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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE REFORM AND RESTRUCTURE THE

Volume  85,  Issue  XV

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

CHARGING FORWARD

Town Prepares for the Possibility of Electric Car Chargers

STORY ON PAGE 4

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN ILLUSTRATION  BY  CAT  TACOPINA

Students Push For Change In Academic Requirements and Procedures STORY ON PAGE 5, EDITORIAL ON PAGE 9

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡3URIHVVRU'LVFXVVHV$GMXQFWVRQ3%63J‡/*%747DVN)RUFH7DONV5HSRUW)LQGLQJV3J ‡67(06FKRODUVKLSV3URSRVHG3J‡,QWHUQDWLRQDO:RPHQ¶V'D\3ODQQHG3J


Cat  Tacopina EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Andrew  Lief

MANAGING  EDITOR _________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

Anthony  DeRosa FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF

Abbott  Brant

FEATURES          PG.  5B A&E                      PG.  9B

_________________

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS  EDITOR

Maxwell  Reide Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Zach  McGrath

ASSISTANT  PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITOR

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Madeline  Anthony Melissa  Kramer Zameena  Mejia .ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG COPY  EDITORS

Hannah  Nesich Jennifer  Newman ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITORS _________________

Nicole  Brinkley WEB  CHIEF

Rosalie  Rodriguez MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

_________________

Matt  Ritchie

BUSINESS  MANAGER

John  Sweet

DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER

The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI SUNY  New  Paltz.  Our  circulation  is  2,500.  The  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG by  the  business  manager.  Community  announcements  are  published  gratuitously,  but  are   subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   of  this  paper  cannot  be  reproduced  without  the  written  permission  of  the  Editor-­in-­Chief. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  published  weekly  throughout  the  fall  and  spring  semesters   on  Thursdays.  It  is  available  in  all  residence  halls  and  academic  buildings,  in  the  New  Paltz   community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu.  For  more  information,  call  845-­257-­3030.  The   fax  line  is  845-­257-­3031.

Volume  85 Issue  XII THE  GUNK  

1B-­12B

THE  DEEP  END COLUMNS

ANTHONY  DEROSA,  JEN  NEWMAN

SPORTS  

12B

Incident:  Sexual  Misconduct   Date:  2/24/14 Location:  College  Hall Female  student  reported  being  sexually  as-­ saulted  by  a  male  student.  Male  student  to  be   interviewed  by  UPD.  Female  student  does  not   want  to  pursue  charges  at  this  time.  

10

Incident:  Trespassing Date:  2/23/14 Location:  Capen  Hall Residence  Life  staff  reported  suspicious  person   in  the  building.  Subject  questioned  by  staff.  No   ID  made.

11-­15

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

9

EDITORIAL  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

NEWS

VISIT “THE ORACLE� ONLINE:

University  Police  Blotter

Index

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE April  Castillo,  Kelsey  Damrad,  Nick  Fodera,  Ben  Kindlon  Sally  Moran,   Eileen  Liebler,  Jahna  Romano,  Kaycia  Sailsman,  Dana  Schmerzler,   Shelby  Seip,  Kelly  Seiz,  Jack  Sommer,  Katherine  Speller,  Ryan  Walz,  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

@NewPaltzOracle

Five-­Day  Forecast Thursday,  Feb.  27 Snow High:  28  Low:  -­2

Friday,  Feb.  28 Sunny  High:  22  Low:  6

Saturday,  March  1 Mostly  Cloudy High:  35  Low:  25

Sunday,  March  2 Snow High:  34  Low:  17

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Contact  us  at   Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   for  more  information!

STAFF

SPORTS                PG.  14

Monday,  March  3 Snow High:  26    Low:  13


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   3

oracle.newpaltz.edu

United  University  Professions  President  Pushes  Pay  On  PBS By  Andrew  Lief   Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY  New  Paltz  United  University  Professions  (UUP)   Chapter  President  Peter  Brown  appeared  on  the  PBS  News   +RXU IHDWXUH RQ )HE  WLWOHG Âł$GMXQFWV LQ +LJKHU (GXFD-­ WLRQ´ Brown   said   he   was   contacted   by   the   producer   of   the   PBS  News  Hour  about  appearing  in  the  piece  and  agreed  to   participate  immediately.    PBS  came  to  Brown’s  New  York   City  apartment  on  Jan.  3  and  conducted  an  hour  long  inter-­ view. Âł,ÂśYHEHHQDQDGYRFDWHIRUFRQWLQJHQWIDFXOW\HTXLW\IRU DERXW\HDUV´%URZQVDLGÂł,ÂśPNQRZQLQWKDWFDSDFLW\´ $FFRUGLQJWRWKHSLHFHDGMXQFWSURIHVVRUVLQWKH8QLWHG 6WDWHV DUH SDLG DQ DYHUDJH RI  WR  SHU FODVV ZKLOHUHFHLYLQJIHZEHQHÂżWVDQGPDNHXSKDOIRIDVFKRROÂśV faculty.     Brown  said  adjunct  professors  are  typically  the  lowest   SDLG HPSOR\HHV RQ D FROOHJH FDPSXV PDNLQJ OHVV PRQH\ than  custodial  staff.    The  average  adjunct  professor  at  New   3DOW]PDNHVSHU\HDU Âł2QWKHRWKHUHQGRIWKHVSHFWUXPWKHUHDUHSHRSOHZKR PDNHKXQGUHGVRIWKRXVDQGVRIGROODUVDVSURYRVWVDVSUHVL-­ GHQWVDVFKDQFHOORUV´%URZQVDLGÂł$QGEHWZHHQDQG WKHDGMXQFWSD\KDVJRQHGRZQSHUFHQW7KHVDODU\ RIFROOHJHSUHVLGHQWVKDVJRQHXSSHUFHQW´ SUNY  New  Paltz  Provost  Phillip  Mauceri  said  he  is  in  

contact  with  Brown  to  discuss  issues  regarding  adjuncts.     “As  provost  I  meet  with  the  UUP  Chapter  President  ev-­ ery  month  to  discuss  issues  and  concerns  affecting  adjuncts   DWRXUSDUWWLPHODERUPDQDJHPHQWPHHWLQJV´0DXFHULVDLG “We  try  to  work  together  to  address  issues  of  importance  for   DGMXQFWVVXFKDVRIÂżFHVSDFH´ Mauceri   said   colleges   have   not   been   able   to   hire   as   many  full-­time  employees  as  they  would  have  liked  because   RIWKHGHFOLQHLQVXSSRUWIURPWKHVWDWHVRLQVWHDGWKH\ÂśYH had  to  hire  more  part-­time  employees.  He  said  the  goal  of   the  school  should  be  to  replace  as  many  part-­time  adjuncts   DVWKH\FDQZLWKIXOOWLPHHPSOR\HHV,QWKHSDVWGHFDGHWKH college  has  reduced  the  number  of  part-­time  faculty  teaching   SHUFHQWRIWKHFRXUVHVRIIHUHGWRWHDFKLQJSHUFHQWRI courses  now. “I  think  it  is  important  for  students  to  be  taught  primar-­ ily  by  full-­time  faculty  that  are  selected  through  a  competi-­ WLYH QDWLRQDO VHDUFK DQG DUH RQ FDPSXV IXOOWLPH RIIHULQJ PRUHDFFHVVWRVWXGHQWVIRUWKLQJVOLNHRIÂżFHKRXUVWKDQSDUW WLPHIDFXOW\´0DXFHULVDLG %URZQVDLGKHUHFHLYHGSRVLWLYHIHHGEDFNRQWKHSLHFH which  was  viewed  by  people  from  all  over  the  country.  He   said  this  piece  is  one  of  a  number  of  national  pieces  that  are   being  done  about  the  rights  of  adjunct  professors.  He  said  he   hopes  the  piece  helps  educate  the  general  public  about  how   DGMXQFWSURIHVVRUVFDQQRWEHUHQHZHGRUÂżUHGZLWKRXWDQ\ due  process.    

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

In  addition  to  being  the  UUP  chapter  president  at  New   3DOW]%URZQLVLQYROYHGLQUHDFKLQJRXWWRRWKHURUJDQL]D-­ tions   in   the   Mid-­Hudson   Valley.   He   is   also   involved   on   a     VWDWHDQGQDWLRQDOOHYHOWKURXJKQDWLRQDOPRELOL]DWLRQIRUHT-­ XLW\ZKLFKLVDQDWLRQDOHIIRUWWKDWKDVVWDUWHGWRGHYHORSLQ support  of  better  working  conditions  for  contingent  faculty.

Cuomo  Proposes  Plan  To  Boost  Top  High  School  Students By  John  Tappen   News  Editor  |  John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

New  York  State  Gov.  Andrew  Cuomo  has  proposed   an   $8   million   plan   for   the   2014-­15   academic   school   year  that  would  give  the  top  10  percent  of  high  school   seniors  full  tuition  to  SUNY  or  CUNY  colleges.   The  stipulation  is  that  those  students  must  declare   DPDMRUZLWKLQWKH67(0¿HOG²VFLHQFHWHFKQRORJ\ HQJLQHHULQJ DQG PDWK ² DV ZHOO DV DJUHH WR VWD\ DQG ZRUNLQ1HZ<RUN6WDWHIRU¿YH\HDUVXSRQJUDGXDWLRQ ³7KH IXWXUH RI WKH HFRQRP\ LV LQ 67(0 MREV ² ZHVKRXOGEHLQFHQWLYL]LQJRXUHGXFDWLRQV\VWHPWR¿OO WKRVHRSHQLQJV´&XRPRZURWHLQDWZHHW ,ISDVVHGE\WKHOHJLVODWXUHWKLVVSULQJVWXGHQWVHQ-­ WHULQJFROOHJHWKLVIDOOZLOOEHWKH¿UVWUHFLSLHQWVRIWKHVH STEM  scholarships.   0RUULV3HWHUVZKRLVDVSRNHVPDQIRUWKHVWDWH'L-­ YLVLRQ RI WKH %XGJHW ZDV TXRWHG LQ WKHTimes   Herald   RecordVD\LQJWKHUHZLOOEHDURXQG³VWXGHQWVRXW RIPRUHWKDQKLJKVFKRROJUDGXDWHVVWDWHZLGH  H[SHFWHG WR EHFRPH WKH ¿UVW\HDU UHFLSLHQWV RI WKH VFKRODUVKLSV´ Morris   said   the   plan   is   to   increase   the   number   of   UHFLSLHQWVWRE\ 'HDQRIWKH6FKRRORI6FLHQFHDW681<1HZ3DOW] 'DQ )UHHGPDQ VDLG WKH SURSRVDO LV D JUHDW LGHD WKDW FRXOG KDYH D VLJQL¿FDQW LPSDFW ² SULQFLSDOO\ UDLVLQJ

WKHSURÂżOHRIWKHVFKRRODQGLWV67(0SURJUDPVZKLFK will  ultimately  attract  new  students.   )UHHGPDQVDLGWKHUHLVDVKRUWDJHRIWUDLQHGVFLHQ-­ WLVWVDQGHQJLQHHUVLQ1HZ<RUN²DQGZKHQFRQVLGHU-­ LQJWKHQXPEHURI67(0WUDLQHGSHRSOHSHUFDSLWD1HZ York  State  falls  somewhere  in  the  middle  of  the  pack.   Âł7KH HFRQRP\ LV DQ LPSRUWDQW IDFRU´ )UHHGPDQ VDLGÂł67(0ÂżHOGVDUHHPSOR\DEOH´ With   the   institution   of   proposed   STEM   scholar-­ VKLSV)UHHGPDQVDLGWKHQRWLRQLVWKDW1HZ<RUNZLOOEH able  to  compete  for  high  tech  industries  because  those   EXVLQHVVHVZLOONQRZWKHUHLVDQLQĂ&#x20AC;X[RI67(0WUDLQHG people  who  will  remain  in  the  state  to  work.   (YHQEHIRUH&XRPRÂśVSURSRVDO1HZ3DOW]67(0 departments  have  been  expanding.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enrollment  in  the  School  of  Science  and  Engineer-­ LQJ KDV LQFUHDVHG E\  SHUFHQW VLQFH ´ 681< 1HZ3DOW]3UHVLGHQW'RQDOG&KULVWLDQVDLGÂł7KHUHDUH nearly   800   students   currently   enrolled   in   the   program   and    another  250  students  in  science  and  math  education   HQUROOHGLQWKH6FKRRORI(GXFDWLRQ´ ,QWKHODVWIRXU\HDUVERWKELRFKHPLVWU\DQGDVWURQ-­ omy  have  been  added  to  the  school.   )UHHGPDQVDLGIRUWKHODVWPRQWKVWKHUHKDVEHHQ serious   discussion   surrounding   the   proposal   of   adding   a   mechanical   engineering   degree   that   would   begin   in   the  fall. Âł6WXGHQWV DUH YHU\ LQWHUHVWHG LQ 67(0 ÂżHOGV DQG

7KXUVGD\)HEUXDU\

ZHDUHSXWWLQJPRUHSULRULW\RQWKHP´&KULVWLDQVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  scholarship  program  will  help  us  recruit  and  pro-­ YLGHÂżQDQFLDOVXSSRUWWRPRUHWRSQRWFKVWXGHQWV´ Along   with   the   addition   of   the   aforementioned   GHJUHHV FRQVWUXFWLRQ RQ D QHZ VFLHQFH EXLOGLQJ WR EH HUHFWHGRQZKDWLVFXUUHQWO\SDUNLQJORWLVVHWWREH-­ gin  this  semester.   Christian   also   said   the   opportunities   that   the   VFKRROÂśVQHZ'SULQWLQJLQLWLDWLYHSURYLGHVZLOOKHOS LQDWWUDFWLQJVWXGHQWV²LQ67(0ÂżHOGVDQGRWKHUZLVH Âł2XU ' 3ULQWLQJ ,QLWLDWLYH UHSUHVHQWV D XQLTXH FROODERUDWLRQDFURVVGLVFLSOLQHV´&KULVWLDQVDLGÂł,WLQ-­ WHJUDWHVWKH&ROOHJHÂśVVWUHQJWKVLQHQJLQHHULQJFRPSXW-­ HUVFLHQFHWHFKQRORJ\DQGWKHLQQRYDWLRQDQGFUHDWLYLW\ RIWKHDUWV´ Because  of  its  capabilities  to  offer  a  more  compre-­ hensive  learning  experience  that  stretches  across  disci-­ SOLQHV)UHHGPDQVDLGKHORRNVDW'SULQWLQJDVDWRRO that  the  program  can  be  built  around.   'SULQWLQJDGYDQFHGWHFKRQRORJ\WKDWÂśVDOVRDF-­ FHVVLEOH)UHHGPDQVDLGRSHQVWKHGRRUIRUWKHSRVVLELO-­ ity  of  exploring  digital  humanities.   Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   proposal   has   not   yet   been   passed   by   the   OHJLVODWXUH )UHHGPDQ VDLG ZKLOH 67(0 VFKRODUVKLSV ZLOOKDYHDSRVLWLYHLPSDFWWKHORJLVWLFVRIWKHSURSRVDO VWLOOQHHGWREHZRUNHGRXWVSHFLÂżFDOO\KRZWKHUHTXLUHG ÂżYHZRUNLQJ\HDUVLQ1HZ<RUNZLOOEHPDQGDWHG


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

SYRIAN  TROOPS  KILL  REBELS Syrian   army   troops   on   Wednesday   killed   175   rebels,   many   of   them   al-­Qaida-­linked   ÂżJKWHUVLQDQDPEXVKGHVFULEHGDVRQHRI the  deadliest  attacks  by  government  forces   DJDLQVW ÂżJKWHUV QHDU 'DPDVFXV DFFRUGLQJ to  state  media. UKRAINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   PROTEST   MOVE-­ MENT Leaders   of   Ukraineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   protest   move-­ ment   on   Wednesday   proposed   a   top   legislator   as   the   countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   next   prime   minister,   while   Russian   President   Vladimir  Putin  ordered  major  military   exercises   just   across   the   border   in   a   show  of  force  and  apparent  displeasure   over  the  countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  new  direction.

AL-­QAIDA   MEMBER   TENCED  TO  LIFE

Transportation  Committee  Proposes  New  Plan %\.ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG

ISRAEL   ATTEMPTS   TO   HALT   WEAPONS Israel  has  opened  a  new  front  in  its  at-­ tempts   to   halt   weapons   smuggling   to   Hezbollah,  striking  one  of  the  groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   SRVLWLRQV LQVLGH /HEDQRQ IRU WKH ÂżUVW time  since  the  sides  fought  a  war  eight   years  ago.

SEN-­

An   al-­Qaida-­inspired   extremist   was   sen-­ tenced  to  life  without  parole  Wednesday  for   hacking  an  off-­duty  British  soldier  to  death   RQD/RQGRQVWUHHWLQIURQWRIKRUUL¿HGSDVV-­ ers-­by. NSA  SURVEILLANCE The  government  is  notifying  some  de-­ fendants   accused   of   terrorism   that   it   used   more   National   Security   Agency   surveillance   than   it   disclosed   during   their  court  proceedings. GAY   ACTIVIST   CONFRONTS   HOSTILITY Pepe  Julian  Onziema,  a  prominent  gay   activist  in  Uganda,  said  Wednesday  he   recently   was   forced   to   confront   some   nurses  at  a  private  clinic  after  they  ne-­ glected  to  serve  him  in  apparent  hostil-­ ity  toward  his  sexual  orientation. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Copy  Editor  |  :DU¿HON#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX

The   New   Paltz   Transportation   Imple-­ mentation   Committee   (TIC),   which   is   responsible   for   creating   and   improving   transportation   methods   in   town,   proposed   an  access  management  plan  intended  to  im-­ prove  accessibility  for  both  pedestrians  and   drivers  on  Main  Street.   Once  adopted,  the  access  management   plan  could  limit  or  reduce  accessibility  to     major  roads  to  increase  safety  for  motorists,   pedestrians  and  bicyclists  as  well  as  facili-­ WDWHWUDIÂżFĂ&#x20AC;RZ Unlike  any  other  recommendation  that   TIC   has   proposed   in   the   past,   the   access   PDQDJHPHQW SODQ LV WKH ÂżUVW RQH WKDW ZLOO be  required  to  change  an  existing  law.  TIC   Chairwoman   Gail   Gallerie   said   the   pro-­ posed   access   management   regulations   will   be  an  addition  to  Chapter  140  of  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   zoning  law. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   access   management   plan   is   evi-­ dence   of   how   land   use   planning   can   affect   WUDIÂżF VR PDNLQJ SODQQHUV DQG GHYHORSHUV mindful   of   these   considerations   is   a   goal   toward  which  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  making  progress,â&#x20AC;?  she   said. According   to   a   report   by   the   townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   2006   Transportation   and   Land   Use   Project   Board,   access   management   is   key   in   con-­

trolling   the   location,   spacing,   design   and   operation   of   driveways,   median   openings,   interchanges   and   street   connections   to   a   roadway. The  report  also  states  that  limiting  and   consolidating  access  along  major  roadways   will  preserve  roadway  capacity  and  increase   safety,   as   well   as   promote   a   supporting   street  system  for  development  and  mobility   within  town. Second-­year  business  management  ma-­ jor  Amanda  Morgewicz  said  she  frequently   UXQVLQWRWUDIÂżFERWWOHQHFNVDWEXV\LQWHUVHF-­ tions  and  entrances  for  shops  on  Main  Street   when   she   drives   in   town,   which   leads   to   some  planning  ahead  on  her  part  in  order  to   DYRLGWUDIÂżF â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   usually   try   to   avoid   the   center   of   town  by  taking  back  roads  because  of  how   tight  Main  Street  is,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tractor  trail-­ ers   really   block   up   the   roads   when   shops   and  restaurants  are  getting  deliveries,  espe-­ cially   now   that   there   is   snow   on   the   roads   and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  even  more  crowded  than  usual.   Whenever  I  need  to  get  to  a  place  in  the  cen-­ ter  of  town  I  try  and  park  on  a  side  street  to   avoid  frustration  and  the  hectic  stop  lights.â&#x20AC;? Chronic   congestion   in   New   Paltz   is   perceived   as   an   inconvenience   and   causes   people   to   modify   their   travel   behavior   by   choosing  not  to  travel,  changing  their  depar-­

ture  times  and  their  travel  routes  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  is   what  the  access  management  plan  is  hoping   WRÂż[ According  to  Gallerie,  the  proposed  ac-­ cess   management   change   was   the   result   of   these   discussions   over   the   course   of   seven   years  with  representatives  of  the  New  York   6WDWH 'HSDUWPHQW RI 7UDQVSRUWDWLRQ DQG Planning  Board  attorney. As  of  now,  the  proposal  is  currently  be-­ fore  the  Town  of  New  Paltz  Planning  Board   for  consideration.  The  next  step  in  the  pro-­ cess  will  be  for  the  Planning  Board  to  rec-­ ommend   it     to   the   Town   Council.   Gallerie   said   since   a   change   to   an   existing   law   is   being  proposed,  a  public  hearing  would  be   held  before  the  Town  Council  could  vote  to   adopt  it,  then  the  revision  would  have  to  be   ÂżOHGZLWKWKHVWDWH Gallerie  said  she  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  predict  how  long   this  process  will  take,  but  it  is  conceivable   that  the  process  could  be  completed  by  this   summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   proposed   change   would   affect   only   new   sites   or   changes   to   existing   sites   undergoing  review  by  the  Planning  Board,â&#x20AC;?   she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although  the  revision  to  the  law   could  go  into  effect  as  soon  as  adopted  and   ÂżOHG LWV DFWXDO DSSOLFDWLRQ ZLOO GHSHQG RQ the  progress  of  new  development  proposals   or  site  plan  revisions.â&#x20AC;?

Town  Board  Close  To  Passing  Electric  Car  Charging  Stations   By  Cat  Tacopina   Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Town   Supervisor   Susan   Zimet   said   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;very  possibleâ&#x20AC;?  New  Paltz  may  soon   be  home  to  electric  car  charging  stations   in  town  parking  lots. After   discussions   about   the   possi-­ bility   of   installing   electric   car   chargers   were  held  at  the  Town  Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Feb.  20   PHHWLQJ =LPHW VDLG VKH LV FRQÂżGHQW LW will  pass  once  a  vote  is  held  at  the  Feb.   27  meeting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   only   reason   we   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   vote   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;yesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   on   it   at   our   last   meeting   was   that   we  were  missing  one  of  our  board  mem-­ bers  and  we  wanted  to  make  sure  every-­ one  on  the  board  got  a  say,â&#x20AC;?  Zimet  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  reason  to  not  vote  [yes]  on   this.â&#x20AC;? New  Paltz  has  a  tradition  and  com-­ mitment   to   environmental   conscious-­ ness,  Zimet  said.  She  also  said  there  are   several   opportunities   already   in   New   Paltz  for  electric  car  chargers  to  be  used.  

Zimet   said   among   the   electric   cars   al-­ ready   owned   by   community   members,   the  town  purchased  a  hybrid  car  for  the   police   department   which   will   be   com-­ patible  with  the  electric  car  chargers. &RXQFLOPDQ 'DQ 7RUUHV VDLG KDY-­ ing   electric   car   chargers   in   New   Paltz   will   further   promote   the   town   as   being   environmentally-­conscious,  and  will  aid   in  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  path  toward  sustainability.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;New  Paltz  is  the  kind  of  communi-­ ty  where  we  promote  walking  and  bike   riding,   but   obviously   people   need   cars   as  well,â&#x20AC;?  Torres  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  to  have   these   chargers   installed   because   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   encourage  residents  to  purchase  electric   cars,   which   will   in   turn   make   us   more   sustainable.â&#x20AC;? 7KRXJK QRW \HW RIÂżFLDO WKH WRZQ is   looking   for   ways   to   fund   the   instal-­ lation.   The   cost   of   purchase   has   yet   to   be   determined.   Torres   said   the   town   started   shopping   around   for   grants   be-­ IRUH RIÂżFLDO FRQÂżUPDWLRQ EHFDXVH WKH\

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

want  New  Paltz  to  be  eligible  to  receive   grants  early.   Âł7KLV LV GHÂżQLWHO\ VRPHWKLQJ FRP-­ munity   members   are   interested   in   and   something  they  believe  will  improve  the   town,â&#x20AC;?  Torres  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  to  send  in   JUDQWUHTXHVWVHDUO\VRZHFDQEHÂżUVWLQ line  to  receive  them.â&#x20AC;?   Zimet  said  this  is  one  of  several  ini-­ tiatives   toward   improving   the   townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   energy   conservation.   She   also   said   the   town   has   already   talked   with   several   ÂżUPV ZKR KDYH LQWHUHVW LQ DLGLQJ 1HZ Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  push  for  energy  conservation.   Torres  said  he  believes  having  elec-­ tric   car   chargers   in   New   Paltz   is   a   per-­ IHFWÂżWZLWKWKHFRPPXQLW\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   blessed   to   have   people   in   our  community  who  are  environmental-­ ly-­conscious  and  see  the  good  that  hav-­ ing  electric  car  chargers  in  our  commu-­ nity  will  bring,â&#x20AC;?  Torres  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  will   be   great   for   New   Paltz   now   and   in   the   future  as  well.â&#x20AC;?  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

GE  And  SEI  Changes  Proposed By  Cat  Tacopina

Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctaopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Student   senators   have   begun   the   semester  by  discussing  desired  changes   they  want  to  make  to  several  academic   policies. Senator   Zach   Grossman,   a   student   representative  on  the  Academic  Affairs   Committee,  said  the  committee  plans  to   make   changes   to   Student   Evaluations   of   Instruction   (SEI).   Senators   Nadia   Alirahi  and  Jesse  Ginsburg  are  working   with  the  Liberal  Education  Committee   to  make  changes  to  General  Education   (GE)  and  Graduation  requirements.   Alirahi  and  Ginsburg  said  the  goal   of    the  Liberal  Education  Committee  is   to   reduce   the   amount   of   GEs   students   are  required  to  take  before  graduating.   The   committee   is   focused   on   helping   undergraduate   students   become   more   well-­rounded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  going  to  be  a  lot  fewer   GEs,â&#x20AC;?   Ginsburg   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   will   also   have   more   choices   in   the   selection   of   classes  you  need  to  use  as  your  GE  re-­ quirements.â&#x20AC;? Alirahi  said  the  committee  wants  to   eliminate  Composition  I  and  II,  and  in-­ stead  offer  one  Composition  course  and   a   pre-­Composition   course   for   students   not  prepared  to  meet  the  demands  of  the   Composition  class.   Students   will   no   longer   be   able   to   place  out  of    math  or  foreign  language   classes.  Alirahi  said  the  only  way  to  get   out   of   either   is   to   have   received   cred-­ its  from  a  college  course  before  enroll-­ ment   or   to   have   gotten   credit   out   of   high  school  AP  and  IB  courses.   She   also   said   that   certain   GE   re-­ quirements  will  become  optional.  From   a  pool  of  six  GE  requirements,  students   will   be   allowed   to   choose   three   of   the   VL[UHTXLUHPHQWVWRÂżOO Both   Alirahi   and   Ginsburg   said   the  committee  plans  to  introduce  more   graduation  requirements  for  undergrad-­ uates.  They  said  the  committee  plans  to   LQWURGXFHDQLQWHUGLVFLSOLQDU\ÂżUVW\HDU seminar   after   the   composition   class.   They  will  also  require  students  to  take   at   least   one   STEM   (Science,   Technol-­ ogy,   Engineering,   Math)   class,   along   with   a   capstone   course   once   they   are   FORVH WR ÂżQLVKLQJ WKHLU XQGHUJUDGXDWH degree. Assistant   Professor   of   Chemis-­ try   and   Liberal   Education   Committee  

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

JUDGE   DECLARES   SAME-­SEX   MARRIAGE   BAND   UNCONSTI-­ TUTIONAL A   federal   judge   declared   a   same-­sex   marriage   ban   in   deeply   conservative   Texas   unconstitutional   on  Wednesday,   but  will  allow  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  second-­most   populous  state  to  enforce  the  law  pend-­ ing  an  appeal  that  will  likely  go  to  the   U.S.  Supreme  Court. DRUG  LOARD  PLEAS  GUILTY A  reputed  lieutenant  of  recently   captured  drug  lord  Joaquin  â&#x20AC;&#x153;El  Chapoâ&#x20AC;?   Guzman  indicated  in  a  U.S.  courtroom   Wednesday  that  he  will  change  his   SOHDWRJXLOW\LQDELOOLRQWUDIÂżFNLQJ conspiracy  that  prosecutors  say  was   masterminded  by  his  infamous  boss. COURT   ORDERS   YOUTUBE   TO   TAKE   DOWN   ANTI-­MUSLIM   VID-­ EOS Senator  Jesse  Ginsburg,  member  of  the  Liberal  Education  Committee.  

member  Megan  Ferguson  said  the  goal   of  the  new  GE  and  graduation  require-­ ments   are   consistent   with   SUNY   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  goal  for  education  in  the  future.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  environment  is  so  fast  and   it  changes  so  quickly  that  students  need   to  be  prepared  and  able  to  tackle  prob-­ lems   you   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   necessarily   learn   in   school,â&#x20AC;?   Ferguson   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   trying   to  enhance  problem-­solving  and  quan-­ titative  skills  by  teaching  from  a  variety   of   perspectives.   With   the   multi-­inter-­ disciplinary   discourse   offered   early   in   your  college  career,  we  want  to  have  it   so  students  will  be  able  to  use  what  they   learn  in  the  upper  division  courses  later   in  their  career.â&#x20AC;? Grossman   said   the   Academic   Af-­ fairs   Committee   wants   to   make   SEIs   more   transparent.   Grossman   said   he   wants  the  SEIs  to  be  more  constructive   than  other  avenues  students  use  to  learn   about  potential  professors.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right  now,  the  only  way  to  reach  a   consensus  about  a  professor  is  through   either  word  of  mouth  or  Ratemyprofes-­ sor.com,â&#x20AC;?  Grossman  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  to   get   the   most   out   of   the   comments   for   both  professors  and  students.â&#x20AC;? The  committee  also  hopes  to  make   it  so  professors  can  choose  to  not  give   their   SEIs   to   their   respective   deans   VKRXOGWKH\ÂżQGWKH6(,RIIHQVLYHDQG if   the   student   agrees   on   their   SEI   of   a  

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

professor  to  not  have  the  comments  re-­ leased  to  the  dean,  Grossman  said.   He  said  the  goal  of  this  is  to  lessen   the   unconstructive   criticism   students   may   feel   comfortable   giving   to   their   professors   because   of   the   current   ano-­ nymity  of  the  SEIs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pretty   much   all   of   the   professors   on  the  committee  said  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  received   personal   attacks   on   their   SEIs   in   the   past,â&#x20AC;?   Grossman   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;None   of   us   on   the   committee   think   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   fair.   From   a   student   and   faculty   perspective,   we   want  to  make  it  so  that  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  as  extremely   constructive  as  possible...If  a  dean  no-­ tices  a  professor  continuously  neglects   to   hand   in   their   SEIs,   they   can   inter-­ vene.â&#x20AC;? The   committee   wants   to   put   em-­ phasis  on  the  written  portion  of  the  SEI   and   shift   away   from   the   number   rank-­ ing  students  can  give.  Grossman  said  he   and  the  committee  hope  the  comments   can  help  build  a  more  productive  rela-­ tionship  between  professors  and  deans,   so   that   the   education   experience   ben-­ HÂżWVVWXGHQWVDQGIDFXOW\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   have   fairness   on   all   sides,â&#x20AC;?   Grossman   said.â&#x20AC;?Neither   too   pro-­student,   too   pro-­professor...we   as   students  need  to  be  constructive  and  re-­ member  out  professors  are  people  too.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   right   to   hide   behind   a   screen.   They  take  it  personally,  and  it  can  hurt.â&#x20AC;?

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

A  federal  appeals  court  ordered   YouTube  on  Wednesday  to  take  down   DQDQWL0XVOLP¿OPWKDWVSDUNHG violence  in  many  parts  of  the  Middle   East. NASA  INVESTIGATION

NASA   could   have   prevented   last   summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   near-­drowning   of   a   spacewalking   astronaut   at   the   International   Space   Station,   an   investigation   panel   concluded   Wednesday. SNACK  AND  SODA  MAKERS Snack  and  soda  makers  that  often  are   blamed  for  fueling  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  obesity   rates  also  play  a  role  in  educating  the   dietitians  who  advise  Americans  on   healthy  eating.  Frito-­Lay,  Kellogg,   Coca-­Cola  and  others  are  essentially   teaching  the  teachers.  Their  workshops   and  online  classes  for  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   dietitians  are  part  of  a  behind-­the-­ scenes  effort  to  burnish  the  images  of   their  snacks  and  drinks. TARGET  SALES  DOWN More  than  two  months  after  it  revealed   that  hackers  stole  credit  card  numbers   and  personal  data  of  millions  of  its   FXVWRPHUV7DUJHWÂśVVDOHVSURÂżWDQG stock  prices  have  dropped. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

LGBTQ  Task  Force  Report  Findings  Revealed

y orth w s New ewman N

By  Jennifer  Newman Asst.  Copy  Editor|  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

it   because   it’s   not   collectively   shared.   It   will   rights,”  she  said.  “They  are  demanding  the  right   WRDEDWKURRPWKDWLVQ¶WVRGH¿QHGE\JHQGHUEL The  LGBTQ  Task  Force  was  assigned  with   make  awareness  even  stronger.” According  to  the  climate  report,  New  Paltz   QDU\WKDWQRPDWWHUZKDWZHGRZHFDQ¶W¿WWKHUH making   recommendations   for   improvement   of   the   campus   climate   for   lesbian,   gay,   bisexual,   has   received   an   overall   campus   pride   score   of     They’re   saying   it’s   a   matter   of   civil   rights,   [to   have]  a  bathroom  that  is  built  in  a  way  where  pri-­ transgender  and  queer  students,  faculty  and  staff   2.5  stars  out  of  5. The   highest   score,   three-­and-­a-­half   stars,   vacy  is  honored.” at   SUNY   New   Paltz,   according   to   the   report   In   the   second   draft   of   the   report,   the   task   released   to   the   campus   community   in   January   was  achieved  in  the  areas  of  Housing  and  Resi-­ dence   Life   and   Sexual   Orientation.   The   lowest   IRUFHVSHFL¿HGZKDWGLYLVLRQVVKRXOGEHLPSOH 2014. “We  talked  a  little  about  some  of  the  issues   score,  one  star,  was  assigned  to  the  category  of   menting   direct   changes,   getting   departments   to   take  responsibility  for  more  inclusiveness. we  are  trying  to  improve  for  the  campus  climate   LGBT  Support  and  Institutional  Commitment.   Tucci  said  the  college  was  in  the  process  of   “We   are   the   college,”  Tucci   said.   “It’s   not   for  LGBTQ  students,”  SUNY  New  Paltz  Presi-­ making  changes  when  they  calculated  the  pride   the  president  who  needs  to  change  SUNY  New   dent  Donald  Christian  said. Paltz.   He   can   guide   changes,   but   it’s   the   work   According   to   Christian,   plans   include   at   index,  a  national  standard. “At   the   time   things   were   already   in   prog-­ we  do  everyday  that  is  where  the  change  comes   least   one   gender-­neutral   bathroom   in   every   building,   having   more   resources   on   the   SUNY   ress  that  were  already  invoking  a  lot  of  change   from.” Fourth-­year   Women’s,   Gen-­ New  Paltz  website,  an  LGBTQ  mixer   der   and   Sexuality   Studies   major   as   a   part   of   summer   orientation,   us-­ Brendan  Wright  worked  on  the  task   ing   preferred   names   with   food   or-­ ders,   adding   gender   orientation   for   “We   are   the   college,”   Tucci   said.   “It’s   not   the   force   as   a   student   representative   from   the   Residence   Hall   Student   the  non-­discrimination  policy,  having   an  LGBTQ  expert  go  over  all  of  the   president  who  needs  to  change  SUNY  New  Paltz.  He   Association  and  said  the  project  has   documentation  and  wording  to  make   can  guide  changes,  but  it’s  the  work  we  do  everyday   and  will  continue  to  make  a  positive   impact  on  the  community. them   gender   inclusive   and   adding   that  is  where  the  change  comes  from.” “It   was   a   wonderful   experi-­ new   material   for   welcome   week   to   ence  to  work  in  collaboration  with   help  students  understand  these  issues.   MARCIA  TUCCI faculty,   staff   and   fellow   students,”   The   task   force   found   that   97   he   said.   “I   would   say   I   am   most   percent   of   respondents   expressed   proud   of   the   immediate   response   supportive   attitudes   toward   LGBTQ   people  at  SUNY  New  Paltz.  The  triangulation  of   on  campus,”  she  said.  “We  know  when  we  do  it   for   current   construction   plan   updates   and   the   the  data  included  11  focus  groups,  according  to   bi-­annually  we  will  score  better  on  the  next  one.   stipulation  made  by  the  president  that  all  future   Marcia   Tucci,   assistant   dean   for   the   Academic   Our  goal  would  be  to  get  between  the  four  and   constructions  should  include  a  gender  inclusive   ¿YHUDQJH´ restroom.” Advising  Center  and  task  force  member.   Tucci   said   the   issue   of   a   lack   of   gender   Director   of   the   Psychological   Counsel-­ “That   really   informed   our   understanding   of  what  peoples’  experiences  are  in  a  very  direct   neutral  bathrooms  available  on  campus  was  the   ing  Center  Gweneth  Lloyd  said  her  department   number   one   safety   issue   for   the   LGBTQ   com-­ works   to   make   sure   LGBTQ   students   feel   safe   way,”  she  said. and  comfortable  and  she  feels  education  would   These   11   groups   participated   in   in-­depth   munity. “Even   though   it’s   potentially   a   very   small   foster  knowledge  and  understanding  in  the  com-­ discussions   about   campus   climate   issues   and   consisted   of   international   students,   student   ath-­ number  of  people,  the  amount  of  discomfort  they   munity.   “I   think   the   college   community   remains   letes,   fraternity   and   sorority   members,   LGBTQ   were   experiencing   not   having   these   facilities   students,   trans   students,   bisexual   students,   resi-­ readily  available  on  campus  was  causing  them  a   very  open,”  Lloyd  said.  “I  don’t  like  to  use  the   dence   life   professionals,   faculty   (two   groups),   very  high  level  of  distress,”  she  said.  “And  we  do   word   ‘tolerance’   because   I   think   ‘tolerated’   facilities  operations  and  maintenance  and  univer-­ have   [gender   neutral   bathrooms].   But   we   don’t   sounds   like   an   annoyance,   but   in   terms   of   liv-­ sity  police  department  and  LGBTQ  employees,   have  them  in  places  that  were  being  most  useful   ing   together   and   creating   a   community   of   un-­ according  to  the  LGBTQ  Campus  Climate  Task   to  students.  We  just  kept  saying  that  we  need  to   derstanding   and   respecting   and   about   how   you   bring  this  to  a  higher  level  of  understanding  of   disagree.  You  can’t  disagree  by  trying  to  oppress.   Force  report. 'LUHFWRURIWKH2I¿FHRI6WXGHQW$FWLYLWLHV what  the  risk  is  for  students.  When  we  brought   You  have  to  at  least  respect  them  as  a  human.”   Patterson  said  he  also  thinks  more  central-­ and  Union  Services  and  chair  of  the  task  force,   that  data  to  the  president,  they  were  just  amazed.” This  prompted  changes  in  the  plans  for  the   ized   education   will   send   a   message   to   our   new   Mike  Patterson,  said  the  report  was  able  to  high-­ light  some  important  LGBTQ  issues  on  campus. renovation  of  Wooster  Science  Building  to  have   entrants  that  this  institution  values  respect  for  all.   “The  interesting  thing  about  a  college  com-­ “There’s  a  good  need  that  all  of  our  campus   a   gender   neutral   bathroom   centralized   on   cam-­ policies  are  up  to  date  and  current  and  reviewed   pus,  along  with  the  changed  policy  that  requires   munity  is  that  you’re  always  cycling  through  new   in   making   sure   they   are   not   discriminatory   in   all  new  construction  to  have  gender  neutral  bath-­ people,”  Patterson  said.  “You  always  have  new   any   way,”   he   said.   “I   think   the   other   thing   that   rooms   and   any   current   renovations   whenever   people  with  opinions  coming  in.  People  have  the   needs  to  come  out  [of  the  report]  is  some  sort  of   possible  would  include  in  their  plans,  these  bath-­ right  to  their  opinions  and  sometimes  those  opin-­ ions  are  not  friendly.  We  believe  in  and  we  stand   centralized  group  to  identify  what  is  going  on  on   rooms,  according  to  Tucci. “I   think   Trans   [people]   are   the   newest   up  for  the  rights  of  our  LGBTQ  counterparts  and   campus.  There’s  a  lot  of  different  things  happen-­ ing  on  LGBTQ  issues,  but  nobody  knows  about   group  of  minorities  to  rise  up  and  demand  equal   you  have  the  right  to  believe  what  you  want,  but  

’’

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

 6

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By  Jennifer  Newman Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

To  frack  or  not  to  frack,  that  is  the  nev-­ er-­ending  question. New  York  Gov.  Andrew  Cuomo  has  not   approved  or  disapproved  the  environmental   impact  of  fracking,  or  hydraulic  fracturing,   a   controversial   drilling   technique   that   has   been  used  to  extract  natural  gas  with  the  use   of  pressurized  water  mixed  with  chemicals.   According   to   the   Department   of   En-­ vironmental   Conservation   (DEC)   website,   they   received   more   than   13,000   public   comments   on   the   Draft   Supplemental   Ge-­ neric   Environmental   Impact   Statement   (SGEIS)  issued  in  September  2009.  It  was   revised  again  in  September  2011.  The  pub-­ lic   comment   period   on   the   draft   ended   in   January  2012.   For  those  of  you  just  tuning  in,  this  is   2014,  more  than  two  years  later.  You  may   ask,  what’s  the  hold  up?  That  is  a  fantastic   question.   New   York’s   environmental   commis-­ sioner   said   he   won’t   issue   regulations   to   allow   fracking   for   natural   gas   until   at   least   April   2015,   meaning   Cuomo   prob-­ ably   won’t   decide   on   the   issue   until   after   he  faces  re-­election,  according  to  a  January   Bloomberg  Sustainability  article.   Is   Cuomo   putting   off   a   decision   on   fracking,  avoiding  controversy  running  for   president  or  re-­election  for  governor?  May-­ be.  Probably.   But   even   President   Barack   Obama   is   on   the   frack   train,   hiding   behind   the   lure   of  independence  from  foreign  oil  and  key-­ words  like  “natural  gas”  instead  of  “frack-­ ing.”   The  possible  risks  in  the  SGEIS  range   from   chemical   emissions   to   pollutants   in   water.  Taking  the  time  to  thoroughly  exam-­ ine  the  risks  of  fracking  is  not  what  bothers   me,  I’m  all  for  it.  What  bothers  me  is  that   we  do  not  know  the  health  and  environmen-­ tal  impacts,  but  this  huge  issue  seems  to  just   be  a  political  tool.  Come  on.   No   matter   which   way   the   decision   falls,  the  health  of  New  Yorkers  should  not   be  used  for  political  gain.  Period.


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Senate  Discusses  Healthcare  And  Finances %\.ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG &RS\(GLWRU_:DU¿HON#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX

The  57th  Student  Senate  met  for  the  fourth  time  this   semester   on   Wednesday,   Feb.   26   at   8   p.m.   in   Student   Union  (SU)  418. 7KH¿UVWGLVFXVVLRQWRSLFRIWKHQLJKWZDVWKHGHYHO-­ RSPHQWWKDWVHQDWHKDVPDGHZLWKUHSUHVHQWDWLYHVIURPWKH +HDOWK 2I¿FH LQ SURYLGLQJ WUDQVJHQGHUHG VWXGHQWV ZLWK KHDOWKFDUHWKDW¿WVWKHLUOLIHVW\OHQHHGV²LQFOXGLQJVH[ FKDQJHVXUJHU\RUWUHDWPHQWIRUJHQGHULGHQWLW\GLVRUGHUV 6WXGHQW $VVRFLDWLRQ 6$  ([HFXWLYH 9LFH 3UHVLGHQW =DFKDU\ 5RXVVHDXV  VDLG WKDW WKHUH ZHUH WKUHH SRVVLEOH RSWLRQVIRUKRZWKHVHKHDOWKFDUHQHHGVZLOOEHDGGUHVVHG 7KH¿UVWRSWLRQZDVWKDWWKHUHZLOOEHQRFKDQJHLQWKHVWX-­ GHQWKHDOWKLQVXUDQFHSROLF\EXWWKHUHZLOOVWLOOEHPRQH\ DOORWWHGWRWKHVWXGHQWVLQQHHGRIDGGLWLRQDOIXQGVWRFRYHU VXUJHULHVRUKRUPRQDOWUHDWPHQWV $QRWKHU RSWLRQ GLVFXVVHG ZDV WR SURYLGH XS WR  WR WKRVH VWUXJJOLQJ ZLWK JHQGHU LGHQWLW\ DQG D WKLUG FKRLFH ZDV WR JLYH WKHVH VWXGHQWV DQ XQOLPLWHG DO-­ ORZDQFHLQKHDOWKFDUHIXQGLQJWRPHHWWKHLUQHHGV ³,W¶V QRW LUUDWLRQDO IRU XV WR EH SXUVXLQJ WKLV LQ DQ\ ZD\´ 5RXVVHDXV VDLG ³,¶YH EHHQ LQ FRQWDFW ZLWK RWKHU FROOHJHVWKDWKDYHGRQHWKLVDQGVLQFHWKHUHDUHVXFKIHZ VWXGHQWV WKDW ZLOO EH LQFOXGHG LQ WKLV SROLF\ WKH VWXGHQW

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Council  Committee   Looks  To  Reform  SEIs %\0DGGLH$QWKRQ\ &RS\(GLWRU_1#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX

7KH WKLUG FRXQFLO RI RUJDQL]D-­ WLRQVRIWKHVHPHVWHUPHWWKLVZHHNLQ Student  Unino  (SU)  62-­63  at  7  p.m.   7KHUHLVRQHVHDWDYDLODEOHLQWKH $FDGHPLF $IIDLUV &RPPLWWHH IRU D EXVLQHVVPDMRU7KHJURXSPHHWVHY-­ ery  other  Wednesday  from  3-­5  p.m. 7KH $FDGHPLF $IIDLUV &RPPLW-­ WHHLVFXUUHQWO\ORRNLQJWRUHIRUP6WX-­ GHQW(YDOXDWLRQRI,QVWUXFWLRQ 6(,V  DQGDOVRWKHVDWLVIDFWRU\XQVDWLVIDFWR-­ U\ 68 RSWLRQDYDLODEOHWRVWXGHQWV :KDWWKH$FDGHPLF$IIDLUV&RPPLW-­ WHHGHFLGHVZLOOXOWLPDWHO\JRWRDFD-­ GHPLFVHQDWH  7KH (GXFDWLRQDO 7HFKQRORJ\ Committee   needs   business   and   edu-­ FDWLRQ VWXGHQWV WR ¿OO WZR DYDLODEOH seats. 7KH %XGJHW *RDOV DQG 3ODQ Committee  needs  a  business  major  to  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

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Copy  Editor  |  .ZDU¿HON@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Francois  Deschamps  is  one  of  27  fellows  in  the  NYFA  photography  category.

By  Zameena  Mejia Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY   New   Paltz   Photography   Professor   Francois   Deschamps  was  named  a  New  York  Foundation  for  the   Arts  (NYFA)  fellow  for  the  2013  award  cycle  upon  enter-­ ing  work  from  his  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photo-­Rapideâ&#x20AC;?  photo  project.   For  the  past  28  years,  NYFA  has  provided  over  $27   million  in  unrestricted  cash  grants  to  artists  in  15  disci-­ plines  at  critical  stages  in  their  creative  development,  ac-­ cording   to   the   foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   website.  Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Fellowship   provides  unrestricted  grants  of  $7,000  to  New  York-­based   artists  and  is  intended  to  fund  an  artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  vision  or  voice,   regardless  of  the  level  of  his  or  her  artistic  career  point.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  very  honored  to  have  won.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  looked  at  the   other  winning  photographers  and  their  work  is  at  a  really   high  level  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  amazed  that  I  got  it,â&#x20AC;?  Deschamps  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  look  at  it  like  wow,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  in  that  same  category.â&#x20AC;? Of  the  27  fellows  in  the  photography  category,  De-­ schamps  represented  Ulster  County,  as  one  of  only  two   photographers   who   did   not   reside   in   New  York   City.  A   three-­time  winner  of  the  competitive  NYFA  Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Fel-­ lowship,  Deschamps  said  he  had  applied  many  times  but   had  not  won.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  keep  applying.    Never  assume  you   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  it  because  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  good,â&#x20AC;?  Deschamps  said. For   the   NYFA   fellowship   application,   Deschamps   chose   eight   photos   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photo-­Rapideâ&#x20AC;?   along   with   a   statement.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photo-­Rapideâ&#x20AC;?   was   the   brainchild   of   Des-­ champsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   2010   Fulbright   Senior   Research   Fellowship,   during  which  he  lived  in  Mali  for  a  year.  Deschamps  said   he   loves   teaching,   but   having   been   able   to   completely   focus   on   his   photography   during   the   Fullbright   was   re-­

Ă&#x20AC;HFWHGLQWKHTXDOLW\DQGVXFFHVVRIKLVZRUN+HPRVW recently  displayed  photos  taken  during  his  time  in  Mali  at   DVRORH[KLELWWLWOHGÂł7D[L%DPDNR´DW2.+DUULV*DO-­ OHU\LQ6R+R â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   very   grateful   to   the   college,   in   particular   to   President   Donald   Christian   who   was   very   generous   in   supporting  the  Fullbright,â&#x20AC;?  Deschamps  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  also   great  to  work  with  The  Dorsky.  This  kind  of  stuff  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   happen   without   support   from   people   like   the   president,   the  dean  at  the  time,  exhibit  visitors.â&#x20AC;? Photography  Professor  Ann  Lovett,  who  served  as  a   NYFA  Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Fellowship  selection  jury  member  in  1993,   VDLGLWÂśVWHUULÂżFWRKHDUDERXW'HVFKDPSVÂśDZDUG â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   is   an   extremely   competitive   and   prestigious   DZDUG´/RYHWWVDLGÂł)UDQFRLVLVGHÂżQLWHO\RQHRIWKRVH accomplished   faculty   members   who   has   received   ac-­ NQRZOHGJHPHQWRIKLVTXDOLW\RIZRUNLQWKHÂżHOG´ Deschamps   said   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   used   the   award   to   cover   the   FRVWRIDQHZFDPHUDHTXLSPHQWDQGPDWHULDOVDQGZLOO VDYHVRPHIRUIXWXUHWUDYHOV+HDOVRVDLGPRQH\LVQÂśWWKH only  reward  from  receiving  the  fellowship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  opens  many  doors.  Many  people  read  the  list  and   make   a   note   of   the   winners,â&#x20AC;?   Deschamps   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   also   helps  when  approaching  curators  with  a  body  of  work  that   has  received  such  recognition.â&#x20AC;?   Next,  Deschamps  said  he  plans  to  put  an  American   take  on  his  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photo-­Rapideâ&#x20AC;?  project,  where  he  will  travel   around  the  country  and  take  photos  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  capturing  people   being  patiently  waiting,  even  when  confronted  with  ordi-­ narily  stimulating  surroundings.   +H KDV DOUHDG\ EHHQ WR )ORULGD DQG SODQV WR YLVLW more  states.

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

The  Department  of  Residence  Life  announced  a  new  position  in   all   residence   halls   on   campus   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultural   liaison.â&#x20AC;?   These   indi-­ viduals  will  be  trained  to  embrace  diversity  within  the  residence  halls,   while  at  the  same  time  creating  a  sense  of  togetherness  for  students   who  may  struggle  with  cultural  issues.   Liaisons  must  already  be  a  resident  assistant  (RA). (DFK OLDLVRQ ZLOO EH UHTXLUHG WR PHHW LQ D FRPPLWWHH RI RWKHU liasons  once  a  month  to  communicate  between  themselves  and  their   respective  hall  in  regards  to  the  programming  efforts  that  Residence   Life  will  plan.  Cultural  liaisons  will  also  conduct  their  own  research   on   the   efforts   other   universities   are   making   for   similar   causes   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   a   celebration  of  diversity  and  cultural  awareness.   Complex  Director  of  Residence  Life  Sandy  Pincay  said  the  main   goal  of  this  cultural  liaison  position  was  to  create  a  team  dedicated  to   improving  the  atmosphere  of  living  in  the  residence  hall  community.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  wish  to  celebrate  diversity  and  all  cultural  differences  con-­ tinuously  rather  than  waiting  for  an  unfortunate  event  to  happen,â&#x20AC;?  she   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  residents  will  learn  that  there  is  a  resource  within  their  hall   that  will  be  properly  trained  for  cultural  or  diverse  issues.  Residents   will  be  able  to  enjoy  the  celebration  of  these  designed  programs.â&#x20AC;? 2ULJLQDOO\ IURP 7DLZDQ XQGHFODUHG ÂżUVW\HDU VWXGHQW $QJHO +XDQJVDLGVKHWKLQNVWKHFXOWXUDOOLDLVRQSRVLWLRQLVQHFHVVDU\WRKDYH in  the  residence  halls  because  it  will  help  students  of  different  cultures   stay  true  to  their  roots. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  hundreds  of  people  living  in  the  dorms  on  campus  and   not  every  one  of  them  share  the  same  culture,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  believe  it  is   important  that  the  dorms  acknowledge  the  different  cultures  that  their   residents  may  have  and  to  share  that  with  other  residents.  If  a  dormi-­ tory  is  supposed  to  be  home  to  the  college  kids  while  they  are  studying   here,  they  should  have  the  opportunity  to  feel  at  home  by  celebrating   the  holidays  of  their  culture  or  whatever  else  they  are  used  to.â&#x20AC;? +XDQJDOVRVDLGWKHSRVLWLRQVHHPVOLNHDJUHDWZD\IRULQWHUHVWHG students  to  get  involved  in  the  campus  community. Âł,WKLQNLWZRXOGEHJUHDWWRKDYHSHRSOHVSHFLÂżFDOO\WUDLQHGIRU this   position   to   be   in   each   dorm   because   this   way   the   RAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   duty   is   reduced  and  it  gives  other  people  opportunities  to  hold  a  leadership   position,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. The   Department   of   Residence   Life   believes   the   students   cho-­ VHQWREHOLDLVRQVZLOOEHDEOHWRJURZSURIHVVLRQDOO\ZLWKVLJQLÂżFDQW WUDLQLQJDQGVXSSRUWIURPIDFXOW\3LQFD\VDLGWKLVSRVLWLRQZLOOEHQHÂżW the  department  as  a  whole  as  it  is  continuously  making  efforts  to  best   serve  the  needs  of  campus  residents. Following  the  nomination  process,  residence  directors  looked  at   the  following:  a  student  must  be  an  RA  for  at  least  one  year  and  dur-­ ing  that  time  established  a  comfortable  and  trusting  relationship  with   their  residents.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  will  be  favorable  for  the  type  of  programs  and  conversa-­ WLRQVZHLQWHQGWRKDYHZKHUHVHQVLWLYLW\DQGWUXVWLVUHTXLUHG´3LQFD\ said. This  position  was  initiated  by  Associate  Vice  President  Raymond   Schwarz  with  the  support  of  Corinna  Caracci  and  the  Department  of   Residence  Life.  Further  development  will  be  made  with  the  collabora-­ tion  of  faculty  from  designated  departments.


THE GUNK T h ursday, FebRuary 27, 2014

C O L L A B O R AT E F O R

CUPSI Story on page 7B

PHOTO  BY  SUZY  BERKOWITZ


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Brew Baby, Brew / Distilling Inferno

By  Hannah  Nesich Assistant  Copy  Editor  |  Hnesich@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Something  different  is  brewing  at  Bacchus,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not   their  soup  specials. The  restaurant  and  bar  just  marked  their  sixth  month  of   having  homemade  beer  on  the  menu,  brewed  just  feet  away   from  customers  by  brewmasters  Michael  Renganeschi  and   Jason  Synan.   Since  late  August,  the  pair  have  brewed  twice  a  week,   creating   one   new   beer   a   week.   There   are   four   styles   they   follow  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  double  IPA,  a  farmhouse  ale,  an  imperial  stout   and  a  porter  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  but  every  single  beer  tastes  at  least  slightly   different  from  the  last  batch  and  takes  a  week  to  sell. Each  beer  is  crafted  in  a  similar  style  with  comparable   base  ingredients,  but  differences  occur  throughout  the  brew-­ ing  process,  according  to  Renganeschi.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  we  are  trying  to  do,  have  people  expect  a   certain  wholesale  idea  that  keeps  them  on  their  toes  also,â&#x20AC;?   Renganeschi  said.   Each   beer   takes   about   a   week   to   sell   and   the   brewing   process  can  take  three  weeks  to  three  months,  though  they   can  choose  to  age  beers  for  up  to  a  few  years. The  process  starts  off  with  80  to  100  gallons  of  water  at   170  degrees  and  250  to  300  lbs.  of  grain.  Renganeschi  and   Synan   use   six   fermenting   tanks   to   ferment   the   liquid,   and   then  move  some  concoctions  to  six  wooden  barrels,  which   DUHVSHFLÂżFWRWKHGLIIHUHQWNLQGVRIDOFRKROWKHLUĂ&#x20AC;DYRULQJ VKRXOG EH LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHG E\ ² ZLQH EDUUHOV ZKLVNH\ EDUUHOV rum  barrels  and  others.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  idea  is  that  each  will  take  a  little  bit  of  character  of   the  spirit  that  was  in  there  beforehand,â&#x20AC;?  Renganeschi  said.   Essentially,  the  porter  beer  you  drink  last  week  may  not   be  exactly  the  same  as  the  one  you  drink  this  week. Synan   and   Renganeschi   started   selling   their   brewed   beer   legally   and   commercially   at   Bacchus   in   August,   but   their  history  with  brewing  goes  back  much  further. Renganeschi  brewed  throughout  his  college  years,  and   shared   his   techniques   with   Synan   after   the   two   became   friends  while  playing  in  a  band  three  or  four  years  ago,  Syn-­ an  said. Even   if   they   werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   selling   their   brewed   creations   at   Bacchus,  they  would  still  be  brewing  the  way  they  started:   with  a  single  barrel,  on  Renganeschiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  front  patio.   %HIRUHEHFRPLQJWKHRIÂżFLDOEUHZHUVRI%DFFKXV5HQ-­ ganeschi  had  worked  at  Bacchus  as  a  waiter  before,  while   Synan  was  co-­manager  of  the  bar,  a  position  he  still  holds. The  pair  had  been  casually  brewing  together  for  about   a  year  before  Synan  got  the  green  light  from  Bacchusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  bar   owner   to   create   their   own   brews   while   in   a   staff   meeting,   something   he   previously   viewed   as   being   â&#x20AC;&#x153;mostly   in   the   realm   of   fantasyâ&#x20AC;?   because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   typically   such   an   expensive   endeavor.   The  good  news  arrived  around  the  same  time  Rengan-­ eschi  was  set  to  move  to  Spain,  leaving  Synan  with  the  task   of   convincing   him   to   stay   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   a   worthwhile   decision,   said   Renganeschi.  

PHOTO  BY  MAXWELL  REIDE

BACCHUS BAR AND RESTAURANT SERVES MICROBREWED CREATIONS

Renganeschi  and  Synan  with  their  brewing  equipment.

Renganeschi   and   Synan   brew   with   locally   produced   products,   sometimes   serving   beer   to   the   very   same   people   they   purchased   the   grapes   from   earlier   that   week.   This   â&#x20AC;&#x153;farm-­to-­tableâ&#x20AC;?   practice,   described   by   Renganeschi,   really   caters  to  the  environmentally-­conscious  crowd  of  the  Hud-­ son  Valley.   In  addition,  the  brewers  think  another  telling  character-­ LVWLFRIWKHLUFRQVXPHUVLVDZLOOLQJQHVVWRWU\QHZĂ&#x20AC;DYRUV also  indicative  of  the  age  of  some  of  their  clientele,  accord-­ ing  to  Synan.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  aspect  of  the  Pokemon,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gotta  catch  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em   allâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   generation,â&#x20AC;?   Synan   said   of   his   age   demographicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   atti-­ tude  toward  beer.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  [our  generation]  is  comfortable  with   variation,  we  are  comfortable  with  not  having  a  standby  beer   that  we  order,  like  Budweiser,  when  we  walk  into  a  bar.â&#x20AC;? Synan  said  when  older  customers  ask  for  Guinness  on   tap  and  Synan    reveals  they  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  carry  that,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;you  see  their   minds   break,   in   a   way,   that   I   think   is   sometimes   hard   for   them  to  understand  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  carry  Guinness  on  tap.â&#x20AC;?   Though   Bacchus   carries   Guinness   by   the   can,   Synan   said  it  underscores  his  point  that  being  comfortable  with  try-­ ing  new  things  might  be  an  aspect  of  the  younger  generation   of  beer  consumers,  which  comprises  much  of  their  fanbase.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   philosophy   as   brewers   is   that   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   want   to  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

make  anything  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  already  been  made  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  we  want  to  make   something   new   and   exciting   and   interesting   every   single     time,â&#x20AC;?   Renganeschi   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   lucky   in   the   fact   that   we   can  do  that  with  our  clientele.â&#x20AC;? Synan   said   throughout   the   course   of   the   project,   Bac-­ chus  was  compared  to  New  Paltz  restaurant  Gilded  Otter.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  have  a  much  larger  brewing  system.  They  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   feature   other   peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   beer   on   tap.   Because   of   that,   their   brewing  schedule,  they  are  required  to  continue  to  produce   beer,â&#x20AC;?  Synan  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  such  an  intensive  brew-­ ing  schedule,  we  offer  one  new  beer  at  a  time,  maybe  two.  It   allows  us  the  freedom  to  be  more  creative.â&#x20AC;? Gilded   Otter   has   been   brewing   since   November   of   1998,   and   features   six   to   eight   beers   on   tap.   Throughout   the  16  years  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  open,  brewmaster  Darren  Currier   has  brewed  close  to  2000  batches  and  around  100  different   styles  of  beer.  For  him,  another  brewery  in  town  means  more   opportunity  than  it  does  competition.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   glad   Bacchus   is   brewing.  The   fact   that   the   town   has   another   brewery   is   good   for   business   for   both   of   us,â&#x20AC;?   Currier,  Gilded  Otterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  brewer  since  2000,  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Craft  beer   enthusiasts  travel  to  brewery  destinations.    The  more  brew-­ eries  in  one  area  the  better.  It  brings  more  beer  fans  to  the   area,  which  in  turn  means  more  business  for  all  of  us.â&#x20AC;?


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Expressive Innovation Ignites Education

WRITING PROJECT ENERGIZES SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND TEACHERS ALIKE By  Roger  Gilson   Contributing  Writer  |  Gilson46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu The  Hudson  Valley  Writing  Project  [HVWP],  a  teacher-­ enrichment  program  housed  and  partially  funded  by  SUNY   New   Paltz,   provides   pre-­school   to   college-­level   educators   of  all  disciplines  with  new  skills  to  apply  in  the  classroom. The  HVWP  is  one  of  195  local  writing  projects  under   the  umbrella  of  The  National  Writing  Project  which  strives   to  create  a  cross-­disciplinary  and  multi-­level  community  of   teachers  to  advance  the  way  students  express  themselves. The   cornerstone   of   the   program   is   the   Summer   Insti-­ tute,  a  month-­long  teacher-­enrichment  program  that  counts   for  nine  graduate  school  credits.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  model  is  one  of  teachers  teaching  teachers,â&#x20AC;?  Tom   Meyer,  one  of  three  co-­founders  of  The  HVWP  and  associ-­ ate  professor  of  secondary  education  at  SUNY  New  Paltz   said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  cool  about  a  network  is  that  it  permits  people   to  move  knowledge  and  skill  that  we  trade  in  a  very  recipro-­ cal  way,â&#x20AC;?  Meyer  said. Bonnie   Kaplan,   the   other   co-­founder   of   the   HVWP,   said  the  National  Writing  Project  was  founded  on  the  notion   that  teachers  â&#x20AC;&#x153;needed  a  sense  of  community.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  just  about  a  talking  head,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  shared  mutual   collaborative  experience,â&#x20AC;?  Kaplan  said.   The  program  works  with  styles  of  writing  from  every   discipline,  Meyer  said.  Science  and  Math  educators  partici-­ pate  in  the  institute  alongside  English  teachers.

Kathleen  Yeager,   who   teaches   elementary   school   stu-­ dents  in  need  of  academic  intervention  and  is  a  graduate  of   WKH 6XPPHU ,QVWLWXWH VDLG WKH ÂżUVW WKLQJ WKDW KLW KHU XSRQ entering  the  program  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;these  people  are  serious.â&#x20AC;? The   variation   of   the   teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   subject   area   and   grade   level  allowed  Yeager  to  consider  her  work  â&#x20AC;&#x153;from  a  variety   of  different  perspectives.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Though   this   interchange,   I   came   to   not   only   under-­ stand  the  work  of  others,  but  my  own  work  on  a  totally  new   level,â&#x20AC;?  Yeager  said. According  to  Kaplan,  the  HVWP  teaches  educators  to   go  beyond  the  written  word  and  teach  their  students  how  to   express  themselves  through  different  media. Kaplan  specializes  in  educating  teachers  about  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Digital   Storytelling.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  you  could  go  into  teaching  today  and  not   be  open  to  the  digital  horizon,â&#x20AC;?  Kaplan  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  cool  thing   about  digital  writing  is  that  it  allows  kids  to  develop  skills   on  devices  they  have  already  fallen  in  love  withâ&#x20AC;Śkids  are   developing  a  certain  mastery,  but  they  still  need  structure.â&#x20AC;? The   multi-­model   learning   of   Digital   Storytelling   in-­ volves  the  mixing  of  writing  with  music,  images,  video  and   other  components. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once  you  start  adding  in  images  and  music,  the  writ-­ ing  generally  changesâ&#x20AC;Śevery  piece  of  that  new  project  that   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  creating  has  to  be  showcased  in  some  way,â&#x20AC;?  Kaplan   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  kid  who  moves  into  Digital  Storytelling  is  taking   on  a  much  more  sophisticated  and  complicated  experience  

then  you  might  have  with  a  pen  and  a  piece  of  paper,â&#x20AC;?  said   Kaplan. The   HVWP   multi-­model   approach   can   take   other   forms.   Rebecca   Burdett,   a   graduate   of   the   Summer   Insti-­ tute  program  who  has  taught  Pre-­K  through  the  sixth  grade,   said  this  approach  â&#x20AC;&#x153;opened  up  another  genreâ&#x20AC;?  for  her  in  the   classroom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  an  early  childhood  person,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  one  to  place   my  students  in  front  of  computers,â&#x20AC;?  Burdett  said.   %XUGHWWGHYHORSHGDFXUULFXOXPWKDWLQWHJUDWHGWKHÂżUVW stages   of   linguistic   education   with   her   â&#x20AC;&#x153;favorite   passion,   which  is  early  childhood  play.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  I  think  about  writing,  I  think  of  it  as  composi-­ tion,   and   we   compose   and   create   in   multiple   ways,â&#x20AC;?   said   Burdett.   She   believes   that   writing   is   based   on   expression,   which  can  take  on  many  forms. %XUGHWW GHYHORSHG D OHDUQLQJ SURJUDP IRU KHU ÂżUVW grade  students  where  they  create  elaborate  buildings  out  of   wooden  blocks  to  begin  to  learn  the  art  of  expression.  Her   students  create  projects  with  the  blocks,  which  are  then  dis-­ cussed   with   Burdett.  At   the   end   of   the   week,   the   creation   is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;published,â&#x20AC;?  through  taking  a  picture  of  it,  or  writing  a   story,  or  telling  a  story  about  it. Kaplan  and  Burdett  agreed  the  feedback  given  by  grad-­ uates  of  the  HVWP  was  exemplary.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;To  have  that  network  of  peer  support,  it  gives  you  the   ability   to   broaden   your   practice   in   really   dynamic   way,â&#x20AC;?   Burdett  said.

Candlelit Prayers And Fond Memories

STUDENTS, FACULTY AND FAMILY GATHER TO PAY THEIR RESPECTS FOR DECEASED STUDENT By  Andrew  Lief   Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu On  Wednesday,  Feb.  26,  at  least  75  people  gathered  on   the  second  level  of  the  Student  Union  concourse  for  a  candle-­ OLJKWPHPRULDOVHUYLFHWRKRQRUWKHOLIHRIÂżUVW\HDUVWXGHQW Eric  Van  de  Laar,  who  passed  away  on  Thursday,  Feb.  6.     The  event  began  with  Rev.  Brother  Salvatore  Patricola   of  St.  Josephsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church  in  New  Paltz  addressing  the  crowd   with  opening  words  and  led  prayers.     Ericâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  friends  and  family  said  he  was  a  person  who  was   passionate   about   music,   loved   playing   video   games,   had   a   good  sense  of  humor,  a  sharp  wit  and  was  someone  who  was   able  to  maintain  his  composure.     Ericâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  father,  Lyell  Van  de  Laar,  addressed  the  crowd  and   thanked  them  for  all  of  the  kind  words  they  posted  on  Face-­ book  and  said  it  meant  so  much  to  their  family  that  everyone   came  out  to  the  service.         Ericâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  brother,  Ian  Van  de  Laar,  said  he  was  thankful  for   everyone  in  attendance  for  the  support  they  have  given  their   family.

Âł+H ZDV P\ EHVW IULHQG DQG P\ ÂżUVW PHPRULHV DUH RI Eric,â&#x20AC;?  Ian  Van  de  Laar  said.     First-­year  biology  major  Alexandra  Shea  said  she  would   always  walk  to  her  9:25  a.m.  classes  with  Eric,  and  described   him  as  a  person  who  put  her  at  ease.     )LUVW\HDU ÂżQH DUWV PDMRU +DOH\ 6SULQJVWRQ VDLG (ULFÂśV kindness  made  a  big  impression  on  her.  She  said  when  she   ÂżUVWFDPHWR1HZ3DOW]VKHZDVYHU\QHUYRXVEXW(ULFJDYH her  some  of  his  momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  cookies,  making  her  feel  at  home.   (ULFÂśVURRPPDWHÂżUVW\HDUELRORJ\PDMRU7KRPDV1LFK olas,  said  Eric  was  a  person  who  was  extremely  kind,  gener-­ ous  and  never  judged  anyone.     First-­year  journalism  and  political  science  double  major   Sarah  Eames  said  she  valued  the  time  spent  with  Eric.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  will  cherish  my  experiences  with  Eric  for  the  rest  of   my  time  at  New  Paltz  and  for  the  rest  of  my  life,â&#x20AC;?  Eames  said.     SUNY  New  Paltz  Associate  Vice  President  Ray  Schwarz   said  the  service  showed  how  large  of  an  impact  Eric  had  on   the  lives  of  those  he  met.     Âł:KDW,WKLQNLWVD\VÂżUVWLVPRUHDERXW(ULFDQGKRZ he  touched  people  than  the  community  itself,â&#x20AC;?  Schwarz  said.    

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes,  it  always  makes  me  proud  when  the  community  comes   together  for  each  other,  and  New  Paltz  does  that  so  well,  but   it   speaks   mostly   to   Eric   and   his   sensitivity   and   his   caring,   which  came  out  over  and  over  again  from  the  hearts  of  stu-­ dents.â&#x20AC;? Director  of  Student  Activities  and  Union  Services  Mike   Patterson  said  when  people  come  together  to  honor  someone   WKH\KDYHORVWDQGORYHGLWGHÂżQHVDVHQVHRIFRPPXQLW\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   we   lose   one   of   our   own,   those   that   are   closest   come  together  to  share  memories  and  honor  the  life  of  some-­ one  that  has  been  lost,â&#x20AC;?  Patterson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  students  really   led  the  effort  on  this  and  I  think  that  shows  a  lot  of  commit-­ ment  and  care.â&#x20AC;? Balloons  were  handed  out  to  those  in  attendance.    At  the   end   of   the   service,   the   balloons   were   released   into   the   sky   to  signify  the  release  of  any  regrets  and  to  send  prayers  and   thoughts  of  kindness  into  the  sky.     For   anyone   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   seeking   additional   counseling,   the   campus  Psychological  Counseling  Center  can  be  reached  at   845-­257-­2920   or   during   regular   business   hours   Monday   to   Friday  8:30  a.m.  to  5  p.m.


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Paw and Order: Supporting Vulnerable Witnesses THERAPY DOG PROVIDES COMFORT FOR CHILD VICTIMS IN THE COURTROOM

By  Anthony  DeRosa Features  Editor|  N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   friend   just   became   a   childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   greatest   ally.   On   Saturday   Feb.   15,   the   New   Paltz   community   was  invited  to  the  Coykendall  Science  Building  audi-­ torium   to   learn   about   the   use   of   facility   trained   dogs   in   the   courtroom,   in   particular   the   story   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosie,â&#x20AC;?   1HZ<RUN 6WDWHÂśV ÂżUVW MXGLFLDOO\ DSSURYHG FRXUWURRP therapy  dog.     Dr.  David  Crenshaw,  clinical  director  at  the  Chil-­ drenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Home  of  Poughkeepsie,  a  residental  shelter  that   provides   therapeutic   services   to   abused,   neglected,   or   at-­risk   children,   moderated   the   event   alongside   li-­ censed   clinical   social   worker   Lori   Stella,   also   of   the   &KLOGUHQÂśV +RPH ZKRVH ZRUN ZDV VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ LQ volved  in  the  case  which  Rosie  premiered.   Stella   shared   the   details   of   how   the   case   was   brought   to   trial   and   how   through   the   use   of   Rosie,   the  victim,  referred  to  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jessica,â&#x20AC;?  was  able  to  testify   against  her  abuser  and  receive  justice.   According   to   Stella,   Jessica   was   born   in   Guate-­ mala  and  at  one  month  old  was  left  by  her  parents  to   be  raised  by  her  maternal  grandparents,  along  with  her   older   brother.   Eleven   years   later   Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mother   re-­ turned  to  Guatemala  to  illegally  immigrate  Jessica  and   her   sibling   to   a   home   the   parents   had   established   in   Dutchess  County,  New  York.   During  their  travel,  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mother  was  caught  by   immigration  authority  and  deported  back  to  Guatema-­ la,  leaving  Jessica  and  her  brother  to  complete  the  trip   into  the  United  States  with  the  other  illegal  immigrants   they  were  traveling  with,  where  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  father  would   eventually  meet  them  and  take  them  to  New  York. Within  one  month  of  her  living  there,  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  fa-­ ther   began   molesting   her,   which   soon   grew   into   rap-­ ing  her  on  a  repeated  basis,  some  of  which  resulted  in   pregnancies  and  forced  abortions,  Stella  said.  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   abuse  would  last  four  years  until  the  day  she  resisted   her  fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  advances  and  drew  an  attempt  on  her  life.   Jessica  was  able  to  evade  the  attack  and  run  away  to   Connecticut  where  she  was  picked  up  by  Child  Protec-­ tive  Services  and  divulged  the  abuse  she  had  endured   at  the  hands  of  her  father.   After   police   recorded   a   phone   call   where   Jessica   tried   to   have   her   father   admit   what   he   had   done,   she   was   placed   in   group   care   at   the   Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Home   in   June   2010,   where   Stella   was   assigned   as   her   social   worker.   Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   father   was   placed   in   custody   await-­ ing  trial,  while  Jessica  spent  nearly  a  year  and  a  half  at   the  Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Home  unable  to  speak  of  the  trauma  she   suffered  to  Stella  or  other  counselors.   Âł$ORWRIWLPHVVKHZRXOGMXVWFRPHWRP\RIÂżFH

DQGFU\DQG,FRXOGQHYHUÂżJXUHRXWZK\´6WHOODVDLG Âł,GLGQÂśWNQRZLIVKHZDVKDYLQJĂ&#x20AC;DVKEDFNVRIKHUGDG I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  if  she  was  missing  her  siblings...Jessica   was  very  introverted  and  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  talk  about  her  feel-­ ings.â&#x20AC;? In  late  winter  2010,  with  the  trial  of  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  father   drawing  near,  Stella  worried  Jessica  would  be  unable   to  testify  as  the  primary  witness  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  acquitting  her  father   of  the  crime.  Dr.  Crenshaw  approached  Stella  with  an   idea   he   had   seen   at   a   recent   conference   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   the   use   of   courthouse  therapy  dogs.  Having  worked  with  Jessica   for   months   with   no   breakthroughs,   Stella   decided   to   give  it  a  try.   ,QWKHPHDQWLPH6WHOODWRRN-HVVLFDWRKHUÂżUVWWULDO preparation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  questions  they  had  to  ask  this  kid,  I  wanted   to  crawl  under  the  table,â&#x20AC;?  Stella  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  just  could  not   imagine   being   a   kid   and   having   to   answer   these   questions   that   are   so   uncomfortable.   [Jessica]   cried   so   much   and   we   had   to   keep   taking  breaks.  I  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  the  amount   of   pain   this   kid   would   have   to   go   through   time  and  time  again  preparing  for  this.â&#x20AC;?   In  spring  of  2011,  Rosie,  an  11-­year-­old   golden  retriever,  was  brought  to  the  Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Home  for  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  session.  Stella  recalled  the   ÂżUVWWLPHWKHWZRHQFRXQWHUHGRQHDQRWKHU â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   went   outside   for   a   walk   behind   the   home  where  there  are  some  picnic  tables,  which   I  thought  would  be  nice  with  the  dog,â&#x20AC;?  Stella  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   sat   down   at   the   table   and   Jessica   sat   across   from   me.   And   Rosie,   Rosie   just   hopped   up   on   the   bench   and   sat   next   to   Jessica.   I   thought   that   was  such  an  amazing  moment  behind  dog  and  hu-­ man.â&#x20AC;? 7KDWDIWHUQRRQDOVRPDUNHGWKHÂżUVWWLPH-HV sica   discussed   something   that   was   bothering   her.   Stella   said   after   that   she   worked   with   Jessica   and   Rosie  everyday.  In  the  presence  of  Rosie,  Jessica  felt   comforted  enough  to  discuss  her  abuse  with  Stella  as   well  as  with  attorneys  during  trial  preparations.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosie  really  allowed  Jessica  to  open  up  and  talk   about   these   traumatic   events   without   taking   breaks   or  sobbing,â&#x20AC;?  Stella  said.   Before  the  trial  commenced,  the  defense  argued   that   the   presence   of   Rosie   in   the   courtroom   would   sway   the   jury   to   sympathy.   However,   after   a   brief   KHDULQJ LQ ZKLFK 6WHOOD WHVWLÂżHG WR WKH QHFHVVLW\ RI Rosie  in  regards  to  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  testimony  as  well  as  pre-­ venting   re-­traumatizing   her,   the   dog   was   allowed   to   take  the  stand.   According   to   Stella,   the   jury   was   unable   to   see   Rosie  as  she  lay  in  the  witness  box  nuzzling  Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   foot   when   necessary.   Jessicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   testimony   lasted   for  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

more   than   an   hour,   said   Stella,   all   while   her   father   glared  at  her  from  the  defendant  seat.   In   the   days   following,   the   jury   reached   a   guilty   verdict,  what  Stella  said  was  an  emotional  moment  for   both  her  and  Jessica.  The  defense  has  since  decided  to   appeal  the  case,  reasoning  again  that  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  presence   LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHGWKHMXU\ The   historic   case   has   prompted   state   legislature   NQRZQDVÂł5RVLHÂśV/DZ´DELOOWKDWLIUDWLÂżHGZRXOG permit  the  use  of  facility  trained  therapy  dogs  in  court-­ houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  across  New  York.   Stella  has  gone  on  to  use  blood  descendant  therapy   dogs  in  her  work  since  Rosie  passed  in  spring  2012.   6KHVDLGWKDWLIDFXOWXUHÂżQGVLWQHFHVVDU\WRSODFH children  in  front  of  court,  there   should  be  measures  or  options   in  place  to  remain  sensi-­ tive  to  them  as  victims.         â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nelson   Mandela   said   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;There   can   be   no   keener   revelation   of   a   societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   soul   than  the  way  it  treats   its   children,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   and   I   agree   with   that,â&#x20AC;?   Stella  said.

IDE ELL  RE

XW  BY  MA PHOTO

Ace,  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  grandpuppy,  currently  works  as  a  facility  dog  with  Stella.


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5B

New Club Nothing Close To A Drag DRAG PERFORMANCE CLUB STARTS AT NEW PALTZ

This  semester,  New  Paltz  is  getting  an  injection  of   charisma,  uniqueness,  nerve  and  talent  from  one  of  its   newest  clubs.   The  Kings  and  Queens  of  New  Paltz,  SUNY  New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Drag   Performance   club,   has   opened   its   doors   this   semester   to   welcome   students   interested   in   drag   performance  and  culture.  Though  the  club  is  still  in  its   infancy,   co-­founders   Mike   Persico   and   Connor   Hen-­ derson   already   have   grand   plans   and   aspirations   for   their  inaugural  semester. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  exclude  anyone,â&#x20AC;?  Persico  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  is  a  place  for  people  with  experience  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a   place  where  people  can  start  off.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  basically  like  drag   boot  camp.â&#x20AC;? Both   Persico   and   Henderson   have   already   start-­ HG GRLQJ SHUIRUPDQFHV LQ GUDJ +HQGHUVRQ D ÂżUVW \HDU SKRWRJUDSK\ PDMRU ZDV ÂżUVW LQWURGXFHG WR GUDJ through  a  friend  and  found  inspiration  from  him.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  always  thought  it  was  really  cool  and  I  wanted   to  try  it  out,â&#x20AC;?  Henderson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  really  got  me  started   and  taught  me  the  tricks  of  the  trade.â&#x20AC;?   3HUVLFR D ÂżUVW\HDU SV\FKRORJ\ PDMRU KDV EHHQ SDUWRIWKHGUDJVFHQHIRUOHVVWKDQD\HDUZLWKKLVÂżUVW experience   being   his   high   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   spirit   week   and   GUHVVLQJXSDVDQRWRULRXVOLWHUDU\ÂżJXUH â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  know  what  drag  was  until  last  April   and  a  friend  introduced  me  to  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;RuPaulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Drag  Race,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   Persico  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  fell  in  love  and  was  later  asked  to  go  to   school  as  the  Queen  of  Hearts.  After  that  I  just  bought  a   ton  of  make-­up  and  started  doing  it  all  on  my  own.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   become  my  creative  outlet.â&#x20AC;? As  the  clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  co-­founders,  the  two  have  discussed   some  of  the  goals  they  have  for  this  semester.  The  club   was  asked  to  perform  in  the  March  8  Drag  Show  that   will  feature  â&#x20AC;&#x153;RuPaulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Drag  Raceâ&#x20AC;?  season  three  contes-­ tant  Shangela  Laquifa  Wadley.  On  top  of  this,  Persico   and  Henderson  said  they  plan  on  having  several  small   performances  throughout  the  year. In  order  to  get  club  members  who  may  be  new  to   drag  culture  comfortable  with  performing,  the  two  co-­ founders  want  to  host  a  series  of  mini-­drag  shows  and   have  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;big  drag  ballâ&#x20AC;?  at  the  end  of  the  semester.  They   also  said  they  were  interested  in  hosting  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;New  Paltz   Drag  Raceâ&#x20AC;?  at  some  point  during  the  semester.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  so  many  things  we  want  to  do,â&#x20AC;?  Persico   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   do   be   able   to   teach   girls   make-­up   tips   and   host   performances   throughout   the   semester.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  so  much  we  can  and  want  to  do.â&#x20AC;? However,   performance   and   programs   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   the  

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  MIKE    PERSICO  

By  Cat  Tacopina   Editor  in  Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

7KH.LQJVDQG4XHHQVRI1HZ3DOW]1HZ3DOW]ÂśVGUDJSHUIRUPDQFHFOXERIÂżFLDOO\VWDUWHGWKLVVHPHVWHU

only   focus   the   club   has.   Henderson   said   being   com-­ fortable  in  drag  is  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;liberatingâ&#x20AC;?  experience,  but  it  takes   time   and   encouragement   to   become   comfortable   in   your  own  skin.   Âł7KHÂżUVWWLPH,ZDVLQGUDJP\IULHQGSDLQWHGP\ whole  face  for  me  and  when  I  looked  in  the  mirror  I   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  it  was  me,â&#x20AC;?  Henderson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  looked   like   a   different   person.   I   could   totally   change   who   I   was,  and  I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really  liberating  to  have  something   where  you  can  change  so  much  about  yourself,  but  you  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

can  still  be  you.â&#x20AC;? Persico   also   said   that   acceptance   and   self-­worth   are  part  of  the  clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mission,  and  that  he  and  Hender-­ son   will   use   every   opportunity   they   can   to   help   club   members  thrive  not  just  in  drag,  but  in  all  facets  of  their   lives.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   inspire   people   to   be   comfortable   in   their  own  skin,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. The  club  meets  on  Thursdays  at  9:30  p.m.  in  Stu-­ dent  Union  414.


  6B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Finding A Common Solution By  Maddie  Anthony   Copy ��Editor  |  N02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Public   Education   Now:   Reform,   Resistance,   and   Solutions   in   New   York   State,   a   panel   discussion   ad-­ dressing   current   educational   policies   and   their   effects   on   students   as   well   as  educators  and  parents,  was  held  on   Wednesday,  Feb.  19  in  the  Coykendall   Science  Building  auditorium.   Eight   people   spoke   at   the   forum   starting   with   Leonie   Haimson   from   Class   Size   Matters   who   spoke   about   ,Q%ORRP,QFGHÂżQHGDVÂłDQLQGHSHQ-­ GHQW QRQSURÂżW RUJDQL]DWLRQ ZKRVH mission   is   to   provide   a   valuable   re-­ source  to  teachers,  students  and  fami-­ lies  to  improve  education,â&#x20AC;?  according   to   its   website.   Haimson   spoke   about   how  the  threat  to  student  privacy  and   safety  is  a  result  of  the  new  trend  data   sharing. According  to  Haimson,  New  York   State  is  the  worst  state  in  the  country   when  it  comes  to  data  privacy. Âł:HQHHGWRUHFODLPSXEOLFHGXFD-­ tion   for   the   public   good,   we   need   to   create  schools  our  children  deserveâ&#x20AC;Ś   with  the  information  available  through   data   sharing,   teachers   tend   to   stereo-­ type  students  before  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  even  met   them,â&#x20AC;?  Haimson  said. Karen  Sprowal,  a  New  York  City   SDUHQW RI D ÂżIWK JUDGHU QDPHG 0DW-­ thew,   who   requires   special   learning,   spoke   about   her   initial   reaction   after   ÂżQGLQJRXWDOORIWKHLQIRUPDWLRQWKDW is  readily  available  to  third  parties  of   his  school.   Âł,I\RXGRVRPHUHVHDUFK\RXZLOO be   extremely   surprised   as   I   was.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   like  big  brother  on  steroids,â&#x20AC;?  Sprowal   said. 6SRZDOÂśVVRQKDGDQÂłHGXFDWLRQDO neurologicalâ&#x20AC;?   evaluation,   a   25-­page-­ long   document   which   was   then   scanned  into  records.   Âł)RUP\VRQKLVVFKRROUHFRUGVDUH his  medical  records,â&#x20AC;?  Spowal  said.   The  topic  then  moved  on  to  the  is-­

sue  of  the  Common  Core,  a  state  stan-­ dards  initiative  which  is  causing  con-­ troversy  throughout  the  state.   Bianca  Tanis,   a   special   education   teacher  and  a  mother  herself,  spoke  of   the  negative  impacts  of  implementing   the  Common  Core.  She  felt  that  mea-­ sures   shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   taken   unless   the   PHDVXUHVDUHVROHO\IRUWKHEHQHÂżWRI students. Âł2XU VWUXJJOLQJ FKLOGUHQ DUH WKH canary   in   the   coal   mine,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   Âł1RRQHNQRZVZKDWWKHRXWFRPHZLOO beâ&#x20AC;Ś  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  always  had  standards.â&#x20AC;? 2QH RI WKH PDLQ FRQFHUQV DERXW the  Common  Core  is  the  idea  that  the   best  teachers  will  leave  the  profession.   Because   teachers   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   stop   and   take   more  time  if  the  children  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  quite   grasping  a  concept  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  or  stay  on  a  cer-­ tain   subject   because   the   students   are   so  engaged  in  it  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  children  with  the   highest  needs  are  often  the  ones  who   struggle   and   fall   behind   according   to   Tanis. Mike  Lillus,  a  high  school  teach-­ HU VDLG WKH FRPPRQ FRUH  ÂłUHDOO\ LV an   experiment   on   our   children,â&#x20AC;?   and   FDOOHG WKH WHVWV JLYHQ ÂłGHYHORSPHQ-­ tally  inappropriate.â&#x20AC;? Ken   Mitchell,   who   came   from   the  Lower  Hudson  Council  of  School   Superintendents,   said   that   Common   Core  narrowed  curriculum  and  causes   districts   to   have   to   cover   unfunded   costs  leading  to  program  and  staff  cuts He  added  that  91  percent  of  super-­ intendents   thought   they   did   not   have   enough   money   to   comply   with   the   Common  Core  and  that  87  New  York   6WDWHGLVWULFWVUHSRUWHGEHLQJLQÂżVFDO stress.   Driving   home   the   uncertainty   of   the   Common   Core,   Mitchell   quoted   Bill   Gates   in   the   speech   he   gave   to   Harvard  on  the  billions  of  dollars  the   Bill  Gates  Foundation  put  into  educa-­ WLRQUHIRUPÂł,WZRXOGEHJUHDWLIRXU education   stuff   worked,   but   that   we   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  for  probably  a  decade.â&#x20AC;? Parents  and  teachers  discussed  their  concerns  on  New  York  Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Common  Core  standards.  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

3+272%<0$;:(//5(,'(

EXPERTS ADDRESS PROPOSED CORE EDUCATION REFORM AT PUBLIC PANEL


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7B

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Snugs Gets Sexy For Slammers

IN TIGHTS OR VERSE, PERFORMERS NIP FUNDRAISING IN THE BUD By  Katherine  Speller

7KH ÂżUVW SHUIRUPDQFH SDLG KRPDJH WR 6WHSKHQ .LQJÂśV Âł7KH stage.   Shining,â&#x20AC;?   and   entailed   the   performer,   with   the   burlesque   persona   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those  of  us  on  the  team  who  were  old  enough  to  get  in  were   The  candle-­lined  stage  at  Snug  Harbor  was  transformed  into  a   Sweet  Samantha  Jane,  writing  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Redrumâ&#x20AC;?  along  her  stomach  in  red   able  to  practice  our  poems  in  front  of  a  loving  audience,â&#x20AC;?  fourth-­ venue  for  showcasing  poetry,  music  and  sensual,  sexual  energy  on   lipstick,   while   the   other   performance,   by   burlesque   persona   Dee   \HDU(QJOLVKPDMRUDQG6ODP7HDP3UHVLGHQW&KULVWLQH5LFKLQVDLG     Richin   performed   her   solo   poetry   in   Tuesday,  Feb.  25.   front   of   the   Snugs   crowd,   along   with   two   The  event  was  created  as  part  of   group   performances   of   pieces   co-­written   by   D IXQGUDLVHU WR EHQHÂżW WKH 1HZ 3DOW] other  Slam  Team  members. 6ODP3RHWU\7HDPÂśVWULSWRWKH&ROOHJH Âł>'DQLH 6DQWRUD@ DQG , SHUIRUPHG D 8QLRQ3RHWU\6ODP,QYLWDWLRQDO &83-­ group-­piece   that   remains   unnamed   but   ex-­ 6,  IURP 6DWXUGD\ 0DUFK  WKURXJK plores   the   concept   of   honesty   in   a   relation-­ 7KXUVGD\0DUFKLQ%RXOGHU&2 ship   between   two   people   with   trust   issues,â&#x20AC;?     After  calling  in  favors  of  friends   Richin  said.   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;various   disciplines,â&#x20AC;?   including   Richin  said  she  and  Slam  Team  member   poets,   musicians   and   burlesque   per-­ Julie  Zuckerman  also  performed  an  unnamed   formers,  fourth-­year  English  major  and   group   piece   that   encompassed   the   notion   of   Slam   Team   Secretary   Rachel   Simons   how   people   lose   thier   concept   of   self   in   the   VDLGLWWRRNWKUHHZHHNVWRRUJDQL]HWKH process  of  being  the  people  they  are  expected   event,   which   ultimately   raised   $230   to  be.   from  donations  and  a  bake  sale.   Richin  said  her  other  pieces  were  â&#x20AC;&#x153;less   6LPRQV DOVR WKH 0HHWLQJ &R-­ FRQVWUXFWHGDQGUHÂżQHG´LQFOXGLQJRQHWLWOHG RUGLQDWRU RI $OSKD 3VL (FG\VLD 1HZ Âł+DUU\ 3RWWHU 2UJ\´ ZKLFK ZDV ULWWOHG ZLWK 3DOW]ÂśV EXUOHVTXH WURXSH SHUIRUPHG SXQV UHODWHG WR WKH FKLOGUHQÂśV ERRNV VHULHV as  her  burlesque  alter  ego  Reyna  Sin-­ and  yielded  positive  responses  from  audience   clair.     members.   As  a  stage  character,  Simons  said   $OWKRXJK WKH 6ODP 7HDPÂśV 6QXJV IXQ-­ Sinclair  has  more  sexual  prowess  than   draiser   has   already   ended,   Richin   said   most   her   creator   and   counterpart,   adopting   of  the  poetry  performed  Tuesday  night  can  be   the  allure  of  a  1920s  showgirl  but  re-­ heard  again  on  Thursday,  Feb.  27,  at  the  Slam   WDLQLQJPXFKRI6LPRQVÂśRZQÂłQHUG\´ 7HDPÂśV ZHHNO\ RSHQ PLF HYHQW DW &DIHWHULD nature. where  the  fundraising  efforts  will  continue.   Simons   said   her   performance,   $GGLWLRQDOO\WKHIXQGUDLVHUDW&DIHWHULD D WULEXWH WR WKH *UHHN P\WK RI 3HUVH-­ ZLOO FRQVLVW RI D SHUIRUPDQFH E\ WKH WHDPÂśV phone   and   Hades,   was   thematically   FRDFK6ODP3RHW-DUHG6LQJHU pretty  typical  for  her.       Richin,   who   has   competed   with   the   She   said   she   prefers   to   create   team  for  three  years,  will  go  head-­to-­head  in   more  â&#x20AC;&#x153;literary  or  nerdyâ&#x20AC;?  routines,  cit-­ YHUVHIRUWKHÂżQDOWLPHDW&836,WKLV\HDU LQJ D SDVW SHUIRUPDQFH DV 2Âś%ULHQ ,Q DGGLWLRQ WR WKH QDWLRQDO HYHQW WKH IURP*HRUJH2UZHOOÂśVG\VWRSLDQQRYHO WHDP LV DOVR SUHSDULQJ IRU 1HZ 3DOW]ÂśV RZQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;1984â&#x20AC;?  during  which  she  threw  rats  at   SRHWU\LQYLWDWLRQDOWKH0DUJDUHW:DGH/HZLV the  audience  after  stripping. 3RHWU\6ODP,QYLWDWLRQDO :/36 WKLVXSFRP-­ During   the   fundraising   event,   ing  weekend. 6LPRQVZULWKHGRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRUDV3HUVH-­ Âł$OWKRXJK LW LV IDVW DSSURDFKLQJ , H[-­ SKRQHWRWKHWXQHRI7KH%ODFN.H\VÂś 7KH6ODP7HDPDQGWKH%XUOHVTXH7URXSHSDLUXSIRUDIXQGUDLVLQJHYHQW pect   we   will   be   bringing   different   poems   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tighten   Up,â&#x20AC;?   tasting   the   forbidden   &XSFDNHVFRQVLVWHGRIDQDQLPHURXWLQHIURPÂł2XUDQ+LJK+RVW WKHVWDJHVLQ&RORUDGRWKDQWKHRQHVZHKDYHSUHSDUHGIRU:/36´ fruit  of  pomegranate  seeds  to  a  hooting  crowd.   Richin   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   all   so   eager   to   write   and   share   as   much   of   ,Q DGGLWLRQ WR 6LPRQVÂś DFW WKH QLJKW FRQVLVWHG RI WZR PRUH &OXE´ :KHQ WKH ODGLHV RI$OSKD 3VL (FG\VLD ÂżQLVKHG VWULSSLQJ WKH RXUVHOYHVDVSRVVLEOHZLWKWKLVDPD]LQJFRPPXQLW\WKDWWKHGD\VRI â&#x20AC;&#x153;nicheâ&#x20AC;?  tribute  performances. night  of  its  burlesque  portion,  members  of  the  Slam  Team  took  the   rigorous  writing  and  performance  practice  are  far  from  over.â&#x20AC;? Staff  Writer  |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

3+2726%<68=<%(5.2:,7=

Thursday,  February  27,  2014


8B

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Finding Safety In A House Of Horrors

DEPARTMENT SPILLS FAMILY SECRETS ON THE MAINSTAGE By  Suzy  Berkowitz A&E  Editor  |  Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buried   Childâ&#x20AC;?   in   name   alone   sounds   GDUN DQG WZLVWHG EXW WUDQVIRUPHG WR ÂżW WKH stage,  the  darkness  only  has  room  to  expand.   $VWKH7KHDWHU'HSDUWPHQWÂśVÂżUVWPDLQ VWDJHSURGXFWLRQRIWKHVHPHVWHU6DP6KHSD UGÂśV IUDJPHQWHG GUDPD GLUHFWHG E\ $VVRFL ate   Professor   Frank   Trezza,   transformed   the   thrust   stage   of   Parker  Theatre   into   a   quaint,   ,OOLQRLVIDUPKRXVHÂżOOHGZLWKG\VIXQFWLRQ Among  the  metaphors  strewn  about  the   production,   the   most   clear   one   lies   within   its   title.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buried   Childâ&#x20AC;?   can   be   taken   both   OLWHUDOO\ DQG ÂżJXUDWLYHO\ DV YLHZHUV UHDOL]H throughout  the  course  of  the  anecdotal  banter   tossed  around  onstage  from  actor  to  actor.   The   family   around   which   the   story   is   centered   has   buried   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;babyâ&#x20AC;?   breathing   life   littered  with  ideals,  be  it  religious  loyalty,  the   SUHVHUYDWLRQRIWKH$PHULFDQGUHDPRURWK erwise.    

7KHSURGXFWLRQÂśVVROHVHWWLQJLQWKLVIDP ilyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  home  paired  with  the  lack  of  familiarity   ²OLWHUDOO\DQGÂżJXUDWLYHO\²DPRQJWKRVH UHVLGLQJLQLWSRVHGDQLQWHUHVWLQJMX[WDSRVL tion  that  helped  carry  the  play  through.   Actor   and   audience   member   alike   seemed  perpetually  trapped  in  this  small  plot   of  land  where  dirty  secrets  lay  buried  within   LWV RZQ EDFN\DUG ² HYHQ IXUWKHU PDNLQJ D prisoner  of  its  residents.         The   playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   plotline,   though   tirelessly   enigmatic   and   riddled   with   dark,   comedic   moments   during   which   audience   members   VHHPHGWRODXJKRXWRIVKHHUSLW\WKDQJHQX LQHDPXVHPHQWNHSWYLHZHUVRQWKHLUWRHV Keeping   with   the   productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   natural   pace   and   tone,   the   actors   followed   suit   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   TXLFN WR DFW DQG UHDFW ZKHQ UHWHOOLQJ D GLV turbing  anecdote,  or  better  yet,  when  trying  to   SUHYHQWWKDWUHWHOOLQJ &KDUDFWHUV ZHUH GLVWXUELQJO\ SUR nounced   and   each   almost   seemed   as   if   they  

were  engrossed  in  their  own  world  of  either   regret,  denial,  nostalgia,  or  a  painful  mixture   of  the  three.   3DUWLFXODUO\ LPSUHVVLYH ZDV WKLUG\HDU theater  performance  major  Max  Singer,  who   SOD\HG7LOGHQVRQRIWKHSURGXFWLRQÂśVSDWUL DUFK DQG D FOHDUO\ VKDNHQ FKDUDFWHU RYHUDOO Singerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ability  to  command  the  stage  with  no   PRUHWKDQDIDURIIVWDUHDQGDKHOSOHVVWRQH ZDVMXVWDVEHDXWLIXODVLWZDVKHDUWZUHQFK ing.     Another   actor   whose   ability   to   become   engrossed  in  his  character  was  effortless  was   WKLUG\HDU WKHDWHU SHUIRUPDQFH PDMRU 3DXO Boothroyd,  who  played  Dodge,  the  patriarch   of  the  family.   7KH VDPH IDURII VWDUH WKDW OLWWHUHG KLV onstage   sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   eyes   was   present   in   his   own,   DQG KLV ZKLVNH\JX]]OLQJ TXLFNZLWWHG XQ ÂżOWHUHG SHUVRQD FUHDWHG DOPRVW D FDULFDWXUH WKDW PRUH OLNHO\ WKDQ QRW UHPLQGHG YLHZHUV of  at  least  one  senile  member  of  their  family.  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

:KHUH%RRWKUR\GODFNHGDQ,OOLQRLVDF cent,  he  made  up  for  in  being  the  productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   dark  comic  relief,  which,  with  subject  matter   DVGHQVHDQGUDZDVWKLVLVXQGHQLDEO\QHFHV sary.   $OWKRXJK WKLV SOD\ LV QRW PHDQW WR HQ tertain,   it   was   shockingly   refreshing   to   see.   Âł%XULHG&KLOG´PXFKOLNHRQHRIP\IDYRULWH dark   comedies,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;August:   Osage   County,â&#x20AC;?   in   VLPSOHWHUPVWHOOVWKHVWRU\RIDIDPLO\ÂśVUH action.   7KH HYHQW VWD\V WKH VDPH EXW WKH FRS LQJPHFKDQLVPVIURPRQHUHODWLYHWRDQRWKHU change.   Each   family   member   is   broken   in   WKHLU RZQ ZD\ DQG HDFK KROGV WKDW IDURII stare  when  met  with  a  memory.   The   production   through   my   eyes   is   not   VRPXFKDERXWSURJUHVVLRQDVLWLVDERXWGH YHORSLQJDQXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIFKDUDFWHUVDQG WKHLU GHYHORSPHQW DQG PRWLYHV ,W LV RQH DQ DXGLHQFHPHPEHUOHDYHVVKDNHQIURPEXWLQ the  most  necessary  of  ways.  3/4  stars.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

oracle.newpaltz.edu 9B

Weekend Warriors Set To Slam The House Down COLLEGIATE COMPETITION COMMENCES IN LOVING MEMORY

By  Hannah  Nesich Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Hnesich@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  SPAK-­INDIVIDULATHOUGHTPATTERNS.BLOGSPOT.COM

This   weekend,   poets   will   put   their   verses   and   rhythms   to   the   test   during   the   second-­largest   annual   collegiate   slam   com-­ petition   in   the   country,   the   Wade-­Lewis   Poetry   Slam   (WLPS)   Invitational. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  WLPS  is  in  its  own  way,  an  event  that  brings  schools   together  to  share  in  the  experience  and  moment  that  is  spoken   word   poetry,â&#x20AC;?   Kelvin   Then,   a   second-­year   physics   major   and   member  of  New  Paltz  performance  team,  Urban  Lyrics,  said.     7KHÂżIWKDQQXDOFRPSHWLWLRQZKLFKLVDOVRFUHDWHGWRFRP-­ memorate   Margaret   Wade-­Lewis,   who   founded   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Black   Studies   Department,   will   host   teams   from   universitites   including  Yale  University,  Brown  University,  Wesleyan  Univer-­ sity,   SUNY   Oneonta,   SUNY   Geneseo,   SUNY   New   Paltz   and   Dartmouth  College,  according  to  the  eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Facebook  page.   Similar  to  last  year,  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  event  will  host  preliminary   DQGÂżQDOURXQGVGXULQJWKHVDPHZHHNHQG7KHHYHQWZLOOIHDWXUH guest   poets   Thuli   Zuma   and   Robbie   Q.   and   campus   a   capella   groups  will  also  provide  entertainment,  Rachel  Simons,  a  fourth-­ year  creative  writing  major  and  secretary  of  the  New  Paltz  Slam   Poetry  Team,  said.    A  quality  of  WLPS  that  sets  it  apart  from  other  collegiate   slams  according  to  Then  is  that  its  â&#x20AC;&#x153;intention  is  so  much  greater   than  the  actual  competition.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not   too   often   are   slams   of   this   caliber   and   size,   with   all  

these  amazing  schools  coming  in,  dedicated  to  someone,â&#x20AC;?  Then   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usually  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  for  the  reward,  for  the  light  at  the  end  of  the   tunnel.  At  the  end  of  the  day...we  all  know  we  are  here  to  pay   respects  for  this  wonderful  woman  who  goes  unnoticed  on  this   campus.â&#x20AC;?   One   of   four   poets   on   his   team   performing,   Then   will   be   slamming  a  poem  about  women  and  equality,  and  said  he  looks   forward  to  hearing  all  different  types  of  poems,  be  them  political,   personal  or  humorous.   Urban  Lyrics  took  home  the  trophy  at  the  2013  invitational,   WKHLUÂżUVWWLPHHYHUVODPPLQJFRPSHWLWLYHO\7KHQVDLGWKH\GRQÂśW have  a  strategy  going  into  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  competition,  other  than  en-­ joying  the  slamming  experience  while  being  in  the  moment.   Aaron  Tremper,  a  fourth-­year  English  major,  was  a  former   member  of  the  New  Paltz  Slam  Team  and  is  currently  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   assistant   coach.   He   said   this   season,   the   team   is   entirely   com-­ posed  of  women,  which  will  create  â&#x20AC;&#x153;an  interesting  dynamic  and   variety  of  voices.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  hope  each  audience  member  leaves  with  the  inspiration   to  be  open  communicators  and  to  use  their  own  voices  which,  in   themselves,  are  just  as  valuable  as  those  of  a  performer,â&#x20AC;?  Trem-­ per  said.   The  slam  will  be  held  from  Friday,  Feb.  28  through  Satur-­ day,  March  1  at  5  p.m.  in  Lecture  Center  100,  with  a  closing  cer-­ emony  in  the  North  Lobby  of  the  Lecture  Center  in  the  afternoon     on  Sunday,  March  2,  according  to  the  eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Facebook  page. Margaret  Wade-­Lewis,  late  founder  of  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Black  Studies  Department.

Internationally Deconstructing Creation IRANIAN ARTIST STROKES THROUGH CONTINENTS, PAINTBRUSH IN HAND By  Zameena  Mejia Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Zahra  Nazari  is  an  artist  who  has  traveled  to  paint  a   picture  of  the  world  as  she  has  seen  it  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  literally.   Nazari   recently   solo   exhibited   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deconstructing   Scapesâ&#x20AC;?  at  the  Hartnett  Gallery  at  the  University  of  Roch-­ ester  from  December  5,  2013  through  January  19,  2014.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deconstructing   Scapesâ&#x20AC;?   showcased   paintings   and   prints   of   imaginary   landscapes   from   work   Nazari   has   done  from  2012  through  2013.  It  consisted  of  eleven  ab-­ stract   cityscapes,   including   aerial   views,   distorted   per-­ spectives  and  combinations  of  different  architectural  time   periods,  Nazari  said.   Nazari   earned   her   Bachelors   of   Fine  Arts   from   the   School  of  Art  &  Architecture,  Tabriz  in  2007  and  is  cur-­ rently   working   toward   an   MFA   degree   in   painting   and   drawing  at  New  Paltz.  

Raised  in  Hamedan,  Iran,  one  of  the  oldest  cities  in   the   world,   Nazari   said   she   grew   up   surrounded   by   ar-­ chaeological  excavations  and  the  resulting  artifacts,  and   that  visiting  ancient  sites  has  always  been  a  considerable   LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRQKHUZRUN Nazari   said   she   began   her   undergraduate   career   painting   with   a   direct   observational   approach,   but   then   VWDUWHG WR ÂżQG D PRUH SHUVRQDO VW\OH DQG VDLG VKH ZDV painting   semi-­realistic   landscapes   by   the   end   of   under-­ graduate  school.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  absolutely  grown  as  an  artist  because  of  the   great   professors   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   always   been   very   supportive   and  have  encouraged  me  a  lot  throughout  my  art  career,â&#x20AC;?   Nazari  said.   Printmaking  Assistant  Professor  Jill  Parisi,  the  exter-­ nal  advisor  for  Nazariâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  thesis  show,  said  Nazari  is  highly   energetic  and  very  focused  on  her  studies  and  in  moving   Thursday,  February  27,  2014

forward  in  her  life  as  an  artist. Among   Nazariâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   professional   opportunities   have   been   residencies,   lectures   about   her   work,   solo   exhibi-­ tions,  interviews  for  positions  as  a  Visiting  Assistant  Pro-­ fessor  next  year  and  a  year  as  Lecture  Coordinator  for  the   Student  Art  Alliance,  according  to  Parisi.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  has  been  looking  ahead  to  life  after  she  com-­ pletes   her   degree   and   working   towards   the   many   goals   that  she  has  already  set  for  herself,â&#x20AC;?  Parisi  said.   Nazariâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  upcoming  MFA  thesis  project  will  incorpo-­ rate   a   mixture   of   paintings   and   large   three-­dimensional   objects,  many  hanging  from  the  ceiling.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   am   very   excited   about   my   thesis   show,â&#x20AC;?   Nazari   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;[After  graduating]  I  plan  to  either  have  a  studio  in   New  York   City   or   attend     long-­term   international   artist   residencies  in  the  United  States  or  other  countries  where   I  can  have  my  studio  space  and  teach  part-­time.â&#x20AC;?


10B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Dance Underground Grooves On Up NEW PALTZ BUSTS A MOVE TO KEEP FRESH DANCE ALIVE

The  New  Paltz  Dance  Association  hosted  the  4th  annual  Dance  Underground  event  from  Friday,  Feb.  14  through  Sunday,  Feb.  16   in  McKenna  Theatre,  featuring  performances  by  the  New  Paltz  Dance  Team,  The  Warriors  and   Andrea  Kron  of  the  Alvin  Ailey  Dance  Comapny.   PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  MIKE  GEISEL CAPTION  BY  SUZY  BERKOWITZ

Thursday,  February  27,  2014


oracle.newpaltz.edu 11B

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

As awards season comes to an end, our editors give a DeGeneres dose of reeltalk on which hits should be on The Academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list. The Animation Situation

Barking Up The Wrong Wolf

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frozenâ&#x20AC;? vs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wind Risesâ&#x20AC;?

Is Belfortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Break Deserving Of The Title?

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  UNBB24.BLOGSPOT.COM

Picks And Predictions

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: CHRIS OWENS

YEAR: Fourth MAJOR: Communications HOMETOWN: Levittown, N.Y.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? My  voice  because  I  can  do  with  it   what  I  want.  

WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   in   a   band   called   The   Other   Brothers   and  I  sing  vocals  for  other  bands  and  art-­ ists.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  also  working  on  an  R&B  project   with  local  DJ  BB  Boof. WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? Stevie   Wonder,   Sam   Cooke,   John   Legend,   Frank   Ocean,   Cab   Calloway,   Bill   Withers   and  Marvin  Gaye.

WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? A  month  ago,  I  was  ready  to  say  Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frozenâ&#x20AC;?  was  the  shoo-­ in  winner  for  Best  Animated  feature.  Now  as  the  time  draws  nearer,   ,ÂśPQRWVRVXUH:KLOH,KDYH\HWWRVHHWKHÂżOP+D\DR0L\D]DNLÂśV Âł7KH:LQG5LVHV´LVDSSDUHQWO\VWXQQLQJDQGEHDXWLIXOZRUNIURP0L \D]DNL,WÂśV0L\D]DNLÂśV VXSSRVHGO\ ODVWÂżOPDQGLWZLOOFHUWDLQO\JLYH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frozenâ&#x20AC;?  a  run  for  its  money.  With  that  being  said,  I  have  a  hard  time   seeing  any  other  song  beating  out  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let  it  Goâ&#x20AC;?  for  best  original  song.                                   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Cat  Tacopina,  Editor-­in-­Chief

/HRÂśV RQVFUHHQ ZDON GRZQ HPEH]]OHPHQW URDG LQ Âł7KH:ROI RI :DOO6WUHHW´OHIWFULWLFVDQGYLHZHUVDOLNHSRVLQJWKHVDPHTXHVWLRQLV WKLVÂżOPZRUWK\RI%HVW3LFWXUH"'RQÂśWJHWPHZURQJWKHPRYLHZDV wild,  hilarious  and  contained  some  stellar  performances,  but  I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   KHOSEXWFULQJHDWVRPHWKLQJWKDWJORULÂżHG-RUGDQ%HOIRUWÂśVIUDXGXOHQW FULPHVWDNLQJWKHWLWOHRYHUDÂżOPDVUDZDQGQHFHVVDU\DVÂł<HDUVD 6ODYH´$VFOLFKHDVLWLVZHKDYHWRNHHSLQPLQGWKDWWKHPRVWLPSRU WDQWSLHFHVRIDUWDUHWKRVHZKLFKFRPIRUWWKHDIĂ&#x20AC;LFWHGDQGDIĂ&#x20AC;LFWWKH comfortable.      ²6X]\%HUNRZLW]$ ((GLWRU

Should The Title Be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Herâ&#x20AC;?s?

Should The Title Be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Herâ&#x20AC;?s?

The Pro Argument

The Con Argument

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Herâ&#x20AC;?  is  nominated  for  Best  Picture,  and  rightfully  so.  The  acting   LQWKHPRYLHIHOWYHU\SHUVRQDEOHDVWKRXJK,UHDOO\NQHZWKHFKDUDF ters  in  person  and  could  relate  to  them.  The  way  Theodoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  clothing   would  change  color  when  his  mood  changed  in  different  scenes  was   a  very  interesting  detail. �� Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  strange  that  a  movie  â&#x20AC;&#x153;about  a  man  fall-­ ing  in  love  with  Siriâ&#x20AC;?  could  touch  me  as  emotionally  as  it  did.  Of  the   QRPLQDWHGPRYLHVÂł+HU´LVGHÂżQLWHO\RQHRIWKRVHWKDWXQH[SHFWHGO\ hits  you  right  in  the  feels.     ²=DPHHQD0HMLD&RS\(GLWRU

I  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  seen  many  movies  this  year.  But  I  did  see  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her,â&#x20AC;?  so  I   NQRZWKDWPRYLHVKRXOGQÂśWZLQ%HVW3LFWXUH,DSSUHFLDWHGWKHÂżOPÂśV PHVVDJH ² -RDTXLQ 3KRHQL[ DQG$P\$GDPVÂś PHODQFKRO\ HQHUJ\ H[SRVHGWKHGDQJHUVRIDVRFLHW\WKDWUHOLHVWRRKHDYLO\RQWHFKQRO ogy.  But  at  the  end  of  the  day,  if  the  iOS  that  you  paid  for  leaves  you,   VKRXOGQÂśW\RXEHDEOHWRUHWXUQLWIRUDUHIXQG"    ²-RKQ7DSSHQ1HZV(GLWRU

Ginuwine,   Aaliyah,   Phantogram,   James   Blake  and  Disclosure.    

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? I  plan  to  graduate  and  take  it  from  there,  but   I  can  promise  big  â&#x20AC;&#x153;thangs.â&#x20AC;?

ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? You  do  you.

CHECK  OUT   CHRIS  OWENS

PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE  WITH   ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Suzy  Berkowitz  at  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014


12B oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  DEEP  END

The New Paltz Oracle

THIS WEEK IN

THE DEEP END BEN LENOVITZ

Major: Painting BFA Year: Third Inspiration: Jean-Michel Basquiat “Painting, for me, is the most genuine pursuit of self-discovery. When I’m painting, I feel as though I’m doing something real which is a primary concern; to be in a place of utmost sincerity. I find that words, my words, are far less pointed than the truthfulness that happens when I paint.”

Photos courtesy of Ben Lenovitz | Captions by Maxwell Reide


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9

oracle.newpaltz.edu

     Diplomatic  Deception

CARTOON  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN  

At  a  recent  senate  meeting,  it  was  announced  that   the  Academic  Affairs  Committee  is  working  to  change   Student   Evaluations   of   Instruction   (SEI)   internal   han-­ dling  by  professors  and  their  respective  deans. Currently,  professors  are  mandated  to  submit  their   SEIs   to   the   dean   of   their   respective   department.   The   proposed   change   from   the  Academic  Affairs   Commit-­ tee  would  allow  professors  to  opt  out  of  sending  SEIs   they   believed   to   be   offensive   or   a   personal   attack   on   their  character.    Those  working  on  the  change  want  to   make  it  so  SEIs  are  more  constructive  and  less  petty  in   the  future. We   at   The   New   Paltz   Oracle   believe   it   is   encour-­ aging  to  see  the  committee  want  to  create  a  more  con-­ structive   and   less-­hostile   environment   for   professors,   but   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   troubled   by   the     option   that   professors   can   discard  any  SEI  that  could  cost  them  a  job.   We  do  understand  that  the  SEIs  being  anonymous   evaluations  act  as  security  blankets  for  students  who  do   not  understand  that  SEIs  are  not  the  place  for  them  to   vent   about   their   grievances.   However,   we   believe   the   current  approach  being  taken  to  the  potential  omission   clause  is  naĂŻve  and  assumes  that  every  professor  at  this   school  is  a  good  professor.   As   students   who   pay   for   a   college   education,   we   too  want  to  believe  that  every  professor  we  interact  with  

LVTXDOLÂżHGDQGFDSDEOH)RUWKHPRVWSDUWZHÂśYHKDG positive  experiences  with  our  instructors.   But  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  also  had  negative  experiences  with  pro-­ fessors.   Not   many,   but   they   have   happened   and   they   happen   everywhere.   Unfortunately,   there   are   unquali-­ ÂżHGLQVWUXFWRUVDWHYHU\LQVWLWXWLRQ7KH6(,JLYHVVWX-­ dents   an   opportunity   to   have   a   voice   and   have   their   voice  matter.       Students   may   gripe   about   professors   they   believe   are  â&#x20AC;&#x153;bad,â&#x20AC;?  but  it  stands  to  reason  that  there  are  profes-­ VRUV ZKR DUH VLPSO\ XQTXDOLÂżHG IRU WKHLU SURIHVVLRQ some  of  which  may  be  tenured.  SEIs  hold  professors  ac-­ countable  for  their  actions  and  allowing  for  the  possible   exclusion  of  honest  critiques  means  that  we,  as  students,   will  be  censored.   It  is  also  worth  mentioning  that  while  we  do  agree   that  our  teachers  are  only  human  and  they  have  feelings,   we   know   that   some   professors   may   take   constructive   criticism  personally.  What  could  be  a  helpful  criticism   to  one  professor  may  be  a  personal  attack  to  another.   While   a   dean   may   be   able   to   intervene   and   ask   a   professor  why  a  certain  number  of  SEIs  did  not  come   through,  the  proposal  to  allow  professors  to  omit  certain   SEIs   relies   too   much   on   the   honor   system.   The   same   honor  systemthat  is  being  asked  of  students  when  they   submit  SEIs.  

7KXUVGD\)HEUXDU\

Criticism,  negative  or  not,  at  least  shows  a  profes-­ sor  and  by  extension  the  department  dean,  what  prob-­ lems  exist  in  the  classroom  both  in  terms  of  curriculum   and   instruction.   Ignoring   these   SEIs   would   stagnate   progress  in  education.   Higher   administration   itself   should   be   opposed   to   this   change   as   it   promotes   false   representation   of   the   professors   in   their   employ.   SEIs   play   a   pivotal   role   in   the  continued  employ  of  adjunct  professors.  If  they  are   given   choose   to   selectively   submit   SEIs   which   only   show  them  in  a  positive  light,  who  is  to  say  if  they  meet   instructor  standards?   We  believe  this  proposed  change  creates  more  prob-­ lems  than  it  solves,  and  should  be  throughly  scrutinized   before  being  considered  for  implementation.

Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the  major-­ ity  of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,  op-­eds   and  letters,  excluding  editorials,  are  solely   those  of  the  writers  and  do  not  necessarily   represent  the  views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,   its  staff  members,  the  campus  and  university   or  the  Town  or  Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

ANTHONY  DEROSA Features  Editor  

N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

My  insomnia  is  getting  worse  and  I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pushing  me   toward  the  edge  of  sanity.   Last  night  I  lay  awake  staring  at  the  red  push-­pin  stuck   in  the  ceiling.  I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  put  it  there,  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  who  did  but   ,NQRZLWÂśVPRFNLQJPH/LNHDVWLFNHURQWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRUPDSRID shopping  mall,  it  regularly  reminds  me  â&#x20AC;&#x153;YOU  ARE  HERE.â&#x20AC;?   ,NQRZ0U3XVK3LQ,ÂśYHEHHQKHUHWKHSDVWÂżYHKRXUVDQG neither  one  of  us  have  moved  or  said  a  word  to  each  other,  so   either  kindly  come  up  with  a  topic  of  conversation  or  get  the   fudge  out.  He  remained  silent,  clearly  not  clever  enough  to   think  of  something  interesting  to  discuss.  I  respond  by  turning   on  my  stomach  and  presenting  him  my  butt.   You  can  learn  quite  a  lot  about  yourself  when  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  sit-­ WLQJLQDGDUNURRPZLWKQRRQHEXWDQRIÂżFHVXSSO\WRWDON to.   Often   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   concerning   your   personal   resolve   to   commit   murder  if  it  would  guarantee  restful  nights  but  sometimes  the   rare  revelation  is  sprinkled  in  among  the  homicidal  thoughts.   For   instance,   just   last   week   I   realized   that   I   love   pistachio   ice  cream  and  it  has  been  years  since  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  had  it.  The  same   night,  I  remembered  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking  Badâ&#x20AC;?  star  Bryan  Crans-­ ton  appeared  on  a  few  episodes  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seinfeldâ&#x20AC;?  as  the  dentist   that  converts  to  Judaism.  OK,  so  the  last  one  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  about  me,  

JENNIFER  NEWMAN Assistant  Copy  Editor Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

As  an  only  child  growing  up  I  learned  to  appreciate  the  little   things,  and  maybe  got  overly  excited  about  them.  I  was  the  type   of  kid  who  would  watch  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back  To  The  Futureâ&#x20AC;?  trilogy  over   and  over  until  bed.  I  remember  one  thing  I  would  jump  up  for  in   an  instant  moment  of  bliss  every  time:  when  my  dad  would  pull   into  the  driveway.  One  day  when  I  was  six  or  so,  I  got  so  excited   WKDW,GHÂżHGP\PRPEXUVWWKURXJKWKHIURQWGRRUDQGVSHGRXW side  to  see  him,  gracefully  tripping  over  the  sidewalk  and  falling   Ă&#x20AC;DWRQP\IDFH%ORRGVWDUWHGWRRR]HIURPP\NQHH1RZLWZDV P\GDGÂśVWXUQWRUXQ,ÂśOODOZD\VUHPHPEHULWFOHDUDVGD\WKHÂżUVW thing  he  said  to  me  when  he  picked  me  up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  tell  your  mother.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  my  dad.  There  for  me  when  I  need  him,  and  always   good  for  a  laugh.  Every  exciting  trip  to  Disney  World  and  every   historic  snooze  fest  we  went  to  he  had  a  way  of  always  knowing   exactly  when  I  needed  his  big  bear  hug. )RXUWHHQ\HDUVDGLYRUFHDQHZÂżDQFpHDQGDORWRIDQJ sty  teenage  years  from  his  daughter  later,  my  dad  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  change   much.  His  thick  glasses  made  him  look  like  he  was  stuck  in  a   6WHYHQ6SLHOEHUJĂ&#x20AC;LFNFXUOLQJEHKLQGKLVDOOWRRREYLRXVO\G\HG

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS Waking  Nightmare but  that  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make  it  any  less  important.   I  decide  to  torture  myself  by  again  looking  at  the  clock.   5:42  a.m.  The  sun  will  soon  rise  to  pester  me  with  questions   it  already  knows  the  answers  to.  Didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  sleep  again,  huh?  Yes.   Stared  at  the  ceiling  again,  huh?  Yes.  Thought  about  useless   television  trivia  again,  huh?  Yes.  Argued  with  inanimate  ob-­ jects  again,  huh?  Clearly.   Hallucinations   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   uncommon.   Projections   of   your   tattered  psyche  manifesting  in  the  shadows,  vanishing  before   you  can  focus  a  gaze  on  them.  I  like  to  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  made  me  a   more   interesting   person   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   more   likely   served   to   increase  my  chances  of  an  aneurysm  or  something  equally  as   morbid,  like  the  infamous  head  exploding  scene  from  Scan-­ ners.  Incidentally  Bryan  Cranston  was  also  in  a  few  episodes   of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  King  of  Queens.â&#x20AC;? A  truck  is  backing  up  outside.  I  sandwich  my  head  be-­ WZHHQSLOORZVDOSKDDQGRPHJDDQGZRQGHULI6WDUEXFNVÂż[HG the   goddamn   espresso   machine   yet   because   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no   way   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  making  it  through  today  without  an  Americano.  The  rays   of  dawnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  glow  penetrate  the  blinds,  prompting  the  birds  to   begin   their   daily   rehearsal   of   that   one   scene   from   Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Snow   White.   Long   ago   the   morning   chorus   brought   upon  

feelings   of   tranquility.   However,   recently   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   the   desire   to   express  my  dissatisfaction  with  their  noisy  ensemble  through   12  gauge  buckshot.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   6:13   now.   Last   call   for   departures   to   Slumberton   Village.   I   gave   the   conductor   my   ticket,   but   the   cabin   door   remains  locked.  It  will  be  some  time  before  the  next  train  ar-­ rives.  A  man  in  a  red  overcoat  taps  me  on  the  shoulder  and   says  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  are  here.â&#x20AC;?  I  respond  by  turning  away  and  present-­ ing  him  my  butt.   Insomnia  is  like  a  fever  dream  where  the  problem  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   that  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  wake  up  but  that  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  already  awake,  so  what   do  you  do?  The  best  advice  I  can  give  is  to  ride  the  wave  into   delirium  until  you  drift  onto  the  other  side.  Not  as  in  death  or   anything.  More  like  the  other  side  of  noon  preferable.     'RRUVDUHRSHQLQJDQGIHHWDUHVKXIĂ&#x20AC;LQJLQWKHKDOOZD\ Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  7:06  and  I  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  made  a  point  yet.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  rethink  it  in  the   evening.  Right  now  I  need  to  sleep.

Anthony  DeRosa  is  a  third-­year  journalism   major  who  when  he  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  not  sleeping,  devotes   his  time  to  poisoning  others  with  his  attitude.

For  my  Dad:  My  Hero KDLU<RXZRXOGPRVWOLNHO\VHHP\GDGVFDUÂżQJGRZQDQRWKHU milk-­soaked   Oreo,   watching   handyman   shows,   trying   to   teach   KLVFOXPV\GDXJKWHUWKRVHOHVVRQVRUWU\LQJWRÂżJXUHRXWKRZWR download  some  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  new  song  he  just  heard.   Then  my  dad  was  in  the  hospital. I  give  no  lead  up  or  ease-­in  here  because  there  was  no  lead   up  or  ease  in  when  I  got  the  phone  call.  There  was  nothing  out   of  the  ordinary  about  that  day  last  semester.  My  dad  had  always   been   the   big   strong   6-­foot-­something   guy   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   help   you   lift   that  heavy  couch.  Not  someone  who  would  be  in  the  hospital.   I   thought   the   waiting   would   be   the   hardest   part,   but   the   hardest  part  was  hearing  it  was  Leukemia.  Suddenly,  I  reverted   back  to  the  only  child  who  just  wanted  her  dad  to  pick  her  up  and   tell  her  it  would  be  ok.  The  nosey  dad  who  would  ask  her  what   boy  she  was  texting. The  longer  the  treatment  went  on,  the  more  my  dad  changed.   He  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  Oreos  anymore.  He  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  stay  awake  for  the   handyman  shows  he  once  enjoyed.  I  saw  the  dad  I  love  get  dis-­ couraged  by  his  illness.  But  I  saw  so  much  more.

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

I  saw  the  power  of  a  support  system  I  never  knew  existed.  I   saw  the  love  of  perfect  strangers  during  the  holiday  season,  and   the  caring  of  co-­workers  who  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mind  the  gowns  and  masks   and  visited  for  hours  at  a  time.  I  saw  my  dad  get  beaten  down  by   an  impossible  situation,  and  I  saw  the  father  I  love  get  up  and   ÂżJKWWKURXJKWKH&DQFHU It   is   not   over.   There   are   still   more   tests,   chemo   and   ulti-­ mately  a  transplant.  But  I  like  to  think  back  to  the  time  I  fell  and   my   dad   picked   me   up   from   time   to   time.   Because   now,   along   with  my  stepmother  and  the  help  of  so  many  great  people,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  my   turn  to  help  him  get  back  up.  I  have  faith  that  soon  my  dad  will   be  back  to  his  old  self,  scarfng  down  cookies  with  his  daughter   watching  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  Old  Houseâ&#x20AC;?  and  trying  to  get  me  to  help  rewine-­ lightbulb.  But  for  now  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pulling  off  the  bald  look  better  than  

Jennifer  Newman  is  a  fourth-­year  journalism  major  on  pa-­ per  and  a  third-­year  in  reality.    She  rarely  has  free  time,  but   when  she  does  she  eats  bagels  and  watches  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Supernatural.â&#x20AC;?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

11

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

No. 1

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN                

The  Div.  III  No.  1  Hawks  had  their  10  game  winning  streak  broken  with  a  loss  to  MIT.                              

WKH+DZNVUHFHLYHGDOOÂżUVWSODFHYRWHV IURPWKH$PHULFDQ9ROOH\EDOO&RDFKHV $VVRFLDWLRQ $9&$ 1&$$'LY,,,0HQ V The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volleyball  team  has  had  a  se-­ &RDFKHV7RS3ROOSXWWLQJWKHPLQÂżUVW ries  of  bumps  and  spikes  the  past  two  weeks.   SODFH7KLVLVWKHÂżUVWWLPHLQWKHKLVWRU\RI The  Hawks  have  maintained  the  No.  1   +DZNVDWKOHWLFVWKDWDSURJUDPKDVUHFHLYHG ranking  in  Div.  III  two  weeks  running,  beat-­ a  No.  1  ranking  in  national  standings.   LQJULYDO6SULQJÂżHOG&ROOHJHDQGUHDFKLQJD â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone  was  really  proud  to  be  a  part   ten-­game  winning  streak  within  the  last  three   of  the  program,â&#x20AC;?  Tuminelli  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most  of  us   ZHHNVRISOD\%XWWKHWHDPÂśVUHOHQWOHVVVXF have  been  working  for  this  for  the  past  year   FHVVUDQVKRUW)HEZKHQWKH+DZNVIHOO DQGDKDOIQRZDQGZHÂżQDOO\JHWWKHUHVSHFW WR8QLWHG9ROOH\EDOO&RQIHUHQFH 89& ULYDO that  we  deserve.â&#x20AC;? 1R0DVVDFKXVHWWV,QVWLWXWHRI7HFKQRORJ\ 6HFRQG\HDUPLGGOHEORFNHU&KULVWRSKHU 7KH+DZNVFDPHLQWRWKH6SULQJÂżHOG Husmann  said  what  separates  the  team  from   Invitational  on  Feb.  14  with  a  No.  3  ranking   RWKHUKLJKUDQNLQJSURJUDPVOLNH6SULQJÂżHOG and  vendetta  to  beat  the  No.  2  Pride,  who   LVWKHXQFRQYHQWLRQDOZD\LQZKLFKWKH\ had  defeated  the  Hawks  in  their  home  opener   RSWLPL]HHDFKSRVLWLRQDQGWKHFRXUWDVD two  weeks  prior  in  a  3-­1  loss.   whole.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  feel  our  team  looked  at  that  loss  as  a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  run  a  6-­2  when  most  teams  run  a   OHDUQLQJH[SHULHQFHDQGZHZHUHDEOHWRVHH ´+XVPDQQVDLGÂł:HKDYHDQRXWVLGH what  we  did  wrong  and  make  adjustments   [hitter]  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  lefty  and  not  many  teams   DQGFRPHRXWVWURQJHUIRUWKHVHFRQGWLPH KDYHWKDW:HKDYHDQ$OO$PHULFDQRXWVLGH ZHSOD\HGWKHP´IRXUWK\HDU&DSWDLQ9LFWRU we  have  a  libero  that  thinks  he  plays  setter,   Tuminelli  said.   ZHKDYHDJUHDWPLGGOHEORFNHULQ6WHYH 7KH+DZNVFDPHRXWVZLQJLQJVZHHS [Woessner],  and  then  we  have  me,  whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not   ing  the  No.  1  ranked  Rivier  University  3-­0  in   really  a  middle,  but  plays  a  kind  of  unortho-­ WKHÂżUVWPDWFKRIWKHWRXUQDPHQWEHIRUHRXVW dox  middle.â&#x20AC;? LQJ6SULQJÂżHOGLQDWLJKWWKUHHVHWV  6HFRQG\HDURXWVLGHKLWWHU7LP)HUULWHU  7KHIROORZLQJGD\WKH+DZNV VDLGZLWKWKH+DZNV GHSWKRIWDOHQWDQG FOLQFKHGWKHWRXUQDPHQWWLWOHZLWKDVZHHSRI FRQÂżGHQFHLQWKHLUDELOLW\RISOD\RSSRVLQJ Johnson  and  Wales  University  and  a  3-­1  win   WHDPVDUHXQDEOHWRSLQSRLQWZKLFKPHPEHUV RYHU%DUG&ROOHJH of  their  team  are  go-­to  players  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  allowing   Defeating  the  top  two  Div.  III  teams  in   the  Hawks  to  out  power  other  teams  and   WKHFRXQWU\DQGERDVWLQJDWRWDOSRLQWV H[HFXWHWKHLUSOD\V By  Abbott  Brant

Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Âł:KHQDWHDPKDVIDLWKLQHDFKRWKHU WKLQJVVWDUWWRĂ&#x20AC;RZDQGZHFDQIRFXVRQLQGL vidual  skills  that  need  improving  instead  of   having  to  make  up  for  others,â&#x20AC;?  Ferriter  said.   +HDG&RDFK5DGX3HWUXVVDLGKHLVKDS S\ZLWKZKDWWKHWHDPKDVDFFRPSOLVKHGLQ REWDLQLQJD1RUDQNLQJEXWDFNQRZOHGJHV WKHSUHVVXUHWKDWFRPHVZLWKVXFKDWLWOH Âł1RZLWÂśVWRXJKWRVWD\1REHFDXVH everyone  wants  to  beat  us,â&#x20AC;?  Petrus  said.   Âł+RSHIXOO\ZHFDQVXUYLYH´ 3HWUXV FRQFHUQFDPHWRIUXLWLRQ7XHV GD\KRZHYHUDVWKHWHDPGURSSHGDÂżYHVHW PDWFK   WR0,7ZKR3HWUXVVDLGZHUHFRPLQJRIIRI ELJZLQVDJDLQVW8&6DQWD&UX]DQG9DVVDU &ROOHJHDQGKDGRQO\ORVWRQH89&PDWFK thus  far  this  season.   Âł:HSUHSDUHIRUWKHVH89&PDWFKHV E\ORRNLQJDWÂżOPIURPDOOWKHWHDPVLQRXU FRQIHUHQFH´3HWUXVVDLGÂł:HORRNIRUWKHLU weakness,  for  both  offense  and  defense,   DJDLQVWHDFKWHDP:HSOD\RXUEHVWSOD\HUV and  play  our  best  strategy.â&#x20AC;?   )HUULWHUDQGÂżUVW\HDUPLGGOHEORFNHU Woessner  led  the  Hawks  in  kills  with  13   HDFK6HFRQG\HDUVHWWHU&KULVWLDQ6PLWKWDO lied  11  kills  and  28  assists,  while  third-­year   VHWWHU-RKQ/XWMHQFRQWULEXWHGDVVLVWVDQG GLJV<HWWKLVZDVQRWHQRXJKWRFRPEDW 0,7ÂśVFRQVLVWHQF\DQGSUHVHQFHDWWKHQHW Âł0DNLQJH[FXVHVLVQHYHUDJRRGUHDVRQ for  a  loss,  but  it  was  a  tough  situation  for   us  as  a  team,â&#x20AC;?  Ferriter  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  had  just  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

FRPHRIIDFRXSOHRIELJZLQVDQGPD\KDYH overlooked  them  a  little.    We  had  trouble  get-­ WLQJHQHUJL]HGDQGÂżQGLQJWKHPRPHQWXPZH usually  thrive  off  of.â&#x20AC;? Ferriter  said  the  long  trip  up  to  Boston   DIIHFWHGWKHWHDP VDELOLW\WREHJLQWKHJDPH DWWKHLUQRUPDOOHYHORILQWHQVLW\ÂąDIDFWRU KHVDLGLVWRXJKWRUHFRYHUIURPLQWKHJDPH of  volleyball  and  led  the  team  to  play  what   3HWUXVFDOOHGÂłVDIHW\YROOH\EDOO´UDWKHUWKDQ WKHWHDP VQRUPDOÂłSRZHUYROOH\EDOO´ :KLOHDZLQZRXOGKDYHVHFXUHGWKH +DZNVÂśSRVLWLRQDVKRVWRIWKH89&7RXU nament,  it  is  up  in  the  air  as  to  where  the   +DZNVQRZWLHGIRUVHFRQGLQWKH89& VWDQGLQJVDORQJZLWK1D]DUHWK&ROOHJHZLOO FRPSHWHIRUWKHFKDPSLRQVKLS But  both  Petrus  and  players  seem  un-­ VKDNHQE\WKHLUQHZUHFRUGHYHQDIWHU VRPHFRQWURYHUV\DVWRWKHLQHOLJLELOLW\RID SOD\HUDWWKHVWDUWRIWKHVHDVRQZKLFKHQGHG LQWKHYDFDWLQJRIIRXUZLQVLQFOXGLQJDYLF WRU\DJDLQVW89&FRPSHWLWRU9DVVDU â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  all  mental  at  this  point,â&#x20AC;?  Petrus   VDLGÂł:HGRQÂśWKDYHRQHVSHFLÂżFSOD\HULWÂśV the  team.  One  by  one  they  help  us  win  these   PDWFKHV2YHUDOOWKHZKROHWHDPGRHVDJRRG job  and  will  lead  us  to  where  we  want  to  be.â&#x20AC;?   This  weekend  the  Hawks  will  travel   DFURVVWKH+XGVRQWR3RXJKNHHSVLHWRFRP SHWHDJDLQVW1R-XQLDWD&ROOHJHDQG7KLHO &ROOHJH0DUFK7KHQH[WGD\WKH\ZLOOWDNH RQ9DVVDUDQG'RPLQLFDQ&ROOHJH ,OO DWWKH +DZN&HQWHU


12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Lady  Hawks  Look  Ahead   By  Abbott  Brant Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  split  their  last  two  games  of  the  season  with   a  narrow  win  against  SUNY  Brockport  and  a  loss  against  SUNY  Geneseo  last   weekend.   The  overall  6-­19  Lady  Hawks   ended  the  2013-­14   season  with  a   SUNYAC  record   of  4-­14.   This  is  the   ÂżUVWVHDVRQ+HDG Coach  Jamie   Seward,  who   has  been  the   head  of  the   program   for  eight   seasons,   has   has  not   led   led  the  Lady  Hawks   to  post  season  play.   Knowing    the  team  had   not  made  the  SUNYAC  Tour-­ nament,  the  season  came  to   a  calm  end  rather  than  an   abrupt  halt,  Seward  said.   The  Lady  Hawks   came  back  from  a  ten  point   GHÂżFLWHQWHULQJKDOIWLPH with  the  Lady  Golden   Eagles  Feb.  21,  and  with   two  capitalizing  free   throws  from  second-­ year  Captain  Goldie   Harrison  to  end  the   matchup,  edged  Brockport   in  a  55-­54  victory.   The  team  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   end  the  season  on  the   same  note  the  next  day   though,  losing  to  the   Lady  Knights  61-­ 58.  With  a  10-­point   lead  with  six  minutes   remaining  in  the   game,  Seward  said   the  loss  shows   that  the  team  

can  compete  with  a  com-­ petitive  Lady  Knights   squad  that  will  be   returning  every   member  on  the         roster  next   season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  team   has  been  enjoy-­ able  to  coach,â&#x20AC;?   Seward  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We've  gotten  a  lot   better  and  the  players,   to  their  credit,  despite   from  the  outside  look-­ ing  in  having  little  to   play  for,  believed  we   had  a  lot  to  play  for  and   we  came  and  practiced   well  and  really  continued   to  improve  throughout   the  end  part  of  the  sea-­ son  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  which  is  hard  to  do   even  when  you're  having  a   great  season  let  alone  when   you're  struggling.â&#x20AC;? The  Lady  Hawks  will   be  losing  a  lone  fourth-­year  in   Captain  Jeanette  Scott,  who  Seward   said  has  been  an  integral  part  of  the   program  the  last  four  years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It's  bittersweet,â&#x20AC;?  Scott  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  sad  I'm   not  playing  anymore.  I'm  also  happy  I  made  it   through  the  four  years,  because  I've  seen  a  lot   of  people  come  and  go  and  not  make  it  until  the   end.â&#x20AC;?   Scott  said  although  the  team  had  a  challeng-­ ing  season,  she  expects  great  things  from  the   Lady  Hawks  next  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Know  the  feeling  that  we  felt  this  year,  and   know  what  it  takes  to  be  the  best  team,â&#x20AC;?  Scott   said  on  what  advice  she  would  give  to  the  return-­ ing  players.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  know  what  it  is  to  work  hard   and  get  better  everyday,  that  they  know,  but  now   they  know  they  have  to  work  that  much  harder   because  it's  not  easy.â&#x20AC;? Third-­year  Captain  Shannan  Walker  said  although   it  is  disappointing  the  team  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make  the  SUNYAC   Tournament,  the  improvement  and  wins  generated  in  the  second  half  of  the   season  illustrated  the  type  of  basketball  the  team  is  capable  of  playing.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  off-­season  is  all  about  getting  better  individually,  so  we're  going  to  be   focusing  a  lot  on  improving  our  skills  and  getting  stronger,â&#x20AC;?  Walker  said.   From  a  coaching  standpoint,  Seward  looks  to  increase  his  ten  women  ros-­ WHUE\ÂżYHWRHQFRXUDJHDOHYHORIFRPSHWLWLRQWKDWWKDWKHGLGQÂśWKDYHWKLV\HDU while  building  a  depth  around  a  strong  core  of  returners.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;No  matter  what,  in  a  way  you  start  all  over  every  year,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   looking  for  not  just  great  players,  but  the  right  people,  to  help  grow  what  we   already  have  started  here.â&#x20AC;?

 PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN                                                                                  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

13

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  Aims  To  Recruit  And  Regroup By  Abbott  Brant

Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  wrapped  up  the  2014  season  last  weekend  with   losses  to  SUNY  Geneseo  and  SUNY  Brockport,  bringing  the  overall  season   record  to  6-­19  and  a  SUNYAC  record  of  3-­15. Âł,WKLQNDIWHUHYHU\SUDFWLFHHYHU\JDPHWKHJRRGFRDFKHVUHĂ&#x20AC;HFW´ Head  Coach  Mike  Rejniak  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know  I  put  a  lot  of  time  in  front  of  the   mirror.  Of  course  you  want  to  go  through  things  different.  I  think  you  learn   more  from  your  failures  than  you  do  your  success.  And  not  to  say  that  this   season  was  a  failure,  but  we  had  several  shortcomings  and  I  learned  a  lot  more   DERXWP\WHDPDQGKRZWRFRDFKWKHP´ The  No.  23  Golden  Eagles  started  off  the  Feb.  21  game  with  an  early   17-­8  lead  that  the  Hawks  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  combat,  even  with  second-­year  guard   Zach  Cone-­Douglas  scoring  presence  aiding  in  closing  the  gap  and  leading   to  a  44-­33  score  at  the  half  that  the  team  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  overcome.   The  following  day,  Geneseo  overcame  a  Hawk  two-­point  halftime   lead,  anchored  in  three-­pointers  from  Cone-­Douglas  and  second-­ year  forward  Kevin  Roach,  and  secured  a  79-­68  victory  for  the   Blue  Knights.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;For  what  it  was  and  what  I  had,  I  thought  it  went   RN´5HMQLDNVDLGRIWKHORVVDJDLQVWWKH*ROGHQ(DJOHV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not  having  [second-­year  guard]  Keegan  [Donovan]   this  weekend  was  a  hit  because  of  his  shoulder.  We   needed  another  ball  handler  out  there  when  we're   going  up  against  a  highly  ranked  team  in  the  coun-­ WU\´ Against  Geneseo,  Rejniak  said  he  had  to  ex-­ haust  key  players  like  fourth-­year  guard  Andrew   Joseph  and  third-­year  Captain  Taylor  Sowah,   who  contributed  to  a  seven  deep  line-­up  ran  out   of  gas  down  three  with  three  minutes  to  go  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  a   problematic  situation  when  facing  a  deep  team   like  Geneseo  who  sub  heavily  with  â&#x20AC;&#x153;hockey  line   VXEVWLWXWLRQVZKHUHHYHU\ÂżYHPLQXWHVZLWKIUHVK OHJV´5HMQLDNVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  tough  to  sustain  that  intensity  on   defense  because  the  minute  you  lax,  they're  going   WRVKRRWDWKUHH´5HMQLDNVDLGÂł7KHW\SHRIHIIRUW they  gave  me,  I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  fault  them  at  all.  They  gave   PHHYHU\WKLQJWKDWWKH\KDG´ Graduate-­student  Captain  Nick  Taldi,  returning   to  play  this  year  after  a  severe  ACL  injury  dur-­ ing  the  2012-­13  season,  joins  the  17  other  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Basketball  players  of  the  Hawks  program  to  score  a   1,000  career  points  during  the  contest  at  Brockport,   scoring  a  game-­high  17  points  and  a  career  total  of   1,013  points  at  the  end  of  the  Geneseo  game.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  felt  really  good  to  become  a  part  of  New  Paltz   KLVWRU\´7DOGLVDLGÂł$Q\WLPH\RXUHDFKDPLOHVWRQH LW VVRPHWKLQJVSHFLDO,W VGHÂżQLWHO\VRPHWKLQJ,ZDQWHG P\HQWLUHFDUHHU´ Taldi  said  that  although  his  time  as  a  Hawk  was  full  of  ups  and   downs,  it  has  taught  him  how  to  battle  adversity,  and  that  he  is  thankful  for   the  people  he  has  met  and  the  friendships  made  that  will  outlive  his  playing   career.   Looking  forward,  Rejniak  looks  to  heavily  recruit  as  the  absence    PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN              

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

of  Joseph  and  Taldi  becomes  a  reality.  Rejniak,   who  entered  the  program  prior  to  the  2011-­ 12  season,  said  it  has  always  been  his  goal   to  gradually  grow  roster  numbers.  After   this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  full  team  of  14,  Rejniak  said   KHORRNVWRÂżOODQPDQURVWHUQH[W season  in  order  to  bring  in  more  depth   DQGÂłIXOÂżOOQHHGVWKDWQHHGWREHDG GUHVVHG´ Rejniak  hopes  the  new  faces  will   also  challenge  the  returners  to  step   up  in  a  big  way.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I'm  really  excited  to  have  the   band  back  together  because  when   we  were  healthy,  even   without  these   impact  re-­ cruits  we   hope  to   bring  in,   we  were   really   JRRG´ Rejniak   said.  


14    oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Softball  Starts  Season  At  Virginia  Beach By  Melissa  Kramer

Copy  Editor  |  Kramerm2@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  softball  team  is  ready  to  take  their   cuts   as   they   travel   to   Virginia   Beach   to   open  up  their  season,  taking  on  four  teams   in   the   Beach   Blast   2014   Tournament   in   Virginia  Beach. The   team   begins   their   journey   under   new  Head  Coach  Brittany  Robinson.  She   said  she  has  one  goal  right  off  the  bat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   expect   us   to   win   games   and   com-­ pete   for   a   conference   championship,â&#x20AC;?   Robinson  said.   During   the   four-­game   2014   Beach   Blast   Tournament,   the   Lady   Hawks   will   face   Bethany   (W.V.)   College   and   Plym-­ outh   State   University   on   Friday   and   Ba-­ ruch  College  and  Kean  University  on  Sat-­ urday. The   team   is   led   by   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   three   captains,   third-­year   catcher/utility   player   Shayna   Burgess,   third-­year   pitcher/in-­ ÂżHOGHU 0HJ %UHZHU DQG IRXUWK\HDU LQ-­ ÂżHOGHU&KHOVHD.XOO Coach  Robinson  said  she  expects  Bur-­ JHVV WR GHÂżQLWHO\ OHDG WKH WHDP EDWWLQJ ZLVHDVZHOODVÂżHOGLQJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Burgess   has   caught   for   a   while,â&#x20AC;?   Robinson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  is  an  excellent  catch-­ HU , GHÂżQLWHO\ H[SHFW KHU WR OHDG XV EDW-­

WLQJZLVH DQG ÂżHOGLQJ$QG %UHZHU ZKR does  all  the  right  things  everywhere.  She   is  the  one  who  keeps  everybody  in  line.â&#x20AC;? Robinson   expects   Kull   to   lead   the   team  in  many  ways. Âł.XOO ZLOO GHÂżQLWHO\ OHDG XV EDWWLQJ and  defensively,â&#x20AC;?  Robinson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  expect   KHUWREHWKHYRFDOOHDGHURQWKHÂżHOG´ Despite   the   new   change   at   the   helm,   SOD\HUVDUHFRQÂżGHQWWRVXFFHHGLQDJUHDW way  this  season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So   far   Coach   Robinson   has   been   awesome,â&#x20AC;?   Burgess   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   can   all   agree  that  we  are  extremely  lucky  to  have   coach   Robinson.   She   has   taught   us   a   lot   during  the  past  three  weeks  that  will  help   us  to  be  successful  in  this  season.  Having   D FRDFK ZKR UHFHQWO\ ÂżQLVKHG KHU 'LY , softball  career  is  very  helpful.â&#x20AC;? Brewer  said  the  team  is  using  Coach   Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   experience   as   a   Div.   I   player   WREHQHÂżWWKHP â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach   has   been   very   insightful   and   knows  a  lot  about  the  game,â&#x20AC;?  Brewer  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  has  made  minor  tweaks  that  only  an   experienced  player  would  know  to  do.â&#x20AC;? Besides   the   upperclassmen   stepping   XS WR WKH SODWH WKH LQFRPLQJ ÂżUVW\HDUV and   transfers   have   took   charge   as   well,   Brewer  said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Upperclassmen  are  also  understand-­ ing  their  roles  as  leaders  and  doing  a  good   job  setting  an  example,â&#x20AC;?  Brewer  said.   Robinson   said   the   team   has   been   fo-­ cusing   on   live   hitting   to   prepare   for   the   season   opener.   Scrimmaging   has   been   a   quintesential   part   of   practices   because   it   helps  replicate  playing  a  real  game.  Brew-­ er   said   applying   previous   technical   work   to   live   situations   helps   them   build   rota-­ tions   and   position   changes   that   they   an-­ ticipate  making  this  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   been   doing   very   well   in   practice,â&#x20AC;?   Robinson   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   have   been   very  impressed  by  the  effort  that  has  been   given,   and   the   improvements   that   have   been  made  so  far.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  just  trying  to  stay   on  a  building  path,  and  not  descend  down-­ hill.â&#x20AC;? Coach   Robinson   and   the   team   are   looking  forward  to  the  good  competition,   as  well  as  the  warm  weather  as  they  travel   down  to  Virginia  Beach  this  weekend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   will   give   me   a   chance   to   scout   some  of  the  teams  in  our  conference  which   is   nice,â&#x20AC;?   Robinson   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   should   be   a   good  way  to  get  a  lot  of  people  in  to  play,   and  kind  of  see  where  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  at  in  terms  of   who  is  going  to  be  playing  where  for  the   rest  of  the  season.â&#x20AC;?  

 PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN              

Baseball  Returns  Key  Players  for  Season  Start By  Andrew  Lief

Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  baseball  team  begins  their  2014  sea-­ son  in  Salisbury,  MD  on  March  1  in  a  three-­ game  series  against  Salisbury  University.     7KLVVHDVRQLV0DWW5LJKWHUÂśVÂżUVWVHDVRQ as  head  coach  of  the  Hawks  and  he  said  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   eager  to  start  the  season  with  his  new  team.       â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   that   we   have   a   lot   of   guys   who   are  excited  for  the  season,  so  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re �� going  to   be  in  good  shape,â&#x20AC;?  Righter  said.     The   Hawks   started   practicing   on   Feb.   3   and  due  to  the  excessive  amount  of  snow  on   the   grounds,   Righter   said   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   prac-­ WLFLQJLQDQHDUE\GRPHÂżHOGLQWKHJ\PDQG in  the  hitting  area  on  campus,  which  they  call   the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;batcave.â&#x20AC;?   Fourth-­year  Captain  David  Lostaglio  said   Righter  has  had  a  very  smooth  transition  into   becoming   the   head   coach   at   New   Paltz.   He   said   the   way   Righter   thinks   about   the   game   allows  the  team  to  have  a  whole  new  perspec-­ tive  while  playing.     Right  now,  Righter  said  the  key  is  for  the  

pitchers   to   get   their   arms   in   shape,   hitters   to   take   a   lot   of   swings   in   the   cage   and   for   the   ÂżHOGHUVWRGRDJLOLW\ZRUNDQGWRSUDFWLFHJHW-­ ting  a  read  on  the  ball.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   like   to   think   we   get   more   swings   than  any  team  in  the  country,â&#x20AC;?  Righter  said. Righter   said   he   is   expecting   his   cap-­ WDLQV /RVWDJOLR WKLUG\HDU RXWÂżHOGHU 5LFKDUG *XLGR ÂżIWK\HDU LQÂżHOGHU 6WHYHQ 0RUVH DQG fourth-­year  pitcher  Chris  Pyz  to  be  the  leaders   of  the  team  and  set  a  good  example  for  other   players.     On   offense,   Righter   said   he   wants   his   team  to  play  an  aggressive  style. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  will  shoot  to  take  a  lot  of  bases  try-­ ing  to  push  singles  into  doubles,â&#x20AC;?  Righter  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  would  expect  our  guys  to  be  pretty  good  on   the  base  paths.  You  will  probably  see  a  lot  of   stolen  bases  out  of  our  team.â&#x20AC;? Righter  said  he  is  expecting  a  big  season   RXWRIWKLUG\HDULQÂżHOGHU6WDQOH\'H/D&UX] who  he  said  is  as  good  of  an  athlete  as  he  has   seen   at   the   Div.   III   level.   He   said   Lostaglio   will  be  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  clutch  hitter  and  is  looking  

for  Morse  to  have  a  breakout  year  at  the  plate   after  hitting  .198  last  season.     Lostaglio   said   if   the   team   utilizes   their   speed  to  go  along  with  their  tough  lineup  then   opposing  pitchers  will  have  to  work  extremely   hard  to  contain  the  Hawks.     Righter   said   the   pitching   staff   will   be   led   by   Pyz,   who   he   views   as   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;bulldog   that   will  do  whatever  he  has  to  do  to  help  the  team   win.â&#x20AC;?  He  is  also  looking  at  fourth-­year  pitcher   Andrew   Grann   and   third-­year   pitcher   Brian   6RORPRQ WR EH VLJQLÂżFDQW LQQLQJJHWWHUV IRU the  team.     Overall,  Righter  said  he  expects  his  team   to  be  resilient  and  have  the  opportunity  to  win   a  lot  of  games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  they  get  down  it  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  bother  them,â&#x20AC;?   Righter   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   they   have   some   failure   it   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   bother   them.   They   get   right   back   up   and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  ready  to  go  back  out  there.â&#x20AC;? Lostaglio  said  he  has  one  goal  he  wants  to   DFFRPSOLVKGXULQJKLVÂżQDOVHDVRQDVD+DZN â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  only  goal  is  to  win  a  championship   at  this  point,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.    

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

 PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN              


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

ANALYSIS: ANDREW  LIEF Managing  Editor

N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

With  the  calendar  shifting  from  Febru-­ ary  to  March  this  weekend,  college  basket-­ ball  is  about  to  enter  its  most  important  part   of  the  season.  With  that  in  mind,  letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  take   DORRNDWÂżYHWKLQJVWRZDWFKRXWIRULQFRO lege  basketball: No.  1  How  long  will  Wichita  State   stay  undefeated  for? The  Shockers  are  currently  30-­0  and   KDYHRQHPRUHJDPHEHIRUHWKH0LVVRXUL Valley  Conference  Tournament.  While  they   KDYHQRWSOD\HGDGLIÂżFXOWQRQFRQIHUHQFH schedule  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  in  an  extremely  weak   conference,  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  take  away  from  the   accomplishment  that  is  winning  30  straight   JDPHV,WKLQNWKH\ZLOOZLQWKHLUÂżQDOJDPH of  the  season  on  Saturday  against  Missouri   State.  The  Shockers  are  clearly  a  capable   WHDPDIWHUWKHLULPSUHVVLYHUXQWRWKH)LQDO Four  last  season.    Currently,  ESPNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Brack-­ etologist  Joe  Lunardi  has  them  as  the  No.  1   seed  in  the  Midwest  Region.    As  it  currently   VWDQGV,WKLQNWKH6KRFNHUV ÂżUVWORVVZLOO FRPHDJDLQVWWKHZLQQHURIWKHIRXUÂżYH game  between  Cincinnati  and  Kentucky  in   the  Sweet  16,  which  is  currently  projected.   1R'RXJ0F'HUPRWWÂśVÂżQLVKWRKLV historic  career

HYTHM & LUESHIRTS Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Now  that  the  Olympics  are  (mercifully,   LI\RXÂśUHD86$IDQ RYHUWKH1+/ÂśVWUDGH window  has  opened  and  will  close  on  March  5   at  3  p.m.  Not  much  has  happened  yet,  but  the   rumor  mill  in  New  York  has  been  churning  for   days  now. This  past  Sunday,  former  NFL  quarterback   and  sports  radio  personality  Boomer  Esiason   took  to  Twitter  and  said  something  â&#x20AC;&#x153;hugeâ&#x20AC;?  was   going  to  happen  with  the  New  York  Rangers.   It  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  take  too  long  for  the  Rangerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  social   media  sphere  to  light  up  and  ignite  seemingly   endless  discussions  about  what  would  happen   before  newt  Wednesday. 7RRIIHUVRPHSHUVSHFWLYH(VLDVRQLVXVX ally  spot-­on  with  his  predictions  and  news  tips.   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  at  almost  all  of  the  Rangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  home  games  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

15

What  To  Watch  In  March   The  casual  college  basketball  fan  prob-­ ably  has  no  idea  who  McDermott  is.    They   probably  are  only  aware  of  the  projected   top  picks  in  the  2014  NBA  draft  Andrew   Wiggins,  Jabari  Parker  and  Julius  Randle.     McDermott  is  dominating  the  competition   DYHUDJLQJSRLQWVDQGUHERXQGVSHU game.    While  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  weaker  Big  East  confer-­ HQFHWKDQLQ\HDUVSDVWLWÂśVVWLOOLPSUHVVLYH that  the  Creighton  Bluejays  won  the  league   WLWOHLQWKHLUÂżUVWVHDVRQ0F'HUPRWWLVQRZ 83  points  away  from  scoring  his  3,000th   FDUHHUSRLQWZKLFKRQO\VHYHQSHRSOHKDYH done  in  college  basketball  history.    Besides   Syracuse,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  team  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  rather  see   make  a  run  to  the  Final  Four.    In  a  time   where  people  criticize  players  who  stay  in   school  for  four  years,  letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  appreciate  the   VSHFWDFXODUFDUHHU0F'HUPRWWLVÂżQLVKLQJ up  and  how  good  he  has  been  for  college   basketball.

ten  games,  but  Izzo  is  a  coach  who  always   prepares  his  teams  to  be  playing  their  best   basketball  when  March  rolls  around.    If   HYHU\RQHFDQJHWKHDOWK\WKHQWKH\ OOEHRQH of  the  toughest  teams  to  beat  in  March.

No.  3  Can  Michigan  State  get  healthy   in  time  for  the  tournament?

No.  5  Who  are  the  Final  Four  con-­ tenders?

$OOVHDVRQWKH6SDUWDQVKDYHKDGWR deal  with  injuries  to  starters  Adreian  Payne,   Branden  Dawson,  Gary  Harris  and  Keith   Appling.    Despite  these  injuries,  they  are   currently  11-­4  in  the  Big  10,  which  puts   WKHPLQVHFRQGSODFHDQGKDYHD RYHUDOOUHFRUG7KLVLVDWHVWDPHQWWRKRZ great  a  coach  Tom  Izzo  is.  I  know  they   KDYHDOWHUQDWHGZLQVDQGORVVHVLQWKHLUODVW

Right  now  Florida  is  ranked  No.  1  in   WKHFRXQWU\ZLWKDRYHUDOOUHFRUGDQGD 15-­0  record  in  the  SEC.    Head  Coach  Billy   'RQRYDQLVWKHPRVWXQGHUUDWHGFRDFKLQ the  country  in  my  opinion  because  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  had   trouble  recently  getting  past  the  Elite  Eight,   which  is  still  a  lot  farther  than  many  teams   get.     Arizona  hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  been  the  same  team  

No.  4  Do  any  mid-­majors  have  a   chance  of  making  a  deep  tournament   run? :LWKFRQIHUHQFHUHDOLJQPHQWPRYLQJD lot  of  the  more  dominant  mid-­major  teams   into  major  conferences,  the  tournament   ZLOOEH¿OOHGZLWKIHZHUWHDPVIURPWKH so-­called  mid-­major  conferences.    This  will   result  in  more  teams  from  the  major  confer-­ ences  being  in  the  tournament  and  making   GHHSUXQV2IFRXUVHWKHUHZLOOREYLRXVO\ be  the  Cinderella  teams  that  make  a  run   to  the  Sweet  16,  which  is  what  makes  the   tournament  incredible.    

since  Brandon  Ashley  was  lost  for  the   season  with  a  torn  ligament  in  his  foot.    The   :LOGFDWVGHÂżQLWHO\KDYHDFKDQFHWRPDNH DGHHSWRXUQDPHQWUXQEXW,KDYHWURXEOH seeing  it  happen  without  Ashley.   After  starting  the  season  25-­0,  Syracuse   lost  two  games  in  a  row  before  getting  back   on  the  winning  side  of  things  with  a  win  at   Maryland.    Jerami  Grantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  injured  back  is   something  to  keep  an  eye  on  going  forward,   EXWWKH2UDQJHFHUWDLQO\KDYHWKHFDSDELOLW\ of  cutting  down  the  nets  on  April  7.     Kansas  won  the  Big  12  regular  season   title  for  the  10th  year  in  a  row  on  Monday   QLJKWDQG:LJJLQVLVÂżQDOO\SOD\LQJXSWR SUHVHDVRQSRWHQWLDO,KDYHDORWRIWURXEOH EHOLHYLQJWKDWWKH-D\KDZNVZRQÂśWEHSOD\ ing  for  a  national  title  April  7.     After  a  rough  stretch  during  the  mid-­ point  of  the  season,  Duke  has  gotten  its   UK\WKPEDFN7KH%OXH'HYLOV RIIHQVHKDV been  superb  and  besides  McDermott,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no  better  scorer  in  the  country  than  Jabari   Parker.     /RXLVYLOOHLVKLWWLQJLWVVWULGHDWWKH right  time  and  is  more  than  capable  of   SOD\LQJLQWKLV\HDUÂśV)LQDO)RXU,EHOLHYH Russ  Smith  has  been  the  most  underrated   SOD\HULQWKHFRXQWU\WKLVVHDVRQDYHUDJLQJ 17.5  points,  4.5  assists  and  3.4  rebounds  per   game.     /DVWO\DVVWDWHGDERYH0LFKLJDQ6WDWH DQG:LFKLWD6WDWHERWKKDYHWKHSRWHQWLDOWR be  playing  in  Texas  on  April  5.  

Deadline    Decisions   and  he  has  friends  in  the  NHL;Íž  he  successfully   predicted  the  end  of  the  NHL  lock  out  and  the   .HYLQ.OHLQWUDGH In  other  words,  Blueshirts  fans  can  count   on  something  drastic  happening  before  the  trade   deadline.   It  probably  has  to  do  with  Ryan  Callahan.   So  far,  the  names  coming  up  the  most  are   &DOODKDQÂśV'DQ*LUDUGLDQG+HQULN/XQGTYLVW in  exchange  for  Tampa  Bay  Lightning  forward   Martin  St.  Louis.   ,WÂśVVDIHWRDVVXPHZHFDQWDNH/XQGTYLVW off  the  list.  The  contract  extension  he  signed   earlier  in  the  season  has  a  no-­trade  clause  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   PRUHRUOHVVIDFWWKDW/XQGTYLVWZLOOEHD5DQJHU for  life.   *LUDUGLDQG&DOODKDQDUHQÂśWDVVDIHHYHQLI their  worth  as  team  leaders  and  franchise  players  

DUHRIDVLPLODULONWR/XQGTYLVWÂśV7DONVDERXW whether  or  not  they  would  resign  with  the  team   at  the  end  of  this  season  and  how  much  they   ZRXOGEHDVNLQJIRUKDYHEHHQJRLQJRQIRU months.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hard  to  imagine  this  trade  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   include  one  of  them.   And  if  Pat  Leonard  at  the  New  York  Daily   Newsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  report  that  St.  Louis  only  wants  to  come  to   New  York  is  true,  than  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  more  than  likely  Cal-­ lahan  will  be  the  one  to  go.  It  may  be  more  sad   since  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  captain,  but  it  does  make  more  sense   and  it  is  smarter  than  letting  Girardi  go.   ,ÂśYHVDLGLWEHIRUHDQG,VWLFNE\WKHEHOLHI WKDWLWLVPRUHGLIÂżFXOWWRÂżQGDÂżUVWSDLUGHIHQ seman  than  most  other  positions.  If  the  Rangers   decided  to  trade  away  Girardi  to  Tampa  they   may  not  lose  more  than  gain,  but  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  still  lose   a  lot.  The  Rangers  would  be  getting  goals  (St.  

Thursday,  February  27,  2014

Louis  has  25  goals  so  far  this  season),  but  the   loss  of  a  defenseman  like  Girardi  would  hurt.   /XQGTYLVWDQG&DP7DOERWZRXOGFHUWDLQO\IHHO the  loss.   If  Callahan  goes,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  huge  drop  in   FKHPLVWU\DQGPRUDOHLQWKHURRP+RZHYHU ÂżQGLQJDJULQGHUZKRFDQSXWLQJRDOVDQGEORFN VKRWVLVHDVLHUWRÂżQGWKDQDWRSOLQHGHIHQVHPDQ The  Rangers  are  a  team  that  has  more  third-­liners   WKDQSXUHJRDOVFRUHUV:HÂśYHQHHGHGVRPHRQH like  St.  Louis  for  years  now  and  while  I  worry   about  the  age,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  comforted  by  the  fact  that   SOD\HUVOLNH-DURPLU-DJUKDYHFRPHKHUHODWHULQ WKHLUFDUHHUVDQGKDYHPDGHDOOWKHGLIIHUHQFH %XWQRQHZV\HW:KDWHYHUKDSSHQVLWÂśV probably  going  to  be  emotional  and  there  will   probably  be  tears.  For  now,  letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hope  for  the   best.  


SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

Men’s Volleyball Receives No. 1 Div. III Ranking PAGE 11

Softball Prepares For Season Opener PAGE 14

SEASON’S ENDING MEN AND WOMEN’S BASKETBALL COMES TO A CLOSE : PAGES 12-­13


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 85, Issue 15