’re  as  unique  as  the  writer’s  voices  are  them-­ selves,â€?  she  said. Local  and  longtime  playwright  Mary  Gallagher  had  her  comedic  play  â€œAndre  the  Sealâ€?  featured  in  the  festival.  Her  play  was  about  a  woman  screenwriter  desperately  trying  to  JHW WKH MRE RI ZULWLQJ ZKDW PD\ EH WKH Âż QDO 79 PRYLH 7KH screenwriter  hates  pitching  ideas,  but  ends  up  turning  a  â€œsad,  personal  memory  into  a  perfectly  structured,  perfectly  pho-­ Q\ 79 PRYLH VWRU\ ´ While  Gallagher  was  unable  to  attend  the  perfor-­ mances  due  to  illness,  she  had  previously  met  with  the  director  and  actresses  and  felt  assured  they  could  handle  the  play. “I  thought  they  all  understood  the  play  very  well  and  ZHUH VPDUW WDOHQWHG SHRSOH VR , IHOW FRQÂż GHQW WKDW WKH\ would  do  well  with  it,â€?  Gallagher  said. Another  playwright  whose  piece  was  selected  and  per-­ formed  was  third-­year  English  major  Annette  Storckman.  Her  play,  titled  â€œAssumptions,â€?  was  about  a  lonely  girl  who  falls  in  love  with  another  girl  in  a  bear  suit.  Storck-­ man  developed  this  idea  after  working  as  the  promotional  Mando  Books  bear  for  an  hour.  During  her  time  in  the  EHDU FRVWXPH VKH ZDV ³À LSSHG RII´ E\ PDQ\ JX\V and  realized  it  was  because  they  thought  it  was  another  guy  under  the  bear  suit.  She  then  decided  to  play  with  gender  as-­ sumptions,  as  well  as  comedy  in  her  play. Storckman  had  taken  a  few  of  Carr’s  classes  previously,  and  saw  the  New  Play  Festival  as  her  way  to  start  get-­ ting  produced.  She Â

was  thrilled  when  she  found  out  her  play  got  in,  especially  considering  the  number  of  submissions.  Her  enthusiasm  was  enhanced  after  the  actual  performance. “I  think  my  play  was  very  well  received.  I  was  relieved  to  hear  the  audience  laugh  at  my  jokes,  and  Rachel  and  Ally  were  phenomenal,â€?  Storckman  said.  â€œThere  were  also  a  few  mentions  of  it  at  the  talk  backs  we  had  after  the  performanc-­ es,  which  was  gratifying‌nice  to  know  it  was  remembered!â€? With  a  total  of  350  audience  members  over  the  course  of  the  weekend,  Saklad  believes  the  festival  was  a  huge  success  and  plans  to  present  a  new  fes-­ tival  in  2013. “New  plays  are  the  life  blood  of  the  theatre,â€?  Saklad  said.  â€œWe  are  proud  to  pro-­ vide  opportunities  for  fresh  voices.â€?

PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â AMANDA Â SCOTT

By  Rachel  Freeman

Thursday,  April  14,  2011


12B | ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The New Paltz Oracle

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

Labor of Love in the Valley

PROFESSOR SCREENS ART THERAPY DOCUMENTARY, ‘CHANGING IDENTITIES’ By Rachel Freeman &RS\ (GLWRU _ Rachel.freeman17@newpaltz.edu

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Thursday, April 14, 2011


ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT Â | Â 13B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle MOVIE REVIEW

A Love Letter to the Haunted House

WAN & WHANNELL’S ‘INSIDIOUS’ PAYS HOMAGE TO CLASSIC FORMULA

LQWR DQ LQH[SOLFDEOH FRPD WKH SDUHQWVÂś SDLQ LV ZHOO the  tradition  of  â€œThe  Amityville  Horror,â€?  showing  received  and  sympathized.   how  each  person  is  affected  by  the  haunting.  Sure,  &RS\ (GLWRU _ Katherine.speller79@newpaltz.edu 7KHUHÂśV WLPH VSHQW ZLWK HDFK IDPLO\ PHPEHU LQ WKH VFDUHV DUHQÂśW DOO WKDW LQQRYDWLYH PDNLQJ XVH RI D I  had  several  reasons  to  hate  â€œInsidiousâ€?  be-­ baby  monitor,  a  creepy  attic  and  playing  on  the  fear  fore  seeing  it.  First  and  foremost,  it  came  from  the  RI ZKDWÂśV JRLQJ RQ LQ WKH FRUQHU RI \RXU H\H EXW WKH same  writer/director  team  that  created  the  â€œSawâ€?  DFWRUÂśV UHVSRQVH WR WKH WHUURU VHOOV LW ,WÂśV DQ ROG VWRU\ franchise.  I  tend  to  think  of  James  Wan  and  Leigh  told  in  the  right  way. Whannell  as  the  people  who  murdered  the  hor-­ $QRWKHU WKLQJ WKH Âż OP GRHV ULJKW LV LQMHFW ror  genre  for  me  since  they  are  the  architects  ing  an  odd  and  subtle  humor  into  the  piece;Íž  of  the  torture  porn  movement  that  attempts  WKLV LVQÂśW D GU\ DQG OLIHOHVV VWULQJ RI VFDUHV to  call  three  hours  of  corn-­syrup  and  Rube  0DNLQJ LW IXQQ\ PDGH WKH Âż OP PRUH DFFHV *ROGEHUJ PXUGHU PDFKLQHV D Âż OP &RP VLEOH DQG PRUH Ă€ XLG ,W GLGQÂśW WDNH LWVHOI WRR ing  from  the  same  directors  and  the  pro-­ VHULRXVO\ 0DQ\ RI WKH VHFRQG DFWÂśV JUHDW ducers  of  the  â€œParanormal  Activityâ€?  moments  took  place  when  the  myth  ¿ OPV , ZDVQÂśW VXUH ZKDW , ZDV H[SHFW buster-­esque  ghost  busters  played  by  a  ing.  The  minimalist  scare  tactics  and  spectacled  Whannel  and  a  scruff-­tastic  IRXQG Âż OP VKWLFN DUH WLULQJ DQG XQLQ and  hilarious  Angus  Sampson  arrived;Íž  spiring  to  me  at  this  point,  so  men-­ WKDWÂśV ZKHQ WKH EDQWHU DQG OLIH LV LQWUR WLRQLQJ WKDW WKH Âż OP ZDV IURP WKH GXFHG :KLOH WKHUHÂśV VWLOO D FUHHS IDF VDPH FUHDWRUV ZDVQÂśW JLYLQJ PH DQ\ tor,  the  scenes  become  so  much  more  more  interest  in  watching  it.  organic  and  entertaining.  %XW ,ÂśOO JLYH WKHP WKLV WKH Âż OP This  humor  is  also  there  in  the  mu-­ PDNHUÂśV ORYH IRU WKH KDXQWHG KRXVH sic.  The  creepy  ukelele  song  â€œTip  Toe  ¿ OP LV DSSDUHQW DQG WKLV DIIHFWLRQ 7KUXÂś 7KH 7XOLSV :LWK 0H´ E\ 7LQ\ ate  play  on  the  old  themes  certainly  Tim  plays  once  in  a  scene  featuring  a  UHGHHPV :DQ DQG :KDQQHO 7KH Âż OP rambunctious  little  ghost  boy  and  again  in  pays  homage  to  the  classics  from  the  D VFHQH ZLWK D Âż UH IDFHG GHPRQ DQG VRPH carefully  plotted  family  dynamic,  the  KRZ , VWLOO FDQÂśW OLVWHQ WR WKH IXOO VRQJ ZLWK seemingly  clichĂŠd  three  acts  (the  initial  out  cringing.  haunting,  the  scare  from  the  premises  and  7KH RQO\ WKLQJ , FRXOGÂśYH GRQH ZLWKRXW WKH Âż QDO VKRZGRZQ LQ WKH RWKHU UHDOP ZDV WKH WLWOH DQG HQG VHTXHQFH Ă€ DVKLQJ WKH the  screeching  crescendo  of  violins  pre-­ word  â€œInsidiousâ€?  in  blood  red  while  blasting  scare  and  the  â€œthe  end‌or  is  it?â€?  ending. some  screeching  violins.  That  was  kind  of  un-­ 3DWULFN :LOVRQ Âł:DWFKPHQ´ DQG 5RVH necessary. %\UQH Âł :HHNV /DWHU´ OHDG WKH FDVW DV WKH $W LWV EHVW WKLV Âż OP LV D PRGHUQ KDXQWHG KRXVH SDUHQWV RI D KDXQWHG ER\ 7KH Âż UVW KDOI RI WKH Âż OP IRO story  told  by  the  geeks  who  grew  up  loving  the  genre.  ORZV WKH WUDGLWLRQDO Âľ V KDXQWHG KRXVH Ă€ LFNÂśV EXLOG 7KHUHÂśV D ORW RI ORYH LQ WKLV PRYLH WKDW QHYHU FRPHV up.  There  are  strategically  slow  camera  movements,  off  as  parody  or  a  rip-­off. eerie  violin  music  and  layer  after  layer  of  thick  ten-­ sion  warning  the  audience  that  shit  will  eventually  go  down.  Wilson  and  Byrne  make  their  characters  easy  to  FDUH IRU DQG WKDWÂśV KDOI WKH EDWWOH IRU D KRUURU Âż OP that  relies  on  emotional  trauma  rather  than  blunt  force  trauma.  The  couple  is  young,  working  through  the  stressful  move  to  a  new  house  while  raising  three  small  children  and  taking  care  of  their  own  careers.  When  their  oldest  son  Dalton  7\ 6LPSNLQV VOLSV 3+272 &2857(6< 2)  By  Katherine  Speller

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Thursday,  April  14,  2011


14B Â | Â ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â MUZORAMA.BLOGSPOT.COM Â Â

MUSIC REVIEW

Fleet Foxes Are Far From Helpless NEWEST ALBUM STICKS TO CAMPFIREY ROOTS OF SEATTLE-BASED BAND, WARMING HEARTS OF ALL

By  Zan  Strumfeld A&E  Editor  |  Sstrumfeld34@newpaltz.edu

The  newest  Fleet  Foxes  al-­ bum,  Helplessness  Blues,  was  recently  leaked  on  the  Internet,  available  for  all  who  dare  to  download.  Although  it  won’t  be  RIÂż FLDOO\ UHOHDVHG XQWLO 0D\ this  album  is  worth  the  down-­ loading  risk.  Why?  Because  it  sounds  like  Fleet  Foxes.  7KH JURXSÂśV Âż UVW DOEXP ÂśV VHOI WLWOHG UHOHDVH was  an  easy  addiction;Íž  the  perfect  all-­weather  adven-­ ture,  especially  with  the  crisp  smell  of  Autumn.  With  a  harmony  of  angels,  a  ragged,  wooded  sound  and  such  ridiculously  hairy  beards,  it  was  an  inescapable  album  to Â

VRRWKH D PRXQWDLQ PDQÂśV FDPSÂż UH\ KHDUW And  now,  three  years  later,  it  is  safe  to  say  that  Fleet  Foxes  have  done  it  again  â€“  they  have  not  lost  their  sound,  and  hardly  even  changed  it  for  that  matter.  You  may  be  saying,  â€œWell,  screw  that!â€?  â€˜cause,  you  know,  musicians  in  the  same  genre  are  trying  new  things  these  days.  Iron  &  Wine  recently  came  out  with  Kiss  Each  Other  Clean  and  Sufjan  Stevens  released  The  Age  of  Adz,  which  were  both  more  electronic  and  huge  leaps  from  their  original  VRXQGV 0D\EH )OHHW )R[HV KDV WKLV LQ PLQG IRU ODWHU RQ but  right  now,  they  really  know  how  to  keep  that  nostal-­ gic  feeling.  And  really,  that’s  all  I  ever  wanted. The  same  ole’  beautiful  and  intricate  guitar  works  are  emphasized  in  tracks  like  â€œBedouin  Dressâ€?  and  the  all-­instrumental,  â€œThe  Cascades.â€?  Frontman  Robin  Pecknold’s  vocals  are  both  haunting  and  heartbreak-­ ing,  smoothing  perfectly  into  the  creases  of  the  songs. Â

Pecknold  even  sounds  older  vocally,  which  adds  to  the  roughness  of  the  album;Íž  there  is  one  particular  high  note  that  he  cracks  on  in  â€œThe  Shrine/An  Argumentâ€?  that  gets  me  every  time.  It  just  sounds  so  right. Each  song  tells  its  own  story,  all  pushing  poetically  through  lyrics  like,  â€œThen  the  Earth  shook,  that  was  all  that  it  took  for  the  dream  to  break/  All  the  loose  ends  would  surround  me  again  in  the  shape  of  your  faceâ€?  from  â€œSim  Sala  Bim.â€?  â€œBattery  Kinzieâ€?  is  very  chant-­ like,  with  its  chorus  repeating  â€œWide-­eyed  walker/  Do  not  wander,â€?  which  is  very  reminiscent  of  â€œWhite  Winter  Hymnalâ€?  off  of  Fleet  Foxes.  There’s  not  much  more  to  say.  This  album,  like  the  last,  is  easily  addicting  and  perfect  for  the  beginning  of  spring.  So  strap  on  your  overalls  and  let  these  sly  foxes  take  you  away.

THE STORY OF YOUR LIFE’S TUESDAY AFTERNOONS, 4 to 6 P.M. with dj ALLI

1. “RISE TO ME� - THE DECEMBERISTS 2. “SIX DAYS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN� - EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY

3. “CHASING IT DOWN� - MOTHER MOTHER 4. “THE WORDS I NEVER SAID� - LUPE FIASCO 5. “TWILIGHT� - ELLIOTT SMITh

TOP TEN

6. “DOWN� - BUFFALO TOM 7. “I wish� - eisley 8. “ALL MY BEST FRIENDS ARE METALHEADS� - LESS THAN JAKE 9. “whirring� - the joy formidable 10. “i know you know� - empires

Thursday,  April  14,  2011


ARTS Â & Â ENTERTAINMENT Â | Â 15B Â

The  New  Paltz  Oracle MUSIC REVIEW

Foo Fighters Still Fulfilling BAND UNLEASHES ‘WASTING LIGHT’ AND SHINES WITH GROWTH IN SOUND

By  Ken  Glauber Staff  Writer  |  Kglauber01@newpaltz.edu

A  lot  of  peo-­ ple  get  scared  whenever  the  Foo  Fighters  re-­ lease  something  new.  Could  this  possibly  be  the  album  where  the  legendary  Dave  Grohl  slips  up?  Will  Grohl  ever  put  something  out  that  will  spoil  his  near-­perfect  resume?  If  you’re  waiting  for  Grohl  to  screw  up  and  release  something  less  than  preferable,  you’ll  be  waiting  forever,  or  another  few  years  at  the  least.  Wasting  Light  is  even  more  than  just  another  score  for  Grohl  and  the  Foos. The  album  rocks  like  it’s  1995  â€”  literally.  Recorded  entirely  with  analog  equipment  at  Grohl’s  house,  the  record-­ ing  scenario  allows  the  band  to  forge  a  sound  reminiscent  of  the  grunge  era  while  showcasing  the  Foo  Fighter’s  incredible  growth  and  unity  as  a  band.  Oh  yeah,  and  Butch  Vig  produced  it.  Vig,  who  produced  Nirvana’s  Nevermind  and  The  Smashing  Pumpkins’  Siamese  Dream,  is  one  of  the  pioneers  of  the  grunge  guitar  sound  that  is  so  prominent  on  this  album,  and  every  rock  album  between  about  1991  and  1996.  A  lot  of  focus  has  been  put  on  the  use  of  analog  equipment  for  the  album.   The  most  important  thing  to  know  about  analog  is  that  it  does  not  allow  the  mu-­ VLFLDQ WR Âż [ WKHLU PLVWDNHV OLNH WKH\ FDQ with  modern  production  technology.   This  puts  all  sorts  of  pressure  on  the  mu-­ sicians  to  be  perfect  and  learn  to  achieve  the  sound  they  want  by  rigorous  practice  instead  of  using  the  safety  net  of  Pro  Tools.   Ironically,  their  use  of  analog,  a  technique  known  to  produce  scrappy  and  desirably  messy  sounding  albums,  has  turned  the  Foo  Fighters  into  rock  â€˜n  roll  machines,  sounding  tighter  than  ever  on  this  record.   After  reaching  what  seems  like  the  peak  of  any  band’s  career,  playing  to  over  80,000  people  at  Wimbledon,  the  Foo  )LJKWHUV PDGH VXUH WKH QH[W UHFRUGLQJ ZRXOG EH UHOD[HG DQG SURYLGH WKHP ZLWK a  clean  slate  to  create  whatever  sound  they  needed  to.   In  contrast  to  2007’s Â

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK:

Emily Murphy

YEAR: Fourth MAJOR: Piano Performance and Contemporary Music HOMETOWN: Nicholville, N.Y.

What  is  your  instrument  of  choice?  Why? PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  TICKETEVENTS.WORDPRESS.COM

Foo  Fighters’  newest  release,  Wasting  Light PL[HV TXDQWLWLHV RI GHSWK GDUN DQG OLJKW Echoes,  Silence,  Patience  &  Grace,  which  was  grandiose  and  broad,  perfect  for  an  epic  arena  rock  band  to  play  all  over  the  world,  Wasting  Light  is  more  straightforward  hard  rock.  7KH WRQH LV XQLÂż HG EXW WKHUH DUH VRXQGV LQWHUPL[HG WKDW UHPLQG WKH OLV tener  of  other  hard  rock  legends.   Certain  tracks  like  â€œArlandriaâ€?  sound  like  a  Josh  Homme-­less  Queens  of  the  Stone  Age  song,  whereas  â€œWhite  Limoâ€?  has  the  scratchier,  screamy,  scalding  sound  of  a  Refused  song.  Many  of  the  songs  seem  to  sit  on  the  perfect  kind  of  middle  ground  between  a  hard-­hitting  headbanging  Nir-­ vana  song,  and  a  softer-­but-­still-­hard  and  melodic  Foo  Fighters  song.  Grohl  sings  accordingly,  busting  out  the  soft,  on-­the-­road-­to-­ballad  tone  for  songs  like  â€œThese  Days,â€?  and  â€œWalk,â€?  while  keep-­ ing  the  hardcore  signature  Grohl  scream  for  tracks  like  â€œWhite  Limo.â€?  A  new  addition  to  the  vocal  prowess,  a  sort  of  FURRQLQJ UHĂ€ HFWLYH EOXHV\ WRQH LV XVHG in  â€œI  Should  Have  Known,â€?  where  Grohl  sings  â€œI  should  have  known,  I’ve  been  here  before,  I  should  have  known,  don’t  want  it  anymore.  One  thing  is  for  certain,  I’m  still  standing  here,  I  should  have  known.â€?  The  album’s  balance  between  the  Foo  Fighters’  signature  ballads  and  their  well-­developed  hard  rock  sound  is  some-­ where  along  the  lines  of  mind-­blowing.   Tracks  that  start  as  a  classic  headbanging  riff  crunching  over  loud  drums,  will  turn  to  a  soft,  slowly  building  verse  that  sets Â

itself  up  for  an  epic  return  to  the  loud,  clashing  chorus  of  harmonizing  vocals  and  power  chords.  Also  present  is  their  undeniable  ability  to  produce  fan  favor-­ ites  that  double  as  hits.  Every  song  on  the  album  could  make  it  onto  Billboard’s  Top  10,  but  they  each  have  a  depth  and  personality  that  can  only  be  found  in  Grohl’s  genius  head.  If  you’re  going  to  be  a  snob,  you  could  point  out  that  the  album  still  sounds  won-­ derfully  mastered  and  clean,  somewhat  defeating  the  purpose  of  recording  on  analog  to  simulate  an  old  school  sound.   You’d  be  right.   There’s  no  doubt  that  the  Foo  Fighters  could  have  duplicated  the  sound  with  several  different  studio  tricks  and  techniques,  but  it’s  the  thought  that  counts  here.  By  taking  themselves  out  of  the  traditional  studio  and  abandoning  the  safety  of  Pro  Tools  and  other  modern  production  software,  the  Foo  Fighters  al-­ lowed  themselves  to  get  in  the  stripped-­ down,  retro  mindset.   The  boys  succeed  in  creating  a  less  epic  and  more  rocking  sound  that  reminds  listeners  of  Grohl’s  edgier  early  work  with  the  Foo  Fighters,  while  bringing  a  new  sophisticated  qual-­ ity  that  only  hard-­working  modern  rock  legends  possess.  While  it  doesn’t  intro-­ duce  a  new  Grohl  that  no  one  has  ever  seen  before,  the  subtle  growth  in  sound  provides  the  Foo  Fighters  with  a  proud  QHZ UHFRUG WKDW VDWLVÂż HV DOO RI WKHLU FUL WHULD ZKLOH PL[LQJ GLIIHUHQW TXDQWLWLHV RI depth,  dark  and  light.  Â

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

Piano.  I’ve  always  liked  it  and  I’m  obsessed  with  it.  I  started  playing  in  seventh  grade.  I  WULHG WHDFKLQJ P\VHOI DW Âż UVW DQG WKHQ , VWDUWHG taking  lessons.  Who  are  you  currently  listening  to? My  senior  recital  is  coming  up  so  I’m  listening  to  a  lot  of  who  I’m  playing:  Brahms,  Debussy.   Matthew  Good  too,  he’s  Canadian. :KR DUH \RXU PDLQ LQĂ€ XHQFHV" My  piano  teachers  that  I’ve  had.  My  teacher  here  has  totally  changed  the  way  I  play.  I  saw  Hiromi  a  few  weeks  ago  and  it  was  so  inspir-­ ing.  It  made  me  either  want  to  quit  or  practice  more.   What  do  you  do  with  music  on/off-­campus? I  play  clarinet  in  the  symphonic  band  and  piano  in  a  chamber  ensemble.  I  also  work  as  D FKXUFK RUJDQLVW $QG , KDYH Âż YH VWXGHQWV LQ Highland  Falls.  I  have  a  senior  recital  on  Sat-­ urday,  May  7  at  1  p.m. What  will  you  do  with  your  degree? I  applied  to  grad  school  for  music  education.  I  got  into  Crane  to  be  a  band  teacher.  I’d  like  to  continue  teaching  piano  privately  and  just  get  better  and  better  at  piano.  I’d  like  to  teach  high  school  and  eventually  college  level.

Check  out  video  of  Emily  Murphy playing  piano  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu  or  scan  the  QR  code  with  a  free  app  on  any  smartphone!


16B | THE DEEP END

The New Paltz Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END HANNAH VAN RAVENSWAAY

Major: BFA in Painting Year: Fourth “I try to focus on the intensity of the colors and the beauty in life. The people that surround me inspire me.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF HANNAH VAN RAVENSWAAY, CAPTION BY LAURA LUENGAS


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SAVING

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:LWK D FXUUHQW UHFRUG RI WKH 1HZ 3DOW] 7HQQLV WHDP LV KRSLQJ WR Âż QLVK WKH Âż QDO WKUHH JDPHV LQ WKHLU VSULQJ VHDVRQ testament  to  the  team’s  continued  conditioning  than  any  of  us  expected...the  wins  have  been  By  Katie  Kocijanski  programs  during  their  offseason.  tons  of  fun,â€?  Schara  said. Staff  Writer  |  Kkocijanski14@newpaltz.edu Over  the  course  of  the  team’s  remaining  Schara  also  pointed  out  high  points  of  the  With  a  current  record  of  13-­4,  the  New  Paltz  matches,  Bruley  said  he  hopes  they  can  contin-­ season  so  far,  including  the  senior  match  she  7HQQLV WHDP LV KRSLQJ WR Âż QLVK WKH Âż QDO WKUHH ue  to  improve  on  their  recently  played  with  matches  in  their  spring  season  and  compete  in  double’s  playing  and  Garyn.  the  NCAA  Division  III  Women’s  Tennis  Cham-­ that  Mother  Nature  â€œI  couldn’t  have  pionships  in  May.  will  allow  the  team  to  asked  for  anything  Head  Coach  Robert  Bruley  believes  their  practice  on  the  courts  better  and  the  team  spring  season  has  been  a  lot  tougher  than  the  more  often.  was  nice  enough  to  RQH WKH\ Âż QLVKHG WKLV IDOO GXH LQ SDUW WR WKH Their  goal  now  is  decorate  the  courts  for  non-­conference  games  against  private  schools  to  make  it  through  one  Lindsey  and  I,â€?  Schara  the  Hawks  have  faced.  round  at  the  champi-­ said.  Despite  the  season  being  tougher  on  the  onships,  and  Bruley  Bruley  and  Schara  girls,  Bruley  said  he  believes  it  has  been  a  suc-­ said  the  tournament  said  the  team’s  main  cessful  season  thus  far  and  that  fourth-­year  will  be  very  tough  and  goals  heading  forward  /LQGVH\ *DU\Q DQG Âż UVW \HDU 3DLJH 0XQURH extremely  competi-­ DUH WR Âż QLVK WKHLU GXDO have  stood  out  among  the  team.   tive.  match  season  as  strong  â€œThe  team  is  very  small  and  a  very  tight-­ Team  captain  and  as  possible  and  get  knit  group,â€?  Coach  Bruley  said.  fourth-­year  Stephanie  through  a  round  at  the  Bruley  said  the  team  is  supportive  of  one  Schara  believes  that  NCAA  national  cham-­ another  and  socialize  both  on  and  off  the  court.  tennis  is  a  sport  of  ex-­ pionships.  He  said  he  has  been  continually  impressed  by  SHULHQFH DQG Âż WQHVV PRUH VR WKDQ PDQ\ RWKHUV “It  would  be  an  amazing  cap  to  my  four  the  maintenance  the  girls  have  exhibited  with  and  the  girls  haven’t  stopped  improving.  years  here  as  well  as  a  motivator  for  future  WKHLU Âż WQHVV OHYHOV VRPHWKLQJ KH EHOLHYHV LV D “I  think  the  season  is  going  much  better  teams.  I  don’t  worry  about  the  team  working Â

“Playing  high  quality  teams  also  really  helped  strengthen  us  for  the  rest  of  the  season  â€?  â€”  Paige  Munroe

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â STOCKTON Â PHOTO

hard  to  achieve  anything.  They  all  run  and  play  almost  every  day,â€?  Schara  said.  Second-­year  player  Kayla  DiPaulo  also  be-­ lieves  their  season  is  going  well  so  far.  â€œWe  got  a  great  start  during  spring  break  in  Florida  where  we  won  three  out  of  our  four  matches  ...  We  all  generally  have  a  positive  at-­ titude  before  going  out  onto  the  court  and  never  give  up,â€?  DiPaulo  said.  Having  a  positive  attitude  is  something  Di-­ Paulo  believes  is  key  to  their  success.  She  said  the  team  hopes  to  achieve  their  goal  of  not  los-­ ing  another  match  by  continuing  to  dedicate  themselves  to  practicing  in  order  to  continue  their  success.  Munroe,  who  Bruley  said  has  had  a  strong  ¿ UVW VHDVRQ IRU WKH +DZNV VDLG WKH WHDPÂśV VWDUW in  Florida  helped  them  prepare  for  matches  that  followed  and  the  recent  tournament  at  MIT  showcased  how  strong  the  Hawks  are.   â€œPlaying  high  quality  teams  also  really  helped  strengthen  us  for  the  rest  of  the  season,â€?  Munroe  said.  The  Hawks  will  continue  their  season  by  playing  Ithaca  College  on  April  15.


Pg 16

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

New  Paltz  Catches  The  Heat

3+2726 &2857(6< 2) FLICKR.COM

1RZ WKDW 0DMRU /HDJXH %DVHEDOO KDV EHJXQ IDQV LQ 1HZ 3DOW] DUH EHJLQQLQJ WR VKRZ WKHLU VSLULW

By  David  Spiegel Staff  Writer  |  David.spiegel98@newpaltz.edu

Spring  has  sprung,  and  that  means  baseball  fever  has  hit  New  Paltz.  Stu-­ dents  around  campus  are  showing  off  their  pride  by  wearing  shirts,  caps,  jer-­ seys  and  anything  else  that  may  have  their  teams  colors  and  logo  on  it. Already  two  weeks  into  baseball  season,  New  Paltz  students  are  still  riding  high  on  the  thrill  of  a  fresh  start.  Yankee  fans  around  campus  said  they  DUH FRQÂż GHQW ZKLOH 0HWVÂś IDQV VWLOO EH lieve  and  everyone  is  getting  in  each  RWKHUÂśV IDFHV DERXW ZKLFK WHDP LV EHW ter.  All  winter  long,  fans  waited  to  see  what  kind  of  moves  their  teams  would  make  and  tried  to  get  a  feel  for  how  well  their  team  may  perform.  Third-­ year  psychology  major  Josh  Weiss  from  Brooklyn,  N.Y.,  said  that  al-­ WKRXJK KLV 0HWV GLG QRW DFTXLUH PDQ\ big  names,  he  is  happy  with  some  of  the  players  that  they  dropped,  such  as  second  baseman  Luis  Castillo.  Weiss  said  he  is  hoping  for  the  best  this  season,  but  expecting  the  worst.  +H EHOLHYHV WKH 0HWV KDYH WKH WDOHQW to  make  the  playoffs  this  year  even  though  many  do  not  expect  them  to Â

even  have  a  winning  record. Both  Weiss  and  his  roommate,  Jus-­ tin  Goodman,  a  third-­year  psychology  major  from  Long  Beach,  N.Y.,  are  very  excited  about  the  new  season.  Weiss  sees  it  as  a  distraction  from  homework,  while  Goodman  is  looking  forward  to  enjoying  games  in  the  summer  heat  with  a  hot  dog  and  a  cold  beer. Goodman,  a  Yankee  fan,  expects  the  Bombers  to  be  competitive  all  year  and  compete  for  their  28th  World  Se-­ ries.  When  asked  if  he  is  optimistic,  he  UHVSRQGHG Âł0RUH WKDQ D 5HG 6R[ IDQ should  be  right  now.â€?  Another  Yankee  fan,  Jason  Zan-­ fordino,  a  third-­year  psychology  major  from  Nanuet,  N.Y.,  could  not  be  more  excited  for  the  brand  new  season.  He  believes  the  Yankees  are  â€œout  for  bloodâ€?  this  year  after  falling  short  last  season.  Baseball  is  special  to  him  be-­ cause  it  has  always  been  a  way  for  him  to  connect  with  his  family  and  friends.  The  Yankees  have  always  been  a  big  part  of  his  life,  and  he  says  their  win-­ ning  culture  has  always  brought  him  happiness  throughout  the  spring,  sum-­ mer  and  fall.  I  myself  am  a  huge  Yankee  and  baseball  fan.  This  is  the  time  of  year Â

where  I  lose  focus  on  homework  to  FKHFN P\ IDQWDV\ WHDP Ă€ LFN WKURXJK the  channels  to  see  which  games  are  on  and  get  the  sudden  urge  to  go  out-­ VLGH DQG WKURZ D EDOO DURXQG 7KH Âż UVW few  weeks  always  remind  me  of  that  ¿ UVW JDPH , ZHQW WR ZKHQ , ZDV MXVW D kid  and  just  the  overall  feeling  of  ex-­ citement  I  get  when  I  see  the  Yankees  win.  I  am  one  of  those  rare  cases  where  my  brother  and  I  are  Yankee  fans,  but  P\ IDWKHU LV D OLIHORQJ 0HW IDQ 0DQ\ <DQNHH DQG 0HW IDQV KDWH WKH RWKHU

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

New  York  team,  but  in  my  situation,  it  is  tough  to  have  any  hatred  toward  WKH 0HWV , PD\ SRNH IXQ DW WKHP IURP time  to  time,  but  I  have  plenty  of  re-­ VSHFW IRU WKH 0HWV DQG WKHLU IDQV Once  the  summer  begins,  base-­ ball  will  be  the  only  major  sport  being  played  in  America.  According  to  some,  no  one  needs  to  force  New  Paltz  stu-­ GHQWV WR ZDWFK EDVHEDOO 7KH UHDO TXHV tion  is:  how  excited  will  everyone  be  if  football  season  begins?

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pg 17

SPORTS

Bennett  Brings  It

Brittany  Bennett  is  a  captain  of  the  Women’s  Lacrosse  team  and  is  hoping  to  help  the  Hawks  land  a  spot  in  the  SUNYAC  tournament. Â

By  Jennifer  Von  Willer  Staff  Writer  |  Jvonwiller76@newpaltz.edu

A  smiling  Brittany  Bennett,  22,  of  Smithtown,  N.Y.  seems  ready  for  winning  or  losing.  But  of  course,  winning  is  more  fun  for  her.  Bennett,  the  captain  of  both  the  Wom-­ en’s  Lacrosse  and  Women’s  Soccer  teams  at  SUNY  New  Paltz,  said  she  aims  to  beat  as  many  SUNYAC  teams  this  season  to  make  the  2011  SUNY  Athletic  Conference  play-­ offs.   The  Hawks  currently  have  a  5-­5  record. She  said  she’s  enjoying  the  season  so  IDU GHVSLWH D GLIÂż FXOW VHDVRQ DW WKH ODVW 68 NYAC. “We  just  lost  a  couple  of  games  and  SU-­ NYAC  is  one  of  the  toughest  [conferences]  in  the  region,â€?  Bennett  said.  â€œSUNY  Cort-­

land,  Geneseo  and  Buffalo  are  very  good  WHDPV DQG ZHÂśUH GHÂż QLWHO\ WU\LQJ WR VKRZ people  how  we  can  keep  up  with  them.â€? Bennett  is  a  fourth-­year  secondary  edu-­ cation  major  concentrating  in  earth  science.  She  said  she  will  be  staying  an  extra  semes-­ ter  to  complete  her  student  teacher  training  next  fall  but  said  many  years  of  hard  work  have  paved  the  way  for  where  she  is  today. “I  started  playing  soccer  when  I  was  two  and  a  half,  three  years  old  and  I  actu-­ ally  started  playing  lacrosse  because  I  didn’t  want  to  run  cross-­country  in  eighth  grade,â€?  she  said.  ,Q KHU Âż QDO \HDU %HQQHWW VDLG VKH FDQ see  differences  in  the  team  this  year  than  in  year’s  past.   â€œI  think  we  made  a  lot  of  improvements Â

in  the  past  three  years.  There  are  giant  leaps  from  years  before  because  we  keep  getting  new  recruits  and  we  keep  getting  better  and  better,â€?  she  said.  Bennett,  who  has  been  playing  lacrosse  since  her  second  year,  won  the  team  MVP  award  in  2009.  She  said  she  used  to  practice  almost  six  days  a  week,  but  sometimes  it  changes  if  there  are  games  on  Saturday.  As  a  leader,  she  tries  to  keep  her  20  teammates  focused  and  motivated.  â€œI’ve  always  been  a  competitor  and  hated  losing  so  I  guess  the  way  I  personally  deal  with  it  is  to  make  myself  better  and  try  to  internalize  that  anger  and  frustration  espe-­ cially  since  I’m  a  leader  on  the  team,â€?   Ben-­ nett  said.  â€œI  don’t  really  want  to  show  that  especially  to  the  younger  players.  I  want  to Â

PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â STOCKTON Â PHOTO

lead  by  example  and  be  as  positive  as  pos-­ sible.â€?  Bennett  sees  herself  as  a  leader  and  a  captain,  and  with  leadership  comes  a  few  special  qualities. “I  think  one  of  the  most  important  things  I’ve  learned  is  to  be  aware  that  a  lot  of  people  are  looking  to  you  being  an  example  and  a  lot  of  eyes  are  watching  you,â€?  Bennett  VDLG Âł<RX GHÂż QLWHO\ KDYH WR EH VWURQJ DQG positive.â€? Although  the  Hawks  recently  lost  Satur-­ day’s  game  against  SUNY  Brockport,  Ben-­ nett  is  still  a  proud  player  and  proud  of  her  team’s  hard  work.   The  next  game  is  on  April  14  against  Mount  Saint  Vincent  College  at  4:30  p.m. Â

DelGaudio  Dishes  Out  New  School  Record  By  Devon  Pope Staff  Writer  |  Dpope69@newpaltz.edu

Samantha  DelGaudio,  a  third-­year  attack  player  on  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  Women’s  La-­ crosse  team,  set  the  programs  all-­time  record  for  career  points  reaching  113  on  March  30  in  a  loss  to  the  University  of  Scranton. DelGaudio,  from  Northport,  N.Y.,  has  been  on  the  team  since  her  freshman  year  when  the  program  was  restarted  after  its  retrench-­ PHQW LQ ,Q WKH\ Âż QLVKHG DQG ODVW \HDU WKH\ Âż QLVKHG This  year,  however,  their  record  is  5-­5.  As  the  team  has  improved,  head  coach  Heather  Semelmacher  said  DelGaudio  has  matured  as  well.

“As  a  freshmen,  Sam  was  more  timid  and  couldn’t  stand  alone,â€?  Semelmacher  said.  â€œShe  has  gotten  more  mature  and  now  the  pack  fol-­ lows  her.â€? Semelmacher  knew  DelGaudio  was  a  special  player,  even  when  she  recruited  her  in  2008. “I  didn’t  know  she  would  set  a  school  re-­ cord,  but  I’m  not  surprised  in  the  least  bit  that  she  did,â€?  Semelmacher  said.  â€œI  could  tell  that  she  has  that  in  her.â€? DelGaudio  played  basketball  and  lacrosse  growing  up.  Her  high  school,  Northport  High  School,  was  a  lacrosse  power-­house,  so  she  was  only  able  to  start  on  the  team  in  her  senior  year.  She  credits  her  high  school  coach,  Carol  Rose, Â

as  her  biggest  motivation. “She  forced  us  to  give  100  percent,â€?  Del-­ Gaudio  said.  â€œShe  was  very  intimidating,  but  she  made  me  the  type  of  player  that  I  am  today.â€? DelGaudio  chose  to  come  to  SUNY  New  Paltz  because  she  was  able  to  play  on  both  the   Women’s  Basketball  and  Lacrosse  teams.  â€œI  really  just  enjoy  playing  sports,â€?  Del-­ Gaudio  said.  â€œSo  I  really  just  came  here  to  have  fun.â€? DelGaudio  loves  the  atmosphere  the  team  has  had  in  her  three  years  here.  Even  when  they  were  losing,  they  were  a  close  knit  family  and  still  are. +HU IDYRULWH WHDPPDWH RQ WKH Âż HOG LV -XOLD 'RQDWR D WKLUG \HDU PLGÂż HOGHU

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

“She  is  a  very  aggressive  player  and  does  everything  well  that  I  don’t  do  good,â€?  DelGau-­ dio  said.  â€œWe  mesh  really  well  together.â€? DelGaudio  is  not  a  captain,  but  she  feels  that  she  is  a  leader  and  would  love  to  become  a  captain  next  season. “I  think  I  already  am  a  leader  and  can  help  this  team  win,â€?  DelGaudio  said.  â€œMy  team-­ mates  listen  to  me.â€? Semelmacher  sees  the  same  qualities  in  DelGaudio. “Sam  is  very  passionate  about  the  game  and  this  program,â€?  Semelmacher  said.  â€œShe  has  improved  greatly  and  turned  into  a  leader,  and  her  hard  work  has  resulted  in  her  all-­time  record.â€?


Pg 18

So,  how  about  them  Mets?  The  team’s  2011  season  is  a  mere  11  games  old;Íž  however,  it  has  already  been  an  emotional  roller  coaster,  teasing  fans  with  glimpses  of  greatness  and  haunting  them  with  peeks  into  the  past.  The  season  started  off  on  the  wrong  foot  when  the  Marlins  beat  the  Mets  on  Opening  Day,  essentially  taking  a  pin  and  popping  the  tangible  bubble  of  optimism  and  yearning  for  better  days  that  ballooned  over  camp  coming  out  of  spring  training.  While  this  was  only  one  game,  and  arguably  the  least  important  game  of  the  entire  season,  the  ORVV GHĂ€ DWHG DQ\ VHPEODQFH RI KRSH WKH PHGLD was  feeding  to  fans.  Luckily,  the  Mets  responded  by  winning  their  next  two  games  and  headed  up  to  arch-­rival  Philadelphia  with  a  series  win  and  renewed  sense  of  purpose.  As  we  know,  the  Phillies  series  did  not  go  well.  After  Chris  Young’s  dominant  Mets  debut,  the  Mets  went  on  to  lose  the  next  two  games  in  embarrassing  and  disheartening  fashion.  These  losses  again  planted  the  seed  of  doubt  into  the  minds  of  Mets  fans.  Losing  the  next  series  against  Washington  didn’t  help  matters,  and  the  losses  highlighted  a  PDMRU Ă€ DZ LQ WKH WHDPÂśV URVWHU 7KH EXOOSHQ ZKDW was  once  considered  a  dark  horse  candidate  for  a  team’s  strength,  has  imploded  so  far  this  season.  0HWV VWDUWHUV KDYH DYHUDJHG MXVW RYHU Âż YH LQQLQJV per  start  and  as  such,  the  bullpen  has  been  taxed.  The  Mets  pen  has  been  overworked  and  has  under-­performed  in  the  innings  they  have  been  used  in,  prompting  General  Manager  Sandy  Alderson  to  shake  things  up  with  hopes  of  new  faces  being  able  to  stabilize  the  teetering  group  of  hurlers.  Blaine  Boyer,  who  pitched  well  over  spring  training  and  won  a  job  coming  out  of  camp,  was  designated  for  assignment  for  being  essentially  useless  and  ineffective  in  every  outing  he  has  SLWFKHG 7R Âż OO KLV VSRW RQ WKH URVWHU $OGHUVRQ

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Panic  On  The  Streets  of  Queens

If  the  Mets  are  not  contending  as  the  trade  deadline  approaches,  the  team  might  look  to  trade  Jose  Reyes. Â

called  former  Met  Jason  Isringhausen.  Izzy  has  not  been  in  a  Mets  uniform  for  years  and  the  hope  is  that  Isringhausen’s  veteran  leadership  will  be  a  positive  in  the  clubhouse.  In  his  Mets  debut,  Izzy  was  spotless  and  hopefully  that  was  a  sign  of  things  to  come.  Surprisingly,  Alderson  also  chose  to  call  up  Japanese  reliever  Ryota  Igarashi.  You  might  remember  Igarashi  from  last  season’s  disas-­ trous  pen,  where  he  was  banished  to  AAA  along  with  his  overpriced  contract.  However,  Iggy  has  pitched  well  so  far  in  Buffalo  and  should  not  be  on  the  roster  for  very  long  as  the  Mets  will  be  searching  for  someone  to  send  down  come  Sun-­ day.  The  Mets  are  currently  in  the  midst  of  a  se-­ ries  with  the  Colorado  Rockies  and  if  the  Mets  are  unable  to  turn  their  season  around  quickly,  the  clouds  could  gather  quickly  over  Citi  Field.  Veteran  players  such  as  Carlos  Beltran,  Francisco  Rodriguez  and  even  Jose  Reyes  could  become  prime  trade  targets  should  the  Mets  be  out  of  contention  around  the  July  31  trade  dead-­ line.  If  the  Mets  are  able  to  trade  their  overpriced  veterans  for  a  decent  package  of  prospects  and  players,  it  should  be  taken  very  seriously.  Just  off  the  top  of  my  head,  Jose  Reyes  ending  up  in  Beantown  would  make  a  lot  of  sense  for  both  teams. Maybe  all  this  doom  and  gloom  is  a  little  premature  as  the  season  is  still  very  young,  but  as  Met  fans,  we  are  now  very  used  to  it  and  at  this  point  almost  expect  the  team  to  falter.  However,  what  we  need  to  remember  is  that  this  season  was  always  seen  as  a  stepping  stone  in  between  the  dark  past  and  our  brighter  Alderson-­led  future.

Thursday,  April  14,  2011

PHOTO Â COURTESY Â OF Â FLICKR.COM


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pg 19

NHL PLAYOFF PREVIEW By  Cat  Tacopina Copy  Editor  |  Ctacopina97@newpaltz.edu

No  1.  Washington  Capitals  (107  points)  Many  complain  and  say  the  Caps  should  have  a  Cup  right  now  with  the  likes  of   Alexander  Ovechkin  and  an  offense  that  destroys.  But  there’s  an  obvious  reason  for  a  lack  of  a  cup  -­  no  goaltending.  Michal  Neuvirth  and  Simeon  Varlamov  are  still  unproven  and  there  are  now  three  instances  where  the  Caps  have  gone  to  a  game  seven  and  have  come  up  short.  I  think  this  could  easily  happen  again.  Goaltending  is  still  too  young.

No.  1  Vancouver  Canucks  (117  points) The  Canucks  come  in  as  the  heavy  favorite  around  the  NHL.  They  have  the  EHVW Âż UVW OLQH LQ WKH OHDJXH ZLWK WKH 6HGLQ WZLQV DQG $OH[ %XUURZV 5\DQ .HVOHU KDG D EUHDNRXW VHDVRQ DQG 5REHUWR /XRQJR ZLOO GHÂż QLWHO\ EH XS IRU Vezina  consideration  come  June.  However,  the  loss  of  Manny  Malhotra  is  not  only  bad  for  the  Canucks,  it’s  devastating.  If  the  Canucks  can  make  do  ZLWKRXW 0DOKRWUD WKRXJK WKH\ VKRXOG EH Âż QH

No  2.  Philadelphia  Flyers  (106  points) The  Broadstreet  Bullies  just  narrowly  missed  the  Eastern  Conference  Title  this  year,  but  they’re  pretty  much  the  same  as  Washington.  The  Flyers  have  DQ LQFUHGLEO\ VWURQJ RIIHQVH WKDW LQFOXGHV DW OHDVW Âż YH SOD\HUV ZKR DUH goal  scorers‌but  then  we  go  to  the  defense.  With  no  Chris  Pronger,  there’s  trouble.  The  goaltending  is  the  worst  part.  Don’t  be  surprised  if  they  leave  early  because  of  it.  I  mean  for  God’s  sake,  they  re-­signed  Michael  Leighton. Â

No.  2  San  Jose  Sharks  (105  points) There  are  a  lot  of  reasons  to  favor  the  Sharks  to  be  the  Western  representa-­ tive  in  the  Finals;Íž  Strong  offense,  strong  defense,  strong  goaltending  and  mind-­numbing  speed  and  strength  will  do  nothing  but  help  the  Sharks  get  through  the  playoffs.  Although,  no  matter  how  good  San  Jo  is  during  the  regular  season,  they  always  choke  when  it  comes  time  for  the  playoffs.  But  maybe‌Could  this  be  the  year?

No.  3  Boston  Bruins  (103  points) The  Bruins  are  probably  the  most  complete  team  coming  in  from  the  East-­ ern  Conference  and  Tim  Thomas  has  what  it  takes  to  carry  them  through.  7KH WHDP ZLOO EH KRVWLQJ WKH PRVW LQWHQVLYH Âż UVW URXQG Âż JKW DJDLQVW ORQJ time  Original  Six  rival  Montreal,  which  will  be  a  lot  of  pressure.   Add  on  the  pressure  of  impressing  fans  at  home  and  redeeming  themselves  after  last  year’s  debacle  against  the  Flyers,  the  Bruins  have  a  lot  to  do.

No.  3  Detroit  Red  Wings  (104  points) It  would  be  stupid  for  anyone  not  to  consider  Detroit  a  serious  threat  in  the  playoffs.  The  thing  about  Detroit  is  that  no  matter  what  kind  of  season  WKH\ KDYH WKH\ DOZD\V PDQDJH WR Âż QG D ZD\ 7KLV \HDU WKH\ÂśOO EH PDNLQJ an  extra  strong  push  since  this  is  probably  Nicklas  Lindstrom’s  last  chance  and  Pavel  Datsyuk  is  playing  so  well  that  ruling  them  out  isn’t  an  option.  7KH\ VKRXOG KDYH QR SUREOHP LQ JHWWLQJ SDVW WKH Âż UVW URXQG

No.  4  Pittsburgh  Penguins  (106  points) With  Evgeni  Malkin  out  for  the  rest  of  the  year  and  Sidney  Crosby  only  SRVVLEO\ FRPLQJ EDFN LQ WLPH IRU Âż UVW URXQG SOD\ WKH 3HQV KDYH D ORW WR worry  about.  Not  having  Crosby  will  be  a  serious  blow  to  the  Penguin’s  chances  of  moving  on,  especially  since  Sid  the  Kid  is  the  type  of  player  who  makes  everyone  around  him  better.  Early  exit?  More  than  possible.

No.  4  Anaheim  Ducks  (99  points) Not  many  people  know  about  Anaheim,  but  they’re  one  of  the  sleeper  teams  this  postseason.  The  only  problem  is  that  they’re  going  up  against  Nashville,  the  other  sleeper  team.  It’s  anyone’s  game  to  be  completely  hon-­ HVW %XW WKDW $QDKHLP Âż UVW OLQH" 7KH RQH ZLWK %REE\ 5\DQ 5\DQ *HW]ODI and  55-­goal-­scorer  Corey  Perry?  That’s  a  hell  of  a  line  that  should  produce. Â

No.  5  Tampa  Bay  Lightning  (103  points) Sure,  the  Lightning  may  have  lost  some  of  the  spark  that  they  had  for  a  majority  of  the  season,  but  it  will  be  incredibly  interesting  to  see  how  7DPSD GRHV LQ WKHLU Âż UVW SOD\RII DSSHDUDQFH VLQFH 6XSHUVWDU 6WHYHQ Stamkos  had  45  goals  this  season,  the  second  highest  in  the  league,  and  there  are  plenty  of  people  who  will  be  watching  to  see  how  he  performs  in  his  postseason  debut. Â

No.  5  Nashville  Predators  (99  points) The  other  sleeper  team  are  the  last  team  I  want  to  face  in  the  playoffs  and  Pierre  McGuire  agrees.  They  have  the  best  goalie  you’ve  never  heard  of  and  the  best  defensive  pair  in  the  league.  Shea  Weber  and  Ryan  Suter?  That’s  rough  for  Anaheim.  Despite  the  fact  that  it’s  Nashville  and  no  one  cares  about  hockey  there,  I’m  really  excited  to  see  how  the  Preds  will  do  during  this  postseason.

No.  6  Montreal  Canadiens  (96  points) Honestly?  The  Montreal  Canadiens  aren’t  that  good.  The  Habs  are  a  fast  team,  but  they’re  pretty  easy  to  push  around.  If  their  power  play  doesn’t  show  up,  they’re  done  for.   They’ll  be  opening  up  in  TD  Garden,  where  all  of  Boston  will  be  screaming  for  their  blood.  It’s  bad  news  for  Canada.

No.  6  Phoenix  Coyotes  (99  points) There’s  just  nothing  special  about  Phoenix  coming  into  the  playoffs.  Shane  Doan  had  the  most  goals  this  season  with  20  and  there’s  just  nothing  that  gives  them  an  edge  over  their  competitors,  plain  and  simple.  Ilya  Bryzga-­ lov  may  be  a  pretty  solid  goaltender,  but  he’s  no  match  for  the  type  of  force  WKDW 'HWURLW ZLOO EH LQ WKH Âż UVW URXQG

No.  7  Buffalo  Sabres  (96  points) No  one  should  ever  count  out  Ryan  Miller.  Remember  when  the  2010  U.S.  Olympic  team  wasn’t  even  supposed  to  see  the  podium  and  then  was  that  close  to  winning  the  gold  medal  and  beating  power-­house  Canada?  Ryan  Miller  is  a  big  part  of  why  that  happened  and  it’s  because  of  him  that  I  FRXOG HDVLO\ VHH %XIIDOR DQQLKLODWLQJ WKH )O\HUV FRPH Âż UVW URXQG ,I 5\DQ Miller  turns  it  up  going  in,  the  Flyers  have  a  lot  to  worry  about. No.  8  New  York  Rangers  (93  points) The  Blueshirts  will  start  the  playoffs  by  going  up  against  a  team  that  is  com-­ pletely  different  from  them.  No  one  could  have  ever  expected  the  New  York  Rangers  to  have  one  of  the  best  defensive  corps  in  the  league  that  was  reliable  enough  to  carry  them  into  the  post  season.  The  offense  is  a  BIG  problem,  but  if  Henrik  Lundqvist  gets  hot,  New  York  will  upset  and  stun  plenty.

No.  7  L.A.  Kings  (98  points) The  Kings  started  off  the  season  looking  like  they  would  be  one  of  the  hot-­ WHVW WHDPV LQ WKH :HVWHUQ &RQIHUHQFH DQG WKH\ GHÂż QLWHO\ VWDUWHG WKH VHDVRQ on  the  right  foot.  However,  injuries  to  the  likes  of  Anze  Kopitar  will  seri-­ ously  hurt  L.A.  Having  them  go  against  state  rival  San  Jose  without  a  home  ice  advantage  doesn’t  help  matters  either.  No.  8  Chicago  Blackhawks  (97  points) Last  year’s  Stanley  Cup  Champions  were  lucky  to  make  the  playoffs  this  year.  Large  contracts  for  big  name  players  forced  the  Hawks  to  lose  some  key  players  that  made  large  contributions  to  their  cup  run,  and  it  showed  how  much  it  hurt  the  team.  The  Hawks  will  be  going  against  the  Canucks,  whom  they  eliminated  last  year.  Now  the  tables  are  turned,  and  you  can  believe  that  the  â€˜Nucks  are  out  for  blood  after  last  postseason.  PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR.COM

Thursday,  April  14,  2011


SPORTS THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

DelGaudio & Bennett Drive Lacrosse Towards SUNYACS PAGE 17

ACE

Early Signs Don’t Look Good For Mets PAGE 18

PHOTO COURTESY OF STOCKTON PHOTO SIDE PHOTOS COURTESY OF STOCKTON PHOTO & FLICKR.COM

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TENNIS TEAM CLOSES IN ON NCAA TENNIS TOURNAMENT IN MAY: PAGE 15